NASA Education Express — Jan. 29, 2015

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Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations
Available While Supplies Last

2014 NASA EONS Solicitation New Appendix
Audience: Minority Universities
Proposal Deadline: Jan. 30, 2015

2015 NOAA Undergraduate Scholarship
Audience: Rising Junior Undergraduate Students at Minority Serving Institutions
Application Deadline: Jan. 30, 2015

U.S. National Park Service’s Young Leaders in Climate Change — Summer 2015 Internships
Audience: Graduate and Undergraduate Students
Application Deadline: Jan. 30, 2015

NASA History Program Office Summer and Fall 2015 Internships
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Summer 2015 Application Deadline: Feb. 1, 2015
Fall 2015 Application Deadline: June 1, 2015

DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2014-2015 NASA Goddard OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Challenge
Audience: Grade 3-12 Students
Registration Deadline: Feb. 1, 2015

International Space Station Research Design Challenge: Capillary Effects on Liquids Exploratory Research Experiments
Audience: Grade 8-12 Educators and Students
Entry Deadlines: Feb. 1, March 1 and April 1, 2015

NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowships Program Accepting Proposals for 2015-2016 Academic Year
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Proposal Deadline: Feb. 2, 2014

2015 Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 2, 2015

Mosaics in Science Program
Audience: Undergraduate Students Ages 18-35 Years Old
Application Deadline: Feb. 3, 2015

NASA Wavelength Special Session at American Camp Association Conference
Audience: Informal Educators
Conference Dates: Feb. 3-6, 2015

Lunar and Planetary Institute Workshops: Earth and Space Science
Audience: 6-12 Educators
Next Registration Deadline: Feb. 4, 2015

2015 NASA Student Airborne Research Program
Audience: Undergraduate Students Currently in Their Junior Year
Application Deadline: Feb. 5, 2015

2015 Space Exploration Educators Conference
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Date: Feb. 5-7, 2015

2015 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge
Audience: 9-12 & Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Deadline for U.S. Teams: Feb. 6, 2015

2015-16 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Undergraduate STEM Research Scholarship
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 9, 2015

2015-16 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Graduate STEM Research Fellowship
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 9, 2015

NASA OSSI Online Career Week
Audience: Higher Education Educators, Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Event Dates: Feb. 10-12, 2015 (1-5 p.m. EST)

National Space Biomedical Research Institute’s Graduate Education Program in Space Life Sciences
Audience: Graduate Students Interested in Pursuing Doctoral Degrees
Proposal Deadline: Feb. 17, 2015

NASA’s ESTEEM “Ask US” Online Professional Development Series
Audience: K-12 Educators
Next Event Date: Feb. 18, 2015, at 7 p.m. EST

Call for Abstracts: 66th International Astronautical Congress
Audience: Full-time Graduate Students
Submission Deadline: Feb. 20, 2015

2015 Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 22, 2015

NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellowships
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Next Application Deadline: March 1, 2015

2015-16 Virginia Space Grant Consortium STEM Bridge Scholarship
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: March 16, 2015

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s 2015 Faculty Research Program
Audience: Higher Education Educators
Application Deadline: April 1, 2015

Airport Cooperative Research Program — University Design Competition for Addressing Airport Needs
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: April 30, 2015

2020 Electric General Aviation NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Students
Entry Deadline: May 8, 2015

Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

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Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles Available for Educational Use

NASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions and museums to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles and other special items offered on a first-come, first-served basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

There will be a nominal shipping fee that must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.

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DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2014 NASA EONS Solicitation New Appendix

NASA’s Office of Education is accepting new proposals under the Education Opportunities in NASA STEM, or EONS, 2014 NASA Research Announcement for the Minority University Research and Education Program, or MUREP, Institutional Research Opportunity, or MIRO appendix. This effort was previously titled as the NASA University Research Centers Project, and has now been consolidated into the MUREP Program within the NASA Office of Education.

Through the EONS omnibus solicitation, the opportunity MIRO has been released. Through MIRO awards, NASA aims to promote science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM literacy and to enhance and sustain the capability of minority serving institutions to perform NASA-related research and education, which directly support NASA’s four mission directorates — Aeronautics Research, Human Exploration and Space Operations, Science, and Space Technology.

The deadline for proposals has been extended to Jan. 30, 2015.

For more information regarding the MIRO solicitation, please visit the NASA EONS page on the NASA Solicitation and Proposal Integrated Review and Proposal System, or NSPIRES, website at: http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId=%7bB6C61D04-5793-EF52-3497-1AA57FA424A5%7d&path=open .

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2015 NOAA Undergraduate Scholarship

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA, is accepting applications for its 2015 Educational Partnership Program, or EPP, Undergraduate Scholarship Program. The EPP Undergraduate Scholarship Program provides scholarships for two years of undergraduate study to rising junior undergraduate students majoring in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields that directly support NOAA’s mission.

Participants receive total awards valued at up to $35,000 in total support during their junior and senior years. During the first summer, scholars complete a nine-week paid summer internship at NOAA in Silver Spring, Maryland. During the second summer, scholars complete paid internships at NOAA facilities across the country. A stipend and housing allowance is provided. At the end of both summer internships, students present the results of their projects at an education and science symposium in Silver Spring.

Students attending an accredited Minority Serving Institution within the United States or U.S. Territories as defined by the U.S. Department of Education (Hispanic Serving Institutions, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tribal Colleges and Universities, Alaskan-Native Serving Institutions, and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions) are eligible to apply for the program. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and must earn and maintain a minimum 3.2 grade point average on a 4.0 scale.

Applications are due Jan. 30, 2015.

For more information and to submit an online application, visit http://www.epp.noaa.gov/ssp_undergrad_page.html.

Questions about this scholarship opportunity should be directed to EPP.USP@noaa.gov.

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U.S. National Park Service’s Young Leaders in Climate Change — Summer 2015 Internships

The George Melendez Wright Initiative for Young Leaders in Climate Change, or YLCC, builds a pathway for exemplary students in higher education to apply cutting-edge climate change knowledge to park management. The program provides paid summer internships to highly accomplished graduate and upper-level undergraduate students to work on diverse issues related to climate change and its effects in national parks. Participants gain valuable work experience, explore career options and develop leadership skills under the mentorship and guidance of the National Park Service.

The program features structured projects in one or more of the following interdisciplinary areas: climate change science and monitoring; resource conservation and adaptation; policy development; sustainable park operations; facilities adaptation; and communication/interpretation/education. Interns who successfully complete the YLCC will be eligible to be hired noncompetitively into subsequent federal jobs once they complete their degree programs. These jobs would be in the Department of Interior, National Park Service or one of the other bureaus within the Department of Interior. An intern must qualify for the job in order to be hired noncompetitively.

Internships are full-time positions (40 hours/week) lasting 11-12 weeks. Interns are paid $14/hour plus benefits, and are employees of the University of Washington. Most positions come with free or subsidized housing in dormitories or other shared accommodations in parks. Internships offer rigorous and challenging projects that demand high-level academic knowledge and skills, allowing interns considerable autonomy and opportunity for leadership under an effective mentor.

The application deadline is 12:01 pm PST on Jan. 30, 2015.

For additional information and to apply for a YLCC internship, visit http://parksclimateinterns.org/.

Questions about this program should be directed to Tim Watkins at climate_change@nps.gov.

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NASA History Program Office Summer and Fall 2015 Internships

The NASA History Program Office is seeking undergraduate and graduate students for summer and fall 2015 internships. The History Program Office maintains archival materials to answer research questions from NASA personnel, journalists, scholars, students at all levels and others from around the world. The division also edits and publishes several books and monographs each year. It maintains a large number of websites on NASA history.

Students of all majors are welcome to apply. While detailed prior knowledge of the aeronautics and space fields is not necessary, a keen interest and some basic familiarity with these topics are needed. Strong research, writing and editing skills are essential. Experience with social media is a plus.

Intern projects are flexible. Typical projects include handling a variety of information requests, writing posts for the NASA history Twitter and Facebook pages, editing historical manuscripts, doing research and writing biographical sketches, and identifying and captioning photos.

Applications for summer 2015 internships are due Feb. 1, 2015. Fall 2015 internship applications are due June 1, 2015.

For more information, visit http://history.nasa.gov/interncall.htm.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please contact Bill Barry at bill.barry@nasa.gov.

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DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2014-2015 NASA Goddard OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Challenge

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center is launching the 2014-2015 TRANSFORMERS OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Challenge, hosted by the Innovative Technology Partnerships Office. The purpose of the challenge is to raise awareness of NASA’s Technology Transfer Program and to inspire interest in all NASA missions, programs and projects.

This year the scope of the contest is being expanded to include two challenges. In the first challenge, students in grades 3-12 are asked to submit a video describing their favorite NASA Goddard spinoff. In a new twist, participants in this year′s contest must also use the engineering design process to develop and propose a new spinoff application of their own for the technology. Spinoffs are technologies originally created for space and modified into everyday products used on Earth. Examples include memory foam, invisible braces and scratch-resistant lenses for eyeglasses.

The second challenge, the TRANSFORMERS OPTIMUS PRIME InWorld Challenge, offers students in grades 6-12 an opportunity to take their video spinoff ideas to another level. Interested teams must study James Webb Space Telescope spinoff technology and post their completed spinoff videos for review by college engineering students. Engineering college mentors will select 20 teams to continue the collaborative design process within a multiuser virtual world to build a 3-D model of the team′s design solutions.

Winning students from each grade category will be invited to Goddard to participate in a behind-the-scenes workshop, attend a VIP awards ceremony and meet actor Peter Cullen, the voice of OPTIMUS PRIME.

The new deadline to register and upload videos is Feb. 1, 2015.

For more information, visit http://itpo.gsfc.nasa.gov/optimus/.

Questions about this contest should be directed to Darryl Mitchell at Darryl.R.Mitchell@nasa.gov.

TRANSFORMERS and OPTIMUS PRIME are trademarks of Hasbro and are used with permission. © 2014 Hasbro. All rights reserved.

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International Space Station Research Design Challenge: Capillary Effects on Liquids Exploratory Research Experiments

NASA and Portland State University are seeking participants for the International Space Station Research Design Challenge: Capillary Effects on Liquids Exploratory Research Experiments, or CELERE. This design challenge enables students to participate in microgravity research on capillary action, similar to that conducted on the space station.

Teams or individuals create their own experiment using computer-aided design, or CAD, with a provided template. Short experiment proposals are submitted, and test cells are manufactured by Portland State University using the CAD drawings and a computer-controlled laser cutter. Each experiment is conducted in a drop tower. Video of the drop is provided for student analysis and reporting of results.

CELERE is open to individuals and teams in grades 8-12 Teams may include younger students as long as there is at least one team member in grades 8-12 to facilitate the participation of informal science clubs, Scouts, etc. Teams may be of any size and may include an entire class or science club. The program is limited to students from the United States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Design proposals are now being accepted. Deadlines for submissions are Feb. 1, March 1 and April 1, 2015.

For more information about this opportunity, visit http://spaceflightsystems.grc.nasa.gov/CELERE/.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please email your inquiries to the CELERE team at celere@lists.nasa.gov.

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NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowships Program Accepting Proposals for 2015-2016 Academic Year

The NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, or NESSF, is soliciting applications from accredited U.S. universities on behalf of individuals pursuing master’s or doctoral degrees in earth and space sciences, or related disciplines, for the 2015-2016 academic year. The purpose of NESSF is to ensure continued training of a highly qualified workforce in disciplines needed to achieve NASA’s scientific goals. Awards resulting from the competitive selection will be training grants to the respective universities, with the advisor serving as the principal investigator. The financial support for the NESSF program comes from the Science Mission Directorate’s four science divisions: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Planetary Science and Astrophysics.

Initially, NESSF awards are made for one year. They may be renewed for up to two additional years, contingent upon satisfactory progress (as reflected in academic performance, research progress and recommendation by the faculty advisor) and the availability of funds.

The maximum amount of a NESSF award is $30,000 per year.

Proposals for this opportunity are due Feb. 2, 2015.

For more information about this solicitation, visit http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId={B6CDCEA6-8EDD-A48A-FAF8-E588F66661C3}&path=open.

Questions about Earth Science Research NESSF opportunities should be directed to Claire Macaulay at Claire.I.Macaulay@nasa.gov.

Questions about Heliophysics Research, Planetary Science Research and Astrophysics Research opportunities should be directed to Dolores Holland at hq-nessf-Space@nasa.gov.

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2015 Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program

The Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program, or PGGURP, pairs qualified undergraduate students with NASA-funded investigators at research locations across the U.S. for eight weeks during the summer. Students will spend the summer at the NASA scientists’ home institutions. Selected students receive a cost-of-living stipend and compensation for housing and travel.

Undergraduate students majoring in geology or related sciences are eligible to apply. Students graduating in 2015 who have not started graduate school yet are also eligible. Preference is given to U.S. citizens and permanent residents.

Applications are due Feb. 2, 2015.

For more information, visit http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/~tgregg/pggurp_homepage.html.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please email Robyn Wagner, PGGURP administrator, at pggurp@buffalo.edu.

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Mosaics in Science Program

The Mosaics in Science program was developed by the National Park Service, in partnership with the Geological Society of America, to increase diversity among those who seek science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, careers within the National Park Service.

Participants will spend 11 weeks working on a STEM project in a national park. After completing their projects, participants travel to the District of Columbia to participate in a career workshop that provides opportunities to present their work, learn about how to apply for a federal job, and meet National Park Service staff and management.

Twenty-six positions will be offered in 2015. Participants will receive a stipend of $4,000, and housing and travel costs are also covered. Applications are due Feb. 3, 2015.

To be eligible, applicants must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States between 18 and 35 years old who attend or recently graduated from an undergraduate institution, or are in the early stages of their career. Interested students must be nominated by an organization partnering with the program. Students from groups historically underrepresented in STEM fields are strongly encouraged to seek nomination. These groups include but are not limited to African-American, American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian, Hispanic, Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander, and persons with disabilities.

For additional information on the Mosaics in Science program and to see a list of partner organizations eligible to nominate students, visit http://rock.geosociety.org/mosaics/. For an overview of the Mosaics in Science Program, see: http://nature.nps.gov/geology/mosaics/index.cfm.

Questions about the program should be directed to Lisa Norby at lisa_norby@nps.gov. Questions on program eligibility and how to apply for a position should be directed to Matt Dawson at mdawson@geosociety.org.

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NASA Wavelength Special Session at American Camp Association Conference

NASA will be represented at Booth #913 during the American Camp Association, or ACA, National Conference in New Orleans, Louisiana. The conference takes place Feb. 3-6, 2015.

NASA also will host a special session on Thursday, Feb. 5, 2015, at 10:30 a.m. titled “Five Easy Ways to Create Out-of-this-World Programs with NASA Resources.” This session will share strategies for creating camp programs using NASA Wavelength resources. There are many projects, games and resources on NASA Wavelength just waiting for your campers. From down-to-earth investigations to outer space imaginations, there’s something for every age group and setting.

For more information, visit http://nasawavelength.org/blog/out-world-camp-programs.

Questions about the program should be directed to Andrew Clark at andrew_clark@strategies.org.

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Lunar and Planetary Institute Workshops: Earth and Space Science

The Lunar and Planetary Institute invites high school teachers to attend a series of earth and space science workshops. These one-day workshops will take place at the Harris County Department of Education Science Center in Houston, Texas.

‘Weather and Climate Interactions’
Feb. 5, 2015, 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Use data-rich activities and hands-on demonstrations to investigate thermal energy transfers and the role of the sun in convection, winds and currents; identify how patterns of atmospheric movement influence weather; and examine the role of oceans in forming hurricanes. The workshop includes a variety of formative assessment strategies.

‘Our Celestial Neighborhood’
Feb. 11, 2015, 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Explore the relationships and scales of the solar system, Milky Way and our universe, and examine the characteristics and life cycles of stars, and the variety and properties of galaxies.

A workshop registration fee of $30 includes extensive presentation materials, reference materials, hands-on lesson plans for the classroom, refreshments and lunch. Workshop space is limited, and interested educators are encouraged to apply early to secure a spot. Registration for each workshop closes the day prior to the workshop.

For more information and to register to attend, visit http://www.lpi.usra.edu/education/workshops/HCDE_2015_Middle_HS.pdf.

Questions about these workshops should be directed to Education@lpi.usra.edu.

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2015 NASA Student Airborne Research Program

The NASA Airborne Science Program invites highly motivated undergraduate students currently in their junior year to apply for the NASA Student Airborne Research Program, also known as SARP 2015. The program provides students with hands-on research experience in all aspects of a major scientific campaign, from detailed planning on how to achieve mission objectives to formal presentation of results and conclusions to peers and others. Students will assist in the operation of airborne instruments aboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft.

The program takes place in summer 2015. Instrument and flight preparations, and the research flights themselves, will occur at NASA′s Armstrong Flight Research Center in Palmdale, California. Post-flight data analysis and interpretation will take place at the University of California, Irvine.

Successful applicants will be awarded a stipend plus a travel and meals allowance for eight weeks of participation in the program. Housing and local transportation will also be provided.

The deadline for applications is Feb. 5, 2015.

For more information and to download the program application, visit http://www.nserc.und.edu/sarp/sarp-2015.

Specific questions about the program should be directed to SARP2015@nserc.und.edu.

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2015 Space Exploration Educators Conference

Make plans to attend the 21st Annual Space Exploration Educators Conference, to be held Feb. 5-7, 2015, at Space Center Houston. This conference is for all K-12 educators. Activities presented use space-related themes to teach across the curricula and can be used for science, language arts, mathematics, history and more.

Attend sessions hosted by scientists and engineers working on the International Space Station, Mars exploration and the planets beyond. Hear from astronauts who will be leading the charge in exploration. Attend sessions presented by educators and receive ready-to-implement classroom ideas. Attendees can earn up to 24 hours of continuing professional education credit.

For more information, visit http://spacecenter.org/education-programs/teacher-programs/teachers-seec/.

Please email any questions about the conference to seec@spacecenter.org.

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2015 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge

NASA has opened team registration for the 2015 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge. Organized by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, the event will be held April 16-18, 2015, at the U.S. Space & Rocket Center, also in Huntsville.

The challenge engages high school, college and university students in hands-on, experiential learning activities, while also testing potential technologies needed for future deep space exploration. Both U.S. and international teams may register to participate. For U.S. teams, registration closes Feb. 6, 2015.

Student teams participating in the Rover Challenge must design, engineer and test a human-powered rover on a mock course designed to simulate the harsh and demanding terrains future NASA explorers may find on distant planets, moons and asteroids.

For more information on the 2015 Human Exploration Rover Challenge and registration, visit http://go.nasa.gov/14dikMF.

Follow the Rover Challenge on social media for the latest news and updates:
https://www.facebook.com/roverchallenge?ref=hl
https://twitter.com/RoverChallenge
http://instagram.com/nasa_marshall.

View images from the 2014 Rover Challenge at http://go.nasa.gov/1iEjGRp.

International teams with questions about this event or registration may email Amy McDowell at Amy.McDowell@nasa.gov. U.S. teams with questions may contact Diedra Williams at MSFC-RoverChallenge2015@mail.nasa.gov.

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2015-16 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Undergraduate STEM Research Scholarship

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium is offering undergraduate research scholarships of up to $8,500 to encourage talented individuals to conduct research in science, technology, engineering or mathematics, or STEM, fields.

Applicants must participate in an active faculty-mentored research experience that aligns with the aerospace sector and meets NASA’s mission. Student stipends and research support totaling $4,000 during the academic year and $4,500 during a summer semester are available.

These one-year awards are nonrenewable and based on student academic merit, quality of the research proposal and alignment of research with the goals of NASA and the aerospace sector. Underrepresented minority students, female students and students with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and enrolled at one of the five Virginia Space Grant member universities: The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia and Virginia Tech.

The deadline for submitting applications is Feb. 9, 2015.

For more information, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/undergrad/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to rkashiri@odu.edu.

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2015-16 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Graduate STEM Research Fellowship

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium’s Graduate STEM Research Fellowship Program provides fellowships of $6,000 in add-on support to graduate students to supplement and enhance basic research support. The objective of this science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, research fellowship opportunity is to encourage talented individuals to pursue careers in STEM industries that support NASA’s mission.

Participants in the Graduate STEM Research Fellowship Program must take part in an active faculty‐mentored research experience that aligns with the aerospace sector and meets NASA’s mission. Awards are made annually and are renewable for one year for students making satisfactory academic and research progress.

This is a competitive fellowship program, and awards are based on merit recognizing high academic achievement and promise. Underrepresented minority students, female students and students with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and enrolled at one of the five Virginia Space Grant member universities: The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia and Virginia Tech.

The deadline for submitting applications is Feb. 9, 2015.

For more information about this opportunity and to apply online, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/gradfellow/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to kmanning@odu.edu.

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NASA OSSI Online Career Week

The NASA One Stop Shopping Initiative, or OSSI, is hosting the NASA OSSI Online Career Week Feb. 10-12, 2015. This online event will connect you with NASA, science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, employers and top graduate programs nationwide. Engage with representatives from all 10 NASA centers to learn about internship, scholarship and fellowship opportunities available at NASA. Interact with recruiters from top STEM employers, and explore internship and job opportunities in the private sector. Learn about highly ranked STEM graduate programs and network with admissions officers from the comfort of your home, dorm, smartphone or tablet. Register for one or all events and launch your career today!

NASA OSSI Online Career Week Live Events
– NASA Internships, Fellowships and Scholarships Day — Feb. 10, 2015 (1-5 p.m. EST)
— STEM Industry Day — Feb. 11, 2015 (1-5 p.m. EST)
— STEM Graduate Programs Fair — Feb. 12, 2015 (1-5 p.m. EST)

Starting on February 9, you will be able to research participating organizations and explore opportunities listed. Complete your profile, and prepare a few questions for the centers, companies or graduate programs you are interested in. During the live events, you will engage in one-on-one text-based conversations directly with a recruiter or admissions officer at those organizations. You can share your background, experience and resume and ask questions. Maximize your time in the event by getting in line to chat with representatives from more than one center, company or university at a time.

To attend, please register at http://nasaossi.brazenconnect.com/.

For more information, please contact nasaossi@hsf.net.

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National Space Biomedical Research Institute’s Graduate Education Program in Space Life Sciences

The National Space Biomedical Research Institute, or NSBRI, seeks solutions to health concerns facing astronauts on long missions. The institute′s research also benefits patients on Earth. This NSBRI-sponsored training program in space life sciences enables students to pursue doctorate degrees at Texas A&M University and to focus their research on space life sciences and fields related to the space initiative. Texas A&M currently is recruiting participants for fall 2015. Students will pursue degrees in biomedical engineering, genetics, kinesiology, health physics or nutrition, or an M.D./Ph.D. or a Ph.D. in medical sciences.

Application packages are due Feb. 17, 2015.

For more information, visit http://SLSGraduateProgram.tamu.edu.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Stella Taddeo at stellat@tamu.edu.

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NASA’s ESTEEM “Ask US” Online Professional Development Series

NASA’s Minority University Research and Education Program, or MUREP, is sponsoring a series of Google Plus Hangout professional development events for K-12 educators. The Earth Systems, Technology and Energy Education for MUREP, or ESTEEM, team will lead the monthly sessions that will cover a variety of climate topics. This month’s webinar topic is:

Change Over Time: Investigate Climate Change Impacts in the Southwest — Feb. 18, 2015, at 7 p.m. EST
The National Climate Assessment, released in May of 2014, summarizes the impacts of climate change on the United States, touching on many disciplines: earth science, biology, human health, engineering, technology, economics and policy. Explore the document with a lead National Climate Assessment author, then learn about related educator resources with Minda Berbeco from the National Center for Science Education. Discover resources that will enable you to bring this topic into classroom lessons, engage students in data collection and analyses and share visualizations and citizen science projects. The focus this month will be on the Southwest region. Watch for additional regions of the U.S. to be featured in upcoming “Ask US” sessions.

Certificates of professional development hours are available upon request.

For more information on this event and upcoming webinar sessions, visit http://nice.larc.nasa.gov/asknice/. Questions about this series should be sent to Bonnie Murray at bonnie.murray@nasa.gov.

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Call for Abstracts: 66th International Astronautical Congress

NASA announces its intent to participate in the 66th International Astronautical Congress, or IAC, and requests that full-time U.S. graduate students attending U.S. universities respond to this “Call for Abstracts.”

The IAC — which is organized by the International Astronautical Federation, or IAF; the International Academy of Astronautics, or IAA; and the International Institute of Space Law, or IISL — is the largest space-related conference worldwide and selects an average of 1,000 scientific papers every year. The upcoming IAC will be held Oct. 12-16, 2015, in Jerusalem, Israel. NASA’s participation in this event is an ongoing effort to continue to bridge NASA with the astronautical and space international community.

This “Call for Abstracts” is a precursor to a subsequent submission of a final paper, which may be presented at the 66th IAC. Student authors are invited to submit an abstract regarding an original, unpublished paper that has not been submitted in any other forum. A NASA technical review panel will select abstracts from those that have been accepted by the International Astronautical Federation. This opportunity is for graduate students majoring in fields related to the IAF research topics. Students may submit technical (oral) presentations and/or posters. Students may submit abstracts that are co-authored with their Principal Investigators. However, the student must be the “lead author,” and only the student will present at the IAC. Students must be available to travel to the conference to represent NASA and their universities. Students must be U.S. citizens, attending a U.S. university, who plan to enter a career in space science or aeronautics. Pending the availability of funding, graduate students selected by NASA to participate in the IAC will be considered for subsidy funding from NASA.

Many students and professors are currently involved in NASA-related research that could be considered for this submission. Students submitting abstracts are strongly encouraged to seek advice from professors who are conducting NASA research and/or from NASA scientists and engineers. Abstracts must be related to NASA’s ongoing vision for space exploration and fit into one of the following IAC categories:

– Science and Exploration — Systems sustaining missions, including life, microgravity, space exploration, space debris and Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence, or SETI
– Applications and Operations — Ongoing and future operational applications, including earth observation, communication, navigation, human space endeavors and small satellites
– Technology — Common technologies to space systems including astrodynamics, structures, power and propulsion
– Infrastructure — Systems sustaining space missions including space system transportation, future systems and safety
– Space and Society — Interaction of space with society including education, policy and economics, history, and law

The criteria for the selection will be defined according to the following specifications:
– Abstracts should specify purpose, methodology, results, conclusions and areas for discussion.
— Abstracts should indicate that substantive technical and/or programmatic content is included.
— Abstracts should clearly indicate that the material is new and original; they should explain why and how.
— Prospective author(s) should certify that the paper was not presented at a previous meeting.

Abstracts must be written in English, and the length should not exceed 400 words. Tables or drawings are not allowed in the abstract.

NOTE: If you plan to seek assistance from NASA, you must submit to the International Astronautical Federation and to NASA.
— Submit your abstract to the IAF at their website
www.iafastro.org by Monday, Feb. 23, 2015 (14:00 CET).
— Submit your abstract to NASA at
http://iac.nasaprs.com no later than 11:59 p.m. EST on Friday, Feb. 20, 2015.

IAC Paper Selection
Submitted abstracts will be evaluated by the Session Chairs on the basis of technical quality and relevance to the session topics. Selected abstracts may be chosen for eventual oral or poster presentation. Any such choice is not an indication of quality of the submitted abstract. Their evaluation will be submitted to the Symposium Coordinators, who will make acceptance recommendations to the International Programme Committee, which will make the final decision. Please note that any relevance to the Congress main theme will be considered as an advantage.

The following information must be included in the submission: paper title, name of contact author, name of co-author(s), organization(s), full postal address, phone, email of the author and co-author(s). Abstract should specify purpose, methodology, results and conclusions and should indicate that substantive technical and/or programmatic content, as well as clearly indicate that the material is new and original and explain why and how.

Please check the IAF and the IAC websites (www.iafastro.org and www.iac2015.org) regularly to get the latest updates on the Technical Programme.

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2015 Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships

Caltech’s Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships, or SURF, project introduces undergraduate students to research under the guidance of seasoned mentors at Caltech or NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, or JPL. Students experience the process of research as a creative intellectual activity and gain a more realistic view of the opportunities and demands of a professional research career.

SURF is modeled on the grant-seeking process. Students collaborate with potential mentors to define and develop a project and to write research proposals. Caltech faculty or JPL staff review the proposals and recommend awards. Students work over a 10-week period in the summer, mid-June to late August. At the conclusion of the project, each student will submit a technical paper and give an oral presentation at SURF Seminar Day.

All application materials must be received no later than Feb. 22, 2015. For more information, visit http://www.sfp.caltech.edu/programs/surf.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to the Caltech Student-Faculty Programs office at sfp@caltech.edu.

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NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellowships

The NASA Postdoctoral Program, or NPP, supports NASA’s goal to expand scientific understanding of the Earth and the universe in which we live.

Selected by a competitive peer-review process, NPP fellows complete one- to three-year fellowships that offer scientists and engineers unique opportunities to conduct research in fields of science relevant to NASA.

These opportunities advance NASA’s missions in earth science, heliophysics, astrophysics, planetary science, astrobiology, space bioscience, aeronautics and engineering, human exploration and operations, and space technology. Opportunities are available at NASA centers and other NASA-approved sites.

As a result, NPP fellows contribute to national priorities for scientific exploration, confirm NASA’s leadership in fundamental research and complement the efforts of NASA’s partners in the national science community.

U.S. citizens, lawful permanent residents and foreign nationals eligible for J-1 status as a research scholar may apply. Applicants must have completed a doctorate or equivalent degree before beginning the fellowship, but may apply while completing degree requirements. Applicants who earned the Ph.D. more than five years before the deadline date are categorized as senior fellows; all applicants, no matter their category, must apply and become eligible for an NPP award via the same process.

Interested applicants may apply by one of three annual application deadlines: March 1, July 1 and November 1.

For more information and application procedures, go to http://nasa.orau.org/postdoc/.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to nasapostdoc@orau.org.

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2015-16 Virginia Space Grant Consortium STEM Bridge Scholarship

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium, or VSGC, is offering renewable scholarships to sophomore undergraduate students studying science, technology, engineering or mathematics, or STEM. The STEM Bridge Scholarships are $1,000 and are available to students who are U.S. citizens from any federally recognized minority group enrolled fulltime at one of the five VSGC member universities: The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia and Virginia Tech.

The STEM Bridge Program bridges students to future opportunities by mentoring and guiding them to future VSGC scholarships and NASA-related paid internships. The program encourages students to explore how their majors can apply to NASA′s Mission.

This is a competitive program, and awards are based on student academic merit, quality of interest essay as well as letters of recommendation from current college faculty who can attest to students’ interest in STEM areas.

The deadline for submitting applications is March 16, 2015.

For more information, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/Bridge/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to rkashiri@odu.edu.

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NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s 2015 Faculty Research Program

Applications are currently accepted for NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory 2015 Faculty Research Program. This program provides opportunities for science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, faculty to engage in research of mutual interest to the faculty member and a JPL researcher. Non-STEM faculty will be considered based on available opportunities.

To be eligible to participate in the program, applicants must hold a full-time appointment at an accredited university or college in the United States. Special requirements for foreign national faculty members apply. Fellows are required to submit research reports and present their work at the end of the session.

The program awards $15,500 fellowships for 10-week sessions. Please note that stipend payments or salaries from other federal funding sources, including research grants and contracts, may not be accepted during the 10-week tenure of a JPL faculty research appointment.

The deadline for applications is April 1, 2015. For more information about this opportunity, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/intern/apply/jpl-summer-faculty-research-program/.

Inquiries about NASA’s JPL Faculty Research Program should be directed to the Petra Kneissl-Milanian at Petra.A.Kneissl-Milanian@jpl.nasa.gov.

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Airport Cooperative Research Program — University Design Competition for Addressing Airport Needs

The Airport Cooperative Research Program is accepting applications for its national competition that engages university students in addressing issues relating to airports and the National Airspace System. The competition, managed by the Virginia Space Grant Consortium, challenges individuals and teams of undergraduate and/or graduate students working with faculty advisors at U.S. colleges and universities to consider innovative approaches related to airport issues.

The competition focuses on design solutions in the following broad areas: airport operation and maintenance, runway safety/runway incursions/runway excursions, airport environmental interactions, and airport management and planning. Some specific challenge areas are defined in the Technical Design Challenges section of the guidelines. Students are not limited to the suggested topical areas listed. They are free to propose design solutions based on other topics that fit the four broad challenge areas.

Students can win cash prizes for their winning innovative design solutions. First place winners will present their work at a national award ceremony in summer 2015.

Submissions are due April 30, 2015.

For more information, including eligibility requirements and application materials, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/ACRPDesignCompetition/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to ACRP@odu.edu.

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2020 Electric General Aviation NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge

Electric-powered aircraft have the potential to revolutionize the way we travel. NASA invites college teams to take part in the 2015 NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate’s 2020 Electric General Aviation Design Challenge. Student teams are invited to design an electric (i.e., no combustion) general aviation aircraft that meets performance requirements and is operational by 2020.

The contest is open to teams of full-time students enrolled in higher education institutions of the United States or its territories. This category includes universities, colleges, trade schools, community colleges, professional schools, etc. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

Letters of intent will be accepted through Jan. 16, 2015. Final entries are due May 8, 2015.

For more information and a complete list of rules, visit http://aero.larc.nasa.gov/university-contest/.

Questions about the challenge should be directed to Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — Jan. 22, 2015

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Search for NASA Educational Resources With New Search Tool
Audience: All Educators and Students

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations
Available While Supplies Last

Free Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series
Audience: All Educators and 9-Higher Education Students
Next Lecture Date: Jan. 24, 2014, at 5:15 p.m. EST

Sally Ride EarthKAM Announces the 2015 Winter Mission
Audience: Middle School Educators and Students, and the Informal Education Community
Mission Date: Jan. 27-30, 2015

DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2014-2015 NASA Goddard OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Challenge
Audience: Grade 3-12 Students
Registration Deadline: Jan. 28, 2015

2014 NASA EONS Solicitation New Appendix
Audience: Minority Universities
Proposal Deadline: Jan. 30, 2015

2015 NOAA Undergraduate Scholarship
Audience: Rising Junior Undergraduate Students at Minority Serving Institutions
Application Deadline: Jan. 30, 2015

U.S. National Park Service’s Young Leaders in Climate Change — Summer 2015 Internships
Audience: Graduate and Undergraduate Students
Application Deadline: Jan. 30, 2015

NASA History Program Office Summer and Fall 2015 Internships
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Summer 2015 Application Deadline: Feb. 1, 2015
Fall 2015 Application Deadline: June 1, 2015

International Space Station Research Design Challenge: Capillary Effects on Liquids Exploratory Research Experiments
Audience: Grade 8-12 Educators and Students
Entry Deadlines: Feb. 1, March 1 and April 1, 2015

NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowships Program Accepting Proposals for 2015-2016 Academic Year
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Proposal Deadline: Feb. 2, 2014

2015 Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 2, 2015

Mosaics in Science Program
Audience: Undergraduate Students Ages 18-35 Years Old
Application Deadline: Feb. 3, 2015

Lunar and Planetary Institute Workshops: Earth and Space Science
Audience: 6-12 Educators
Next Registration Deadline: Feb. 4, 2015

2015 NASA Student Airborne Research Program
Audience: Undergraduate Students Currently in Their Junior Year
Application Deadline: Feb. 5, 2015

2015 Space Exploration Educators Conference
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Date: Feb. 5-7, 2015

2015 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge
Audience: 9-12 & Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Deadline for U.S. Teams: Feb. 6, 2015

2015-16 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Undergraduate STEM Research Scholarship
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 9, 2015

2015-16 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Graduate STEM Research Fellowship
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 9, 2015

NASA OSSI Online Career Week
Audience: Higher Education Educators, Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Event Dates: Feb. 10-12, 2015 (1-5 p.m. EST)

NASA/Applied Physics Laboratory Summer Internship 2015
Audience: Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 28, 2015

2015 NASA Scholarship — Minority University Research Education Project
Audience: Undergraduate Students at Minority Serving Institutions
Application Deadline: March 31, 2015

2015 NASA Office of Education — Aeronautics Undergraduate Scholarship
Audience: Undergraduate Students Majoring in Aeronautics Related Fields
Application Deadline: March 31, 2015

2015 LiftOff Summer Institute
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: April 1, 2015

NASA Robotic Mining Competition 2015
Audience: Higher Education Educators & Students
Event Date: May 18-22, 2015

Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

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Search for NASA Educational Resources With New Search Tool

Are you looking for a lesson plan about the planet Jupiter? Do you need a poster with information about the Wright Brothers’ first flight? Or maybe you’re hunting for a website with information about NASA’s deep space missions. NASA Education has a new tool to help you in your search!

NASA’s new Educational Resource Search Tool can help you find lesson plans, posters, educator guides and other materials to supplement your science, technology, engineering and mathematics curriculum. Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keywords.

To check out the new search tool and begin your educational resource hunt, visit http://www.nasa.gov/education/materials/.

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Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles Available for Educational Use

NASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions and museums to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles and other special items offered on a first-come, first-served basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

There will be a nominal shipping fee that must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.

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Free Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series

Curious about icy bodies in the outer reaches of our solar system, the effects of space junk on deep-space observation, the latest discoveries about the origins of the universe and new ways galaxy formation is mapped? Come to the Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series presented by Smithsonian researchers who are exploring the sun, the moon, planets, stars, galaxies and the universe. These speakers will share behind-the-scenes details about how their research is done and about technologies that advance new discoveries. The lectures will be held at the Albert Einstein Planetarium at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.

Each lecture begins at 5:15 p.m. EST and is followed by a Q&A session. Stay after the lecture to visit the museum’s observatory, weather permitting.

Jan. 24, 2015 — Observing the Origin of the Universe From the South Pole
After three years of observing from the South Pole, scientists may have found confirmation that the universe underwent a burst of inflationary growth at the time of the Big Bang. Cosmologist Colin Bischoff will discuss these findings as well as the excitement of astronomy from Antarctica.

Feb. 21, 2015 — Tracing the Structure of the Universe With Galaxy Surveys
Studies of galaxy formation and cosmology have exploded in recent years due to the immense data obtained from large galaxy surveys. Postdoctoral fellow Cameron McBride will discuss how observational data and theory are combined to better understand fundamental questions in our universe, and will highlight some exciting results from ongoing research.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/lectures/smithsonian-stars/.

Questions about this lecture series should be directed to the visitor service line at 202-633-2214.

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Sally Ride EarthKAM Announces the 2015 Winter Mission

Students and educators are invited to participate in the Sally Ride EarthKAM winter mission scheduled for Jan. 27-30, 2015. Guide your students in hands-on research as they program a camera aboard the International Space Station to take pictures of specific locations on Earth. The optional online curricula at the Sally Ride EarthKAM website are targeted at middle school students but are adaptable for other grade levels. All students and educators are welcome, including participants in afterschool programs.

For more information and to register for an upcoming mission, visit the Sally Ride EarthKAM home page at https://earthkam.ucsd.edu/.

If you have questions about the EarthKAM project, please email ek-help@earthkam.ucsd.edu.

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DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2014-2015 NASA Goddard OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Challenge

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center is launching the 2014-2015 TRANSFORMERS OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Challenge, hosted by the Innovative Technology Partnerships Office. The purpose of the challenge is to raise awareness of NASA’s Technology Transfer Program and to inspire interest in all NASA missions, programs and projects.

This year the scope of the contest is being expanded to include two challenges. In the first challenge, students in grades 3-12 are asked to submit a video describing their favorite NASA Goddard spinoff. In a new twist, participants in this year′s contest must also use the engineering design process to develop and propose a new spinoff application of their own for the technology. Spinoffs are technologies originally created for space and modified into everyday products used on Earth. Examples include memory foam, invisible braces and scratch-resistant lenses for eyeglasses.

The second challenge, the TRANSFORMERS OPTIMUS PRIME InWorld Challenge, offers students in grades 6-12 an opportunity to take their video spinoff ideas to another level. Interested teams must study James Webb Space Telescope spinoff technology and post their completed spinoff videos for review by college engineering students. Engineering college mentors will select 20 teams to continue the collaborative design process within a multiuser virtual world to build a 3-D model of the team′s design solutions.

Winning students from each grade category will be invited to Goddard to participate in a behind-the-scenes workshop, attend a VIP awards ceremony and meet actor Peter Cullen, the voice of OPTIMUS PRIME.

The new deadline to register and upload videos is Jan. 28, 2015.

For more information, visit http://itpo.gsfc.nasa.gov/optimus/.

Questions about this contest should be directed to Darryl Mitchell at Darryl.R.Mitchell@nasa.gov.

TRANSFORMERS and OPTIMUS PRIME are trademarks of Hasbro and are used with permission. © 2014 Hasbro. All rights reserved.

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DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2014 NASA EONS Solicitation New Appendix

NASA’s Office of Education is accepting new proposals under the Education Opportunities in NASA STEM, or EONS, 2014 NASA Research Announcement for the Minority University Research and Education Program, or MUREP, Institutional Research Opportunity, or MIRO appendix. This effort was previously titled as the NASA University Research Centers Project, and has now been consolidated into the MUREP Program within the NASA Office of Education.

Through the EONS omnibus solicitation, the opportunity MIRO has been released. Through MIRO awards, NASA aims to promote science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM literacy and to enhance and sustain the capability of minority serving institutions to perform NASA-related research and education, which directly support NASA’s four mission directorates — Aeronautics Research, Human Exploration and Space Operations, Science, and Space Technology.

The deadline for proposals has been extended to Jan. 30, 2015.

For more information regarding the MIRO solicitation, please visit the NASA EONS page on the NASA Solicitation and Proposal Integrated Review and Proposal System, or NSPIRES, website at: http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId=%7bB6C61D04-5793-EF52-3497-1AA57FA424A5%7d&path=open .

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2015 NOAA Undergraduate Scholarship

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA, is accepting applications for its 2015 Educational Partnership Program, or EPP, Undergraduate Scholarship Program. The EPP Undergraduate Scholarship Program provides scholarships for two years of undergraduate study to rising junior undergraduate students majoring in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields that directly support NOAA’s mission.

Participants receive total awards valued at up to $35,000 in total support during their junior and senior years. During the first summer, scholars complete a nine-week paid summer internship at NOAA in Silver Spring, Maryland. During the second summer, scholars complete paid internships at NOAA facilities across the country. A stipend and housing allowance is provided. At the end of both summer internships, students present the results of their projects at an education and science symposium in Silver Spring.

Students attending an accredited Minority Serving Institution within the United States or U.S. Territories as defined by the U.S. Department of Education (Hispanic Serving Institutions, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tribal Colleges and Universities, Alaskan-Native Serving Institutions, and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions) are eligible to apply for the program. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and must earn and maintain a minimum 3.2 grade point average on a 4.0 scale.

Applications are due Jan. 30, 2015.

For more information and to submit an online application, visit http://www.epp.noaa.gov/ssp_undergrad_page.html.

Questions about this scholarship opportunity should be directed to EPP.USP@noaa.gov.

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U.S. National Park Service’s Young Leaders in Climate Change — Summer 2015 Internships

The George Melendez Wright Initiative for Young Leaders in Climate Change, or YLCC, builds a pathway for exemplary students in higher education to apply cutting-edge climate change knowledge to park management. The program provides paid summer internships to highly accomplished graduate and upper-level undergraduate students to work on diverse issues related to climate change and its effects in national parks. Participants gain valuable work experience, explore career options and develop leadership skills under the mentorship and guidance of the National Park Service.

The program features structured projects in one or more of the following interdisciplinary areas: climate change science and monitoring; resource conservation and adaptation; policy development; sustainable park operations; facilities adaptation; and communication/interpretation/education. Interns who successfully complete the YLCC will be eligible to be hired noncompetitively into subsequent federal jobs once they complete their degree programs. These jobs would be in the Department of Interior, National Park Service or one of the other bureaus within the Department of Interior. An intern must qualify for the job in order to be hired noncompetitively.

Internships are full-time positions (40 hours/week) lasting 11-12 weeks. Interns are paid $14/hour plus benefits, and are employees of the University of Washington. Most positions come with free or subsidized housing in dormitories or other shared accommodations in parks. Internships offer rigorous and challenging projects that demand high-level academic knowledge and skills, allowing interns considerable autonomy and opportunity for leadership under an effective mentor.

The application deadline is 12:01 pm PST on Jan. 30, 2015.

For additional information and to apply for a YLCC internship, visit http://parksclimateinterns.org/.

Questions about this program should be directed to Tim Watkins at climate_change@nps.gov.

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NASA History Program Office Summer and Fall 2015 Internships

The NASA History Program Office is seeking undergraduate and graduate students for summer and fall 2015 internships. The History Program Office maintains archival materials to answer research questions from NASA personnel, journalists, scholars, students at all levels and others from around the world. The division also edits and publishes several books and monographs each year. It maintains a large number of websites on NASA history.

Students of all majors are welcome to apply. While detailed prior knowledge of the aeronautics and space fields is not necessary, a keen interest and some basic familiarity with these topics are needed. Strong research, writing and editing skills are essential. Experience with social media is a plus.

Intern projects are flexible. Typical projects include handling a variety of information requests, writing posts for the NASA history Twitter and Facebook pages, editing historical manuscripts, doing research and writing biographical sketches, and identifying and captioning photos.

Applications for summer 2015 internships are due Feb. 1, 2015. Fall 2015 internship applications are due June 1, 2015.

For more information, visit http://history.nasa.gov/interncall.htm.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please contact Bill Barry at bill.barry@nasa.gov.

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International Space Station Research Design Challenge: Capillary Effects on Liquids Exploratory Research Experiments

NASA and Portland State University are seeking participants for the International Space Station Research Design Challenge: Capillary Effects on Liquids Exploratory Research Experiments, or CELERE. This design challenge enables students to participate in microgravity research on capillary action, similar to that conducted on the space station.

Teams or individuals create their own experiment using computer-aided design, or CAD, with a provided template. Short experiment proposals are submitted, and test cells are manufactured by Portland State University using the CAD drawings and a computer-controlled laser cutter. Each experiment is conducted in a drop tower. Video of the drop is provided for student analysis and reporting of results.

CELERE is open to individuals and teams in grades 8-12 Teams may include younger students as long as there is at least one team member in grades 8-12 to facilitate the participation of informal science clubs, Scouts, etc. Teams may be of any size and may include an entire class or science club. The program is limited to students from the United States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Design proposals are now being accepted. Deadlines for submissions are Feb. 1, March 1 and April 1, 2015.

For more information about this opportunity, visit http://spaceflightsystems.grc.nasa.gov/CELERE/.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please email your inquiries to the CELERE team at celere@lists.nasa.gov.

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NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowships Program Accepting Proposals for 2015-2016 Academic Year

The NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, or NESSF, is soliciting applications from accredited U.S. universities on behalf of individuals pursuing master’s or doctoral degrees in earth and space sciences, or related disciplines, for the 2015-2016 academic year. The purpose of NESSF is to ensure continued training of a highly qualified workforce in disciplines needed to achieve NASA’s scientific goals. Awards resulting from the competitive selection will be training grants to the respective universities, with the advisor serving as the principal investigator. The financial support for the NESSF program comes from the Science Mission Directorate’s four science divisions: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Planetary Science and Astrophysics.

Initially, NESSF awards are made for one year. They may be renewed for up to two additional years, contingent upon satisfactory progress (as reflected in academic performance, research progress and recommendation by the faculty advisor) and the availability of funds.

The maximum amount of a NESSF award is $30,000 per year.

Proposals for this opportunity are due Feb. 2, 2015.

For more information about this solicitation, visit http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId={B6CDCEA6-8EDD-A48A-FAF8-E588F66661C3}&path=open.

Questions about Earth Science Research NESSF opportunities should be directed to Claire Macaulay at Claire.I.Macaulay@nasa.gov.

Questions about Heliophysics Research, Planetary Science Research and Astrophysics Research opportunities should be directed to Dolores Holland at hq-nessf-Space@nasa.gov.

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2015 Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program

The Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program, or PGGURP, pairs qualified undergraduate students with NASA-funded investigators at research locations across the U.S. for eight weeks during the summer. Students will spend the summer at the NASA scientists’ home institutions. Selected students receive a cost-of-living stipend and compensation for housing and travel.

Undergraduate students majoring in geology or related sciences are eligible to apply. Students graduating in 2015 who have not started graduate school yet are also eligible. Preference is given to U.S. citizens and permanent residents.

Applications are due Feb. 2, 2015.

For more information, visit http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/~tgregg/pggurp_homepage.html.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please email Robyn Wagner, PGGURP administrator, at pggurp@buffalo.edu.

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Mosaics in Science Program

The Mosaics in Science program was developed by the National Park Service, in partnership with the Geological Society of America, to increase diversity among those who seek science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, careers within the National Park Service.

Participants will spend 11 weeks working on a STEM project in a national park. After completing their projects, participants travel to the District of Columbia to participate in a career workshop that provides opportunities to present their work, learn about how to apply for a federal job, and meet National Park Service staff and management.

Twenty-six positions will be offered in 2015. Participants will receive a stipend of $4,000, and housing and travel costs are also covered. Applications are due Feb. 3, 2015.

To be eligible, applicants must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States between 18 and 35 years old who attend or recently graduated from an undergraduate institution, or are in the early stages of their career. Interested students must be nominated by an organization partnering with the program. Students from groups historically underrepresented in STEM fields are strongly encouraged to seek nomination. These groups include but are not limited to African-American, American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian, Hispanic, Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander, and persons with disabilities.

For additional information on the Mosaics in Science program and to see a list of partner organizations eligible to nominate students, visit http://rock.geosociety.org/mosaics/. For an overview of the Mosaics in Science Program, see: http://nature.nps.gov/geology/mosaics/index.cfm.

Questions about the program should be directed to Lisa Norby at lisa_norby@nps.gov. Questions on program eligibility and how to apply for a position should be directed to Matt Dawson at mdawson@geosociety.org.

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Lunar and Planetary Institute Workshops: Earth and Space Science

The Lunar and Planetary Institute invites high school teachers to attend a series of earth and space science workshops. These one-day workshops will take place at the Harris County Department of Education Science Center in Houston, Texas.

‘Weather and Climate Interactions’
Feb. 5, 2015, 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Use data-rich activities and hands-on demonstrations to investigate thermal energy transfers and the role of the sun in convection, winds and currents; identify how patterns of atmospheric movement influence weather; and examine the role of oceans in forming hurricanes. The workshop includes a variety of formative assessment strategies.

‘Our Celestial Neighborhood’
Feb. 11, 2015, 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Explore the relationships and scales of the solar system, Milky Way and our universe, and examine the characteristics and life cycles of stars, and the variety and properties of galaxies.

A workshop registration fee of $30 includes extensive presentation materials, reference materials, hands-on lesson plans for the classroom, refreshments and lunch. Workshop space is limited, and interested educators are encouraged to apply early to secure a spot. Registration for each workshop closes the day prior to the workshop.

For more information and to register to attend, visit http://www.lpi.usra.edu/education/workshops/HCDE_2015_Middle_HS.pdf.

Questions about these workshops should be directed to Education@lpi.usra.edu.

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2015 NASA Student Airborne Research Program

The NASA Airborne Science Program invites highly motivated undergraduate students currently in their junior year to apply for the NASA Student Airborne Research Program, also known as SARP 2015. The program provides students with hands-on research experience in all aspects of a major scientific campaign, from detailed planning on how to achieve mission objectives to formal presentation of results and conclusions to peers and others. Students will assist in the operation of airborne instruments aboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft.

The program takes place in summer 2015. Instrument and flight preparations, and the research flights themselves, will occur at NASA′s Armstrong Flight Research Center in Palmdale, California. Post-flight data analysis and interpretation will take place at the University of California, Irvine.

Successful applicants will be awarded a stipend plus a travel and meals allowance for eight weeks of participation in the program. Housing and local transportation will also be provided.

The deadline for applications is Feb. 5, 2015.

For more information and to download the program application, visit http://www.nserc.und.edu/sarp/sarp-2015.

Specific questions about the program should be directed to SARP2015@nserc.und.edu.

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2015 Space Exploration Educators Conference

Make plans to attend the 21st Annual Space Exploration Educators Conference, to be held Feb. 5-7, 2015, at Space Center Houston. This conference is for all K-12 educators. Activities presented use space-related themes to teach across the curricula and can be used for science, language arts, mathematics, history and more.

Attend sessions hosted by scientists and engineers working on the International Space Station, Mars exploration and the planets beyond. Hear from astronauts who will be leading the charge in exploration. Attend sessions presented by educators and receive ready-to-implement classroom ideas. Attendees can earn up to 24 hours of continuing professional education credit.

For more information, visit http://spacecenter.org/education-programs/teacher-programs/teachers-seec/.

Please email any questions about the conference to seec@spacecenter.org.

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2015 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge

NASA has opened team registration for the 2015 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge. Organized by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, the event will be held April 16-18, 2015, at the U.S. Space & Rocket Center, also in Huntsville.

The challenge engages high school, college and university students in hands-on, experiential learning activities, while also testing potential technologies needed for future deep space exploration. Both U.S. and international teams may register to participate. For U.S. teams, registration closes Feb. 6, 2015.

Student teams participating in the Rover Challenge must design, engineer and test a human-powered rover on a mock course designed to simulate the harsh and demanding terrains future NASA explorers may find on distant planets, moons and asteroids.

For more information on the 2015 Human Exploration Rover Challenge and registration, visit http://go.nasa.gov/14dikMF.

Follow the Rover Challenge on social media for the latest news and updates:
https://www.facebook.com/roverchallenge?ref=hl
https://twitter.com/RoverChallenge
http://instagram.com/nasa_marshall.

View images from the 2014 Rover Challenge at http://go.nasa.gov/1iEjGRp.

International teams with questions about this event or registration may email Amy McDowell at Amy.McDowell@nasa.gov. U.S. teams with questions may contact Diedra Williams at MSFC-RoverChallenge2015@mail.nasa.gov.

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2015-16 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Undergraduate STEM Research Scholarship

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium is offering undergraduate research scholarships of up to $8,500 to encourage talented individuals to conduct research in science, technology, engineering or mathematics, or STEM, fields.

Applicants must participate in an active faculty-mentored research experience that aligns with the aerospace sector and meets NASA’s mission. Student stipends and research support totaling $4,000 during the academic year and $4,500 during a summer semester are available.

These one-year awards are nonrenewable and based on student academic merit, quality of the research proposal and alignment of research with the goals of NASA and the aerospace sector. Underrepresented minority students, female students and students with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and enrolled at one of the five Virginia Space Grant member universities: The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia and Virginia Tech.

The deadline for submitting applications is Feb. 9, 2015.

For more information, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/undergrad/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to rkashiri@odu.edu.

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2015-16 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Graduate STEM Research Fellowship

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium’s Graduate STEM Research Fellowship Program provides fellowships of $6,000 in add-on support to graduate students to supplement and enhance basic research support. The objective of this science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, research fellowship opportunity is to encourage talented individuals to pursue careers in STEM industries that support NASA’s mission.

Participants in the Graduate STEM Research Fellowship Program must take part in an active faculty‐mentored research experience that aligns with the aerospace sector and meets NASA’s mission. Awards are made annually and are renewable for one year for students making satisfactory academic and research progress.

This is a competitive fellowship program, and awards are based on merit recognizing high academic achievement and promise. Underrepresented minority students, female students and students with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and enrolled at one of the five Virginia Space Grant member universities: The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia and Virginia Tech.

The deadline for submitting applications is Feb. 9, 2015.

For more information about this opportunity and to apply online, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/gradfellow/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to kmanning@odu.edu.

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NASA OSSI Online Career Week

The NASA One Stop Shopping Initiative, or OSSI, is hosting the NASA OSSI Online Career Week Feb. 10-12, 2015. This online event will connect you with NASA, science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, employers and top graduate programs nationwide. Engage with representatives from all 10 NASA centers to learn about internship, scholarship and fellowship opportunities available at NASA. Interact with recruiters from top STEM employers, and explore internship and job opportunities in the private sector. Learn about highly ranked STEM graduate programs and network with admissions officers from the comfort of your home, dorm, smartphone or tablet. Register for one or all events and launch your career today!

NASA OSSI Online Career Week Live Events
– NASA Internships, Fellowships and Scholarships Day — Feb. 10, 2015 (1-5 p.m. EST)
— STEM Industry Day — Feb. 11, 2015 (1-5 p.m. EST)
— STEM Graduate Programs Fair — Feb. 12, 2015 (1-5 p.m. EST)

Starting on February 9, you will be able to research participating organizations and explore opportunities listed. Complete your profile, and prepare a few questions for the centers, companies or graduate programs you are interested in. During the live events, you will engage in one-on-one text-based conversations directly with a recruiter or admissions officer at those organizations. You can share your background, experience and resume and ask questions. Maximize your time in the event by getting in line to chat with representatives from more than one center, company or university at a time.

To attend, please register at http://nasaossi.brazenconnect.com/.

For more information, please contact nasaossi@hsf.net.

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NASA/Applied Physics Laboratory Summer Internship 2015

The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, or APL, is offering summer projects for students interested in working on NASA missions or space-related research opportunities.

Students participating in the 2015 NASA/APL Internship Program will work at the APL facility in Laurel, Maryland. Students will receive a stipend for the 10-week program, and housing will be provided.

Eligible students include undergraduate students who will be sophomores, juniors or seniors as of fall 2015. Graduate students starting their first or second year in fall 2015 are also eligible. Applicants must be U.S. citizens.

Applications are due Feb. 28, 2015.

For more information about the internship, including a list of opportunities that are currently available, visit https://dnnpro.outer.jhuapl.edu/aplnasaintern/Home.aspx.

Questions about the NASA/APL Internships Program should be emailed to aplnasaintern-web@jhuapl.edu.

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2015 NASA Scholarship — Minority University Research Education Project

NASA’s Office of Education is accepting applications for the Minority University Research and Education Project, or MUREP, Scholarship program. The MUREP Scholarship is for individuals pursuing or planning to pursue undergraduate studies leading to an Associate’s or a Bachelor’s degree in relevant NASA related disciplines at an accredited United States minority serving institution. This opportunity is open to students pursuing degrees in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, specifically in areas of projected deficiencies in the NASA STEM workforce.

Eligible students include freshmen, sophomores and juniors at the undergraduate level. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or nationals. The scholarship includes 75% of tuition up to $9,000 academic scholarship, based on tuition amount, and $6,000 for a summer internship.

Applications are due March 31, 2015.

Applications should be submitted through the NASA One Stop Shopping Initiative at http://intern.nasa.gov. Applicants should be sure to select “scholarship” for the type of application.

Questions about the 2015 MUREP Scholarship opportunity should be emailed to NASA.MUREP2015@nasaprs.com.

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2015 NASA Office of Education — Aeronautics Undergraduate Scholarship

NASA’s Office of Education is accepting applications for the for the Aeronautics Undergraduate Scholarship, or AUS, program. The Aeronautics Undergraduate Scholarship is for individuals pursuing or planning to pursue undergraduate studies leading to an Associate’s or a Bachelor’s degree in areas related to aeronautics. These scholarships are directed toward enhancing the state of aeronautics for the nation, transforming the nation’s air transportation system, and developing the knowledge, tools, and technologies to support future air and space vehicles.

Eligible students include freshmen, sophomores and juniors at the undergraduate level. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or nationals. The scholarship includes 75% of tuition up to $9,000 academic scholarship, based on tuition amount, and $6,000 for a summer internship.

Applications are due March 31, 2015.

Applications should be submitted through the NASA One Stop Shopping Initiative at http://intern.nasa.gov. Applicants should be sure to select “scholarship” for the type of application.

Questions about the 2015 Aeronautics Undergraduate Scholarship opportunity should be emailed to NASA.ASP2015@nasaprs.com.

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2015 LiftOff Summer Institute

Registration is now open for the 2015 LiftOff Summer Institute, sponsored by NASA’s Texas Space Grant Consortium. This weeklong professional development training for teachers will be held June 28-July 3, 2015, at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. This competitive aerospace workshop emphasizes science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, learning experiences through speakers, hands-on activities and field investigations.

The theme for this year’s institute is “Living in Freefall.” The event will feature the International Space Station, a laboratory, observatory and factory in space. Have you ever wondered what it would be like to live and work in space? What are the biological factors, psychological trials and physical challenges?

Attendees must be U.S. citizens currently employed as classroom teachers of grades 4-12 with at least one year teaching experience prior to the institute. Texas Space Grant pays all expenses for any Texas teacher selected. Other Space Grant Consortia fund teachers from their states.

Applications are due April 1, 2015.

For more information and to access the online application, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/liftoff/.

If you have questions about the 2015 LiftOff Summer Institute, please email your inquiries to Margaret Baguio at baguio@tsgc.utexas.edu.

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NASA Robotic Mining Competition 2015

The Sixth Annual NASA Robotic Mining Competition will be held at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center May 18-22, 2015. NASA’s Robotic Mining Competition is for university-level students, enrolled in a U.S. college or university. Teams are challenged to design and build a mining robot that can traverse the simulated Martian chaotic terrain, excavate Martian regolith and deposit the regolith into a collector bin within 10 minutes. There is particular relevance to NASA’s recently announced mission to find an asteroid by 2016 and then bring it to cislunar space. NASA will directly benefit from the competition by encouraging the development of innovative excavation concepts from universities, which may result in ideas and solutions that could be applied to an actual excavation device or payload.

The winning team will receive the Joe Kosmo Award for Excellence trophy, KSC launch invitations, team certificates for each member and a monetary team scholarship. Awards for other categories include monetary team scholarships, a school trophy or plaque, team and individual certificates, and KSC launch invitations.

Design teams must include at least one college or university faculty member and at least two undergraduate or graduate students. NASA has not set an upper limit on team members. A team should have a sufficient number of members to successfully operate their mining robot. Teams will compete in up to five major competition categories, including onsite mining, systems engineering paper, outreach project, slide presentation and demonstration (optional) and team spirit (optional).

Registration opened on Sept. 3, 2014, and is limited to 50 teams.

For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/centers/kennedy/technology/nasarmc.html.

Follow the NASA Robotic Mining Competition on Twitter at https://twitter.com/NASARMC.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Bethanné Hull at Bethanne.Hull@nasa.gov.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

EXPRESS Message Special Edition: White House State of STEM 2015

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On behalf of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) and Office of Public Engagement, we would like to invite you and your students to participate in the third annual State of Science Technology, Engineering and Mathematics address, or “SoSTEM”.

This event will feature Dr. John P. Holdren, Assistant to the President for Science and Technology and Director of OSTP, NASA Administrator Charles Bolden and other special guests, including crew members of Expedition 42 aboard the International Space Station. NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Terry Virts, currently in orbit 250 miles above Earth, will engage with students via a live communications downlink.

Following the Earth-to-Station video chat, there will be a special panel focused on engaging more students in STEM — particularly girls.

This exciting SoSTEM event will take place Wednesday, January 21, 1:15-3 p.m. EST. It will be carried live on NASA Television and through the agency’s Digital Learning Network.

http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv
http://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/dln/

Students may submit questions during the event via Twitter using #SoSTEM #AsktheWH.

NASA Education Express — Jan. 15, 2015

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations
Available While Supplies Last

Apply for the 2015 Summer NASA Academies — Webinar
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Webinar Date: Jan. 15, 2015 at 3 p.m. EST

Museum Alliance Webcast — Space Launch System: America’s New Rocket
Audience: Museum Professionals and Informal Educators
Event Date: Jan. 15, 2015, at 4 p.m. EST

NASA’s ESTEEM “Ask US” Online Professional Development Series
Audience: K-12 Educators
Next Event Date: Jan. 15, 2015, at 4:30 p.m. EST

National Science Foundation’s Community College Innovation Challenge
Audience: Teams of Community College Students and Faculty Mentors
Entry Deadline: Jan. 15, 2015

NOAA “Marine Debris Prevention Through Education and Outreach” Federal Funding Opportunity
Audience: Higher Education Institutions
Application Deadline: Jan. 15, 2015

2015 Alan Shepard Technology in Education Award
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: Jan. 16, 2015

NASA-USGS Data App Challenge
Audience: Citizen Scientists
Entry Deadline for Idea Generation Phase: Jan. 18, 2015

DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2014-2015 NASA Goddard OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Challenge
Audience: Grade 3-12 Students
Registration Deadline: Jan. 23, 2015

Free Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series
Audience: All Educators and 9-Higher Education Students
Next Lecture Date: Jan. 24, 2014, at 5:15 p.m. EST

Sally Ride EarthKAM Announces the 2015 Winter Mission
Audience: Middle School Educators and Students, and the Informal Education Community
Mission Date: Jan. 27-30, 2015

DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2014 NASA EONS Solicitation New Appendix
Audience: Minority Universities
Proposal Deadline: Jan. 30, 2015

2015 NOAA Undergraduate Scholarship
Audience: Rising Junior Undergraduate Students at Minority Serving Institutions
Application Deadline: Jan. 30, 2015

U.S. National Park Service’s Young Leaders in Climate Change — Summer 2015 Internships
Audience: Graduate and Undergraduate Students
Application Deadline: Jan. 30, 2015

NASA History Program Office Summer and Fall 2015 Internships
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Summer 2015 Application Deadline: Feb. 1, 2015
Fall 2015 Application Deadline: June 1, 2015

International Space Station Research Design Challenge: Capillary Effects on Liquids Exploratory Research Experiments
Audience: Grade 8-12 Educators and Students
Entry Deadlines: Feb. 1, March 1 and April 1, 2015

NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowships Program Accepting Proposals for 2015-2016 Academic Year
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Proposal Deadline: Feb. 2, 2014

2015 Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 2, 2015

Mosaics in Science Program
Audience: Undergraduate Students Ages 18-35 Years Old
Application Deadline: Feb. 3, 2015

Lunar and Planetary Institute Workshops: Earth and Space Science
Audience: 6-12 Educators
Next Registration Deadline: Feb. 4, 2015

2015 NASA Student Airborne Research Program
Audience: Undergraduate Students Currently in Their Junior Year
Application Deadline: Feb. 5, 2015

2015 Space Exploration Educators Conference
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Date: Feb. 5-7, 2015

2015 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge
Audience: 9-12 & Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Deadline for U.S. Teams: Feb. 6, 2015

Engineering for You Video Contest 2
Audience: All Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: March 2, 2015

2015 NASA Office of Education — Aeronautics Undergraduate Scholarship
Audience: Undergraduate Students Majoring in Aeronautics Related Fields
Application Deadline: March 31, 2015

Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

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Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles Available for Educational Use

NASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions and museums to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles and other special items offered on a first-come, first-served basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

There will be a nominal shipping fee that must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.

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Apply for the 2015 Summer NASA Academies — Webinar

The NASA Minority Innovation Challenges Institute, or MICI, is hosting a special webinar on Jan. 15, 2015, at 3 p.m. EST, which will provide undergraduate students details on how they can apply for admission into a 2015 NASA Summer Academy. The NASA Academy is not a 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. summer research internship program. It is a rigorous, immersive 10-week experience that will challenge the participants and push them outside their comfort zones. It offers interns an intense learning experience. The NASA Academies at NASA centers have different areas of focus, including space, aerospace, robotics, aeronautics and propulsion.

The NASA Academy curriculum combines a valuable research experience with a residential leadership development experience. Academy participants, known as research associates, or RAs, spend four days per week working full time on an individual research project with a NASA scientist or engineer, called their principal investigator. These projects offer a challenging learning experience in which the RAs do hands-on research side by side with their mentors. Projects are typically cutting-edge topics that teach the RAs about the latest in NASA research and development. The RAs demonstrate the progress of their research in the annual Intern Poster Expo. The academies conclude with final oral presentations and a graduate ceremony.

To sign up for this webinar, and gain access to MICI’s other free webinars, visit http://nasamici.com/upcoming-sessions.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Mary Baker at mary@nasamici.com.

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Museum Alliance Webcast — Space Launch System: America’s New Rocket

NASA’s Digital Learning Network and the Space Launch System team invite you to participate in an interactive webcast featuring NASA engineer Steve Creech on Jan. 15, 2015, at 4 p.m. EST.

In this presentation, Creech will webcast live from NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. His presentation will focus on America’s next heavy-lift launch vehicle, the Space Launch System, or SLS. He will also answer questions from webcast viewers around the country.

NASA’s Space Launch System is an advanced, heavy-lift launch vehicle that will provide an entirely new capability for science and human exploration beyond Earth’s orbit. The SLS will give the United States a safe, affordable and sustainable means of extending beyond our current limits and open new doors of discovery from the unique vantage point of space.

Questions may be submitted prior to and during the event via dlinfochannel@gmail.com.

You may view the webcast as an individual at your personal computer, or set up audio visual equipment in your museum or school for a large group to participate.

To view the webcast, visit http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-dlinfo.

To learn more about the SLS visit www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/.

After the webcast, presentation materials will be posted on the Museum Alliance member site at https://informal.jpl.nasa.gov/museum/Conversations. A downloadable copy of the webcast and transcript will be posted a week or so later at the same location. Username and password are required to access the member site.

To learn how to become a Museum Alliance member, visit https://informal.jpl.nasa.gov/museum/About.

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NASA’s ESTEEM “Ask US” Online Professional Development Series

NASA’s Minority University Research and Education Program, or MUREP, is sponsoring a series of Google Plus Hangout professional development events for K-12 educators. The Earth Systems, Technology and Energy Education for MUREP, or ESTEEM, team will lead monthly sessions covering a variety of climate topics. This month’s webinar topic is:

Communicating Climate Change: Mind the Gap — Jan. 15, 2015, at 4:30 p.m. EST
Although 97 percent of active climate scientists agree that the earth is warming due to human activities, some polls have found that only 44 percent of Americans share this view. As an educator, you are likely to encounter people who have received information that conflicts with the accepted climate science. This session will help you better understand Americans’ perceptions of climate change and provide tips for better communicating climate science.

Certificates of professional development hours are available upon request.

For more information on this event and upcoming webinar sessions, visit http://nice.larc.nasa.gov/asknice/. Questions about this series should be sent to Bonnie Murray at bonnie.murray@nasa.gov.

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National Science Foundation’s Community College Innovation Challenge

The National Science Foundation’s Community College Innovation Challenge is underway and seeking teams to propose innovative science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, -based solutions for real-world problems. Teams must comprise community college students, a faculty mentor and a community or industry partner.

Challenge entries consist of two components: a written entry and a video entry. Each team’s entry must address one of the five themes outlined by the National Science Foundation. This year’s themes are Big Data, Infrastructure Security, Sustainability, Broadening Participation in STEM and Improving STEM Education.

Finalist teams will be invited to attend an Innovation Boot Camp, a professional development workshop on innovation and entrepreneurship.

The entry submission deadline is Jan. 15, 2015.

For additional information about the challenge, visit http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/communitycollege/.

Questions about this challenge should be directed to InnovationChallenge@nsf.gov.

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NOAA “Marine Debris Prevention Through Education and Outreach” Federal Funding Opportunity

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Marine Debris Program, or NOAA MDP, is offering a federal funding opportunity called “Marine Debris Prevention Through Education and Outreach.”

The NOAA MDP seeks to fund projects that will lead to the prevention of marine debris in marine and coastal environments through the implementation of dedicated education and outreach activities. Projects awarded through this grant competition are expected to educate the public about marine debris through activities including, but not limited to, the following:

1. Encouraging changes in behavior to address marine debris.

2. Developing, using, and disseminating tools, products and campaigns to improve efforts to address marine debris.

3. Engaging the public in active, personal participation (e.g., a small-scale shoreline cleanup with students or other hands-on activities, etc.).

While the anticipated range of federal funding available per award is approximately $20,000 to $100,000, projects typically receive between $30,000 and $60,000. Eligible applicants include: U.S. institutions of higher education; nonprofit organizations; commercial (for-profit) organizations; and state, local and tribal governments. Applications from federal agencies or employees of federal agencies will not be considered. International organizations are not eligible.

To download the official Federal Funding Opportunity along with complete eligibility requirements, please visit Grants Online at http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=270188.

The deadline for applications to this funding opportunity is 11:59:59 p.m. EST on Jan. 15, 2015. Applications must be submitted online via www.grants.gov.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Alison Hammer Weingast at Alison.Hammer@noaa.gov.

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2015 Alan Shepard Technology in Education Award

Do you know K-12 teachers or district-level administrators who are making a difference in education through the use of technology? Recognize their achievements by nominating them for the Alan Shepard Technology in Education Award. The Astronauts Memorial Foundation, in partnership with NASA and the Space Foundation, will recognize the accomplishments of one outstanding individual and his or her contributions to lifelong learning through the application of technology in the classroom or in the professional development of teachers.

Technology personnel and K-12 classroom teachers who have demonstrated exemplary use of technology to enhance learning in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, are eligible for this award. School principals, superintendents or associate superintendents may nominate eligible candidates. The award will be presented in April 2015 at the Space Foundation’s 31st Space Symposium in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The deadline for applications is Jan. 16, 2015.

Applications and more information are available online at http://www.astronautsmemorial.org/alan-shepard-award.html .

Questions about this award should be directed to amfreg@amfcse.org.

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NASA-USGS Data App Challenge

NASA, in partnership with the U.S. Geological Survey, or USGS, is offering more than $35,000 in prizes to citizen scientists for ideas using climate data to address vulnerabilities faced by the United States in coping with climate change.

According to the recent National Climate Assessment produced by more than 300 experts across government and academia, the United States faces a number of current and future challenges as the result of climate change. Vulnerabilities include coastal flooding and weather-related hazards that threaten lives and property, increased disruptions to agriculture, prolonged drought that adversely affects food security and water availability, and ocean acidification capable of damaging ecosystems and biodiversity. The challenge seeks to unlock the potential of climate data to address these and other climate risks.

The challenge begins with an ideation stage for data-driven application pitches, followed by storyboarding and, finally, prototyping of concepts with the greatest potential. Entries for the ideation stage are due Jan. 18, 2015. Other phases of the challenge will run through March 2015.

The ideation stage challenges competitors to imagine new applications of climate data to address climate vulnerabilities. This stage is divided into three competitive classes based on data sources: NASA data, federal data from agencies such as the USGS and any open data. The storyboarding stage allows competitors to conceptualize and design the best ideas, followed by the prototyping stage, which implements the best ideas.

The Climate Resilience Data Challenge is managed by NASA’s Center of Excellence for Collaborative Innovation at NASA Headquarters in the District of Columbia, and is being conducted through the NASA Tournament Lab, a partnership with Harvard University hosted on Appirio/Topcoder. The challenge supports the efforts of the White House Climate Data Initiative, a broad effort to leverage the federal government’s extensive, freely available climate-relevant data resources to spur innovation and private-sector entrepreneurship in order to advance awareness of and preparedness for the impacts of climate change.

For additional information on the Climate Resilience Data Challenge and to register to take part, visit http://www.topcoder.com/earthscience/crdc/.

To learn more about other NASA challenges and citizen science efforts, visit http://www.nasa.gov/solve/.

To find out more about U.S. climate change vulnerabilities, visit the National Climate Assessment website http://nca2014.globalchange.gov/.

NASA monitors Earth’s vital signs from land, air and space with a fleet of satellites and ambitious airborne and ground-based observation campaigns. For more information about NASA’s earth science activities, visit http://www.nasa.gov/earthrightnow/.

Questions about the challenge should be directed to Jeff Chen at jeffrey.c.chen@nasa.gov.

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DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2014-2015 NASA Goddard OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Challenge

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center is launching the 2014-2015 TRANSFORMERS OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Challenge, hosted by the Innovative Technology Partnerships Office. The purpose of the challenge is to raise awareness of NASA’s Technology Transfer Program and to inspire interest in all NASA missions, programs and projects.

This year the scope of the contest is being expanded to include two challenges. In the first challenge, students in grades 3-12 are asked to submit a video describing their favorite NASA Goddard spinoff. In a new twist, participants in this year′s contest must also use the engineering design process to develop and propose a new spinoff application of their own for the technology. Spinoffs are technologies originally created for space and modified into everyday products used on Earth. Examples include memory foam, invisible braces and scratch-resistant lenses for eyeglasses.

The second challenge, the TRANSFORMERS OPTIMUS PRIME InWorld Challenge, offers students in grades 6-12 an opportunity to take their video spinoff ideas to another level. Interested teams must study James Webb Space Telescope spinoff technology and post their completed spinoff videos for review by college engineering students. Engineering college mentors will select 20 teams to continue the collaborative design process within a multiuser virtual world to build a 3-D model of the team′s design solutions.

Winning students from each grade category will be invited to Goddard to participate in a behind-the-scenes workshop, attend a VIP awards ceremony and meet actor Peter Cullen, the voice of OPTIMUS PRIME.

The new deadline to register and upload videos is Jan. 23, 2015.

For more information, visit http://itpo.gsfc.nasa.gov/optimus/.

Questions about this contest should be directed to Darryl Mitchell at Darryl.R.Mitchell@nasa.gov.

TRANSFORMERS and OPTIMUS PRIME are trademarks of Hasbro and are used with permission. © 2014 Hasbro. All rights reserved.

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Free Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series

Curious about icy bodies in the outer reaches of our solar system, the effects of space junk on deep-space observation, the latest discoveries about the origins of the universe and new ways galaxy formation is mapped? Come to the Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series presented by Smithsonian researchers who are exploring the sun, the moon, planets, stars, galaxies and the universe. These speakers will share behind-the-scenes details about how their research is done and about technologies that advance new discoveries. The lectures will be held at the Albert Einstein Planetarium at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.

Each lecture begins at 5:15 p.m. EST and is followed by a Q&A session. Stay after the lecture to visit the museum’s observatory, weather permitting.

Jan. 24, 2015 — Observing the Origin of the Universe From the South Pole
After three years of observing from the South Pole, scientists may have found confirmation that the universe underwent a burst of inflationary growth at the time of the Big Bang. Cosmologist Colin Bischoff will discuss these findings as well as the excitement of astronomy from Antarctica.

Feb. 21, 2015 — Tracing the Structure of the Universe With Galaxy Surveys
Studies of galaxy formation and cosmology have exploded in recent years due to the immense data obtained from large galaxy surveys. Postdoctoral fellow Cameron McBride will discuss how observational data and theory are combined to better understand fundamental questions in our universe, and will highlight some exciting results from ongoing research.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/lectures/smithsonian-stars/.

Questions about this lecture series should be directed to the visitor service line at 202-633-2214.

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Sally Ride EarthKAM Announces the 2015 Winter Mission

Students and educators are invited to participate in the Sally Ride EarthKAM winter mission scheduled for Jan. 27-30, 2015. Guide your students in hands-on research as they program a camera aboard the International Space Station to take pictures of specific locations on Earth. The optional online curricula at the Sally Ride EarthKAM website are targeted at middle school students but are adaptable for other grade levels. All students and educators are welcome, including participants in afterschool programs.

For more information and to register for an upcoming mission, visit the Sally Ride EarthKAM home page at https://earthkam.ucsd.edu/.

If you have questions about the EarthKAM project, please email ek-help@earthkam.ucsd.edu.

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DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2014 NASA EONS Solicitation New Appendix

NASA’s Office of Education is accepting new proposals under the Education Opportunities in NASA STEM, or EONS, 2014 NASA Research Announcement for the Minority University Research and Education Program, or MUREP, Institutional Research Opportunity, or MIRO appendix. This effort was previously titled as the NASA University Research Centers Project, and has now been consolidated into the MUREP Program within the NASA Office of Education.

Through the EONS omnibus solicitation, the opportunity MIRO has been released. Through MIRO awards, NASA aims to promote science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM literacy and to enhance and sustain the capability of minority serving institutions to perform NASA-related research and education, which directly support NASA’s four mission directorates — Aeronautics Research, Human Exploration and Space Operations, Science, and Space Technology.

The deadline for proposals has been extended to Jan. 30, 2015.

For more information regarding the MIRO solicitation, please visit the NASA EONS page on the NASA Solicitation and Proposal Integrated Review and Proposal System, or NSPIRES, website at: http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId=%7bB6C61D04-5793-EF52-3497-1AA57FA424A5%7d&path=open .

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2015 NOAA Undergraduate Scholarship

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA, is accepting applications for its 2015 Educational Partnership Program, or EPP, Undergraduate Scholarship Program. The EPP Undergraduate Scholarship Program provides scholarships for two years of undergraduate study to rising junior undergraduate students majoring in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields that directly support NOAA’s mission.

Participants receive total awards valued at up to $35,000 in total support during their junior and senior years. During the first summer, scholars complete a nine-week paid summer internship at NOAA in Silver Spring, Maryland. During the second summer, scholars complete paid internships at NOAA facilities across the country. A stipend and housing allowance is provided. At the end of both summer internships, students present the results of their projects at an education and science symposium in Silver Spring.

Students attending an accredited Minority Serving Institution within the United States or U.S. Territories as defined by the U.S. Department of Education (Hispanic Serving Institutions, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tribal Colleges and Universities, Alaskan-Native Serving Institutions, and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions) are eligible to apply for the program. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and must earn and maintain a minimum 3.2 grade point average on a 4.0 scale.

Applications are due Jan. 30, 2015.

For more information and to submit an online application, visit http://www.epp.noaa.gov/ssp_undergrad_page.html.

Questions about this scholarship opportunity should be directed to EPP.USP@noaa.gov.

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U.S. National Park Service’s Young Leaders in Climate Change — Summer 2015 Internships

The George Melendez Wright Initiative for Young Leaders in Climate Change, or YLCC, builds a pathway for exemplary students in higher education to apply cutting-edge climate change knowledge to park management. The program provides paid summer internships to highly accomplished graduate and upper-level undergraduate students to work on diverse issues related to climate change and its effects in national parks. Participants gain valuable work experience, explore career options and develop leadership skills under the mentorship and guidance of the National Park Service.

The program features structured projects in one or more of the following interdisciplinary areas: climate change science and monitoring; resource conservation and adaptation; policy development; sustainable park operations; facilities adaptation; and communication/interpretation/education. Interns who successfully complete the YLCC will be eligible to be hired noncompetitively into subsequent federal jobs once they complete their degree programs. These jobs would be in the Department of Interior, National Park Service or one of the other bureaus within the Department of Interior. An intern must qualify for the job in order to be hired noncompetitively.

Internships are full-time positions (40 hours/week) lasting 11-12 weeks. Interns are paid $14/hour plus benefits, and are employees of the University of Washington. Most positions come with free or subsidized housing in dormitories or other shared accommodations in parks. Internships offer rigorous and challenging projects that demand high-level academic knowledge and skills, allowing interns considerable autonomy and opportunity for leadership under an effective mentor.

The application deadline is 12:01 pm PST on Jan. 30, 2015.

For additional information and to apply for a YLCC internship, visit http://parksclimateinterns.org/.

Questions about this program should be directed to Tim Watkins at climate_change@nps.gov.

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NASA History Program Office Summer and Fall 2015 Internships

The NASA History Program Office is seeking undergraduate and graduate students for summer and fall 2015 internships. The History Program Office maintains archival materials to answer research questions from NASA personnel, journalists, scholars, students at all levels and others from around the world. The division also edits and publishes several books and monographs each year. It maintains a large number of websites on NASA history.

Students of all majors are welcome to apply. While detailed prior knowledge of the aeronautics and space fields is not necessary, a keen interest and some basic familiarity with these topics are needed. Strong research, writing and editing skills are essential. Experience with social media is a plus.

Intern projects are flexible. Typical projects include handling a variety of information requests, writing posts for the NASA history Twitter and Facebook pages, editing historical manuscripts, doing research and writing biographical sketches, and identifying and captioning photos.

Applications for summer 2015 internships are due Feb. 1, 2015. Fall 2015 internship applications are due June 1, 2015.

For more information, visit http://history.nasa.gov/interncall.htm.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please contact Bill Barry at bill.barry@nasa.gov.

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International Space Station Research Design Challenge: Capillary Effects on Liquids Exploratory Research Experiments

NASA and Portland State University are seeking participants for the International Space Station Research Design Challenge: Capillary Effects on Liquids Exploratory Research Experiments, or CELERE. This design challenge enables students to participate in microgravity research on capillary action, similar to that conducted on the space station.

Teams or individuals create their own experiment using computer-aided design, or CAD, with a provided template. Short experiment proposals are submitted, and test cells are manufactured by Portland State University using the CAD drawings and a computer-controlled laser cutter. Each experiment is conducted in a drop tower. Video of the drop is provided for student analysis and reporting of results.

CELERE is open to individuals and teams in grades 8-12 Teams may include younger students as long as there is at least one team member in grades 8-12 to facilitate the participation of informal science clubs, Scouts, etc. Teams may be of any size and may include an entire class or science club. The program is limited to students from the United States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Design proposals are now being accepted. Deadlines for submissions are Feb. 1, March 1 and April 1, 2015.

For more information about this opportunity, visit http://spaceflightsystems.grc.nasa.gov/CELERE/.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please email your inquiries to the CELERE team at celere@lists.nasa.gov.

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NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowships Program Accepting Proposals for 2015-2016 Academic Year

The NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, or NESSF, is soliciting applications from accredited U.S. universities on behalf of individuals pursuing master’s or doctoral degrees in earth and space sciences, or related disciplines, for the 2015-2016 academic year. The purpose of NESSF is to ensure continued training of a highly qualified workforce in disciplines needed to achieve NASA’s scientific goals. Awards resulting from the competitive selection will be training grants to the respective universities, with the advisor serving as the principal investigator. The financial support for the NESSF program comes from the Science Mission Directorate’s four science divisions: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Planetary Science and Astrophysics.

Initially, NESSF awards are made for one year. They may be renewed for up to two additional years, contingent upon satisfactory progress (as reflected in academic performance, research progress and recommendation by the faculty advisor) and the availability of funds.

The maximum amount of a NESSF award is $30,000 per year.

Proposals for this opportunity are due Feb. 2, 2015.

For more information about this solicitation, visit http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId={B6CDCEA6-8EDD-A48A-FAF8-E588F66661C3}&path=open.

Questions about Earth Science Research NESSF opportunities should be directed to Claire Macaulay at Claire.I.Macaulay@nasa.gov.

Questions about Heliophysics Research, Planetary Science Research and Astrophysics Research opportunities should be directed to Dolores Holland at hq-nessf-Space@nasa.gov.

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2015 Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program

The Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program, or PGGURP, pairs qualified undergraduate students with NASA-funded investigators at research locations across the U.S. for eight weeks during the summer. Students will spend the summer at the NASA scientists’ home institutions. Selected students receive a cost-of-living stipend and compensation for housing and travel.

Undergraduate students majoring in geology or related sciences are eligible to apply. Students graduating in 2015 who have not started graduate school yet are also eligible. Preference is given to U.S. citizens and permanent residents.

Applications are due Feb. 2, 2015.

For more information, visit http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/~tgregg/pggurp_homepage.html.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please email Robyn Wagner, PGGURP administrator, at pggurp@buffalo.edu.

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Mosaics in Science Program

The Mosaics in Science program was developed by the National Park Service, in partnership with the Geological Society of America, to increase diversity among those who seek science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, careers within the National Park Service.

Participants will spend 11 weeks working on a STEM project in a national park. After completing their projects, participants travel to the District of Columbia to participate in a career workshop that provides opportunities to present their work, learn about how to apply for a federal job, and meet National Park Service staff and management.

Twenty-six positions will be offered in 2015. Participants will receive a stipend of $4,000, and housing and travel costs are also covered. Applications are due Feb. 3, 2015.

To be eligible, applicants must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States between 18 and 35 years old who attend or recently graduated from an undergraduate institution, or are in the early stages of their career. Interested students must be nominated by an organization partnering with the program. Students from groups historically underrepresented in STEM fields are strongly encouraged to seek nomination. These groups include but are not limited to African-American, American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian, Hispanic, Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander, and persons with disabilities.

For additional information on the Mosaics in Science program and to see a list of partner organizations eligible to nominate students, visit http://rock.geosociety.org/mosaics/. For an overview of the Mosaics in Science Program, see: http://nature.nps.gov/geology/mosaics/index.cfm.

Questions about the program should be directed to Lisa Norby at lisa_norby@nps.gov. Questions on program eligibility and how to apply for a position should be directed to Matt Dawson at mdawson@geosociety.org.

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Lunar and Planetary Institute Workshops: Earth and Space Science

The Lunar and Planetary Institute invites high school teachers to attend a series of earth and space science workshops. These one-day workshops will take place at the Harris County Department of Education Science Center in Houston, Texas.

‘Weather and Climate Interactions’
Feb. 5, 2015, 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Use data-rich activities and hands-on demonstrations to investigate thermal energy transfers and the role of the sun in convection, winds and currents; identify how patterns of atmospheric movement influence weather; and examine the role of oceans in forming hurricanes. The workshop includes a variety of formative assessment strategies.

‘Our Celestial Neighborhood’
Feb. 11, 2015, 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Explore the relationships and scales of the solar system, Milky Way and our universe, and examine the characteristics and life cycles of stars, and the variety and properties of galaxies.

A workshop registration fee of $30 includes extensive presentation materials, reference materials, hands-on lesson plans for the classroom, refreshments and lunch. Workshop space is limited, and interested educators are encouraged to apply early to secure a spot. Registration for each workshop closes the day prior to the workshop.

For more information and to register to attend, visit http://www.lpi.usra.edu/education/workshops/HCDE_2015_Middle_HS.pdf.

Questions about these workshops should be directed to Education@lpi.usra.edu.

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2015 NASA Student Airborne Research Program

The NASA Airborne Science Program invites highly motivated undergraduate students currently in their junior year to apply for the NASA Student Airborne Research Program, also known as SARP 2015. The program provides students with hands-on research experience in all aspects of a major scientific campaign, from detailed planning on how to achieve mission objectives to formal presentation of results and conclusions to peers and others. Students will assist in the operation of airborne instruments aboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft.

The program takes place in summer 2015. Instrument and flight preparations, and the research flights themselves, will occur at NASA′s Armstrong Flight Research Center in Palmdale, California. Post-flight data analysis and interpretation will take place at the University of California, Irvine.

Successful applicants will be awarded a stipend plus a travel and meals allowance for eight weeks of participation in the program. Housing and local transportation will also be provided.

The deadline for applications is Feb. 5, 2015.

For more information and to download the program application, visit http://www.nserc.und.edu/sarp/sarp-2015.

Specific questions about the program should be directed to SARP2015@nserc.und.edu.

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2015 Space Exploration Educators Conference

Make plans to attend the 21st Annual Space Exploration Educators Conference, to be held Feb. 5-7, 2015, at Space Center Houston. This conference is for all K-12 educators. Activities presented use space-related themes to teach across the curricula and can be used for science, language arts, mathematics, history and more.

Attend sessions hosted by scientists and engineers working on the International Space Station, Mars exploration and the planets beyond. Hear from astronauts who will be leading the charge in exploration. Attend sessions presented by educators and receive ready-to-implement classroom ideas. Attendees can earn up to 24 hours of continuing professional education credit.

For more information, visit http://spacecenter.org/education-programs/teacher-programs/teachers-seec/.

Please email any questions about the conference to seec@spacecenter.org.

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2015 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge

NASA has opened team registration for the 2015 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge. Organized by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, the event will be held April 16-18, 2015, at the U.S. Space & Rocket Center, also in Huntsville.

The challenge engages high school, college and university students in hands-on, experiential learning activities, while also testing potential technologies needed for future deep space exploration. Both U.S. and international teams may register to participate. For U.S. teams, registration closes Feb. 6, 2015.

Student teams participating in the Rover Challenge must design, engineer and test a human-powered rover on a mock course designed to simulate the harsh and demanding terrains future NASA explorers may find on distant planets, moons and asteroids.

For more information on the 2015 Human Exploration Rover Challenge and registration, visit http://go.nasa.gov/14dikMF.

Follow the Rover Challenge on social media for the latest news and updates:
https://www.facebook.com/roverchallenge?ref=hl
https://twitter.com/RoverChallenge
http://instagram.com/nasa_marshall.

View images from the 2014 Rover Challenge at http://go.nasa.gov/1iEjGRp.

International teams with questions about this event or registration may email Amy McDowell at Amy.McDowell@nasa.gov. U.S. teams with questions may contact Diedra Williams at MSFC-RoverChallenge2015@mail.nasa.gov.

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Engineering for You Video Contest 2

The National Academy of Engineering, or NAE, is launching the Engineering for You Video Contest 2, or E4U2.

Throughout history, engineering has advanced civilization from the way we connect with each other, to the way we heal, to how we get around and simply have fun. But society still faces major obstacles. The NAE has outlined 14 game-changing opportunities for the 21st century called the Grand Challenges for Engineering. Review the challenges and produce a one- to two-minute video showing how achieving one or more of the NAE Grand Challenges for Engineering will lead to a more sustainable, healthy, secure and/or joyous world.

The competition is open to all individuals or teams in the following competition categories:
— Middle school students and younger (grades K-8)
— High school students (grades 9-12)
— Tertiary education students (two-year college through graduate school, full or part time)
— The general public

The main prize is $25,000, and videos will be accepted through March 2, 2015.

For more information, visit http://www.nae.edu/e4u2/.

Questions about the E4U2 Video Contest should be directed to E4Uvideocontest@nae.edu.

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2015 NASA Office of Education — Aeronautics Undergraduate Scholarship

NASA’s Office of Education is accepting applications for the for the Aeronautics Undergraduate Scholarship, or AUS, program. The Aeronautics Undergraduate Scholarship is for individuals pursuing or planning to pursue undergraduate studies leading to an Associate’s or a Bachelor’s degree in areas related to aeronautics. These scholarships are directed toward enhancing the state of aeronautics for the nation, transforming the nation’s air transportation system, and developing the knowledge, tools, and technologies to support future air and space vehicles.

Eligible students include freshmen, sophomores and juniors at the undergraduate level. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or nationals. The scholarship includes 75% of tuition up to $9,000 academic scholarship, based on tuition amount, and $6,000 for a summer internship.

Applications are due March 31, 2015.

Applications should be submitted through the NASA One Stop Shopping Initiative at http://intern.nasa.gov. Applicants should be sure to select “scholarship” for the type of application.

Questions about the 2015 Aeronautics Undergraduate Scholarship opportunity should be emailed to NASA.ASP2015@nasaprs.com.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — Jan. 8, 2015

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations
Available While Supplies Last

White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics Unveils New Federal Agency Opportunity Bank
Audience: Institutions and Organizations Supporting Hispanic Education

Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: Jan. 8, 2015, at 5 p.m. EST

2015 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge
Audience: 9-12 & Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Deadline for International Teams: Jan. 9, 2015
Registration Deadline for U.S. Teams: Feb. 6, 2015

2015 RASC-AL Aerospace Concepts Design Competition
Audience: Higher Education Students
Proposal Deadline: Jan. 11, 2015

2014-2015 NASA Goddard OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Challenge
Audience: Grade 3-12 Students
Registration Deadline: Jan. 12, 2015

Free Program — Cubes in SpaceTM
Audience: Middle and High School Educators and Students
Registration Deadline: Jan. 12, 2015

Apply for the 2015 Summer NASA Academies — Webinar
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Webinar Date: Jan. 15, 2015, at 3 p.m. EST

Museum Alliance Webcast — Space Launch System: America’s New Rocket
Audience: Museum Professionals and Informal Educators
Event Date: Jan. 15, 2015, at 4 p.m. EST

NASA’s ESTEEM “Ask US” Online Professional Development Series
Audience: K-12 Educators
Next Event Date: Jan. 15, 2015, at 4:30 p.m. EST

Call for NEXT GEN Plenary: 66th International Astronautical Congress
Audience: Full-time Graduate Students
Submission Deadline: Jan. 15, 2015

National Science Foundation’s Community College Innovation Challenge
Audience: Teams of Community College Students and Faculty Mentors
Entry Deadline: Jan. 15, 2015

NOAA “Marine Debris Prevention Through Education and Outreach” Federal Funding Opportunity
Audience: Higher Education Institutions
Application Deadline: Jan. 15, 2015

2015 Alan Shepard Technology in Education Award
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: Jan. 16, 2015

Free Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series
Audience: All Educators and 9-Higher Education Students
Next Lecture Date: Jan. 24, 2014, at 5:15 p.m. EST

DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2014 NASA EONS Solicitation New Appendix
Audience: Minority Universities
Proposal Deadline: Jan. 30, 2015

2015 NOAA Undergraduate Scholarship
Audience: Rising Junior Undergraduate Students at Minority Serving Institutions
Application Deadline: Jan. 30, 2015

U.S. National Park Service’s Young Leaders in Climate Change — Summer 2015 Internships
Audience: Graduate and Undergraduate Students
Application Deadline: Jan. 30, 2015

NASA History Program Office Summer and Fall 2015 Internships
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Summer 2015 Application Deadline: Feb. 1, 2015
Fall 2015 Application Deadline: June 1, 2015

NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowships Program Accepting Proposals for 2015-2016 Academic Year
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Proposal Deadline: Feb. 2, 2014

2015 Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 2, 2015

Mosaics in Science Program
Audience: Undergraduate Students Ages 18-35 Years Old
Application Deadline: Feb. 3, 2015

2015 Space Exploration Educators Conference
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Date: Feb. 5-7, 2015

Call for Papers: Fourth Annual International Space Station Research and Development Conference
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Abstract Submission Deadline: March 2, 2015

NASA Robotic Mining Competition 2015
Audience: Higher Education Educators & Students
Event Date: May 18-22, 2015

NASA’s Cube Quest Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Proposal Due Date: Multiple Deadlines Through 2018

Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

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Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles Available for Educational Use

NASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions and museums to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles and other special items offered on a first-come, first-served basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

There will be a nominal shipping fee that must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.

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White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics Unveils New Federal Agency Opportunity Bank

In order to increase Hispanic participation in all levels of government and in funding opportunities, the Federal Agency Opportunity Bank collects information from the Federal Interagency Working Group on Educational Excellence for Hispanics about the vast number of opportunities and investments supporting all youth, local and state agencies, nonprofits and other organizations supporting Hispanic educational excellence.

Opportunities include but are not limited to federal employment, fellowships, internships, grant and peer review opportunities, and technical assistance workshops. In addition, there is information regarding partnerships, resources and tools, and federal award nominations. The Opportunity Bank will be updated quarterly with information from participating federal agencies. The goal is to continue highlighting opportunities and investments supporting all youth, local and state agencies, nonprofits and other organizations supporting Hispanic educational excellence. Users are encouraged to share this resource with their networks and congratulate agencies for their efforts on behalf of the Latino community.

To view the Opportunity Bank, visit http://www.ed.gov/edblogs/hispanic-initiative/federal-agency-opportunity-bank/.

Questions about this resource should be directed to whieeh@ed.gov.

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Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

NASA Educator Professional Development is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources to bring NASA into your classroom.

NASA Rockets 2 Racecars
Audience:
Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: Jan. 8, 2015, at 5 p.m. EST
Participants will learn about the NASA Rockets 2 Racecars program that offers opportunities for professional development at race tracks on the East Coast. Learn about the different NASA spinoffs related to car racing and how to participate at the Atlanta Motor Speedway on March 1, 2015.

Magnetospheric Multiscale Mathematics
Audience:
Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-8
Event Date: Jan. 8, 2015, at 6:30 p.m. EST
Participants will learn about the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission set to launch in March 2015 and the mathematics-based educator guide associated with the mission. Participants will learn about the mission, get an overview of the lesson activities and engage in discussion about classroom implementation.

For more information about these webinars and to register online, visit https://paragon-tec.adobeconnect.com/admin/show-event-catalog.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Clarence Jones at Clarence.F.Jones@NASA.gov.

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2015 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge

NASA has opened team registration for the 2015 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge. Organized by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, the event will be held April 16-18, 2015, at the U.S. Space & Rocket Center, also in Huntsville.

The challenge engages high school, college and university students in hands-on, experiential learning activities, while also testing potential technologies needed for future deep space exploration. Both U.S. and international teams may register to participate. For U.S. teams, registration closes Feb. 6, 2015. Registration for international teams closes Jan. 9, 2015.

Student teams participating in the Rover Challenge must design, engineer and test a human-powered rover on a mock course designed to simulate the harsh and demanding terrains future NASA explorers may find on distant planets, moons and asteroids.

For more information on the 2015 Human Exploration Rover Challenge and registration, visit http://go.nasa.gov/14dikMF.

Follow the Rover Challenge on social media for the latest news and updates:
https://www.facebook.com/roverchallenge?ref=hl
https://twitter.com/RoverChallenge
http://instagram.com/nasa_marshall.

View images from the 2014 Rover Challenge at http://go.nasa.gov/1iEjGRp.

International teams with questions about this event or registration may email Amy McDowell at Amy.McDowell@nasa.gov. U.S. teams with questions may contact Diedra Williams at MSFC-RoverChallenge2015@mail.nasa.gov.

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2015 RASC-AL Aerospace Concepts Design Competition

NASA and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2015 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts-Academic Linkage, or RASC-AL, Aerospace Concepts competition. RASC-AL is a design project competition for university-level engineering students and faculty.

The 2015 RASC-AL contest challenges participants to design projects based on real NASA problems, responding to one of four themes:
— Earth-Independent Mars Pioneering Architecture
— Earth-Independent Lunar Pioneering Architecture
— Mars’ Moons Prospector Mission
— Large-Scale Mars Entry, Decent and Landing Pathfinder Mission

Concepts derived from the design projects could potentially be implemented by NASA.

Teams must submit an abstract for their proposed project by Jan. 11, 2015. The RASC-AL Steering Committee of NASA and industry experts will evaluate the proposals and select as many as 11 undergraduate and five graduate teams to compete against each other at a forum in June 2015 in Florida.

The RASC-AL competition is open to full-time undergraduate or graduate students majoring in engineering or science at an accredited university. University design teams must include one faculty or industry advisor with a university affiliation and two or more undergraduate or graduate students. A group of universities may also collaborate on a design project entry. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

For more information about this competition, visit http://nianet.org/RASCAL.

If you have questions about this competition, please contact Stacy Dees at stacy.dees@nianet.org or Shelley Spears at Shelley.Spears@nianet.org.

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2014-2015 NASA Goddard OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Challenge

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center is launching the 2014-2015 TRANSFORMERS OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Challenge, hosted by the Innovative Technology Partnerships Office. The purpose of the challenge is to raise awareness of NASA’s Technology Transfer Program and to inspire interest in all NASA missions, programs and projects.

This year the scope of the contest is being expanded to include two challenges. In the first challenge, students in grades 3-12 are asked to submit a video describing their favorite NASA Goddard spinoff. In a new twist, participants in this year′s contest must also use the engineering design process to develop and propose a new spinoff application of their own for the technology. Spinoffs are technologies originally created for space and modified into everyday products used on Earth. Examples include memory foam, invisible braces and scratch-resistant lenses for eyeglasses.

The second challenge, the TRANSFORMERS OPTIMUS PRIME InWorld Challenge, offers students in grades 6-12 an opportunity to take their video spinoff ideas to another level. Interested teams must study James Webb Space Telescope spinoff technology and post their completed spinoff videos for review by college engineering students. Engineering college mentors will select 20 teams to continue the collaborative design process within a multiuser virtual world to build a 3-D model of the team′s design solutions.

Winning students from each grade category will be invited to Goddard to participate in a behind-the-scenes workshop, attend a VIP awards ceremony and meet actor Peter Cullen, the voice of OPTIMUS PRIME.

The deadline to register and upload videos is Jan. 12, 2015.

For more information, visit http://itpo.gsfc.nasa.gov/optimus/.

Questions about this contest should be directed to Darryl Mitchell at Darryl.R.Mitchell@nasa.gov.

TRANSFORMERS and OPTIMUS PRIME are trademarks of Hasbro and are used with permission. © 2014 Hasbro. All rights reserved.

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Free Program — Cubes in SpaceTM

idoodlelearning™ is offering two flight opportunities as part of the Cubes in Space program. A free science, technology, engineering, the arts and mathematics, or STEAM, program for students ages 11-18, Cubes in Space provides opportunities for students to design and compete to launch experiments into space. 

In partnership with Colorado Space Grant Consortium as part of the RockSat-C program, experiments will be launched via a sounding rocket from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility, Wallops Island, Virginia, in late June 2015. This opportunity is open to U.S. and international students 11-14 years of age.

Through partnership with NASA Langley Research Center, a second flight opportunity is offered on a zero-pressure scientific balloon to be launched from Ft. Sumner, New Mexico, in September 2015. The Science Missions Directorate Astrophysics division manages the NASA scientific balloon program; Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia oversees Balloon Flight Operations. This opportunity is open to students 11-18 years of age who are U.S. citizens.

Using formal or informal learning environments, students and educators will learn about the methodology for taking an idea from design through the review process. Throughout the experience, students will acquire key 21st century skills necessary for success in a highly connected, global society.

The deadline for program registration is Jan. 12, 2015.

For more information, visit http://www.CubesInSpace.com.

Questions about this program should be directed to info@cubesinspace.com.

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Apply for the 2015 Summer NASA Academies — Webinar

The NASA Minority Innovation Challenges Institute, or MICI, is hosting a special webinar on Jan. 15, 2015, at 3 p.m. EST, which will provide undergraduate students details on how they can apply for admission into a 2015 NASA Summer Academy. The NASA Academy is not a 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. summer research internship program. It is a rigorous, immersive 10-week experience that will challenge the participants and push them outside their comfort zones. It offers interns an intense learning experience. The NASA Academies at NASA centers have different areas of focus, including space, aerospace, robotics, aeronautics and propulsion.

The NASA Academy curriculum combines a valuable research experience with a residential leadership development experience. Academy participants, known as research associates, or RAs, spend four days per week working full time on an individual research project with a NASA scientist or engineer, called their principal investigator. These projects offer a challenging learning experience in which the RAs do hands-on research side by side with their mentors. Projects are typically cutting-edge topics that teach the RAs about the latest in NASA research and development. The RAs demonstrate the progress of their research in the annual Intern Poster Expo. The academies conclude with final oral presentations and a graduate ceremony.

To sign up for this webinar, and gain access to MICI’s other free webinars, visit http://nasamici.com/upcoming-sessions.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Mary Baker at mary@nasamici.com.

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Museum Alliance Webcast — Space Launch System: America’s New Rocket

NASA’s Digital Learning Network and the Space Launch System team invite you to participate in an interactive webcast featuring NASA engineer Steve Creech on Jan. 15, 2015, at 4 p.m. EST.

In this presentation, Creech will webcast live from NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. His presentation will focus on America’s next heavy-lift launch vehicle, the Space Launch System, or SLS. He will also answer questions from webcast viewers around the country.

NASA’s Space Launch System is an advanced, heavy-lift launch vehicle that will provide an entirely new capability for science and human exploration beyond Earth’s orbit. The SLS will give the United States a safe, affordable and sustainable means of extending beyond our current limits and open new doors of discovery from the unique vantage point of space.

Questions may be submitted prior to and during the event via dlinfochannel@gmail.com.

You may view the webcast as an individual at your personal computer, or set up audio visual equipment in your museum or school for a large group to participate.

To view the webcast, visit http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-dlinfo.

To learn more about the SLS visit www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/.

After the webcast, presentation materials will be posted on the Museum Alliance member site at https://informal.jpl.nasa.gov/museum/Conversations. A downloadable copy of the webcast and transcript will be posted a week or so later at the same location. Username and password are required to access the member site.

To learn how to become a Museum Alliance member, visit https://informal.jpl.nasa.gov/museum/About.

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NASA’s ESTEEM “Ask US” Online Professional Development Series

NASA’s Minority University Research and Education Program, or MUREP, is sponsoring a series of Google Plus Hangout professional development events for K-12 educators. The Earth Systems, Technology and Energy Education for MUREP, or ESTEEM, team will lead monthly sessions covering a variety of climate topics. This month’s webinar topic is:

Communicating Climate Change: Mind the Gap — Jan. 15, 2015, at 4:30 p.m. EST
Although 97 percent of active climate scientists agree that the earth is warming due to human activities, some polls have found that only 44 percent of Americans share this view. As an educator, you are likely to encounter people who have received information that conflicts with the accepted climate science. This session will help you better understand Americans’ perceptions of climate change and provide tips for better communicating climate science.

Certificates of professional development hours are available upon request.

For more information on this event and upcoming webinar sessions, visit https://nice.larc.nasa.gov/asknice/. Questions about this series should be sent to Bonnie Murray at bonnie.murray@nasa.gov.

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Call for NEXT GEN Plenary: 66th International Astronautical Congress

Is your work found in Kibo, Columbus, Destiny or another International Space Station module? Have you been a key player in an experiment, research project or other hardware on the space station? How has your work with the space station benefited humankind in space or on Earth?

We want to hear what you are doing on or through the International Space Station that will change the future for humans in space and on Earth. As today’s 21 to 35 year olds, you will be the senior engineers, principal investigators and mission managers who will be carrying out and leading the exploration of space in the future. Why wait 10 years to be heard? We want your input now! We invite you to share your ideas in a plenary panel with an audience of senior space leaders in government, industry and academia at the International Astronautical Congress, or IAC, in Jerusalem, Israel, Oct. 12-16, 2015.

This is a wonderful opportunity for you to address and possibly influence the international space community. We are proposing a plenary event with a panel of six 21 to 35 year olds in a discussion of their innovative utilization of the International Space Station. If approved, this event will take place the week of Oct. 12-16, 2015, in Jerusalem, Israel, at the IAC (www.iafastro.com). The plenary participants will engage in a panel discussion and interact with the audience while discussing their research, experiments and engineering contributions to the future of humankind through the International Space Station. The session will be moderated in a format similar to a talk show, interweaving clips from the panelists’ audition videos with questions and comments from the moderator, other panelists and the audience. The video clips will be used to enhance the audience’s understanding of the ideas of the panel participants. This is an exciting opportunity that you do not want to miss!

This sounds great!  What do I need to do to participate?

Round One: 15 Seconds of Fame!
By Jan. 15, 2015, create a 15-second video telling us briefly the subject of the innovative space station research you are conducting or currently working on that you would speak about on the panel and why you should be chosen to address the IAC, and post it on http://www.youtube.com. We will only watch/listen for 15 seconds, so be sure to watch the time of your video. Then complete the application at http://tinyurl.com/NextGenPlenary2015.

Round Two: Three Minutes!
The International Astronautical Federation, or IAF, will select the second round of candidates from those submitting the 15-second videos and notify all entrants by Feb. 1, 2015. Specific details of round two requirements will be sent to the candidates in the notification. Selected candidates will be asked to create and post a three-minute video on a specified YouTube site by March 1, 2015.

Video Details:
Please record your video in a high-quality audio and video format. If you are selected as a panelist, segments of your videos will be used to promote and during the plenary. Please limit special effects, scene changes and music. The video is about you, not your video editing skills. Please do not use copyrighted video, images or music.

Final Selection:
The IAF will select the finalists from these entries based on their creativity, efficacy of messages and relevance to the plenary topics. We will be looking for concrete ideas on what you are doing on the International Space Station that will change the way humans explore and how it will impact life on Earth and why this idea is important, as well as your expertise in this area.

The IAF will make the final selection of plenaries for the IAC in Jerusalem the week of March 23, 2015, and will notify the finalists of its decision by April 3, 2015.

Who Will Sponsor Me to Travel to Jerusalem?
Plenary participants will be responsible for finding a sponsor or sponsors for their travel to and accommodations at the IAC.
In addition to the obvious sources of sponsorship — your employer or school, and industry contacts — we want to share with you some great programs for students and young professionals that occur in conjunction with the 2015 Jerusalem IAC. The following are all distinct programs related to the IAC but are not directly related to this opportunity.

— IAF Emerging Space Leaders Grant Programme: Visit http://www.iafastro.org/emerging-space-leaders-esl-grant-programme-announcement/ for more info.

— Candidates are encouraged to contact the Space Generation Advisory Committee, or SGAC, concerning the plans for the SGAC event prior to the IAC in Jerusalem and associated sponsorship opportunities. Visit www.spacegeneration.org for more information.

— Students in Europe, Japan and the United States are encouraged to contact the European Space Agency, the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency and NASA, respectively, to apply to the space agencies’ student programs at the IAC in Jerusalem.

— The Future Space Leaders Foundation offers grants to students and young professionals in the United States. More information can be found at http://www.futurespaceleaders.org/about.html.

Questions about this opportunity should be emailed to Kevin Stube at kevin@spaceaffairs.com.

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National Science Foundation’s Community College Innovation Challenge

The National Science Foundation’s Community College Innovation Challenge is underway and seeking teams to propose innovative science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, -based solutions for real-world problems. Teams must comprise community college students, a faculty mentor and a community or industry partner.

Challenge entries consist of two components: a written entry and a video entry. Each team’s entry must address one of the five themes outlined by the National Science Foundation. This year’s themes are Big Data, Infrastructure Security, Sustainability, Broadening Participation in STEM and Improving STEM Education.

Finalist teams will be invited to attend an Innovation Boot Camp, a professional development workshop on innovation and entrepreneurship.

The entry submission deadline is Jan. 15, 2015.

For additional information about the challenge, visit http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/communitycollege/.

Questions about this challenge should be directed to InnovationChallenge@nsf.gov.

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NOAA “Marine Debris Prevention Through Education and Outreach” Federal Funding Opportunity

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Marine Debris Program, or NOAA MDP, is offering a federal funding opportunity called “Marine Debris Prevention Through Education and Outreach.”

The NOAA MDP seeks to fund projects that will lead to the prevention of marine debris in marine and coastal environments through the implementation of dedicated education and outreach activities. Projects awarded through this grant competition are expected to educate the public about marine debris through activities including, but not limited to, the following:

1. Encouraging changes in behavior to address marine debris.

2. Developing, using, and disseminating tools, products and campaigns to improve efforts to address marine debris.

3. Engaging the public in active, personal participation (e.g., a small-scale shoreline cleanup with students or other hands-on activities, etc.).

While the anticipated range of federal funding available per award is approximately $20,000 to $100,000, projects typically receive between $30,000 and $60,000. Eligible applicants include: U.S. institutions of higher education; nonprofit organizations; commercial (for-profit) organizations; and state, local and tribal governments. Applications from federal agencies or employees of federal agencies will not be considered. International organizations are not eligible.

To download the official Federal Funding Opportunity along with complete eligibility requirements, please visit Grants Online at http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=270188.

The deadline for applications to this funding opportunity is 11:59:59 p.m. EST on Jan. 15, 2015. Applications must be submitted online via www.grants.gov.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Alison Hammer Weingast at Alison.Hammer@noaa.gov.

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2015 Alan Shepard Technology in Education Award

Do you know K-12 teachers or district-level administrators who are making a difference in education through the use of technology? Recognize their achievements by nominating them for the Alan Shepard Technology in Education Award. The Astronauts Memorial Foundation, in partnership with NASA and the Space Foundation, will recognize the accomplishments of one outstanding individual and his or her contributions to lifelong learning through the application of technology in the classroom or in the professional development of teachers.

Technology personnel and K-12 classroom teachers who have demonstrated exemplary use of technology to enhance learning in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, are eligible for this award. School principals, superintendents or associate superintendents may nominate eligible candidates. The award will be presented in April 2015 at the Space Foundation’s 31st Space Symposium in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The deadline for applications is Jan. 16, 2015.

Applications and more information are available online at http://www.astronautsmemorial.org/alan-shepard-award.html .

Questions about this award should be directed to amfreg@amfcse.org.

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Free Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series

Curious about icy bodies in the outer reaches of our solar system, the effects of space junk on deep-space observation, the latest discoveries about the origins of the universe and new ways galaxy formation is mapped? Come to the Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series presented by Smithsonian researchers who are exploring the sun, the moon, planets, stars, galaxies and the universe. These speakers will share behind-the-scenes details about how their research is done and about technologies that advance new discoveries. The lectures will be held at the Albert Einstein Planetarium at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.

Each lecture begins at 5:15 p.m. EST and is followed by a Q&A session. Stay after the lecture to visit the museum’s observatory, weather permitting.

Jan. 24, 2015 — Observing the Origin of the Universe From the South Pole
After three years of observing from the South Pole, scientists may have found confirmation that the universe underwent a burst of inflationary growth at the time of the Big Bang. Cosmologist Colin Bischoff will discuss these findings as well as the excitement of astronomy from Antarctica.

Feb. 21, 2015 — Tracing the Structure of the Universe With Galaxy Surveys
Studies of galaxy formation and cosmology have exploded in recent years due to the immense data obtained from large galaxy surveys. Postdoctoral fellow Cameron McBride will discuss how observational data and theory are combined to better understand fundamental questions in our universe, and will highlight some exciting results from ongoing research.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/lectures/smithsonian-stars/.

Questions about this lecture series should be directed to the visitor service line at 202-633-2214.

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DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2014 NASA EONS Solicitation New Appendix

NASA’s Office of Education is accepting new proposals under the Education Opportunities in NASA STEM, or EONS, 2014 NASA Research Announcement for the Minority University Research and Education Program, or MUREP, Institutional Research Opportunity, or MIRO appendix. This effort was previously titled as the NASA University Research Centers Project, and has now been consolidated into the MUREP Program within the NASA Office of Education.

Through the EONS omnibus solicitation, the opportunity MIRO has been released. Through MIRO awards, NASA aims to promote science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM literacy and to enhance and sustain the capability of minority serving institutions to perform NASA-related research and education, which directly support NASA’s four mission directorates — Aeronautics Research, Human Exploration and Space Operations, Science, and Space Technology.

The deadline for proposals has been extended to Jan. 30, 2015.

For more information regarding the MIRO solicitation, please visit the NASA EONS page on the NASA Solicitation and Proposal Integrated Review and Proposal System, or NSPIRES, website at: http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId=%7bB6C61D04-5793-EF52-3497-1AA57FA424A5%7d&path=open.

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2015 NOAA Undergraduate Scholarship

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA, is accepting applications for its 2015 Educational Partnership Program, or EPP, Undergraduate Scholarship Program. The EPP Undergraduate Scholarship Program provides scholarships for two years of undergraduate study to rising junior undergraduate students majoring in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields that directly support NOAA’s mission.

Participants receive total awards valued at up to $35,000 in total support during their junior and senior years. During the first summer, scholars complete a nine-week paid summer internship at NOAA in Silver Spring, Maryland. During the second summer, scholars complete paid internships at NOAA facilities across the country. A stipend and housing allowance is provided. At the end of both summer internships, students present the results of their projects at an education and science symposium in Silver Spring.

Students attending an accredited Minority Serving Institution within the United States or U.S. Territories as defined by the U.S. Department of Education (Hispanic Serving Institutions, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tribal Colleges and Universities, Alaskan-Native Serving Institutions, and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions) are eligible to apply for the program. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and must earn and maintain a minimum 3.2 grade point average on a 4.0 scale.

Applications are due Jan. 30, 2015.

For more information and to submit an online application, visit http://www.epp.noaa.gov/ssp_undergrad_page.html.

Questions about this scholarship opportunity should be directed to EPP.USP@noaa.gov.

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U.S. National Park Service’s Young Leaders in Climate Change — Summer 2015 Internships

The George Melendez Wright Initiative for Young Leaders in Climate Change, or YLCC, builds a pathway for exemplary students in higher education to apply cutting-edge climate change knowledge to park management. The program provides paid summer internships to highly accomplished graduate and upper-level undergraduate students to work on diverse issues related to climate change and its effects in national parks. Participants gain valuable work experience, explore career options and develop leadership skills under the mentorship and guidance of the National Park Service.

The program features structured projects in one or more of the following interdisciplinary areas: climate change science and monitoring; resource conservation and adaptation; policy development; sustainable park operations; facilities adaptation; and communication/interpretation/education. Interns who successfully complete the YLCC will be eligible to be hired noncompetitively into subsequent federal jobs once they complete their degree programs. These jobs would be in the Department of Interior, National Park Service or one of the other bureaus within the Department of Interior. An intern must qualify for the job in order to be hired noncompetitively.

Internships are full-time positions (40 hours/week) lasting 11-12 weeks. Interns are paid $14/hour plus benefits, and are employees of the University of Washington. Most positions come with free or subsidized housing in dormitories or other shared accommodations in parks. Internships offer rigorous and challenging projects that demand high-level academic knowledge and skills, allowing interns considerable autonomy and opportunity for leadership under an effective mentor.

The application deadline is 12:01 pm PST on Jan. 30, 2015.

For additional information and to apply for a YLCC internship, visit http://parksclimateinterns.org/.

Questions about this program should be directed to Tim Watkins at climate_change@nps.gov.

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NASA History Program Office Summer and Fall 2015 Internships

The NASA History Program Office is seeking undergraduate and graduate students for summer and fall 2015 internships. The History Program Office maintains archival materials to answer research questions from NASA personnel, journalists, scholars, students at all levels and others from around the world. The division also edits and publishes several books and monographs each year. It maintains a large number of websites on NASA history.

Students of all majors are welcome to apply. While detailed prior knowledge of the aeronautics and space fields is not necessary, a keen interest and some basic familiarity with these topics are needed. Strong research, writing and editing skills are essential. Experience with social media is a plus.

Intern projects are flexible. Typical projects include handling a variety of information requests, writing posts for the NASA history Twitter and Facebook pages, editing historical manuscripts, doing research and writing biographical sketches, and identifying and captioning photos.

Applications for summer 2015 internships are due Feb. 1, 2015. Fall 2015 internship applications are due June 1, 2015.

For more information, visit http://history.nasa.gov/interncall.htm.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please contact Bill Barry at bill.barry@nasa.gov.

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NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowships Program Accepting Proposals for 2015-2016 Academic Year

The NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, or NESSF, is soliciting applications from accredited U.S. universities on behalf of individuals pursuing master’s or doctoral degrees in earth and space sciences, or related disciplines, for the 2015-2016 academic year. The purpose of NESSF is to ensure continued training of a highly qualified workforce in disciplines needed to achieve NASA’s scientific goals. Awards resulting from the competitive selection will be training grants to the respective universities, with the advisor serving as the principal investigator. The financial support for the NESSF program comes from the Science Mission Directorate’s four science divisions: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Planetary Science and Astrophysics.

Initially, NESSF awards are made for one year. They may be renewed for up to two additional years, contingent upon satisfactory progress (as reflected in academic performance, research progress and recommendation by the faculty advisor) and the availability of funds.

The maximum amount of a NESSF award is $30,000 per year.

Proposals for this opportunity are due Feb. 2, 2015.

For more information about this solicitation, visit http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId={B6CDCEA6-8EDD-A48A-FAF8-E588F66661C3}&path=open.

Questions about Earth Science Research NESSF opportunities should be directed to Claire Macaulay at Claire.I.Macaulay@nasa.gov.

Questions about Heliophysics Research, Planetary Science Research and Astrophysics Research opportunities should be directed to Dolores Holland at hq-nessf-Space@nasa.gov.

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2015 Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program

The Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program, or PGGURP, pairs qualified undergraduate students with NASA-funded investigators at research locations across the U.S. for eight weeks during the summer. Students will spend the summer at the NASA scientists’ home institutions. Selected students receive a cost-of-living stipend and compensation for housing and travel.

Undergraduate students majoring in geology or related sciences are eligible to apply. Students graduating in 2015 who have not started graduate school yet are also eligible. Preference is given to U.S. citizens and permanent residents.

Applications are due Feb. 2, 2015.

For more information, visit http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/~tgregg/pggurp_homepage.html.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please email Robyn Wagner, PGGURP administrator, at pggurp@buffalo.edu.

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Mosaics in Science Program

The Mosaics in Science program was developed by the National Park Service, in partnership with the Geological Society of America, to increase diversity among those who seek science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, careers within the National Park Service.

Participants will spend 11 weeks working on a STEM project in a national park. After completing their projects, participants travel to the District of Columbia to participate in a career workshop that provides opportunities to present their work, learn about how to apply for a federal job, and meet National Park Service staff and management.

Twenty-six positions will be offered in 2015. Participants will receive a stipend of $4,000, and housing and travel costs are also covered. Applications are due Feb. 3, 2015.

To be eligible, applicants must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States between 18 and 35 years old who attend or recently graduated from an undergraduate institution, or are in the early stages of their career. Interested students must be nominated by an organization partnering with the program. Students from groups historically underrepresented in STEM fields are strongly encouraged to seek nomination. These groups include but are not limited to African-American, American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian, Hispanic, Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander, and persons with disabilities.

For additional information on the Mosaics in Science program and to see a list of partner organizations eligible to nominate students, visit http://rock.geosociety.org/mosaics/. For an overview of the Mosaics in Science Program, see: http://nature.nps.gov/geology/mosaics/index.cfm.

Questions about the program should be directed to Lisa Norby at lisa_norby@nps.gov. Questions on program eligibility and how to apply for a position should be directed to Matt Dawson at mdawson@geosociety.org.

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2015 Space Exploration Educators Conference

Make plans to attend the 21st Annual Space Exploration Educators Conference, to be held Feb. 5-7, 2015, at Space Center Houston. This conference is for all K-12 educators. Activities presented use space-related themes to teach across the curricula and can be used for science, language arts, mathematics, history and more.

Attend sessions hosted by scientists and engineers working on the International Space Station, Mars exploration and the planets beyond. Hear from astronauts who will be leading the charge in exploration. Attend sessions presented by educators and receive ready-to-implement classroom ideas. Attendees can earn up to 24 hours of continuing professional education credit.

For more information, visit http://spacecenter.org/education-programs/teacher-programs/teachers-seec/.

Please email any questions about the conference to seec@spacecenter.org.

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Call for Papers: Fourth Annual International Space Station Research and Development Conference

The fourth annual International Space Station Research and Development Conference will be held July 7-9, 2015, at the Marriott Copley Hotel in Boston, Massachusetts. NASA, the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space and the American Astronomical Society are seeking abstracts under the categories of biology and medicine, human health in space, commercialization and nongovernment utilization, materials development, plant science, remote sensing/Earth and space observation, energy, technology development and demonstration, and science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, education. Topics should relate to science, exploration and technology activities (past, present, planned or under development) on the International Space Station.

Due to the large number of expected submissions, presenters are encouraged to submit abstracts early; the deadline is March 2, 2015.

For more information about the conference and how to submit an abstract for consideration, visit http://www.issconference.org/.

Questions about this opportunity should be submitted via http://www.issconference.org/#contactus.

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NASA Robotic Mining Competition 2015

The Sixth Annual NASA Robotic Mining Competition will be held at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center May 18-22, 2015. NASA’s Robotic Mining Competition is for university-level students, enrolled in a U.S. college or university. Teams are challenged to design and build a mining robot that can traverse the simulated Martian chaotic terrain, excavate Martian regolith and deposit the regolith into a collector bin within 10 minutes. There is particular relevance to NASA’s recently announced mission to find an asteroid by 2016 and then bring it to cislunar space. NASA will directly benefit from the competition by encouraging the development of innovative excavation concepts from universities, which may result in ideas and solutions that could be applied to an actual excavation device or payload.

The winning team will receive the Joe Kosmo Award for Excellence trophy, KSC launch invitations, team certificates for each member and a monetary team scholarship. Awards for other categories include monetary team scholarships, a school trophy or plaque, team and individual certificates, and KSC launch invitations.

Design teams must include at least one college or university faculty member and at least two undergraduate or graduate students. NASA has not set an upper limit on team members. A team should have a sufficient number of members to successfully operate their mining robot. Teams will compete in up to five major competition categories, including onsite mining, systems engineering paper, outreach project, slide presentation and demonstration (optional) and team spirit (optional).

Registration opened on Sept. 3, 2014, and is limited to 50 teams.

For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/centers/kennedy/technology/nasarmc.html.

Follow the NASA Robotic Mining Competition on Twitter at https://twitter.com/NASARMC.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Bethanné Hull at Bethanne.Hull@nasa.gov.

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NASA’s Cube Quest Challenge

Registration now is open for NASA’s Cube Quest Challenge, advancing communication and propulsion technologies for CubeSats. This is the agency’s first in-space competition and offers the agency’s largest-ever prize purse.

Competitors have a shot at a share of $5 million in prize money and an opportunity to participate in space exploration and technology development. Competitors can compete for a chance at flying their very own CubeSat to the moon and beyond as secondary payload on the first integrated flight of NASA’s Orion spacecraft and Space Launch System, or SLS, or launch their satellite using an independent launch provider.

Challenge objectives include designing, building and launching flight-qualified, small satellites capable of advanced operations near and beyond the moon. The challenge and prize purse are divided into three major areas:

– Ground Tournaments: $500,000 in the four qualifying ground tournaments to determine who will have the ability to fly on the first SLS flight;
– Deep Space Derby: $1.5 million purse for demonstrating communication and CubeSat durability at a distance greater than almost 2.5 million miles (4,000,000 km), 10 times the distance from the Earth to the moon; and
– Lunar Derby: $3 million purse for demonstrating the ability to place a CubeSat in a stable lunar orbit and demonstrate communication and durability near the moon.

The Cube Quest Challenge seeks to develop and test subsystems necessary to perform deep space exploration using small spacecraft. Advancements in small spacecraft capabilities will provide benefits to future missions and also may enable new mission scenarios, including future investigations of near-Earth asteroids.

All teams may compete in any one of the four ground tournaments. Teams that rate high on mission safety and probability of success will receive incremental awards. The ground tournaments, or GT, will be held every four to six months, and participation in GT4 is required to earn a secondary payload spot on SLS.

Teams must register at least 30 days prior to the ground tournament in which they plan to participate. Check the Cube Quest Challenge website for updates on when tournaments will take place.

The Lunar Derby focuses primarily on propulsion for small spacecraft and near-Earth communications, while the Deep Space Derby focuses on finding innovative solutions to deep space communications using small spacecraft. Together, these competitions will contribute to opening deep space exploration to nongovernment spacecraft.

For more information on the Cube Quest Challenge, visit http://www.nasa.gov/cubequest.

To learn more about NASA’s challenges and citizen science efforts, visit http://www.nasa.gov/solve.

Please direct any questions about the Cube Quest Challenge to James Cockrell at james.j.cockrell@nasa.gov.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — Dec. 30, 2014

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations
Available While Supplies Last

2014-2015 FIRST Robotic Competitions
Audience: K-12 Educators and Students
Kick-off Event: Jan. 3, 2015

2015 NASA and Worcester Polytechnic Institute Sample Return Robot Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Deadline: 11:59 pm EST Jan. 6, 2015

2015 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge
Audience: 9-12 & Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Deadline for International Teams: Jan. 9, 2015
Registration Deadline for U.S. Teams: Feb. 6, 2015

2015 RASC-AL Aerospace Concepts Design Competition
Audience: Higher Education Students
Proposal Deadline: Jan. 11, 2015

2014-2015 NASA Goddard OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Challenge
Audience: Grade 3-12 Students
Registration Deadline: Jan. 12, 2015

Free Program — Cubes in SpaceTM
Audience: Middle and High School Educators and Students
Registration Deadline: Jan. 12, 2015

Apply for the 2015 Summer NASA Academies — Webinar
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Webinar Date: Jan. 15, 2015

NASA’s ESTEEM “Ask US” Online Professional Development Series
Audience: K-12 Educators
Next Event Date: Jan. 15, 2015, at 4:30 p.m. EST

National Science Foundation’s Community College Innovation Challenge
Audience: Teams of Community College Students and Faculty Mentors
Entry Deadline: Jan. 15, 2015

NOAA “Marine Debris Prevention Through Education and Outreach” Federal Funding Opportunity
Audience: Higher Education Institutions
Application Deadline: Jan. 15, 2015

2015 Alan Shepard Technology in Education Award
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: Jan. 16, 2015

Free Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series
Audience: All Educators and 9-Higher Education Students
Next Lecture Date: Jan. 24, 2014, at 5:15 p.m. EST

DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2014 NASA EONS Solicitation New Appendix
Audience: Minority Universities
Proposal Deadline: Jan. 30, 2015

2015 NOAA Undergraduate Scholarship
Audience: Rising Junior Undergraduate Students at Minority Serving Institutions
Application Deadline: Jan. 30, 2015

Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

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Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles Available for Educational Use

NASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions and museums to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles and other special items offered on a first-come, first-served basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

There will be a nominal shipping fee that must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.

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2014-2015 FIRST Robotic Competitions

The FIRST Robotics Competition challenges teams of young people and their mentors to create a robot designed to solve a common problem in a six-week timeframe. Teams experience the entire engineering life cycle while building robots to compete in games that change every year. FIRST Robotics Competition teams are composed of high school students, with professional engineers acting as mentors. Additional FIRST programs are available for students of ages 6-18.

FIRST is a national organization founded in 1989 by inventor Dean Kamen in Manchester, New Hampshire, to inspire young people to pursue careers in science and technical fields.

The FRC Kickoff, the official start of the FIRST Robotics Competition design-and-build season, is set for Jan. 3, 2015. Teams have the opportunity to meet at local kickoff events to compare notes, get ideas, make friends, find mentoring teams, learn the game, pick up the Kit of Parts and get geared up for the exciting competition season. To find kickoff events in your area, visit http://www.usfirst.org/roboticsprograms/frc/kickoff.

For more information about FIRST Robotics and to register your team to participate, visit http://www.usfirst.org/.

Questions about FIRST Robotics should be submitted via http://www.usfirst.org/contactform.

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2015 NASA and Worcester Polytechnic Institute Sample Return Robot Challenge

NASA and the Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Worcester, Massachusetts, are seeking teams to compete in a robot technology demonstration competition with a potential $1.5 million prize purse.

During the Sample Return Robot Challenge, teams will compete to demonstrate a robot that can locate and retrieve geologic samples from a wide and varied terrain without human control. The objective of the competition is to encourage innovations in automatic navigation and robotic manipulator technologies. Innovations stemming from this challenge may improve NASA’s capability to explore a variety of destinations in space, as well as enhance the nation’s robotic technology for use in industries and applications on Earth.

The competition is planned for June 8-13, 2015, in Worcester, and is anticipated to attract hundreds of competitors from industry and academia nationwide.

Registration is open until Jan. 6, 2015.

For more information about the Sample Return Robot Challenge and to register online for the competition, visit http://challenge.wpi.edu.

The Centennial Challenges program is part of NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate, which is innovating, developing, testing and flying hardware for use in NASA’s future missions. For more information about NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate, visit http://www.nasa.gov/spacetech.

Questions about the Sample Return Robot Challenge should be sent to challenge@wpi.edu.

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2015 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge

NASA has opened team registration for the 2015 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge. Organized by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, the event will be held April 16-18, 2015, at the U.S. Space & Rocket Center, also in Huntsville.

The challenge engages high school, college and university students in hands-on, experiential learning activities, while also testing potential technologies needed for future deep space exploration. Both U.S. and international teams may register to participate. For U.S. teams, registration closes Feb. 6, 2015. Registration for international teams closes Jan. 9, 2015.

Student teams participating in the Rover Challenge must design, engineer and test a human-powered rover on a mock course designed to simulate the harsh and demanding terrains future NASA explorers may find on distant planets, moons and asteroids.

For more information on the 2015 Human Exploration Rover Challenge and registration, visit http://go.nasa.gov/14dikMF.

Follow the Rover Challenge on social media for the latest news and updates:
https://www.facebook.com/roverchallenge?ref=hl
https://twitter.com/RoverChallenge
http://instagram.com/nasa_marshall.

View images from the 2014 Rover Challenge at http://go.nasa.gov/1iEjGRp.

International teams with questions about this event or registration may email Amy McDowell at Amy.McDowell@nasa.gov. U.S. teams with questions may contact Diedra Williams at MSFC-RoverChallenge2015@mail.nasa.gov.

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2015 RASC-AL Aerospace Concepts Design Competition

NASA and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2015 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts-Academic Linkage, or RASC-AL, Aerospace Concepts competition. RASC-AL is a design project competition for university-level engineering students and faculty.

The 2015 RASC-AL contest challenges participants to design projects based on real NASA problems, responding to one of four themes:
— Earth-Independent Mars Pioneering Architecture
— Earth-Independent Lunar Pioneering Architecture
— Mars’ Moons Prospector Mission
— Large-Scale Mars Entry, Decent and Landing Pathfinder Mission

Concepts derived from the design projects could potentially be implemented by NASA.

Teams must submit an abstract for their proposed project by Jan. 11, 2015. The RASC-AL Steering Committee of NASA and industry experts will evaluate the proposals and select as many as 11 undergraduate and five graduate teams to compete against each other at a forum in June 2015 in Florida.

The RASC-AL competition is open to full-time undergraduate or graduate students majoring in engineering or science at an accredited university. University design teams must include one faculty or industry advisor with a university affiliation and two or more undergraduate or graduate students. A group of universities may also collaborate on a design project entry. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

For more information about this competition, visit http://nianet.org/RASCAL.

If you have questions about this competition, please contact Stacy Dees at stacy.dees@nianet.org or Shelley Spears at Shelley.Spears@nianet.org.

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2014-2015 NASA Goddard OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Challenge

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center is launching the 2014-2015 TRANSFORMERS OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Challenge, hosted by the Innovative Technology Partnerships Office. The purpose of the challenge is to raise awareness of NASA’s Technology Transfer Program and to inspire interest in all NASA missions, programs and projects.

This year the scope of the contest is being expanded to include two challenges. In the first challenge, students in grades 3-12 are asked to submit a video describing their favorite NASA Goddard spinoff. In a new twist, participants in this year′s contest must also use the engineering design process to develop and propose a new spinoff application of their own for the technology. Spinoffs are technologies originally created for space and modified into everyday products used on Earth. Examples include memory foam, invisible braces and scratch-resistant lenses for eyeglasses.

The second challenge, the TRANSFORMERS OPTIMUS PRIME InWorld Challenge, offers students in grades 6-12 an opportunity to take their video spinoff ideas to another level. Interested teams must study James Webb Space Telescope spinoff technology and post their completed spinoff videos for review by college engineering students. Engineering college mentors will select 20 teams to continue the collaborative design process within a multiuser virtual world to build a 3-D model of the team′s design solutions.

Winning students from each grade category will be invited to Goddard to participate in a behind-the-scenes workshop, attend a VIP awards ceremony and meet actor Peter Cullen, the voice of OPTIMUS PRIME.

The deadline to register and upload videos is Jan. 12, 2015.

For more information, visit http://itpo.gsfc.nasa.gov/optimus/.

Questions about this contest should be directed to Darryl Mitchell at Darryl.R.Mitchell@nasa.gov.

TRANSFORMERS and OPTIMUS PRIME are trademarks of Hasbro and are used with permission. © 2014 Hasbro. All rights reserved.

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Free Program — Cubes in SpaceTM

idoodlelearning™ is offering two flight opportunities as part of the Cubes in Space program. A free science, technology, engineering, the arts and mathematics, or STEAM, program for students ages 11-18, Cubes in Space provides opportunities for students to design and compete to launch experiments into space. 

In partnership with Colorado Space Grant Consortium as part of the RockSat-C program, experiments will be launched via a sounding rocket from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility, Wallops Island, Virginia, in late June 2015. This opportunity is open to U.S. and international students 11-14 years of age.

Through partnership with NASA Langley Research Center, a second flight opportunity is offered on a zero-pressure scientific balloon to be launched from Ft. Sumner, New Mexico, in September 2015. The Science Missions Directorate Astrophysics division manages the NASA scientific balloon program; Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia oversees Balloon Flight Operations. This opportunity is open to students 11-18 years of age who are U.S. citizens.

Using formal or informal learning environments, students and educators will learn about the methodology for taking an idea from design through the review process. Throughout the experience, students will acquire key 21st century skills necessary for success in a highly connected, global society.

The deadline for program registration is Jan. 12, 2015.

For more information, visit http://www.CubesInSpace.com.

Questions about this program should be directed to info@cubesinspace.com.

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Apply for the 2015 Summer NASA Academies — Webinar

The NASA Minority Innovation Challenges Institute, or MICI, is hosting a special webinar on Jan. 15, 2015, at 3 p.m. EST, which will provide undergraduate students details on how they can apply for admission into a 2015 NASA Summer Academy. The NASA Academy is not a 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. summer research internship program. It is a rigorous, immersive 10-week experience that will challenge the participants and push them outside their comfort zones. It offers interns an intense learning experience. The NASA Academies at NASA centers have different areas of focus, including space, aerospace, robotics, aeronautics and propulsion.

The NASA Academy curriculum combines a valuable research experience with a residential leadership development experience. Academy participants, known as research associates, or RAs, spend four days per week working full time on an individual research project with a NASA scientist or engineer, called their principal investigator. These projects offer a challenging learning experience in which the RAs do hands-on research side by side with their mentors. Projects are typically cutting-edge topics that teach the RAs about the latest in NASA research and development. The RAs demonstrate the progress of their research in the annual Intern Poster Expo. The academies conclude with final oral presentations and a graduate ceremony.

To sign up for this webinar, and gain access to MICI’s other free webinars, visit http://nasamici.com/upcoming-sessions.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Mary Baker at mary@nasamici.com.

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NASA’s ESTEEM “Ask US” Online Professional Development Series

NASA’s Minority University Research and Education Program, or MUREP, is sponsoring a series of Google Plus Hangout professional development events for K-12 educators. The Earth Systems, Technology and Energy Education for MUREP, or ESTEEM, team will lead monthly sessions covering a variety of climate topics. This month’s webinar topic is:

Communicating Climate Change: Mind the Gap — Jan. 15, 2015, at 4:30 p.m. EST
Although 97 percent of active climate scientists agree that the earth is warming due to human activities, some polls have found that only 44 percent of Americans share this view. As an educator, you are likely to encounter people who have received information that conflicts with the accepted climate science. This session will help you better understand Americans’ perceptions of climate change and provide tips for better communicating climate science.

Certificates of professional development hours are available upon request.

For more information on this event and upcoming webinar sessions, visit https://nice.larc.nasa.gov/asknice/. Questions about this series should be sent to Bonnie Murray at bonnie.murray@nasa.gov.

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National Science Foundation’s Community College Innovation Challenge

The National Science Foundation’s Community College Innovation Challenge is underway and seeking teams to propose innovative science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, -based solutions for real-world problems. Teams must comprise community college students, a faculty mentor and a community or industry partner.

Challenge entries consist of two components: a written entry and a video entry. Each team’s entry must address one of the five themes outlined by the National Science Foundation. This year’s themes are Big Data, Infrastructure Security, Sustainability, Broadening Participation in STEM and Improving STEM Education.

Finalist teams will be invited to attend an Innovation Boot Camp, a professional development workshop on innovation and entrepreneurship.

The entry submission deadline is Jan. 15, 2015.

For additional information about the challenge, visit http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/communitycollege/.

Questions about this challenge should be directed to InnovationChallenge@nsf.gov.

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NOAA “Marine Debris Prevention Through Education and Outreach” Federal Funding Opportunity

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Marine Debris Program, or NOAA MDP, is offering a federal funding opportunity called “Marine Debris Prevention Through Education and Outreach.”

The NOAA MDP seeks to fund projects that will lead to the prevention of marine debris in marine and coastal environments through the implementation of dedicated education and outreach activities. Projects awarded through this grant competition are expected to educate the public about marine debris through activities including, but not limited to, the following:

1. Encouraging changes in behavior to address marine debris.

2. Developing, using, and disseminating tools, products and campaigns to improve efforts to address marine debris.

3. Engaging the public in active, personal participation (e.g., a small-scale shoreline cleanup with students or other hands-on activities, etc.).

While the anticipated range of federal funding available per award is approximately $20,000 to $100,000, projects typically receive between $30,000 and $60,000. Eligible applicants include: U.S. institutions of higher education; nonprofit organizations; commercial (for-profit) organizations; and state, local and tribal governments. Applications from federal agencies or employees of federal agencies will not be considered. International organizations are not eligible.

To download the official Federal Funding Opportunity along with complete eligibility requirements, please visit Grants Online at http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=270188.

The deadline for applications to this funding opportunity is 11:59:59 p.m. EST on Jan. 15, 2015. Applications must be submitted online via www.grants.gov.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Alison Hammer Weingast at Alison.Hammer@noaa.gov.

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2015 Alan Shepard Technology in Education Award

Do you know K-12 teachers or district-level administrators who are making a difference in education through the use of technology? Recognize their achievements by nominating them for the Alan Shepard Technology in Education Award. The Astronauts Memorial Foundation, in partnership with NASA and the Space Foundation, will recognize the accomplishments of one outstanding individual and his or her contributions to lifelong learning through the application of technology in the classroom or in the professional development of teachers.

Technology personnel and K-12 classroom teachers who have demonstrated exemplary use of technology to enhance learning in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, are eligible for this award. School principals, superintendents or associate superintendents may nominate eligible candidates. The award will be presented in April 2015 at the Space Foundation’s 31st Space Symposium in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The deadline for applications is Jan. 16, 2015.

Applications and more information are available online at http://www.astronautsmemorial.org/alan-shepard-award.html .

Questions about this award should be directed to amfreg@amfcse.org.

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Free Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series

Curious about icy bodies in the outer reaches of our solar system, the effects of space junk on deep-space observation, the latest discoveries about the origins of the universe and new ways galaxy formation is mapped? Come to the Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series presented by Smithsonian researchers who are exploring the sun, the moon, planets, stars, galaxies and the universe. These speakers will share behind-the-scenes details about how their research is done and about technologies that advance new discoveries. The lectures will be held at the Albert Einstein Planetarium at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.

Each lecture begins at 5:15 p.m. EST and is followed by a Q&A session. Stay after the lecture to visit the museum’s observatory, weather permitting.

Jan. 24, 2015 — Observing the Origin of the Universe From the South Pole
After three years of observing from the South Pole, scientists may have found confirmation that the universe underwent a burst of inflationary growth at the time of the Big Bang. Cosmologist Colin Bischoff will discuss these findings as well as the excitement of astronomy from Antarctica.

Feb. 21, 2015 — Tracing the Structure of the Universe With Galaxy Surveys
Studies of galaxy formation and cosmology have exploded in recent years due to the immense data obtained from large galaxy surveys. Postdoctoral fellow Cameron McBride will discuss how observational data and theory are combined to better understand fundamental questions in our universe, and will highlight some exciting results from ongoing research.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/lectures/smithsonian-stars/.

Questions about this lecture series should be directed to the visitor service line at 202-633-2214.

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DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2014 NASA EONS Solicitation New Appendix

NASA’s Office of Education is accepting new proposals under the Education Opportunities in NASA STEM, or EONS, 2014 NASA Research Announcement for the Minority University Research and Education Program, or MUREP, Institutional Research Opportunity, or MIRO appendix. This effort was previously titled as the NASA University Research Centers Project, and has now been consolidated into the MUREP Program within the NASA Office of Education.

Through the EONS omnibus solicitation, the opportunity MIRO has been released. Through MIRO awards, NASA aims to promote science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM literacy and to enhance and sustain the capability of minority serving institutions to perform NASA-related research and education, which directly support NASA’s four mission directorates — Aeronautics Research, Human Exploration and Space Operations, Science, and Space Technology.

The deadline for proposals has been extended to Jan. 30, 2015.

For more information regarding the MIRO solicitation, please visit the NASA EONS page on the NASA Solicitation and Proposal Integrated Review and Proposal System, or NSPIRES, website at: http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId=%7bB6C61D04-5793-EF52-3497-1AA57FA424A5%7d&path=open.

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2015 NOAA Undergraduate Scholarship

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA, is accepting applications for its 2015 Educational Partnership Program, or EPP, Undergraduate Scholarship Program. The EPP Undergraduate Scholarship Program provides scholarships for two years of undergraduate study to rising junior undergraduate students majoring in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields that directly support NOAA’s mission.

Participants receive total awards valued at up to $35,000 in total support during their junior and senior years. During the first summer, scholars complete a nine-week paid summer internship at NOAA in Silver Spring, Maryland. During the second summer, scholars complete paid internships at NOAA facilities across the country. A stipend and housing allowance is provided. At the end of both summer internships, students present the results of their projects at an education and science symposium in Silver Spring.

Students attending an accredited Minority Serving Institution within the United States or U.S. Territories as defined by the U.S. Department of Education (Hispanic Serving Institutions, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tribal Colleges and Universities, Alaskan-Native Serving Institutions, and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions) are eligible to apply for the program. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and must earn and maintain a minimum 3.2 grade point average on a 4.0 scale.

Applications are due Jan. 30, 2015.

For more information and to submit an online application, visit http://www.epp.noaa.gov/ssp_undergrad_page.html.

Questions about this scholarship opportunity should be directed to EPP.USP@noaa.gov.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — Dec. 18, 2014

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations
Available While Supplies Last

New Diversity Tool Available from MissionSTEM — Unconscious Bias in STEM: Addressing the Challenges
Audience: Higher Education Faculty and Informal Educators

Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: Dec. 18, 2014, at 4:30 p.m. EST

2015 NASA High-Altitude Student Platform Opportunity
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: Dec. 19, 2014

SOFIA Airborne Astronomy Ambassador Program
Audience: K-14 Teachers and Informal Educators
Application Deadline: Dec. 22, 2014

Historical NASA Space Artifacts Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations
Request Deadline: Dec. 22, 2014

Nominate a White House Champion of Change for Climate Education and Literacy
Audience: All Educators
Nomination Deadline: Dec. 23, 2014

2014-2015 FIRST Robotic Competitions
Audience: K-12 Educators and Students
Kick-off Event: Jan. 3, 2015

2015 NASA and Worcester Polytechnic Institute Sample Return Robot Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Deadline: 11:59 pm EST Jan. 6, 2015

2015 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge
Audience: 9-12 & Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Deadline for International Teams: Jan. 9, 2015
Registration Deadline for U.S. Teams: Feb. 6, 2015

2015 RASC-AL Aerospace Concepts Design Competition
Audience: Higher Education Students
Proposal Deadline: Jan. 11, 2015

2014-2015 NASA Goddard OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Challenge
Audience: Grade 3-12 Students
Registration Deadline: Jan. 12, 2015

Free Program — Cubes in SpaceTM
Audience: Middle and High School Educators and Students
Registration Deadline: Jan. 12, 2015

National Science Foundation’s Community College Innovation Challenge
Audience: Teams of Community College Students and Faculty Mentors
Entry Deadline: Jan. 15, 2015

NOAA “Marine Debris Prevention Through Education and Outreach” Federal Funding Opportunity
Audience: Higher Education Institutions
Application Deadline: Jan. 15, 2015

2015 Alan Shepard Technology in Education Award
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: Jan. 16, 2015

Free Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series
Audience: All Educators and 9-Higher Education Students
Next Lecture Date: Jan. 24, 2014, at 5:15 p.m. EST

DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2014 NASA EONS Solicitation New Appendix
Audience: Minority Universities
Proposal Deadline: Jan. 30, 2015

2015 NOAA Undergraduate Scholarship
Audience: Rising Junior Undergraduate Students at Minority Serving Institutions
Application Deadline: Jan. 30, 2015

NASA History Program Office Summer and Fall 2015 Internships
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Summer 2015 Application Deadline: Feb. 1, 2015
Fall 2015 Application Deadline: June 1, 2015

NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowships Program Accepting Proposals for 2015-2016 Academic Year
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Proposal Deadline: Feb. 2, 2014

2015 Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 2, 2015

2015 NASA Student Airborne Research Program
Audience: Undergraduate Students Currently in Their Junior Year
Application Deadline: Feb. 5, 2015

2015 Space Exploration Educators Conference
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Date: Feb. 5-7, 2015

2015-16 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Undergraduate STEM Research Scholarship
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 9, 2015

2015-16 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Graduate STEM Research Fellowship
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 9, 2015

Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

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Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles Available for Educational Use

NASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions and museums to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles and other special items offered on a first-come, first-served basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

There will be a nominal shipping fee that must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.

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New Diversity Tool Available from MissionSTEM — Unconscious Bias in STEM: Addressing the Challenges

On behalf of NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden, the agency’s Office of Diversity and Equal Opportunity is pleased to announce exciting new content available on the MissionSTEM website. The newest civil rights technical assistance tool for science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, grantees is titled “Unconscious Bias in STEM: Addressing the Challenges.” This tool is designed to provide STEM program administrators, faculty, staff and students with a better understanding and appreciation of the ways in which unconscious bias can impact the STEM environment, as well as fresh perspectives on how to avoid the pitfalls of such bias and maintain compliance with the law. The tool is also designed to support equal opportunity compliance officials, such as Title IX coordinators, in their efforts to help ensure equal opportunities and to advance diversity and inclusion in STEM programs.

To view the tool, visit http://missionstem.nasa.gov/eLearn.html.

NASA’s Office of Diversity and Equal Opportunity hope you find these materials helpful in your continuing efforts to advance equal opportunity compliance and diversity and inclusion at your respective institutions. We invite you to offer your questions or commentary at http://missionstem.nasa.gov/ask.html, or to register for the MissionSTEM mailing list at http://missionstem.nasa.gov/index.html in lower left corner.

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Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

NASA Educator Professional Development is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources to bring NASA into your classroom.

NASA STEM Power With Matter and Energy: Middle School and Beyond
Audience:
Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-8
Event Date: Dec. 18, 2014, at 4:30 p.m. EST
Participants will explore the NASA Beginning Engineering Science and Technology, or BEST, Next Generation Activity Guide. This guide features activities that challenge students to design a storage container to keep spacecraft propellant cold and a transfer system to move propellant from one container to another.

Solar System and the Periodic Table
Audience:
Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: Dec. 18, 2014, at 7 p.m. EST
Participants will learn about our solar system and how it relates to the periodic table of elements. This standards-based workshop will teach you basic principles of what the table represents using our solar system as an exciting basis for understanding.

NASA STEM Power With Matter and Energy: High School and Beyond
Audience:
Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 9-12
Event Date: Dec. 22, 2014, at 4:30 p.m. EST
Participants will explore the “Gaining Traction on Mars” guide, which challenges students to work in engineering design teams to create and test various wheel designs and materials to see which would perform best in a Martian environment.

For more information about these webinars and to register online, visit https://paragon-tec.adobeconnect.com/admin/show-event-catalog.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Clarence Jones at Clarence.F.Jones@NASA.gov.

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2015 NASA High-Altitude Student Platform Opportunity

NASA is accepting applications from students at U.S. colleges and universities who want to send experiments to the edge of space on a high-flying scientific balloon.

The annual NASA project provides near-space access for 12 undergraduate and graduate student experiments to be carried by a NASA high-altitude research balloon. The flights typically last 15 to 20 hours and reach an altitude of 23 miles. Experiments may include compact satellites or prototypes.

The experiments are flown aboard the High-Altitude Student Platform, or HASP, a balloon-born instrument stack launched from the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility’s remote site in Fort Sumner, New Mexico. The goals of the project are to provide a space test platform to encourage student research and stimulate the development of student satellite payloads and other space-engineering products.

HASP seeks to enhance the technical skills and research abilities of students in critical science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines. The project is a joint effort between NASA and the Louisiana Space Consortium. The Science Missions Directorate Astrophysics division manages the NASA scientific balloon program; Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia oversees Balloon Flight Operations.

The deadline for applications is Dec. 19, 2014.

For application information and technical details about the program, visit http://laspace.lsu.edu/hasp.

Questions about the High-Altitude Student Platform opportunity should be directed to T. Gregory Guzik at guzik@phunds.phys.lsu.edu.

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SOFIA Airborne Astronomy Ambassador Program

NASA’s Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, or SOFIA, is a 747SP aircraft carrying a 2.5 meter-diameter telescope. The SOFIA project is now accepting applications for the Cycle 3 — 2015 Airborne Astronomy Ambassadors, or AAA, program. The AAA program is an exciting and unique opportunity for teams of two educators to receive online astronomy instruction and a trip to NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in California to participate in two SOFIA science flights. The science flights offer educators interaction with astronomers, engineers and technicians aboard the aircraft and a view to the collaboration that leads to astronomical data collection and the research papers that follow.

One team member must be a science teacher; the other team member may be a teacher, informal educator or amateur astronomer. The eligibility and program requirements are detailed at http://www.seti.org/sofia. The program pays all costs.

Applications are due Dec. 22, 2014.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Pamela Harman at pharman@seti.org.

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Historical NASA Space Artifacts Available for Educational Use

NASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions, museums and other organizations to screen and request historical artifacts of significance to spaceflight. This is the 24th screening of artifacts since 2009.

Eligible schools, universities, museums, libraries and planetariums may view the artifacts and request specific items through Dec. 22, 2014. Online registrations should include an assigned Department of Education number. Registration also may be made through the requester’s State Agency for Surplus Property office. For instructions, to register and to view and request artifacts online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/NASAWel.htm.

The artifacts are free of charge and are offered “as-is.” Organizations must cover shipping costs and any handling fees. Shipping fees on smaller items will be relatively inexpensive; however, larger items may involve extensive disassembly, preparation, shipping and reassembly costs. NASA will work closely with eligible organizations to address any unique handling costs.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.

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Nominate a White House Champion of Change for Climate Education and Literacy

Communities across the United States are working to advance understanding of climate variability and change. Leaders inside and outside of government are helping to increase science-based understanding and awareness of current and future climate change, enhancing climate literacy in K-12 classrooms, on college and university campuses, and in parks and museums across the country. There has been tremendous progress to date, but there is still more work to be done.

A climate-literate workforce will be required for tomorrow’s community leaders, city planners, and entrepreneurs to have the information, knowledge, and training to make sound choices and grow businesses in the context of a changing climate. That’s why on Dec. 3, 2014, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy launched the Climate Education and Literacy Initiative, focused on connecting Americans of all ages with the best-available, science-based information about climate change. This initiative builds upon a Call to Action around climate education and literacy that received nearly 150 submissions from schools, communities, individuals, and organizations across the country. These responses demonstrated the magnitude and diversity of efforts underway and articulated ideas for future action.

Today, we’re asking you to help us identify and honor local leaders who are taking action to enhance understanding of climate change as Champions of Change for Climate Education and Literacy. These extraordinary leaders will be invited to the White House to celebrate their accomplishments and amplify their work to promote climate education and literacy as a critical step toward building an educated, next-generation American workforce that grasps the climate change challenge and is equipped to seek and implement solutions.

Please submit nominations by midnight EST on Tuesday, Dec. 23, 2014. Nominees may include the following types of individuals:

–Educators who serve as leaders in promoting and integrating best-available climate science into their classrooms.

–Outstanding students who demonstrate a high proficiency in climate knowledge and skills and leadership both inside and outside of the classroom.

–Young scientists who are advancing understanding of climate impacts and solutions.

–Leaders from organizations that are developing high-quality, science-based tools, resources, and other learning opportunities for students of all ages.

–Individuals from place-based institutions (zoos, parks, aquaria, museums, etc.) that are effectively engaging visitors around climate change.

–Business leaders taking action to enhance understanding and awareness around climate change.

Click on the link below to submit your nomination (be sure to choose Climate Education and Literacy in the “Theme of Service” field of the nomination form):

http://www.whitehouse.gov/champions/nominate

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Laura Petes via email at Laura_E_Petes@ostp.eop.gov.

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2014-2015 FIRST Robotic Competitions

The FIRST Robotics Competition challenges teams of young people and their mentors to create a robot designed to solve a common problem in a six-week timeframe. Teams experience the entire engineering life cycle while building robots to compete in games that change every year. FIRST Robotics Competition teams are composed of high school students, with professional engineers acting as mentors. Additional FIRST programs are available for students of ages 6-18.

FIRST is a national organization founded in 1989 by inventor Dean Kamen in Manchester, New Hampshire, to inspire young people to pursue careers in science and technical fields.

The FRC Kickoff, the official start of the FIRST Robotics Competition design-and-build season, is set for Jan. 3, 2015. Teams have the opportunity to meet at local kickoff events to compare notes, get ideas, make friends, find mentoring teams, learn the game, pick up the Kit of Parts and get geared up for the exciting competition season. To find kickoff events in your area, visit http://www.usfirst.org/roboticsprograms/frc/kickoff.

For more information about FIRST Robotics and to register your team to participate, visit http://www.usfirst.org/.

Questions about FIRST Robotics should be submitted via http://www.usfirst.org/contactform.

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2015 NASA and Worcester Polytechnic Institute Sample Return Robot Challenge

NASA and the Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Worcester, Massachusetts, are seeking teams to compete in a robot technology demonstration competition with a potential $1.5 million prize purse.

During the Sample Return Robot Challenge, teams will compete to demonstrate a robot that can locate and retrieve geologic samples from a wide and varied terrain without human control. The objective of the competition is to encourage innovations in automatic navigation and robotic manipulator technologies. Innovations stemming from this challenge may improve NASA’s capability to explore a variety of destinations in space, as well as enhance the nation’s robotic technology for use in industries and applications on Earth.

The competition is planned for June 8-13, 2015, in Worcester, and is anticipated to attract hundreds of competitors from industry and academia nationwide.

Registration is open until Jan. 6, 2015.

For more information about the Sample Return Robot Challenge and to register online for the competition, visit http://challenge.wpi.edu.

The Centennial Challenges program is part of NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate, which is innovating, developing, testing and flying hardware for use in NASA’s future missions. For more information about NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate, visit http://www.nasa.gov/spacetech.

Questions about the Sample Return Robot Challenge should be sent to challenge@wpi.edu.

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2015 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge

NASA has opened team registration for the 2015 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge. Organized by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, the event will be held April 16-18, 2015, at the U.S. Space & Rocket Center, also in Huntsville.

The challenge engages high school, college and university students in hands-on, experiential learning activities, while also testing potential technologies needed for future deep space exploration. Both U.S. and international teams may register to participate. For U.S. teams, registration closes Feb. 6, 2015. Registration for international teams closes Jan. 9, 2015.

Student teams participating in the Rover Challenge must design, engineer and test a human-powered rover on a mock course designed to simulate the harsh and demanding terrains future NASA explorers may find on distant planets, moons and asteroids.

For more information on the 2015 Human Exploration Rover Challenge and registration, visit http://go.nasa.gov/14dikMF.

Follow the Rover Challenge on social media for the latest news and updates:
https://www.facebook.com/roverchallenge?ref=hl
https://twitter.com/RoverChallenge
http://instagram.com/nasa_marshall.

View images from the 2014 Rover Challenge at http://go.nasa.gov/1iEjGRp.

International teams with questions about this event or registration may email Amy McDowell at Amy.McDowell@nasa.gov. U.S. teams with questions may contact Diedra Williams at MSFC-RoverChallenge2015@mail.nasa.gov.

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2015 RASC-AL Aerospace Concepts Design Competition

NASA and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2015 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts-Academic Linkage, or RASC-AL, Aerospace Concepts competition. RASC-AL is a design project competition for university-level engineering students and faculty.

The 2015 RASC-AL contest challenges participants to design projects based on real NASA problems, responding to one of four themes:
— Earth-Independent Mars Pioneering Architecture
— Earth-Independent Lunar Pioneering Architecture
— Mars’ Moons Prospector Mission
— Large-Scale Mars Entry, Decent and Landing Pathfinder Mission

Concepts derived from the design projects could potentially be implemented by NASA.

Teams must submit an abstract for their proposed project by Jan. 11, 2015. The RASC-AL Steering Committee of NASA and industry experts will evaluate the proposals and select as many as 11 undergraduate and five graduate teams to compete against each other at a forum in June 2015 in Florida.

The RASC-AL competition is open to full-time undergraduate or graduate students majoring in engineering or science at an accredited university. University design teams must include one faculty or industry advisor with a university affiliation and two or more undergraduate or graduate students. A group of universities may also collaborate on a design project entry. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

For more information about this competition, visit http://nianet.org/RASCAL.

If you have questions about this competition, please contact Stacy Dees at stacy.dees@nianet.org or Shelley Spears at Shelley.Spears@nianet.org.

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2014-2015 NASA Goddard OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Challenge

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center is launching the 2014-2015 TRANSFORMERS OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Challenge, hosted by the Innovative Technology Partnerships Office. The purpose of the challenge is to raise awareness of NASA’s Technology Transfer Program and to inspire interest in all NASA missions, programs and projects.

This year the scope of the contest is being expanded to include two challenges. In the first challenge, students in grades 3-12 are asked to submit a video describing their favorite NASA Goddard spinoff. In a new twist, participants in this year′s contest must also use the engineering design process to develop and propose a new spinoff application of their own for the technology. Spinoffs are technologies originally created for space and modified into everyday products used on Earth. Examples include memory foam, invisible braces and scratch-resistant lenses for eyeglasses.

The second challenge, the TRANSFORMERS OPTIMUS PRIME InWorld Challenge, offers students in grades 6-12 an opportunity to take their video spinoff ideas to another level. Interested teams must study James Webb Space Telescope spinoff technology and post their completed spinoff videos for review by college engineering students. Engineering college mentors will select 20 teams to continue the collaborative design process within a multiuser virtual world to build a 3-D model of the team′s design solutions.

Winning students from each grade category will be invited to Goddard to participate in a behind-the-scenes workshop, attend a VIP awards ceremony and meet actor Peter Cullen, the voice of OPTIMUS PRIME.

The deadline to register and upload videos is Jan. 12, 2015.

For more information, visit http://itpo.gsfc.nasa.gov/optimus/.

Questions about this contest should be directed to Darryl Mitchell at Darryl.R.Mitchell@nasa.gov.

TRANSFORMERS and OPTIMUS PRIME are trademarks of Hasbro and are used with permission. © 2014 Hasbro. All rights reserved.

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Free Program — Cubes in SpaceTM

idoodlelearning™ is offering two flight opportunities as part of the Cubes in Space program. A free science, technology, engineering, the arts and mathematics, or STEAM, program for students ages 11-18, Cubes in Space provides opportunities for students to design and compete to launch experiments into space. 

In partnership with Colorado Space Grant Consortium as part of the RockSat-C program, experiments will be launched via a sounding rocket from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility, Wallops Island, Virginia, in late June 2015. This opportunity is open to U.S. and international students 11-14 years of age.

Through partnership with NASA Langley Research Center, a second flight opportunity is offered on a zero-pressure scientific balloon to be launched from Ft. Sumner, New Mexico, in September 2015. The Science Missions Directorate Astrophysics division manages the NASA scientific balloon program; Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia oversees Balloon Flight Operations. This opportunity is open to students 11-18 years of age who are U.S. citizens.

Using formal or informal learning environments, students and educators will learn about the methodology for taking an idea from design through the review process. Throughout the experience, students will acquire key 21st century skills necessary for success in a highly connected, global society.

The deadline for program registration is Jan. 12, 2015.

For more information, visit http://www.CubesInSpace.com.

Questions about this program should be directed to info@cubesinspace.com.

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National Science Foundation’s Community College Innovation Challenge

The National Science Foundation’s Community College Innovation Challenge is underway and seeking teams to propose innovative science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, -based solutions for real-world problems. Teams must comprise community college students, a faculty mentor and a community or industry partner.

Challenge entries consist of two components: a written entry and a video entry. Each team’s entry must address one of the five themes outlined by the National Science Foundation. This year’s themes are Big Data, Infrastructure Security, Sustainability, Broadening Participation in STEM and Improving STEM Education.

Finalist teams will be invited to attend an Innovation Boot Camp, a professional development workshop on innovation and entrepreneurship.

The entry submission deadline is Jan. 15, 2015.

For additional information about the challenge, visit http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/communitycollege/.

Questions about this challenge should be directed to InnovationChallenge@nsf.gov.

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NOAA “Marine Debris Prevention Through Education and Outreach” Federal Funding Opportunity

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Marine Debris Program, or NOAA MDP, is offering a federal funding opportunity called “Marine Debris Prevention Through Education and Outreach.”

The NOAA MDP seeks to fund projects that will lead to the prevention of marine debris in marine and coastal environments through the implementation of dedicated education and outreach activities. Projects awarded through this grant competition are expected to educate the public about marine debris through activities including, but not limited to, the following:

1. Encouraging changes in behavior to address marine debris.

2. Developing, using, and disseminating tools, products and campaigns to improve efforts to address marine debris.

3. Engaging the public in active, personal participation (e.g., a small-scale shoreline cleanup with students or other hands-on activities, etc.).

While the anticipated range of federal funding available per award is approximately $20,000 to $100,000, projects typically receive between $30,000 and $60,000. Eligible applicants include: U.S. institutions of higher education; nonprofit organizations; commercial (for-profit) organizations; and state, local and tribal governments. Applications from federal agencies or employees of federal agencies will not be considered. International organizations are not eligible.

To download the official Federal Funding Opportunity along with complete eligibility requirements, please visit Grants Online at http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=270188.

The deadline for applications to this funding opportunity is 11:59:59 p.m. EST on Jan. 15, 2015. Applications must be submitted online via www.grants.gov.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Alison Hammer Weingast at Alison.Hammer@noaa.gov.

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2015 Alan Shepard Technology in Education Award

Do you know K-12 teachers or district-level administrators who are making a difference in education through the use of technology? Recognize their achievements by nominating them for the Alan Shepard Technology in Education Award. The Astronauts Memorial Foundation, in partnership with NASA and the Space Foundation, will recognize the accomplishments of one outstanding individual and his or her contributions to lifelong learning through the application of technology in the classroom or in the professional development of teachers.

Technology personnel and K-12 classroom teachers who have demonstrated exemplary use of technology to enhance learning in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, are eligible for this award. School principals, superintendents or associate superintendents may nominate eligible candidates. The award will be presented in April 2015 at the Space Foundation’s 31st Space Symposium in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The deadline for applications is Jan. 16, 2015.

Applications and more information are available online at http://www.astronautsmemorial.org/alan-shepard-award.html .

Questions about this award should be directed to amfreg@amfcse.org.

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Free Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series

Curious about icy bodies in the outer reaches of our solar system, the effects of space junk on deep-space observation, the latest discoveries about the origins of the universe and new ways galaxy formation is mapped? Come to the Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series presented by Smithsonian researchers who are exploring the sun, the moon, planets, stars, galaxies and the universe. These speakers will share behind-the-scenes details about how their research is done and about technologies that advance new discoveries. The lectures will be held at the Albert Einstein Planetarium at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.

Each lecture begins at 5:15 p.m. EST and is followed by a Q&A session. Stay after the lecture to visit the museum’s observatory, weather permitting.

Jan. 24, 2015 — Observing the Origin of the Universe From the South Pole
After three years of observing from the South Pole, scientists may have found confirmation that the universe underwent a burst of inflationary growth at the time of the Big Bang. Cosmologist Colin Bischoff will discuss these findings as well as the excitement of astronomy from Antarctica.

Feb. 21, 2015 — Tracing the Structure of the Universe With Galaxy Surveys
Studies of galaxy formation and cosmology have exploded in recent years due to the immense data obtained from large galaxy surveys. Postdoctoral fellow Cameron McBride will discuss how observational data and theory are combined to better understand fundamental questions in our universe, and will highlight some exciting results from ongoing research.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/lectures/smithsonian-stars/.

Questions about this lecture series should be directed to the visitor service line at 202-633-2214.

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DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2014 NASA EONS Solicitation New Appendix

NASA’s Office of Education is accepting new proposals under the Education Opportunities in NASA STEM, or EONS, 2014 NASA Research Announcement for the Minority University Research and Education Program, or MUREP, Institutional Research Opportunity, or MIRO appendix. This effort was previously titled as the NASA University Research Centers Project, and has now been consolidated into the MUREP Program within the NASA Office of Education.

Through the EONS omnibus solicitation, the opportunity MIRO has been released. Through MIRO awards, NASA aims to promote science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM literacy and to enhance and sustain the capability of minority serving institutions to perform NASA-related research and education, which directly support NASA’s four mission directorates — Aeronautics Research, Human Exploration and Space Operations, Science, and Space Technology.

The deadline for proposals has been extended to Jan. 30, 2015.

For more information regarding the MIRO solicitation, please visit the NASA EONS page on the NASA Solicitation and Proposal Integrated Review and Proposal System, or NSPIRES, website at: http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId=%7bB6C61D04-5793-EF52-3497-1AA57FA424A5%7d&path=open .

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2015 NOAA Undergraduate Scholarship

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA, is accepting applications for its 2015 Educational Partnership Program, or EPP, Undergraduate Scholarship Program. The EPP Undergraduate Scholarship Program provides scholarships for two years of undergraduate study to rising junior undergraduate students majoring in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields that directly support NOAA’s mission.

Participants receive total awards valued at up to $35,000 in total support during their junior and senior years. During the first summer, scholars complete a nine-week paid summer internship at NOAA in Silver Spring, Maryland. During the second summer, scholars complete paid internships at NOAA facilities across the country. A stipend and housing allowance is provided. At the end of both summer internships, students present the results of their projects at an education and science symposium in Silver Spring.

Students attending an accredited Minority Serving Institution within the United States or U.S. Territories as defined by the U.S. Department of Education (Hispanic Serving Institutions, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tribal Colleges and Universities, Alaskan-Native Serving Institutions, and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions) are eligible to apply for the program. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and must earn and maintain a minimum 3.2 grade point average on a 4.0 scale.

Applications are due Jan. 30, 2015.

For more information and to submit an online application, visit http://www.epp.noaa.gov/ssp_undergrad_page.html.

Questions about this scholarship opportunity should be directed to EPP.USP@noaa.gov.

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NASA History Program Office Summer and Fall 2015 Internships

The NASA History Program Office is seeking undergraduate and graduate students for summer and fall 2015 internships. The History Program Office maintains archival materials to answer research questions from NASA personnel, journalists, scholars, students at all levels and others from around the world. The division also edits and publishes several books and monographs each year. It maintains a large number of websites on NASA history.

Students of all majors are welcome to apply. While detailed prior knowledge of the aeronautics and space fields is not necessary, a keen interest and some basic familiarity with these topics are needed. Strong research, writing and editing skills are essential. Experience with social media is a plus.

Intern projects are flexible. Typical projects include handling a variety of information requests, writing posts for the NASA history Twitter and Facebook pages, editing historical manuscripts, doing research and writing biographical sketches, and identifying and captioning photos.

Applications for summer 2015 internships are due Feb. 1, 2015. Fall 2015 internship applications are due June 1, 2015.

For more information, visit http://history.nasa.gov/interncall.htm.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please contact Bill Barry at bill.barry@nasa.gov.

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NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowships Program Accepting Proposals for 2015-2016 Academic Year

The NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, or NESSF, is soliciting applications from accredited U.S. universities on behalf of individuals pursuing master’s or doctoral degrees in earth and space sciences, or related disciplines, for the 2015-2016 academic year. The purpose of NESSF is to ensure continued training of a highly qualified workforce in disciplines needed to achieve NASA’s scientific goals. Awards resulting from the competitive selection will be training grants to the respective universities, with the advisor serving as the principal investigator. The financial support for the NESSF program comes from the Science Mission Directorate’s four science divisions: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Planetary Science and Astrophysics.

Initially, NESSF awards are made for one year. They may be renewed for up to two additional years, contingent upon satisfactory progress (as reflected in academic performance, research progress and recommendation by the faculty advisor) and the availability of funds.

The maximum amount of a NESSF award is $30,000 per year.

Proposals for this opportunity are due Feb. 2, 2015.

For more information about this solicitation, visit http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId={B6CDCEA6-8EDD-A48A-FAF8-E588F66661C3}&path=open.

Questions about Earth Science Research NESSF opportunities should be directed to Claire Macaulay at Claire.I.Macaulay@nasa.gov.

Questions about Heliophysics Research, Planetary Science Research and Astrophysics Research opportunities should be directed to Dolores Holland at hq-nessf-Space@nasa.gov.

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2015 Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program

The Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program, or PGGURP, pairs qualified undergraduate students with NASA-funded investigators at research locations across the U.S. for eight weeks during the summer. Students will spend the summer at the NASA scientists’ home institutions. Selected students receive a cost-of-living stipend and compensation for housing and travel.

Undergraduate students majoring in geology or related sciences are eligible to apply. Students graduating in 2015 who have not started graduate school yet are also eligible. Preference is given to U.S. citizens and permanent residents.

Applications are due Feb. 2, 2015.

For more information, visit http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/~tgregg/pggurp_homepage.html.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please email Robyn Wagner, PGGURP administrator, at pggurp@buffalo.edu.

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2015 NASA Student Airborne Research Program

The NASA Airborne Science Program invites highly motivated undergraduate students currently in their junior year to apply for the NASA Student Airborne Research Program, also known as SARP 2015. The program provides students with hands-on research experience in all aspects of a major scientific campaign, from detailed planning on how to achieve mission objectives to formal presentation of results and conclusions to peers and others. Students will assist in the operation of airborne instruments aboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft.

The program takes place in summer 2015. Instrument and flight preparations, and the research flights themselves, will occur at NASA′s Armstrong Flight Research Center in Palmdale, California. Post-flight data analysis and interpretation will take place at the University of California, Irvine.

Successful applicants will be awarded a stipend plus a travel and meals allowance for eight weeks of participation in the program. Housing and local transportation will also be provided.

The deadline for applications is Feb. 5, 2015.

For more information and to download the program application, visit http://www.nserc.und.edu/sarp/sarp-2015.

Specific questions about the program should be directed to SARP2015@nserc.und.edu.

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2015 Space Exploration Educators Conference

Make plans to attend the 21st Annual Space Exploration Educators Conference, to be held Feb. 5-7, 2015, at Space Center Houston. This conference is for all K-12 educators. Activities presented use space-related themes to teach across the curricula and can be used for science, language arts, mathematics, history and more.

Attend sessions hosted by scientists and engineers working on the International Space Station, Mars exploration and the planets beyond. Hear from astronauts who will be leading the charge in exploration. Attend sessions presented by educators and receive ready-to-implement classroom ideas. Attendees can earn up to 24 hours of continuing professional education credit.

For more information, visit http://spacecenter.org/education-programs/teacher-programs/teachers-seec/.

Please email any questions about the conference to seec@spacecenter.org.

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2015-16 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Undergraduate STEM Research Scholarship

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium is offering undergraduate research scholarships of up to $8,500 to encourage talented individuals to conduct research in science, technology, engineering or mathematics, or STEM, fields.

Applicants must participate in an active faculty-mentored research experience that aligns with the aerospace sector and meets NASA’s mission. Student stipends and research support totaling $4,000 during the academic year and $4,500 during a summer semester are available.

These one-year awards are nonrenewable and based on student academic merit, quality of the research proposal and alignment of research with the goals of NASA and the aerospace sector. Underrepresented minority students, female students and students with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and enrolled at one of the five Virginia Space Grant member universities: The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia and Virginia Tech.

The deadline for submitting applications is Feb. 9, 2015.

For more information, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/undergrad/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to rkashiri@odu.edu.

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2015-16 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Graduate STEM Research Fellowship

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium’s Graduate STEM Research Fellowship Program provides fellowships of $6,000 in add-on support to graduate students to supplement and enhance basic research support. The objective of this science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, research fellowship opportunity is to encourage talented individuals to pursue careers in STEM industries that support NASA’s mission.

Participants in the Graduate STEM Research Fellowship Program must take part in an active faculty‐mentored research experience that aligns with the aerospace sector and meets NASA’s mission. Awards are made annually and are renewable for one year for students making satisfactory academic and research progress.

This is a competitive fellowship program, and awards are based on merit recognizing high academic achievement and promise. Underrepresented minority students, female students and students with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and enrolled at one of the five Virginia Space Grant member universities: The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia and Virginia Tech.

The deadline for submitting applications is Feb. 9, 2015.

For more information about this opportunity and to apply online, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/gradfellow/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to kmanning@odu.edu.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — Dec. 11, 2014

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations
Available While Supplies Last

NASA Wavelength Resource Simplifies Teaching About the Solstice
Audience: All Educators

NASA’s ESTEEM “Ask US” Online Professional Development Series
Audience: K-12 Educators
Next Event Date: Dec. 11, 2014, at 4:30 p.m. EST

Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: Dec. 11, 2014, at 4:30 p.m. EST

Pre-Proposal Teleconference for NASA Research Announcement (NRA) Education Opportunities in NASA STEM (EONS) 2014 MUREP Institutional Research Opportunity (MIRO)
Audience: Minority Universities
Event Date: Dec. 15, 2015, 4 – 5:30 p.m. EST

Host a Real-Time Conversation With Crew Members Aboard the International Space Station
Audience: All Educators
Proposal Deadline: Dec. 15, 2014

Future Engineers 3-D Printing in Space: Design a Space Tool Challenge
Audience: K-12 Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: Dec. 15, 2014

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 8 to the International Space Station
Audience: School Districts Serving Grades 5-12, Informal Education Institutions, Colleges and Universities
Inquiry Deadline: Dec. 15, 2014

GLOBE Distinguished Educator Fellowship
Audience: K-12 & Informal Educators
Application Deadline: Dec. 15, 2014

NASA Space Technology Game Changing Program Solicitation for Ultralightweight Core Materials for Efficient Load-Bearing Composite Sandwich Structures
Audience: Higher Education Institutions
Proposal Deadline: Dec. 16, 2014

Free Smithsonian’s “STEM in 30″ Webcast Series
Audience: Grades 6-8 Educators and Students
Next Webcast Date: Dec. 17, 2014, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EST

2015 NASA High-Altitude Student Platform Opportunity
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: Dec. 19, 2014

SOFIA Airborne Astronomy Ambassador Program
Audience: K-14 Teachers and Informal Educators
Application Deadline: Dec. 22, 2014

Historical NASA Space Artifacts Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations
Request Deadline: Dec. 22, 2014

2014-2015 FIRST Robotic Competitions
Audience: K-12 Educators and Students
Kick-off Event: Jan. 3, 2015

2015 NASA and Worcester Polytechnic Institute Sample Return Robot Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Deadline: 11:59 pm EST Jan. 6, 2015

2015 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge
Audience: 9-12 & Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Deadline for International Teams: Jan. 9, 2015
Registration Deadline for U.S. Teams: Feb. 6, 2015

2015 RASC-AL Aerospace Concepts Design Competition
Audience: Higher Education Students
Proposal Deadline: Jan. 11, 2015

2014-2015 NASA Goddard OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Challenge
Audience: Grade 3-12 Students
Registration Deadline: Jan. 12, 2015

Free Program — Cubes in SpaceTM
Audience: Middle and High School Educators and Students
Registration Deadline: Jan. 12, 2015

National Science Foundation’s Community College Innovation Challenge
Audience: Teams of Community College Students and Faculty Mentors
Entry Deadline: Jan. 15, 2015

2015 Alan Shepard Technology in Education Award
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: Jan. 16, 2015

Free Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series
Audience: All Educators and 9-Higher Education Students
Next Lecture Date: Jan. 24, 2014, at 5:15 p.m. EST

DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2014 NASA EONS Solicitation New Appendix
Audience: Minority Universities
Proposal Deadline: Jan. 30, 2015

2015 NOAA Undergraduate Scholarship
Audience: Rising Junior Undergraduate Students at Minority Serving Institutions
Application Deadline: Jan. 30, 2015

2015 Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 22, 2015

NASA’s Cube Quest Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Proposal Due Date: Multiple Deadlines Through 2018

Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

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Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles Available for Educational Use

NASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions and museums to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles and other special items offered on a first-come, first-served basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

There will be a nominal shipping fee that must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.

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NASA Wavelength Resource Simplifies Teaching About the Solstice

Solstices and equinoxes are seasonal astronomical events that foster teachable moments. The next chance to bring these natural events into your classroom is the winter solstice, coming up on Dec. 21, 2014. Unfortunately, explanations of these events often seem obscure and technical to many learners.

Prepare yourself to teach about the solstice by following these step-by-step instructions to create a suntrack model customized to your location. With a simple visual representation, your learners can more easily grasp the notion of solstices and equinoxes.

The resource is available at http://nasawavelength.org/resource/nw-000-000-003-836.

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NASA’s ESTEEM “Ask US” Online Professional Development Series

NASA’s Minority University Research and Education Program, or MUREP, is sponsoring a series of Google Plus Hangout professional development events for K-12 educators. The Earth Systems, Technology and Energy Education for MUREP, or ESTEEM, team will lead the monthly sessions that will cover a variety of climate topics. This month’s webinar topic is:

Change Over Time: Investigate Climate Change Impacts in the Midwest — Dec. 11, 2014, at 4:30 p.m. EST
The National Climate Assessment, released in May of 2014, summarizes the impacts of climate change on the United States, touching on many disciplines: earth science, biology, human health, engineering, technology, economics and policy. Explore the document with Dr. Fred Lipschultz from the United States Global Change Research Project, and then learn about educator resources with Kristen Poppleton from the Will Steger Foundation. Discover resources that will enable you to bring this topic into classroom lessons, engage students in data collection and analysis, and share visualizations and citizen science projects. The focus this month will be on the Midwest region. Watch for additional regions of the U.S. to be featured in upcoming “Ask US” sessions.

Certificates of professional development hours are available upon request.

For more information on this event and upcoming webinar sessions, visit https://nice.larc.nasa.gov/asknice/. Questions about this series should be sent to Bonnie Murray at bonnie.murray@nasa.gov.

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Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

NASA Educator Professional Development is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources to bring NASA into your classroom.

NASA Engineering Design Challenges
Audience:
Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: Dec. 11, 2014, at 4:30 p.m. EST
Participants will explore engineering design the NASA way. Learn about NASA Engineering Design Challenges that can be used to integrate the engineering design process into existing curricula.

Scale of Discovery
Audience:
Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: Dec. 12, 2014, at 4 p.m. EST
Participants will explore the applications of scale with hands-on, standards-aligned science, technology, engineering and mathematics activities and interactive multimedia. Engage with examples from our universe as you apply scale to distance, time, size, models and more.

Solar System Scale: Modeling and Kinesthetic Inquiry
Audience:
Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: Dec. 16, 2014, at 6 p.m. EST
Participants will explore the misconceptions about the scale of the solar system by physically creating a model of the Earth-moon system. Prediction, estimation, measuring, debate and research are featured in this lesson.

Solar System and the Periodic Table
Audience:
Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: Dec. 18, 2014, at 7 p.m. EST
Participants will learn about our solar system and how it relates to the periodic table of elements. This standards-based workshop will teach you basic principles of what the table represents using our solar system as an exciting basis for understanding.

For more information about these webinars and to register online, visit https://paragon-tec.adobeconnect.com/admin/show-event-catalog.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Clarence Jones at Clarence.F.Jones@NASA.gov.

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Pre-Proposal Teleconference for NASA Research Announcement (NRA) Education Opportunities in NASA STEM (EONS) 2014 MUREP Institutional Research Opportunity (MIRO)

A pre-proposal teleconference will be held to discuss NASA Education Opportunities in NASA STEM (EONS) 2014 MUREP Institutional Research Opportunity (MIRO) [Announcement Number: NNH14ZHA001N, Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 43.008]. The teleconference will provide an in-depth overview of the MIRO opportunity and proposal requirements. Please visit the MIRO page in NSPIRES for information regarding this NASA opportunity.

After the presentations, there will be a brief Q&A session. In order to address as many participants as possible, you are asked to limit your questions to general topics only. If you have a question pertaining to your specific organization or institution, it should be submitted in writing to NASAMIRO@nasaprs.com. This will give NASA the time to respond, in detail, to your individual needs. We also ask that your questions be concise and clearly stated because the call is being recorded and will be transcribed.

Please note: It is strongly suggested that you read through the FAQ document, found here by clicking on the ‘Frequently Asked Questions-MIRO’ link, prior to the teleconference. It is possible that your question(s) may have already been answered.

Also, any changes regarding this workshop will be posted on the MIRO page in NSPIRES. This is the only way to be notified of any updates, so it is very important that you check the webpage prior to the session.

Instructions on how to connect to the teleconference are listed below. The call will start on time, so everyone is encouraged to connect 10-15 minutes prior to the session to address any technical difficulties you may encounter. Upon logging in, you might be prompted to install the WebEx software before joining the online session. It should take less than 5 minutes to install the software.

TO JOIN THE MIRO PRE PROPOSAL TELECONFERENCE, FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS FOR BOTH THE WEBEX AND CONFERENCE NUMBER
WebEx will be used for the slide presentation only.
For audio and to participate in the Q&A session, you must use the telecon number.

CONNECT TO WEBEX (for slide presentation)

Meeting Number: 994 734 547

1. Go to https://nasa.webex.com/nasa/j.php?MTID=mf9fb45bd9f3645c10915aff49a53e6be.
2. If requested, enter your name and email address.
3. Enter the meeting password: EONSMIRO123$ to join.
4. Click “Join”.

For assistance go to https://nasa.webex.com/nasa/mc and on the left navigation bar, click “Support”.

CONNECT TO TELECONFERENCE (for audio)

Call-in number: 1-844-467-4685
Participant passcode: 5362715988

This call will be recorded and transcribed. For the sake of accuracy, be sure to speak slowly and clearly, and please spell anything that might be recorded incorrectly.

Cell phones are not recommended for use for this call due to the possibility of disconnection and static.

If you are unable to attend, presentation slides and a written transcript of the teleconference will be posted to the NSPIRES website. Questions asked during the call will be part of the MIRO FAQ document.

Any questions regarding this session should be sent to NASAMIRO@nasaprs.com.

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Host a Real-Time Conversation With Crew Members Aboard the International Space Station

ARISS-US is now accepting proposals from U.S. schools, museums, science centers and community youth organizations to host an Amateur Radio on the International Space Station, or ARISS, contact between May 1 – Dec. 31, 2015. To maximize these radio contact opportunities, ARISS-US is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed education plan. Proposals are due Dec. 15, 2014.

Using amateur radio, students can ask astronauts questions about life in space and other space-related topics. Students fully engage in the ARISS contact by helping set up an amateur radio ground station at the school and then using that station to talk directly with a crew member on the International Space Station for approximately 10 minutes. ARISS provides experienced mentors and relies on local amateur radio volunteers to help organizations obtain the technology required to host this once in a lifetime opportunity for students.

Interested parties should visit http://www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact to obtain complete information including how the technology works, what is expected of the host organization and how to submit the proposal form.

Questions about this opportunity should be emailed to ariss@arrl.org.

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Future Engineers 3-D Printing in Space: Design a Space Tool Challenge

NASA, in conjunction with the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Foundation, has issued a series of Future Engineers 3-D Space Challenges for students focused on solving real-world space exploration problems. Students will become the creators and innovators of tomorrow by using 3-D modeling software to submit their designs. Multiple prizes are available, but the grand prize winner will have the opportunity for his or her design to be printed on the first 3-D printer aboard the International Space Station while watching from NASA′s Payload Operations Center with the mission control team.

The Design a Space Tool Challenge is the first in series of challenges where students in grades K-12 will create and submit a digital 3-D model of a tool that they think astronauts might need in space. Future Engineers is a multiyear education initiative that consists of 3-D space challenges and curriculum videos on the site that parents and educators can use to get kids designing today.

Entries must be submitted by Dec. 15, 2014.

For more information about the challenge and to watch an introductory video from astronaut Doug Wheelock, visit http://www.nasa.gov/content/printing-challenges-for-the-first-3d-printer-aboard-the-international-space-station/.

If you have any questions about the Design a Space Tool Challenge, please email info@futureengineers.org.

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DEADLINE EXTENDED: Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 8 to the International Space Station

The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education and the Arthur C. Clarke Institute for Space Education, in partnership with NanoRacks LLC, announce an authentic science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, opportunity for school districts across the U.S. and space station partner nations. The newest flight opportunity, Mission 8 to the International Space Station, or ISS, gives students across a community the ability to design and propose real experiments to fly in low-Earth orbit on the ISS. This opportunity is part of the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program, or SSEP.

Each participating community will receive a real microgravity research minilaboratory capable of supporting a single microgravity experiment and all launch services to fly the minilab to the space station in fall 2015 and return it to Earth. An experiment design competition in each community — engaging typically 300+ students — allows student teams to design and propose real experiments vying for their community′s reserved minilab. Content resources for teachers and students support foundational instruction on science in microgravity and experimental design. Additional SSEP programming leverages the experiment design competition to engage the community, embracing a learning community model for STEM education.

This competition is open to students in grades 5-12 and college. Informal education groups and organizations are also encouraged to participate. Interested communities must inquire about the program no later than Dec. 15, 2014. The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education is available to help interested communities in the U.S. secure the needed funding.

To learn more about this opportunity, visit the SSEP Mission 8 to International Space Station National Announcement of Opportunity at http://ssep.ncesse.org/2014/10/new-flight-opportunity-for-school-districts-announcing-student-spaceflight-experiments-program-ssep-mission-8-to-the-international-space-station-starting-february-2015/.

SSEP is enabled through a strategic partnership with NanoRacks LLC working with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the utilization of the International Space Station as a national laboratory. The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (http://www.iss-casis.org/) is a national partner on SSEP. To view a list of all SSEP national partners, visit http://ssep.ncesse.org/national-partners/.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please email SSEP National Program Director Jeff Goldstein at jeffgoldstein@ncesse.org.

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GLOBE Distinguished Educator Fellowship

The Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment, or GLOBE, program is accepting applications for the GLOBE Distinguished Educator Fellowship. This fellowship harnesses the GLOBE community expertise in the development of new educational resources that can benefit the whole community.

Selected educators, either formal or informal, will work with scientists in the development of GLOBE educational materials. The scientist will support the educator in ensuring scientific accuracy. As part of the application process, we invite teachers to team with scientists on a particular project.

There will be two fellowships awarded this year: one for the United States and one for GLOBE countries outside the U.S. Applicants must be active GLOBE teachers who have entered data into the GLOBE database in the past year.

Applications are due Dec. 15, 2014. Fellowships will begin no later than July 1, 2015.

Additional information including application requirements can be found at http://www.globe.gov/events/competitions/fellowships.

Please email any questions about this opportunity science@globe.gov.

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NASA Space Technology Game Changing Program Solicitation for Ultralightweight Core Materials for Efficient Load-Bearing Composite Sandwich Structures

NASA is seeking proposals to develop and manufacture ultralightweight materials for aerospace vehicles and structures of the future. Proposals will demonstrate lower-mass alternatives to honeycomb or foam cores currently used in composite sandwich structures.

The goal of this Game Changing Development Program is to develop and demonstrate scalable and cost-effective manufacturing approaches to produce ultralightweight core materials both as flat panels and curved structures. The final products will have half or less the area density of conventional honeycomb cores, with equal or better mechanical properties.

Proposals will be accepted from U.S. organizations, including NASA centers and other government agencies, federally funded research and development centers, educational institutions, industry and nonprofit organizations. NASA expects to make two awards of up to $550,000 each for this first development phase.

Proposals are due Dec. 16, 2014.

For information on the solicitation and how to submit proposals, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/october/nasa-seeks-ultra-lightweight-materials-to-help-enable-journey-to-mars/.

This solicitation is part of NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate, which is responsible for innovating, developing, testing and flying hardware for use in future missions. For more information about the directorate and Space Technology Research Grants Program, visit http://www.nasa.gov/spacetech.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to Ryan Stephens at HQ-STMD-GCDC1@mail.nasa.gov.

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Free Smithsonian’s “STEM in 30″ Webcast Series

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is presenting a series of free education webcast events called “STEM in 30.” This new program consists of live, fast-paced 30-minute webcasts designed to increase interest and engagement in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, for students. To enhance the learning experience, students can get involved with the content through the interactive “Cover It Live” feature, including poll questions and classroom activities. The webcasts will be available live on the National Air and Space Museum website as well as on NASA TV, and will be archived for on-demand viewing.

Kites to Flight: Inventing With the Wright Brothers
Dec. 17, 2014, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EST
In celebration of the anniversary of the Wilbur and Orville Wright’s historic first flight in 1903, this fast-paced webcast will give students in grades 6-8 an introduction to the Wright brothers and the process of innovation. The program will use the Wright Flyer as a starting point to explore the concepts of flight.

“STEM in 30″ webcasts are online learning experiences, but are filmed in front of a live audience. If you are interested in bringing your school group to a live filming of “STEM in 30,” please contact Myra Banks-Scott at banksscottm@si.edu.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s “STEM in 30″ Webcast Series, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/explore-and-learn/stem-in-30/.

Questions about this series should be directed to the visitor service line at 202-633-2214.

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2015 NASA High-Altitude Student Platform Opportunity

NASA is accepting applications from students at U.S. colleges and universities who want to send experiments to the edge of space on a high-flying scientific balloon.

The annual NASA project provides near-space access for 12 undergraduate and graduate student experiments to be carried by a NASA high-altitude research balloon. The flights typically last 15 to 20 hours and reach an altitude of 23 miles. Experiments may include compact satellites or prototypes.

The experiments are flown aboard the High-Altitude Student Platform, or HASP, a balloon-born instrument stack launched from the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility’s remote site in Fort Sumner, New Mexico. The goals of the project are to provide a space test platform to encourage student research and stimulate the development of student satellite payloads and other space-engineering products.

HASP seeks to enhance the technical skills and research abilities of students in critical science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines. The project is a joint effort between NASA and the Louisiana Space Consortium. The Science Missions Directorate Astrophysics division manages the NASA scientific balloon program; Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia oversees Balloon Flight Operations.

The deadline for applications is Dec. 19, 2014.

For application information and technical details about the program, visit http://laspace.lsu.edu/hasp.

Questions about the High-Altitude Student Platform opportunity should be directed to T. Gregory Guzik at guzik@phunds.phys.lsu.edu.

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SOFIA Airborne Astronomy Ambassador Program

NASA’s Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, or SOFIA, is a 747SP aircraft carrying a 2.5 meter-diameter telescope. The SOFIA project is now accepting applications for the Cycle 3 — 2015 Airborne Astronomy Ambassadors, or AAA, program. The AAA program is an exciting and unique opportunity for teams of two educators to receive online astronomy instruction and a trip to NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in California to participate in two SOFIA science flights. The science flights offer educators interaction with astronomers, engineers and technicians aboard the aircraft and a view to the collaboration that leads to astronomical data collection and the research papers that follow.

One team member must be a science teacher; the other team member may be a teacher, informal educator or amateur astronomer. The eligibility and program requirements are detailed at http://www.seti.org/sofia. The program pays all costs.

Applications are due Dec. 22, 2014.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Pamela Harman at pharman@seti.org.

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Historical NASA Space Artifacts Available for Educational Use

NASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions, museums and other organizations to screen and request historical artifacts of significance to spaceflight. This is the 24th screening of artifacts since 2009.

Eligible schools, universities, museums, libraries and planetariums may view the artifacts and request specific items through Dec. 22, 2014. Online registrations should include an assigned Department of Education number. Registration also may be made through the requester’s State Agency for Surplus Property office. For instructions, to register and to view and request artifacts online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/NASAWel.htm.

The artifacts are free of charge and are offered “as-is.” Organizations must cover shipping costs and any handling fees. Shipping fees on smaller items will be relatively inexpensive; however, larger items may involve extensive disassembly, preparation, shipping and reassembly costs. NASA will work closely with eligible organizations to address any unique handling costs.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.

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2014-2015 FIRST Robotic Competitions

The FIRST Robotics Competition challenges teams of young people and their mentors to create a robot designed to solve a common problem in a six-week timeframe. Teams experience the entire engineering life cycle while building robots to compete in games that change every year. FIRST Robotics Competition teams are composed of high school students, with professional engineers acting as mentors. Additional FIRST programs are available for students of ages 6-18.

FIRST is a national organization founded in 1989 by inventor Dean Kamen in Manchester, New Hampshire, to inspire young people to pursue careers in science and technical fields.

The FRC Kickoff, the official start of the FIRST Robotics Competition design-and-build season, is set for Jan. 3, 2015. Teams have the opportunity to meet at local kickoff events to compare notes, get ideas, make friends, find mentoring teams, learn the game, pick up the Kit of Parts and get geared up for the exciting competition season. To find kickoff events in your area, visit http://www.usfirst.org/roboticsprograms/frc/kickoff.

For more information about FIRST Robotics and to register your team to participate, visit http://www.usfirst.org/.

Questions about FIRST Robotics should be submitted via http://www.usfirst.org/contactform.

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2015 NASA and Worcester Polytechnic Institute Sample Return Robot Challenge

NASA and the Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Worcester, Massachusetts, are seeking teams to compete in a robot technology demonstration competition with a potential $1.5 million prize purse.

During the Sample Return Robot Challenge, teams will compete to demonstrate a robot that can locate and retrieve geologic samples from a wide and varied terrain without human control. The objective of the competition is to encourage innovations in automatic navigation and robotic manipulator technologies. Innovations stemming from this challenge may improve NASA’s capability to explore a variety of destinations in space, as well as enhance the nation’s robotic technology for use in industries and applications on Earth.

The competition is planned for June 8-13, 2015, in Worcester, and is anticipated to attract hundreds of competitors from industry and academia nationwide.

Registration is open until Jan. 6, 2015.

For more information about the Sample Return Robot Challenge and to register online for the competition, visit http://challenge.wpi.edu.

The Centennial Challenges program is part of NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate, which is innovating, developing, testing and flying hardware for use in NASA’s future missions. For more information about NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate, visit http://www.nasa.gov/spacetech.

Questions about the Sample Return Robot Challenge should be sent to challenge@wpi.edu.

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2015 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge

NASA has opened team registration for the 2015 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge. Organized by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, the event will be held April 16-18, 2015, at the U.S. Space & Rocket Center, also in Huntsville.

The challenge engages high school, college and university students in hands-on, experiential learning activities, while also testing potential technologies needed for future deep space exploration. Both U.S. and international teams may register to participate. For U.S. teams, registration closes Feb. 6, 2015. Registration for international teams closes Jan. 9, 2015.

Student teams participating in the Rover Challenge must design, engineer and test a human-powered rover on a mock course designed to simulate the harsh and demanding terrains future NASA explorers may find on distant planets, moons and asteroids.

For more information on the 2015 Human Exploration Rover Challenge and registration, visit http://go.nasa.gov/14dikMF.

Follow the Rover Challenge on social media for the latest news and updates:
https://www.facebook.com/roverchallenge?ref=hl
https://twitter.com/RoverChallenge
http://instagram.com/nasa_marshall.

View images from the 2014 Rover Challenge at http://go.nasa.gov/1iEjGRp.

International teams with questions about this event or registration may email Amy McDowell at Amy.McDowell@nasa.gov. U.S. teams with questions may contact Diedra Williams at MSFC-RoverChallenge2015@mail.nasa.gov.

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2015 RASC-AL Aerospace Concepts Design Competition

NASA and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2015 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts-Academic Linkage, or RASC-AL, Aerospace Concepts competition. RASC-AL is a design project competition for university-level engineering students and faculty.

The 2015 RASC-AL contest challenges participants to design projects based on real NASA problems, responding to one of four themes:
— Earth-Independent Mars Pioneering Architecture
— Earth-Independent Lunar Pioneering Architecture
— Mars’ Moons Prospector Mission
— Large-Scale Mars Entry, Decent and Landing Pathfinder Mission

Concepts derived from the design projects could potentially be implemented by NASA.

Teams must submit an abstract for their proposed project by Jan. 11, 2015. The RASC-AL Steering Committee of NASA and industry experts will evaluate the proposals and select as many as 11 undergraduate and five graduate teams to compete against each other at a forum in June 2015 in Florida.

The RASC-AL competition is open to full-time undergraduate or graduate students majoring in engineering or science at an accredited university. University design teams must include one faculty or industry advisor with a university affiliation and two or more undergraduate or graduate students. A group of universities may also collaborate on a design project entry. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

For more information about this competition, visit http://nianet.org/RASCAL.

If you have questions about this competition, please contact Stacy Dees at stacy.dees@nianet.org or Shelley Spears at Shelley.Spears@nianet.org.

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2014-2015 NASA Goddard OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Challenge

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center is launching the 2014-2015 TRANSFORMERS OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Challenge, hosted by the Innovative Technology Partnerships Office. The purpose of the challenge is to raise awareness of NASA’s Technology Transfer Program and to inspire interest in all NASA missions, programs and projects.

This year the scope of the contest is being expanded to include two challenges. In the first challenge, students in grades 3-12 are asked to submit a video describing their favorite NASA Goddard spinoff. In a new twist, participants in this year′s contest must also use the engineering design process to develop and propose a new spinoff application of their own for the technology. Spinoffs are technologies originally created for space and modified into everyday products used on Earth. Examples include memory foam, invisible braces and scratch-resistant lenses for eyeglasses.

The second challenge, the TRANSFORMERS OPTIMUS PRIME InWorld Challenge, offers students in grades 6-12 an opportunity to take their video spinoff ideas to another level. Interested teams must study James Webb Space Telescope spinoff technology and post their completed spinoff videos for review by college engineering students. Engineering college mentors will select 20 teams to continue the collaborative design process within a multiuser virtual world to build a 3-D model of the team′s design solutions.

Winning students from each grade category will be invited to Goddard to participate in a behind-the-scenes workshop, attend a VIP awards ceremony and meet actor Peter Cullen, the voice of OPTIMUS PRIME.

The deadline to register and upload videos is Jan. 12, 2015.

For more information, visit http://itpo.gsfc.nasa.gov/optimus/.

Questions about this contest should be directed to Darryl Mitchell at Darryl.R.Mitchell@nasa.gov.

TRANSFORMERS and OPTIMUS PRIME are trademarks of Hasbro and are used with permission. © 2014 Hasbro. All rights reserved.

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Free Program — Cubes in SpaceTM

idoodlelearning™ is offering two flight opportunities as part of the Cubes in Space program. A free science, technology, engineering, the arts and mathematics, or STEAM, program for students ages 11-18, Cubes in Space provides opportunities for students to design and compete to launch experiments into space. 

In partnership with Colorado Space Grant Consortium as part of the RockSat-C program, experiments will be launched via a sounding rocket from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility, Wallops Island, Virginia, in late June 2015. This opportunity is open to U.S. and international students 11-14 years of age.

Through partnership with NASA Langley Research Center, a second flight opportunity is offered on a zero-pressure scientific balloon to be launched from Ft. Sumner, New Mexico, in September 2015. The Science Missions Directorate Astrophysics division manages the NASA scientific balloon program; Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia oversees Balloon Flight Operations. This opportunity is open to students 11-18 years of age who are U.S. citizens.

Using formal or informal learning environments, students and educators will learn about the methodology for taking an idea from design through the review process. Throughout the experience, students will acquire key 21st century skills necessary for success in a highly connected, global society.

The deadline for program registration is Jan. 12, 2015.

For more information, visit http://www.CubesInSpace.com.

Questions about this program should be directed to info@cubesinspace.com.

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National Science Foundation’s Community College Innovation Challenge

The National Science Foundation’s Community College Innovation Challenge is underway and seeking teams to propose innovative science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, -based solutions for real-world problems. Teams must comprise community college students, a faculty mentor and a community or industry partner.

Challenge entries consist of two components: a written entry and a video entry. Each team’s entry must address one of the five themes outlined by the National Science Foundation. This year’s themes are Big Data, Infrastructure Security, Sustainability, Broadening Participation in STEM and Improving STEM Education.

Finalist teams will be invited to attend an Innovation Boot Camp, a professional development workshop on innovation and entrepreneurship.

The entry submission deadline is Jan. 15, 2015.

For additional information about the challenge, visit http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/communitycollege/.

Questions about this challenge should be directed to InnovationChallenge@nsf.gov.

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2015 Alan Shepard Technology in Education Award

Do you know K-12 teachers or district-level administrators who are making a difference in education through the use of technology? Recognize their achievements by nominating them for the Alan Shepard Technology in Education Award. The Astronauts Memorial Foundation, in partnership with NASA and the Space Foundation, will recognize the accomplishments of one outstanding individual and his or her contributions to lifelong learning through the application of technology in the classroom or in the professional development of teachers.

Technology personnel and K-12 classroom teachers who have demonstrated exemplary use of technology to enhance learning in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, are eligible for this award. School principals, superintendents or associate superintendents may nominate eligible candidates. The award will be presented in April 2015 at the Space Foundation’s 31st Space Symposium in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The deadline for applications is Jan. 16, 2015.

Applications and more information are available online at http://www.astronautsmemorial.org/alan-shepard-award.html .

Questions about this award should be directed to amfreg@amfcse.org.

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Free Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series

Curious about icy bodies in the outer reaches of our solar system, the effects of space junk on deep-space observation, the latest discoveries about the origins of the universe and new ways galaxy formation is mapped? Come to the Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series presented by Smithsonian researchers who are exploring the sun, the moon, planets, stars, galaxies and the universe. These speakers will share behind-the-scenes details about how their research is done and about technologies that advance new discoveries. The lectures will be held at the Albert Einstein Planetarium at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.

Each lecture begins at 5:15 p.m. EST and is followed by a Q&A session. Stay after the lecture to visit the museum’s observatory, weather permitting.

Jan. 24, 2015 — Observing the Origin of the Universe From the South Pole
After three years of observing from the South Pole, scientists may have found confirmation that the universe underwent a burst of inflationary growth at the time of the Big Bang. Cosmologist Colin Bischoff will discuss these findings as well as the excitement of astronomy from Antarctica.

Feb. 21, 2015 — Tracing the Structure of the Universe With Galaxy Surveys
Studies of galaxy formation and cosmology have exploded in recent years due to the immense data obtained from large galaxy surveys. Postdoctoral fellow Cameron McBride will discuss how observational data and theory are combined to better understand fundamental questions in our universe, and will highlight some exciting results from ongoing research.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/lectures/smithsonian-stars/.

Questions about this lecture series should be directed to the visitor service line at 202-633-2214.

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DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2014 NASA EONS Solicitation New Appendix

NASA’s Office of Education is accepting new proposals under the Education Opportunities in NASA STEM, or EONS, 2014 NASA Research Announcement for the Minority University Research and Education Program, or MUREP, Institutional Research Opportunity, or MIRO appendix. This effort was previously titled as the NASA University Research Centers Project, and has now been consolidated into the MUREP Program within the NASA Office of Education.

Through the EONS omnibus solicitation, the opportunity MIRO has been released. Through MIRO awards, NASA aims to promote science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM literacy and to enhance and sustain the capability of minority serving institutions to perform NASA-related research and education, which directly support NASA’s four mission directorates — Aeronautics Research, Human Exploration and Space Operations, Science, and Space Technology.

The deadline for proposals has been extended to Jan. 30, 2015.

For more information regarding the MIRO solicitation, please visit the NASA EONS page on the NASA Solicitation and Proposal Integrated Review and Proposal System, or NSPIRES, website at: http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId=%7bB6C61D04-5793-EF52-3497-1AA57FA424A5%7d&path=open .

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2015 NOAA Undergraduate Scholarship

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA, is accepting applications for its 2015 Educational Partnership Program, or EPP, Undergraduate Scholarship Program. The EPP Undergraduate Scholarship Program provides scholarships for two years of undergraduate study to rising junior undergraduate students majoring in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields that directly support NOAA’s mission.

Participants receive total awards valued at up to $35,000 in total support during their junior and senior years. During the first summer, scholars complete a nine-week paid summer internship at NOAA in Silver Spring, Maryland. During the second summer, scholars complete paid internships at NOAA facilities across the country. A stipend and housing allowance is provided. At the end of both summer internships, students present the results of their projects at an education and science symposium in Silver Spring.

Students attending an accredited Minority Serving Institution within the United States or U.S. Territories as defined by the U.S. Department of Education (Hispanic Serving Institutions, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tribal Colleges and Universities, Alaskan-Native Serving Institutions, and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions) are eligible to apply for the program. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and must earn and maintain a minimum 3.2 grade point average on a 4.0 scale.

Applications are due Jan. 30, 2015.

For more information and to submit an online application, visit http://www.epp.noaa.gov/ssp_undergrad_page.html.

Questions about this scholarship opportunity should be directed to EPP.USP@noaa.gov.

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2015 Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships

Caltech’s Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships, or SURF, project introduces undergraduate students to research under the guidance of seasoned mentors at Caltech or NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, or JPL. Students experience the process of research as a creative intellectual activity and gain a more realistic view of the opportunities and demands of a professional research career.

SURF is modeled on the grant-seeking process. Students collaborate with potential mentors to define and develop a project and to write research proposals. Caltech faculty or JPL staff review the proposals and recommend awards. Students work over a 10-week period in the summer, mid-June to late August. At the conclusion of the project, each student will submit a technical paper and give an oral presentation at SURF Seminar Day.

All application materials must be received no later than Feb. 22, 2015. For more information, visit http://www.sfp.caltech.edu/programs/surf.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to the Caltech Student-Faculty Programs office at sfp@caltech.edu.

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NASA’s Cube Quest Challenge

Registration now is open for NASA’s Cube Quest Challenge, advancing communication and propulsion technologies for CubeSats. This is the agency’s first in-space competition and offers the agency’s largest-ever prize purse.

Competitors have a shot at a share of $5 million in prize money and an opportunity to participate in space exploration and technology development. Competitors can compete for a chance at flying their very own CubeSat to the moon and beyond as secondary payload on the first integrated flight of NASA’s Orion spacecraft and Space Launch System, or SLS, or launch their satellite using an independent launch provider.

Challenge objectives include designing, building and launching flight-qualified, small satellites capable of advanced operations near and beyond the moon. The challenge and prize purse are divided into three major areas:

– Ground Tournaments: $500,000 in the four qualifying ground tournaments to determine who will have the ability to fly on the first SLS flight;
– Deep Space Derby: $1.5 million purse for demonstrating communication and CubeSat durability at a distance greater than almost 2.5 million miles (4,000,000 km), 10 times the distance from the Earth to the moon; and
– Lunar Derby: $3 million purse for demonstrating the ability to place a CubeSat in a stable lunar orbit and demonstrate communication and durability near the moon.

The Cube Quest Challenge seeks to develop and test subsystems necessary to perform deep space exploration using small spacecraft. Advancements in small spacecraft capabilities will provide benefits to future missions and also may enable new mission scenarios, including future investigations of near-Earth asteroids.

All teams may compete in any one of the four ground tournaments. Teams that rate high on mission safety and probability of success will receive incremental awards. The ground tournaments, or GT, will be held every four to six months, and participation in GT4 is required to earn a secondary payload spot on SLS.

Teams must register at least 30 days prior to the ground tournament in which they plan to participate. Check the Cube Quest Challenge website for updates on when tournaments will take place.

The Lunar Derby focuses primarily on propulsion for small spacecraft and near-Earth communications, while the Deep Space Derby focuses on finding innovative solutions to deep space communications using small spacecraft. Together, these competitions will contribute to opening deep space exploration to nongovernment spacecraft.

For more information on the Cube Quest Challenge, visit http://www.nasa.gov/cubequest.

To learn more about NASA’s challenges and citizen science efforts, visit http://www.nasa.gov/solve.

Please direct any questions about the Cube Quest Challenge to James Cockrell at james.j.cockrell@nasa.gov.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — Dec. 4, 2014

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations
Available While Supplies Last

NASA Wavelength Resources Bring Science News into Classroom
Audience: All Educators

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event – Orion Flight Test
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Dec. 5, 2014, 1:30-2:30 p.m. EST

Free Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series
Audience: All Educators and 9-Higher Education Students
Next Lecture Date: Dec. 6, 2014, at 5:15 p.m. EST

Free Education Webinar From NASA Educator Professional Development — Astronomy Resources From NASA
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: Dec. 9, 2014, at 5 p.m. EST

NASA’s ESTEEM “Ask US” Online Professional Development Series
Audience: K-12 Educators
Next Event Date: Dec. 11, 2014, at 4:30 p.m. EST

Host a Real-Time Conversation With Crew Members Aboard the International Space Station
Audience: All Educators
Proposal Deadline: Dec. 15, 2014

Future Engineers 3-D Printing in Space: Design a Space Tool Challenge
Audience: K-12 Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: Dec. 15, 2014

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 8 to the International Space Station
Audience: School Districts Serving Grades 5-12, Informal Education Institutions, Colleges and Universities
Inquiry Deadline: Dec. 15, 2014

GLOBE Distinguished Educator Fellowship
Audience: K-12 & Informal Educators
Application Deadline: Dec. 15, 2014

NASA Space Technology Game Changing Program Solicitation for Ultralightweight Core Materials for Efficient Load-Bearing Composite Sandwich Structures
Audience: Higher Education Institutions
Proposal Deadline: Dec. 16, 2014

Free Smithsonian’s “STEM in 30″ Webcast Series
Audience: Grades 6-8 Educators and Students
Next Webcast Date: Dec. 17, 2014, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EST

2015 NASA High-Altitude Student Platform Opportunity
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: Dec. 19, 2014

SOFIA Airborne Astronomy Ambassador Program
Audience: K-14 Teachers and Informal Educators
Application Deadline: Dec. 22, 2014

Historical NASA Space Artifacts Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations
Request Deadline: Dec. 22, 2014

2014-2015 FIRST Robotic Competitions
Audience: K-12 Educators and Students
Kick-off Event: Jan. 3, 2015

2015 NASA and Worcester Polytechnic Institute Sample Return Robot Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Deadline: 11:59 pm EST Jan. 6, 2015

2015 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge
Audience: 9-12 & Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Deadline for International Teams: Jan. 9, 2015
Registration Deadline for U.S. Teams: Feb. 6, 2015

2015 RASC-AL Aerospace Concepts Design Competition
Audience: Higher Education Students
Proposal Deadline: Jan. 11, 2015

2014-2015 NASA Goddard OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Challenge
Audience: Grade 3-12 Students
Registration Deadline: Jan. 12, 2015

National Science Foundation’s Community College Innovation Challenge
Audience: Teams of Community College Students and Faculty Mentors
Entry Deadline: Jan. 15, 2015

2015 Alan Shepard Technology in Education Award
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: Jan. 16, 2015

DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2014 NASA EONS Solicitation New Appendix
Audience: Minority Universities
Proposal Deadline: Jan. 30, 2015

2015 NOAA Undergraduate Scholarship
Audience: Rising Junior Undergraduate Students at Minority Serving Institutions
Application Deadline: Jan. 30, 2015

NASA History Program Office Summer and Fall 2015 Internships
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Summer 2015 Application Deadline: Feb. 1, 2015
Fall 2015 Application Deadline: June 1, 2015

2015 Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 2, 2015

NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellowships
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Next Application Deadline: March 1, 2015

2014 NASA EONS Solicitation Amendment 8: New Program Element
Audience: Minority Universities
Proposal Deadline: March 2, 2015

Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

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Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles Available for Educational Use

NASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions and museums to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles and other special items offered on a first-come, first-served basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

There will be a nominal shipping fee that must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.

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NASA Wavelength Resources Bring Science News into Classroom

NASA science can provide students of all ages with a front-row seat to some of the most exciting, important breaking news about our Earth, sun, solar system and universe. This month, our attentions were captured by the first successful landing on a comet, and we’re now looking ahead to landing on an asteroid and returning with samples.

Take advantage of your students’ excitement over the Rosetta mission’s success, and the upcoming Origins Spectral Interpretation Resource Identification Security — Regolith Explorer mission, also known as OSIRIS-REx, with these Wavelength resources.

Educational Resources Related to Asteroids
http://nasawavelength.org/resource-search?educationalLevel=&qq=asteroid

Educational Resources Related to Comets
http://nasawavelength.org/resource-search?educationalLevel=&qq=comet

And check out our blog post for more strategies to bring NASA news into the classroom.
http://nasawavelength.org/blog/read-all-about-it-science-news-your-class

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NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event – Orion Flight Test

Don’t miss the Orion Flight Test. NASA invites you to tune in for a special Digital Learning Network event. Orion will launch atop a Delta IV heavy rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. This two-orbit, four-hour flight will evaluate launch and high-speed re-entry systems such as avionics, attitude control, parachutes and the heat shield. The webcast including video of launch, special guests and more will be streamed on the NASA DLiNfo Channel.

The event will be webcast on the NASA DLiNfo Channel on Dec. 5, 2014, at 1:30 p.m. EST.

For more information and to view the webcast, visit http://dln.nasa.gov.

Questions about this event should be directed to Rachel Power at rachel.b.power@nasa.gov.

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Free Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series

Curious about icy bodies in the outer reaches of our solar system, the effects of space junk on deep-space observation, the latest discoveries about the origins of the universe and new ways galaxy formation is mapped? Come to the Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series presented by Smithsonian researchers who are exploring the sun, the moon, planets, stars, galaxies and the universe. These speakers will share behind-the-scenes details about how their research is done and about technologies that advance new discoveries. The lectures will be held at the Albert Einstein Planetarium at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.

Each lecture begins at 5:15 p.m. EST and is followed by a Q&A session. Stay after the lecture to visit the museum’s observatory, weather permitting.

Dec. 6, 2014 — Rubble Trouble: How Space Junk Impacts Astronomy
The incredible information and images gathered using space telescopes have revolutionized what we know about the cosmos. Could space junk hinder future findings? Research associate Lisa Rand will discuss this question and the impact space junk has on astronomy.

Jan. 24, 2015 — Observing the Origin of the Universe From the South Pole
After three years of observing from the South Pole, scientists may have found confirmation that the universe underwent a burst of inflationary growth at the time of the Big Bang. Cosmologist Colin Bischoff will discuss these findings as well as the excitement of astronomy from Antarctica.

Feb. 21, 2015 — Tracing the Structure of the Universe With Galaxy Surveys
Studies of galaxy formation and cosmology have exploded in recent years due to the immense data obtained from large galaxy surveys. Postdoctoral fellow Cameron McBride will discuss how observational data and theory are combined to better understand fundamental questions in our universe, and will highlight some exciting results from ongoing research.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/lectures/smithsonian-stars/.

Questions about this lecture series should be directed to the visitor service line at 202-633-2214.

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Free Education Webinar From NASA Educator Professional Development — Astronomy Resources From NASA

Join NASA Educator Professional Development on Dec. 9, 2014, at 5 p.m. EST for an hourlong webinar for educators of grades 6-12. Participants will learn about a multitude of astronomy resources including educator guides, lesson plan sets, multimedia and websites covering all aspects of astronomy for grades 6-12. Discussion of possible uses and modifications of materials for individual classrooms will be an integral part of this webinar.

For more information and to register online, visit https://events-na11.adobeconnect.com/content/connect/c1/1088539485/en/events/event/shared/1097653603/event_landing.html?sco-id=1259851622.

Questions about this webinar should be directed to Clarence Jones at Clarence.F.Jones@NASA.gov.

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NASA’s ESTEEM “Ask US” Online Professional Development Series

NASA’s Minority University Research and Education Program, or MUREP, is sponsoring a series of Google Plus Hangout professional development events for K-12 educators. The Earth Systems, Technology and Energy Education for MUREP, or ESTEEM, team will lead the monthly sessions that will cover a variety of climate topics. This month’s webinar topic is:

Change Over Time: Investigate Climate Change Impacts in the Midwest — Dec. 11, 2014, at 4:30 p.m. EST
The National Climate Assessment, released in May of 2014, summarizes the impacts of climate change on the United States, touching on many disciplines: earth science, biology, human health, engineering, technology, economics and policy. Explore the document with Dr. Fred Lipschultz from the United States Global Change Research Project, and then learn about educator resources with Kristen Poppleton from the Will Steger Foundation. Discover resources that will enable you to bring this topic into classroom lessons, engage students in data collection and analysis, and share visualizations and citizen science projects. The focus this month will be on the Midwest region. Watch for additional regions of the U.S. to be featured in upcoming “Ask US” sessions.

Certificates of professional development hours are available upon request.

For more information on this event and upcoming webinar sessions, visit https://nice.larc.nasa.gov/asknice/. Questions about this series should be sent to Bonnie Murray at bonnie.murray@nasa.gov.

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Host a Real-Time Conversation With Crew Members Aboard the International Space Station

ARISS-US is now accepting proposals from U.S. schools, museums, science centers and community youth organizations to host an Amateur Radio on the International Space Station, or ARISS, contact between May 1 – Dec. 31, 2015. To maximize these radio contact opportunities, ARISS-US is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed education plan. Proposals are due Dec. 15, 2014.

Using amateur radio, students can ask astronauts questions about life in space and other space-related topics. Students fully engage in the ARISS contact by helping set up an amateur radio ground station at the school and then using that station to talk directly with a crew member on the International Space Station for approximately 10 minutes. ARISS provides experienced mentors and relies on local amateur radio volunteers to help organizations obtain the technology required to host this once in a lifetime opportunity for students.

Interested parties should visit http://www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact to obtain complete information including how the technology works, what is expected of the host organization and how to submit the proposal form.

Questions about this opportunity should be emailed to ariss@arrl.org.

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Future Engineers 3-D Printing in Space: Design a Space Tool Challenge

NASA, in conjunction with the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Foundation, has issued a series of Future Engineers 3-D Space Challenges for students focused on solving real-world space exploration problems. Students will become the creators and innovators of tomorrow by using 3-D modeling software to submit their designs. Multiple prizes are available, but the grand prize winner will have the opportunity for his or her design to be printed on the first 3-D printer aboard the International Space Station while watching from NASA′s Payload Operations Center with the mission control team.

The Design a Space Tool Challenge is the first in series of challenges where students in grades K-12 will create and submit a digital 3-D model of a tool that they think astronauts might need in space. Future Engineers is a multiyear education initiative that consists of 3-D space challenges and curriculum videos on the site that parents and educators can use to get kids designing today.

Entries must be submitted by Dec. 15, 2014.

For more information about the challenge and to watch an introductory video from astronaut Doug Wheelock, visit http://www.nasa.gov/content/printing-challenges-for-the-first-3d-printer-aboard-the-international-space-station/.

If you have any questions about the Design a Space Tool Challenge, please email info@futureengineers.org.

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DEADLINE EXTENDED: Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 8 to the International Space Station

The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education and the Arthur C. Clarke Institute for Space Education, in partnership with NanoRacks LLC, announce an authentic science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, opportunity for school districts across the U.S. and space station partner nations. The newest flight opportunity, Mission 8 to the International Space Station, or ISS, gives students across a community the ability to design and propose real experiments to fly in low-Earth orbit on the ISS. This opportunity is part of the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program, or SSEP.

Each participating community will receive a real microgravity research minilaboratory capable of supporting a single microgravity experiment and all launch services to fly the minilab to the space station in fall 2015 and return it to Earth. An experiment design competition in each community — engaging typically 300+ students — allows student teams to design and propose real experiments vying for their community′s reserved minilab. Content resources for teachers and students support foundational instruction on science in microgravity and experimental design. Additional SSEP programming leverages the experiment design competition to engage the community, embracing a learning community model for STEM education.

This competition is open to students in grades 5-12 and college. Informal education groups and organizations are also encouraged to participate. Interested communities must inquire about the program no later than Dec. 15, 2014. The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education is available to help interested communities in the U.S. secure the needed funding.

To learn more about this opportunity, visit the SSEP Mission 8 to International Space Station National Announcement of Opportunity at http://ssep.ncesse.org/2014/10/new-flight-opportunity-for-school-districts-announcing-student-spaceflight-experiments-program-ssep-mission-8-to-the-international-space-station-starting-february-2015/.

SSEP is enabled through a strategic partnership with NanoRacks LLC working with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the utilization of the International Space Station as a national laboratory. The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (http://www.iss-casis.org/) is a national partner on SSEP. To view a list of all SSEP national partners, visit http://ssep.ncesse.org/national-partners/.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please email SSEP National Program Director Jeff Goldstein at jeffgoldstein@ncesse.org.

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GLOBE Distinguished Educator Fellowship

The Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment, or GLOBE, program is accepting applications for the GLOBE Distinguished Educator Fellowship. This fellowship harnesses the GLOBE community expertise in the development of new educational resources that can benefit the whole community.

Selected educators, either formal or informal, will work with scientists in the development of GLOBE educational materials. The scientist will support the educator in ensuring scientific accuracy. As part of the application process, we invite teachers to team with scientists on a particular project.

There will be two fellowships awarded this year: one for the United States and one for GLOBE countries outside the U.S. Applicants must be active GLOBE teachers who have entered data into the GLOBE database in the past year.

Applications are due Dec. 15, 2014. Fellowships will begin no later than July 1, 2015.

Additional information including application requirements can be found at http://www.globe.gov/events/competitions/fellowships.

Please email any questions about this opportunity science@globe.gov.

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NASA Space Technology Game Changing Program Solicitation for Ultralightweight Core Materials for Efficient Load-Bearing Composite Sandwich Structures

NASA is seeking proposals to develop and manufacture ultralightweight materials for aerospace vehicles and structures of the future. Proposals will demonstrate lower-mass alternatives to honeycomb or foam cores currently used in composite sandwich structures.

The goal of this Game Changing Development Program is to develop and demonstrate scalable and cost-effective manufacturing approaches to produce ultralightweight core materials both as flat panels and curved structures. The final products will have half or less the area density of conventional honeycomb cores, with equal or better mechanical properties.

Proposals will be accepted from U.S. organizations, including NASA centers and other government agencies, federally funded research and development centers, educational institutions, industry and nonprofit organizations. NASA expects to make two awards of up to $550,000 each for this first development phase.

Proposals are due Dec. 16, 2014.

For information on the solicitation and how to submit proposals, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/october/nasa-seeks-ultra-lightweight-materials-to-help-enable-journey-to-mars/.

This solicitation is part of NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate, which is responsible for innovating, developing, testing and flying hardware for use in future missions. For more information about the directorate and Space Technology Research Grants Program, visit http://www.nasa.gov/spacetech.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to Ryan Stephens at HQ-STMD-GCDC1@mail.nasa.gov.

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Free Smithsonian’s “STEM in 30″ Webcast Series

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is presenting a series of free education webcast events called “STEM in 30.” This new program consists of live, fast-paced 30-minute webcasts designed to increase interest and engagement in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, for students. To enhance the learning experience, students can get involved with the content through the interactive “Cover It Live” feature, including poll questions and classroom activities. The webcasts will be available live on the National Air and Space Museum website as well as on NASA TV, and will be archived for on-demand viewing.

Kites to Flight: Inventing With the Wright Brothers
Dec. 17, 2014, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EST
In celebration of the anniversary of the Wilbur and Orville Wright’s historic first flight in 1903, this fast-paced webcast will give students in grades 6-8 an introduction to the Wright brothers and the process of innovation. The program will use the Wright Flyer as a starting point to explore the concepts of flight.

“STEM in 30″ webcasts are online learning experiences, but are filmed in front of a live audience. If you are interested in bringing your school group to a live filming of “STEM in 30,” please contact Myra Banks-Scott at banksscottm@si.edu.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s “STEM in 30″ Webcast Series, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/explore-and-learn/stem-in-30/.

Questions about this series should be directed to the visitor service line at 202-633-2214.
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2015 NASA High-Altitude Student Platform Opportunity

NASA is accepting applications from students at U.S. colleges and universities who want to send experiments to the edge of space on a high-flying scientific balloon.

The annual NASA project provides near-space access for 12 undergraduate and graduate student experiments to be carried by a NASA high-altitude research balloon. The flights typically last 15 to 20 hours and reach an altitude of 23 miles. Experiments may include compact satellites or prototypes.

The experiments are flown aboard the High-Altitude Student Platform, or HASP, a balloon-born instrument stack launched from the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility’s remote site in Fort Sumner, New Mexico. The goals of the project are to provide a space test platform to encourage student research and stimulate the development of student satellite payloads and other space-engineering products.

HASP seeks to enhance the technical skills and research abilities of students in critical science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines. The project is a joint effort between NASA and the Louisiana Space Consortium. The Science Missions Directorate Astrophysics division manages the NASA scientific balloon program; Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia oversees Balloon Flight Operations.

The deadline for applications is Dec. 19, 2014.

For application information and technical details about the program, visit http://laspace.lsu.edu/hasp.

Questions about the High-Altitude Student Platform opportunity should be directed to T. Gregory Guzik at guzik@phunds.phys.lsu.edu.

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SOFIA Airborne Astronomy Ambassador Program

NASA’s Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, or SOFIA, is a 747SP aircraft carrying a 2.5 meter-diameter telescope. The SOFIA project is now accepting applications for the Cycle 3 — 2015 Airborne Astronomy Ambassadors, or AAA, program. The AAA program is an exciting and unique opportunity for teams of two educators to receive online astronomy instruction and a trip to NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in California to participate in two SOFIA science flights. The science flights offer educators interaction with astronomers, engineers and technicians aboard the aircraft and a view to the collaboration that leads to astronomical data collection and the research papers that follow.

One team member must be a science teacher; the other team member may be a teacher, informal educator or amateur astronomer. The eligibility and program requirements are detailed at http://www.seti.org/sofia. The program pays all costs.

Applications are due Dec. 22, 2014.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Pamela Harman at pharman@seti.org.

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Historical NASA Space Artifacts Available for Educational Use

NASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions, museums and other organizations to screen and request historical artifacts of significance to spaceflight. This is the 24th screening of artifacts since 2009.

Eligible schools, universities, museums, libraries and planetariums may view the artifacts and request specific items through Dec. 22, 2014. Online registrations should include an assigned Department of Education number. Registration also may be made through the requester’s State Agency for Surplus Property office. For instructions, to register and to view and request artifacts online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/NASAWel.htm.

The artifacts are free of charge and are offered “as-is.” Organizations must cover shipping costs and any handling fees. Shipping fees on smaller items will be relatively inexpensive; however, larger items may involve extensive disassembly, preparation, shipping and reassembly costs. NASA will work closely with eligible organizations to address any unique handling costs.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.

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2014-2015 FIRST Robotic Competitions

The FIRST Robotics Competition challenges teams of young people and their mentors to create a robot designed to solve a common problem in a six-week timeframe. Teams experience the entire engineering life cycle while building robots to compete in games that change every year. FIRST Robotics Competition teams are composed of high school students, with professional engineers acting as mentors. Additional FIRST programs are available for students of ages 6-18.

FIRST is a national organization founded in 1989 by inventor Dean Kamen in Manchester, New Hampshire, to inspire young people to pursue careers in science and technical fields.

The FRC Kickoff, the official start of the FIRST Robotics Competition design-and-build season, is set for Jan. 3, 2015. Teams have the opportunity to meet at local kickoff events to compare notes, get ideas, make friends, find mentoring teams, learn the game, pick up the Kit of Parts and get geared up for the exciting competition season. To find kickoff events in your area, visit http://www.usfirst.org/roboticsprograms/frc/kickoff.

For more information about FIRST Robotics and to register your team to participate, visit http://www.usfirst.org/.

Questions about FIRST Robotics should be submitted via http://www.usfirst.org/contactform.

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2015 NASA and Worcester Polytechnic Institute Sample Return Robot Challenge

NASA and the Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Worcester, Massachusetts, are seeking teams to compete in a robot technology demonstration competition with a potential $1.5 million prize purse.

During the Sample Return Robot Challenge, teams will compete to demonstrate a robot that can locate and retrieve geologic samples from a wide and varied terrain without human control. The objective of the competition is to encourage innovations in automatic navigation and robotic manipulator technologies. Innovations stemming from this challenge may improve NASA’s capability to explore a variety of destinations in space, as well as enhance the nation’s robotic technology for use in industries and applications on Earth.

The competition is planned for June 8-13, 2015, in Worcester, and is anticipated to attract hundreds of competitors from industry and academia nationwide.

Registration is open until Jan. 6, 2015.

For more information about the Sample Return Robot Challenge and to register online for the competition, visit http://challenge.wpi.edu.

The Centennial Challenges program is part of NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate, which is innovating, developing, testing and flying hardware for use in NASA’s future missions. For more information about NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate, visit http://www.nasa.gov/spacetech.

Questions about the Sample Return Robot Challenge should be sent to challenge@wpi.edu.

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2015 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge

NASA has opened team registration for the 2015 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge. Organized by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, the event will be held April 16-18, 2015, at the U.S. Space & Rocket Center, also in Huntsville.

The challenge engages high school, college and university students in hands-on, experiential learning activities, while also testing potential technologies needed for future deep space exploration. Both U.S. and international teams may register to participate. For U.S. teams, registration closes Feb. 6, 2015. Registration for international teams closes Jan. 9, 2015.

Student teams participating in the Rover Challenge must design, engineer and test a human-powered rover on a mock course designed to simulate the harsh and demanding terrains future NASA explorers may find on distant planets, moons and asteroids.

For more information on the 2015 Human Exploration Rover Challenge and registration, visit http://go.nasa.gov/14dikMF.

Follow the Rover Challenge on social media for the latest news and updates:
https://www.facebook.com/roverchallenge?ref=hl
https://twitter.com/RoverChallenge
http://instagram.com/nasa_marshall.

View images from the 2014 Rover Challenge at http://go.nasa.gov/1iEjGRp.

International teams with questions about this event or registration may email Amy McDowell at Amy.McDowell@nasa.gov. U.S. teams with questions may contact Diedra Williams at MSFC-RoverChallenge2015@mail.nasa.gov.

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2015 RASC-AL Aerospace Concepts Design Competition

NASA and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2015 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts-Academic Linkage, or RASC-AL, Aerospace Concepts competition. RASC-AL is a design project competition for university-level engineering students and faculty.

The 2015 RASC-AL contest challenges participants to design projects based on real NASA problems, responding to one of four themes:
— Earth-Independent Mars Pioneering Architecture
— Earth-Independent Lunar Pioneering Architecture
— Mars’ Moons Prospector Mission
— Large-Scale Mars Entry, Decent and Landing Pathfinder Mission

Concepts derived from the design projects could potentially be implemented by NASA.

Teams must submit an abstract for their proposed project by Jan. 11, 2015. The RASC-AL Steering Committee of NASA and industry experts will evaluate the proposals and select as many as 11 undergraduate and five graduate teams to compete against each other at a forum in June 2015 in Florida.

The RASC-AL competition is open to full-time undergraduate or graduate students majoring in engineering or science at an accredited university. University design teams must include one faculty or industry advisor with a university affiliation and two or more undergraduate or graduate students. A group of universities may also collaborate on a design project entry. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

For more information about this competition, visit http://nianet.org/RASCAL.

If you have questions about this competition, please contact Stacy Dees at stacy.dees@nianet.org or Shelley Spears at Shelley.Spears@nianet.org.

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2014-2015 NASA Goddard OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Challenge

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center is launching the 2014-2015 TRANSFORMERS OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Challenge, hosted by the Innovative Technology Partnerships Office. The purpose of the challenge is to raise awareness of NASA’s Technology Transfer Program and to inspire interest in all NASA missions, programs and projects.

This year the scope of the contest is being expanded to include two challenges. In the first challenge, students in grades 3-12 are asked to submit a video describing their favorite NASA Goddard spinoff. In a new twist, participants in this year′s contest must also use the engineering design process to develop and propose a new spinoff application of their own for the technology. Spinoffs are technologies originally created for space and modified into everyday products used on Earth. Examples include memory foam, invisible braces and scratch-resistant lenses for eyeglasses.

The second challenge, the TRANSFORMERS OPTIMUS PRIME InWorld Challenge, offers students in grades 6-12 an opportunity to take their video spinoff ideas to another level. Interested teams must study James Webb Space Telescope spinoff technology and post their completed spinoff videos for review by college engineering students. Engineering college mentors will select 20 teams to continue the collaborative design process within a multiuser virtual world to build a 3-D model of the team′s design solutions.

Winning students from each grade category will be invited to Goddard to participate in a behind-the-scenes workshop, attend a VIP awards ceremony and meet actor Peter Cullen, the voice of OPTIMUS PRIME.

The deadline to register and upload videos is Jan. 12, 2015.

For more information, visit http://itpo.gsfc.nasa.gov/optimus/.

Questions about this contest should be directed to Darryl Mitchell at Darryl.R.Mitchell@nasa.gov.

TRANSFORMERS and OPTIMUS PRIME are trademarks of Hasbro and are used with permission. © 2014 Hasbro. All rights reserved.

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National Science Foundation’s Community College Innovation Challenge

The National Science Foundation’s Community College Innovation Challenge is underway and seeking teams to propose innovative science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, -based solutions for real-world problems. Teams must comprise community college students, a faculty mentor and a community or industry partner.

Challenge entries consist of two components: a written entry and a video entry. Each team’s entry must address one of the five themes outlined by the National Science Foundation. This year’s themes are Big Data, Infrastructure Security, Sustainability, Broadening Participation in STEM and Improving STEM Education.

Finalist teams will be invited to attend an Innovation Boot Camp, a professional development workshop on innovation and entrepreneurship.

The entry submission deadline is Jan. 15, 2015.

For additional information about the challenge, visit http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/communitycollege/.

Questions about this challenge should be directed to InnovationChallenge@nsf.gov.

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2015 Alan Shepard Technology in Education Award

Do you know K-12 teachers or district-level administrators who are making a difference in education through the use of technology? Recognize their achievements by nominating them for the Alan Shepard Technology in Education Award. The Astronauts Memorial Foundation, in partnership with NASA and the Space Foundation, will recognize the accomplishments of one outstanding individual and his or her contributions to lifelong learning through the application of technology in the classroom or in the professional development of teachers.

Technology personnel and K-12 classroom teachers who have demonstrated exemplary use of technology to enhance learning in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, are eligible for this award. School principals, superintendents or associate superintendents may nominate eligible candidates. The award will be presented in April 2015 at the Space Foundation’s 31st Space Symposium in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The deadline for applications is Jan. 16, 2015.

Applications and more information are available online at http://www.astronautsmemorial.org/alan-shepard-award.html .

Questions about this award should be directed to amfreg@amfcse.org.

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DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2014 NASA EONS Solicitation New Appendix

NASA’s Office of Education is accepting new proposals under the Education Opportunities in NASA STEM, or EONS, 2014 NASA Research Announcement for the Minority University Research and Education Program, or MUREP, Institutional Research Opportunity, or MIRO appendix. This effort was previously titled as the NASA University Research Centers Project, and has now been consolidated into the MUREP Program within the NASA Office of Education.

Through the EONS omnibus solicitation, the opportunity MIRO has been released. Through MIRO awards, NASA aims to promote science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM literacy and to enhance and sustain the capability of minority serving institutions to perform NASA-related research and education, which directly support NASA’s four mission directorates — Aeronautics Research, Human Exploration and Space Operations, Science, and Space Technology.

The deadline for proposals has been extended to Jan. 30, 2015.

For more information regarding the MIRO solicitation, please visit the NASA EONS page on the NASA Solicitation and Proposal Integrated Review and Proposal System, or NSPIRES, website at: http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId=%7bB6C61D04-5793-EF52-3497-1AA57FA424A5%7d&path=open .

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2015 NOAA Undergraduate Scholarship

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA, is accepting applications for its 2015 Educational Partnership Program, or EPP, Undergraduate Scholarship Program. The EPP Undergraduate Scholarship Program provides scholarships for two years of undergraduate study to rising junior undergraduate students majoring in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields that directly support NOAA’s mission.

Participants receive total awards valued at up to $35,000 in total support during their junior and senior years. During the first summer, scholars complete a nine-week paid summer internship at NOAA in Silver Spring, Maryland. During the second summer, scholars complete paid internships at NOAA facilities across the country. A stipend and housing allowance is provided. At the end of both summer internships, students present the results of their projects at an education and science symposium in Silver Spring.

Students attending an accredited Minority Serving Institution within the United States or U.S. Territories as defined by the U.S. Department of Education (Hispanic Serving Institutions, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tribal Colleges and Universities, Alaskan-Native Serving Institutions, and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions) are eligible to apply for the program. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and must earn and maintain a minimum 3.2 grade point average on a 4.0 scale.

Applications are due Jan. 30, 2015.

For more information and to submit an online application, visit http://www.epp.noaa.gov/ssp_undergrad_page.html.

Questions about this scholarship opportunity should be directed to EPP.USP@noaa.gov.

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NASA History Program Office Summer and Fall 2015 Internships

The NASA History Program Office is seeking undergraduate and graduate students for summer and fall 2015 internships. The History Program Office maintains archival materials to answer research questions from NASA personnel, journalists, scholars, students at all levels and others from around the world. The division also edits and publishes several books and monographs each year. It maintains a large number of websites on NASA history.

Students of all majors are welcome to apply. While detailed prior knowledge of the aeronautics and space fields is not necessary, a keen interest and some basic familiarity with these topics are needed. Strong research, writing and editing skills are essential. Experience with social media is a plus.

Intern projects are flexible. Typical projects include handling a variety of information requests, writing posts for the NASA history Twitter and Facebook pages, editing historical manuscripts, doing research and writing biographical sketches, and identifying and captioning photos.

Applications for summer 2015 internships are due Feb. 1, 2015. Fall 2015 internship applications are due June 1, 2015.

For more information, visit http://history.nasa.gov/interncall.htm.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please contact Bill Barry at bill.barry@nasa.gov.

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2015 Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program

The Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program, or PGGURP, pairs qualified undergraduate students with NASA-funded investigators at research locations across the U.S. for eight weeks during the summer. Students will spend the summer at the NASA scientists’ home institutions. Selected students receive a cost-of-living stipend and compensation for housing and travel.

Undergraduate students majoring in geology or related sciences are eligible to apply. Students graduating in 2015 who have not started graduate school yet are also eligible. Preference is given to U.S. citizens and permanent residents.

Applications are due Feb. 2, 2015.

For more information, visit http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/~tgregg/pggurp_homepage.html.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please email Robyn Wagner, PGGURP administrator, at pggurp@buffalo.edu.

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NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellowships

The NASA Postdoctoral Program, or NPP, supports NASA’s goal to expand scientific understanding of the Earth and the universe in which we live.

Selected by a competitive peer-review process, NPP fellows complete one- to three-year fellowships that offer scientists and engineers unique opportunities to conduct research in fields of science relevant to NASA.

These opportunities advance NASA’s missions in earth science, heliophysics, astrophysics, planetary science, astrobiology, space bioscience, aeronautics and engineering, human exploration and operations, and space technology. Opportunities are available at NASA centers and other NASA-approved sites.

As a result, NPP fellows contribute to national priorities for scientific exploration, confirm NASA’s leadership in fundamental research and complement the efforts of NASA’s partners in the national science community.

U.S. citizens, lawful permanent residents and foreign nationals eligible for J-1 status as a research scholar may apply. Applicants must have completed a doctorate or equivalent degree before beginning the fellowship, but may apply while completing degree requirements. Applicants who earned the Ph.D. more than five years before the deadline date are categorized as senior fellows; all applicants, no matter their category, must apply and become eligible for an NPP award via the same process.

Interested applicants may apply by one of three annual application deadlines: March 1, July 1 and November 1.

For more information and application procedures, go to http://nasa.orau.org/postdoc/.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to nasapostdoc@orau.org.

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2014 NASA EONS Solicitation Amendment 8: New Program Element

The NASA Office of Education Minority University Research and Education Project, or MUREP, solicits proposals from Minority Serving Institutions, or MSIs, to create and implement a NASA STEM challenge, targeted for MSI participation. STEM challenges are creative applications of NASA-related science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and cross-cutting concepts.

MUREP STEM Engagement, or MSE, seeks proposals to support MSIs that demonstrate the potential to increase the number of minority undergraduates in STEM education areas relevant to NASA.

The specific goals of MSE awards are to:
— Increase the retention and completion rates of undergraduate degrees awarded from MSIs in NASA-related STEM disciplines;
— Increase the number of NASA-focused STEM experiences that engage underrepresented groups in active learning to improve retention of information and critical thinking skills; and,
— Disseminate proven, innovative practices and programs in STEM teaching, STEM learning, and recruitment and retention of underrepresented/ underserved students in STEM fields.

The specific objectives of the NASA MSE solicitation are to:
— Design, develop and implement a NASA-related STEM challenge targeted for MSI and community college STEM-enrolled student participation;
— Align the challenge design with the NASA mission and with a specific NASA program or project; and
— Develop and implement processes to capture the impact of activities and strategies implemented through this challenge.

Notices of Intent are requested by Jan. 20, 2015, and proposals are due March 2, 2015.

For more information, visit http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId={F257E429-24AC-EE13-09E6-45812E0D1314}&path=open.

Questions about this solicitation may be directed to Theresa Martinez, MSE manager, at NASAMSE@nasaprs.com.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — Nov. 20, 2014

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations
Available While Supplies Last

Release of Draft Cooperative Agreement Notice for NASA Science Mission Directorate Science Education
Audience: All Educators

NASA’s ESTEEM “Ask US” Online Professional Development Series
Audience: K-12 Educators
Next Event Date: Nov. 20, 2014, at 4 p.m. EST

Museum Alliance Webcast: Beyond Earth Orbit With the Orion Spacecraft
Audience: Home School Families, Museums and Schools
Event Date: Nov. 20, 2014, at 4 p.m. EST

Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program Accepting Applications for 2015-2016 Fellowship Year
Audience: K-12 STEM Educators
Application Deadline: Nov. 20, 2014, at 5 p.m. EST

NASA’s Balance Mass Challenge: Using “Dead Weight” on Mars Spacecraft to Advance Science and Technology
Audience: Educators and Students 18 Years of Age and Older
Entry Deadline: Nov. 21, 2014

NASA CubeSat Space Missions
Audience: Higher Education Educators & Students
Application Deadline: Nov. 25, 2014

Louisiana Tech University Online Course — Steps to STEM: NASA Education Resources for STEM Engagement
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: Nov. 30, 2014

DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2014 Humans in Space Art Video Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Students and Early Career Professionals
Deadline: Nov. 30, 2014

Beautiful Earth Program Presents: Bella Gaia, a Multimedia Performance
Audience: Grades 5-12 Educators and Students
Event Date: Dec. 1, 2014, at 1 p.m. EST

Free Education Webinar From NASA Educator Professional Development — Orion: NASA’s New Spacecraft for Human Exploration
Audience: K-12 In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Event Date: Dec. 2, 2014, at 5 p.m. EST

National Academies Workshop: “Sharing the Adventure With the Student: Exploring the Intersections of NASA Space Science and Education”
Audience: All Educators
Workshop Dates: Dec. 2-3, 2014

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event – Orion Flight Test
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Dec. 4, 2014, 1:30-2:30 p.m. EST

Free Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series
Audience: All Educators and 9-Higher Education Students
Next Lecture Date: Dec. 6, 2014, at 5:15 p.m. EST

Host a Real-Time Conversation With Crew Members Aboard the International Space Station
Audience: All Educators
Proposal Deadline: Dec. 15, 2014

Future Engineers 3-D Printing in Space: Design a Space Tool Challenge
Audience: K-12 Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: Dec. 15, 2014

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 8 to the International Space Station
Audience: School Districts Serving Grades 5-12, Informal Education Institutions, Colleges and Universities
Inquiry Deadline: Dec. 15, 2014

NASA Space Technology Game Changing Program Solicitation for Ultralightweight Core Materials for Efficient Load-Bearing Composite Sandwich Structures
Audience: Higher Education Institutions
Proposal Deadline: Dec. 16, 2014

2015 NASA High-Altitude Student Platform Opportunity
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: Dec. 19, 2014

SOFIA Airborne Astronomy Ambassador Program
Audience: K-14 Teachers and Informal Educators
Application Deadline: Dec. 22, 2014

2014-2015 FIRST Robotic Competitions
Audience: K-12 Educators and Students
Kick-off Event: Jan. 3, 2015

2015 NASA and Worcester Polytechnic Institute Sample Return Robot Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Deadline: 11:59 pm EST Jan. 6, 2015

2015 RASC-AL Aerospace Concepts Design Competition
Audience: Higher Education Students
Proposal Deadline: Jan. 11, 2015

2014-2015 NASA Goddard OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Challenge
Audience: Grade 3-12 Students
Registration Deadline: Jan. 12, 2015

National Science Foundation’s Community College Innovation Challenge
Audience: Teams of Community College Students and Faculty Mentors
Entry Deadline: Jan. 15, 2015

2015 Alan Shepard Technology in Education Award
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: Jan. 16, 2015

DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2014 NASA EONS Solicitation New Appendix
Audience: Minority Universities
Proposal Deadline: Jan. 30, 2015

NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowships Program Accepting Proposals for 2015-2016 Academic Year
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Proposal Deadline: Feb. 2, 2014

2020 Electric General Aviation NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Students
Entry Deadline: May 8, 2015

NASA Robotic Mining Competition 2015
Audience: Higher Education Educators & Students
Event Date: May 18-22, 2015

Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

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Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles Available for Educational Use

NASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions and museums to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles and other special items offered on a first-come, first-served basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

There will be a nominal shipping fee that must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.

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Release of Draft Cooperative Agreement Notice for NASA Science Mission Directorate Science Education

On Nov. 6, 2014, NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, or SMD, released for community comment a draft Cooperative Agreement Notice, or CAN, for team-based proposals for SMD science education. The draft text is downloadable from the NASA Solicitation and Proposal Integrated Review and Evaluation System, or NSPIRES, Web page at http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId={556FB435-535C-1D75-3E70-05C2B341A1FD}&path=future. Comments on this draft text are due to the point of contact noted below no later than 30 days after release of the draft text. It is anticipated that the final CAN will be issued no earlier than December 2014.

The goal of the NASA SMD Science Education CAN is to meet the following NASA SMD Science Education Objectives: Enabling science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, education, improving U.S. science literacy; advancing National education goals; and leveraging science education through partnerships. NASA intends to select one or more focused science discipline-based team(s). While it is envisioned that multiple agreements may be awarded, selection of a single award to support all of SMD science education requirements is not precluded. Awards are anticipated by Sept. 30, 2015.

Neither the issuance of this announcement nor the draft CAN obligates NASA to issue the final CAN and solicit proposals. Issuance of the CAN is dependent on programmatic factors, including NASA receiving an appropriation and operating plan containing adequate funding within the NASA Science Mission Directorate budget. Any costs incurred by prospective submitters in response to this announcement or the draft CAN are incurred completely at the submitters′ own risk. The final CAN may contain provisions that differ from the draft CAN, in which case those provisions in the final CAN would take precedence.

All comments and questions should be directed only to CANsci-ed@hq.nasa.gov by the due date above. Comments are to be submitted by email using the character string “Science Education CAN” (without quotes) included in the subject line. The identity of those submitting comments will be held in confidence. Answers to questions about this announcement and draft CAN will be made available in a FAQ under other documents on the NSPIRES website for this CAN. Check FAQs often for updates.

Anticipated SMD Science Education CAN schedule:
Final CAN Release Date (target)………………………………. January 2015
Notice of Intent to Propose Deadline…………………………. 30 days after final CAN release
Proposal Deadline…………………………………………………… 90 days after final CAN release
Selections Announced (target)………………………………….. Summer 2015
Projects Begin (target)…………………………………………….. October 1, 2015

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NASA’s ESTEEM “Ask US” Online Professional Development Series

NASA’s Minority University Research and Education Program, or MUREP, is sponsoring a series of Google Plus Hangout professional development events for K-12 educators. The Earth Systems, Technology and Energy Education for MUREP, or ESTEEM, team will lead the monthly sessions that will cover a variety of climate topics. This month’s webinar topic is:

Change Over Time: Investigate Climate Change Impacts in the Southeast U.S. — Nov. 20, 2014, at 4 p.m. EST
The National Climate Assessment, released in May of 2014, summarizes the impacts of climate change on the United States, touching on many disciplines: earth science, biology, human health, engineering, technology, economics and policy. Explore the document with Dr. Fred Lipschultz from the United States Global Change Research Project, and then learn about educator resources that will enable you to bring this topic into classroom lessons, engage students in data collection and analysis, and share visualizations and citizen science projects. The focus this month will be on the Southeast and Caribbean region. Watch for additional regions of the U.S. to be featured in upcoming “Ask US” sessions.

Certificates of professional development hours are available upon request.

For more information on this event and upcoming webinar sessions, visit https://nice.larc.nasa.gov/asknice/. Questions about this series should be sent to Bonnie Murray at bonnie.murray@nasa.gov.

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Museum Alliance Webcast: Beyond Earth Orbit With the Orion Spacecraft

The Orion team invites home school families, museums and schools to participate in an interactive webcast featuring Lockheed Martin engineer Joe LeBlanc. In this interactive webcast on Nov. 20, 2014, at 4 p.m. EST, LeBlanc will broadcast live from the Space Vehicle Mock-up Facility at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. He will share NASA′s efforts in deep space exploration and the importance of Orion′s first flight.

You may view the webcast as an individual at your personal computer or set up audio visual equipment in your museum or school for a large group to participate.

LeBlanc will take questions from a live audience at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama, as well as from webcast viewers nationwide. Questions may be submitted before or during the event to jsc-orion-outreach@mail.nasa.gov.

To view the webcast, visit http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-jsc.

To learn more about the upcoming Orion mission and to learn how you can plan an event to celebrate the launch, visit www.ExploreDeepSpace.com.

Additional Orion resources may be found at http://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/mpcv/ and https://www.flickr.com/photos/nasaorion.

After the webcast, presentation materials will be posted on the Museum Alliance member site at https://informal.jpl.nasa.gov/museum/Conversations. A downloadable copy of the webcast and transcript will be posted a week or so later at the same location. Username and password are required to access the member site.

To learn how to become a Museum Alliance member, visit https://informal.jpl.nasa.gov/museum/About.

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Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program Accepting Applications for 2015-2016 Fellowship Year

The Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship, or AEF, Program provides a unique opportunity for accomplished K-12 educators in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, to serve in the national education arena. Fellows spend 11 months working in a federal agency or U.S. congressional office, bringing their extensive classroom knowledge and experience to STEM education program and/or education policy efforts. Program applications are due Nov. 20, 2014, and must be submitted through an online application system.

To be eligible, applicants must be U.S. citizens who are currently employed full time in a U.S. public or private elementary or secondary school or school district, and must have been teaching full time in a public or private elementary or secondary school for at least five of the last seven years in a STEM discipline.

Federal sponsors have included NASA, the Department of Energy, or DOE, the National Science Foundation and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The DOE sponsors up to four placements in U.S. congressional offices.

The AEF Program is managed by the DOE Office of Science, Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists, in collaboration with the Triangle Coalition for STEM Education and the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education.

Information about the Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program, including eligibility requirements, program benefits, application requirements and access to the online application system can be found at http://science.energy.gov/wdts/einstein/.

Inquiries about the Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program should be directed to sc.einstein@science.doe.gov.

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NASA’s Balance Mass Challenge: Using “Dead Weight” on Mars Spacecraft to Advance Science and Technology

The Mars Balance Mass Challenge seeks design ideas for science and technology payloads that could potentially provide dual purpose as ejectable balance masses on spacecraft entering the Martian atmosphere.

The payloads may serve two roles: perform scientific and/or technology functions that help us learn more about the Red Planet, and provide the necessary mass to balance planetary landers.

Submissions are due Nov. 21, 2014. All potential solvers submitting ideas must be 18 years of age or older. A winner will be announced in mid-January 2015 and receive an award of $20,000.

For more information about the challenge, visit https://www.innocentive.com/ar/challenge/9933607.

The Mars Balance Mass Challenge is managed by NASA’s Center of Excellence for Collaborative Innovation, or CoECI. CoECI was established in coordination with the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy to advance NASA’s open innovation efforts and extend that expertise to other federal agencies. The challenges are being released on the NASA Innovation Pavilion, one of the CoECI platforms available to NASA team members, through its contract with InnoCentive Inc. Also please visit the new NASA Solve website to watch a video on the Mars Balance Mass challenge and to learn more about all NASA challenge and prize-based activities.

Questions about the contest series should be directed to NASA′s Center of Excellence for Collaborative Innovation at nasa-coeci@mail.nasa.gov.

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NASA CubeSat Space Missions

NASA has opened the next round of its CubeSat Launch Initiative, part of the White House Maker Initiative, in an effort to engage the growing community of space enthusiasts that can contribute to NASA’s space exploration goals.

The CubeSat Launch Initiative gives students, teachers and faculty a chance to get hands-on flight hardware development experience in the process of designing, building and operating small research satellites. It also provides a low-cost pathway to space for research in the areas of science, exploration, technology development, education or operations consistent with NASA’s Strategic Plan.

Applicants must submit their proposals electronically by 4:30 p.m. EST, Nov. 25, 2014. NASA will select the payloads by Feb. 6, 2015, but selection does not guarantee a launch opportunity. Selected experiments are slated to be flown as auxiliary payloads on agency rocket launches or to be deployed from the International Space Station beginning in 2015 and running through 2018. NASA does not provide funding for the development of the small satellites, and this opportunity is open only to U.S. nonprofit organizations and accredited educational organizations.

One goal of the CubeSat Launch Initiative is to extend the successes of space exploration to all 50 states by launching a small satellite from at least one participant in each state in the next five years. During this round, NASA is particularly focused on gaining participation in the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and 21 states not previously selected for the CubeSat Launch Initiative. These states are: Arkansas, Delaware, Georgia, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, South Dakota, Washington, West Virginia and Wyoming.

CubeSats are in a class of research spacecraft called nanosatellites. The base CubeSat dimensions are about 4 inches by 4 inches by 4 inches (10 centimeters by 10 centimeters by 11 centimeters), which equals one “cube,” or 1U. CubeSats supported by this launch effort include volumes of 1U, 2U, 3U and 6U. CubeSats of 1U, 2U and 3U size typically have a mass of about three pounds (1.33 kilograms) per 1U Cube. A 6U CubeSat typically has a mass of about 26.5 pounds (12 kilograms). The CubeSat’s final mass depends on which deployment method is selected.

To date, NASA has selected 114 CubeSats from 29 states, 17 of which have already been launched. Nine more CubeSats are scheduled to go into space in the next 12 months.

For additional information about NASA’s CubeSat Launch Initiative program, visit http://www.nasa.gov/cubesats.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Jason Crusan at Jason.Crusan@nasa.gov.

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Louisiana Tech University Online Course — Steps to STEM: NASA Education Resources for STEM Engagement

Louisiana Tech University is teaming up with NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center to offer a 10-week course for educators interested in putting a space-themed twist on learning. The course is designed to be a self-paced, online professional development experience focusing on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, or STEM, education resources available from NASA. These resources have application methods for use in grades 4-9 classrooms with the goal of advancing high quality STEM education utilizing NASA’s unique capabilities.

Applications are due Nov. 30, 2014.

For more information and to enroll in the course, visit http://education.latech.edu/departments/science_technology_education_center/opeo.php.

Requests for a course syllabus and additional course information, and questions about the course should be directed to Amy McDowell at amy.mcdowell@nasa.gov.

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DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2014 Humans in Space Art Video Challenge

The Humans in Space Art Program and NASA’s International Space Station Program have teamed up to launch the international Humans in Space Art Challenge. How will humans use space science and technology to benefit humanity? College students and early career professionals are invited to ponder this question and to express an answer creatively in a video less than three minutes long. Video artwork can be of any style, featuring original animation, sketches, music, live action drama, poetry, dance, Rube Goldberg machines, apps, etc. Younger students may also participate, but all artwork will be judged in one age category.

Individuals or teams of participants should include one clear reference to the International Space Station in their videos and may use space station footage if desired.

An interdisciplinary team of space representatives and art experts will evaluate the videos. NASA and the Humans in Space Art program will make the highest scoring artwork visible worldwide through online and local touring events. NASA will also take the winning video on a trip into orbit on the International Space Station and provide montages with flown patches for winners.

The deadline for submissions has been extended. All submissions must be received by Nov. 30, 2014.

For additional information and a complete list of guidelines, visit http://www.lpi.usra.edu/humansinspaceart/challenge/.

Inquiries about this opportunity should be directed to humansinspaceart@lpi.usra.edu.

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Beautiful Earth Program Presents: Bella Gaia, a Multimedia Performance

NASA’s Beautiful Earth Program invites educators and students to take part in a musical and visual tour of Earth from space on Dec. 1, 2014, at 1 p.m. EST. During this one-hour event, composer and musician Kenji Williams will perform Bella Gaia, a multimedia experience that incorporates music and NASA imagery. Following the performance, scientist Dr. Dalia Kirschbaum from NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement mission will lead a discussion on extreme weather science. During the discussion, students and teachers from across the country are invited to ask questions on the theme of extreme weather. (There are only six slots available for schools to interact live.)

Other participants can view and interact with the program via webcast.

For more information and to register to attend, visit http://beautifulearth.gsfc.nasa.gov/Events/.

Questions about this event should be directed to vcasa@umbc.edu.

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Free Education Webinar From NASA Educator Professional Development — Orion: NASA’s New Spacecraft for Human Exploration

Join NASA Educator Professional Development on Dec. 2, 2014, at 5 p.m. EST for an hourlong webinar for educators of grades K-12. Participants will learn about Orion, NASA’s new spacecraft that will take humans farther than they’ve ever gone. Orion will serve as the exploration vehicle that will carry the crew to space, provide emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. On Dec. 4, 2014, Orion will launch atop a Delta IV heavy rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Space Launch Complex Flight Test on the Orion Flight Test: a two-orbit, four-hour flight that will test many of the systems most critical to safety.

For more information and to register online, visit https://events-na11.adobeconnect.com/content/connect/c1/1088539485/en/events/event/shared/1097653603/event_landing.html?sco-id=1259584673.

Questions about this webinar should be directed to Clarence Jones at Clarence.F.Jones@NASA.gov.

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National Academies Workshop: “Sharing the Adventure With the Student: Exploring the Intersections of NASA Space Science and Education”

The National Academies invite educators to attend a free workshop entitled “Sharing the Adventure With the Student: Exploring the Intersections of NASA Space Science and Education.” This two-day workshop will take place Dec. 2-3, 2014, at the National Academy of Sciences Building in the District of Columbia.

The workshop will focus on maximizing the effectiveness of the transfer of knowledge from the scientists supported by NASA’s Science Mission Directorate to K-12 students directly and to teachers and informal educators. Not only will the effectiveness of recent models for transferring science content and scientific practices to students be covered, but the workshop will also serve as a venue for dialogue between education specialists, education staff from NASA and other agencies, space scientists and engineers, and science content generators.

Workshop participants will review case studies of scientists or engineers who were able to successfully translate their research results and research experiences into formal and informal student science learning, including measureable improvements to student achievement and other valued outcomes. Education specialists (e.g., state science supervisors, teacher education departments, professional development providers, informal science institutions/organizations, such as planetariums, after-school science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, education providers, state STEM education networks, and education researchers) will share how the science can be translated to education materials and to students directly, and teachers will share their experiences of space science in their classrooms.

For more information and to register for the workshop, visit http://sites.nationalacademies.org/SSB/CurrentProjects/SSB_152563.

Questions about the workshop should be directed to ssb@nas.edu.

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NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event – Orion Flight Test

Don’t miss the Orion Flight Test. NASA invites you to tune in for a special Digital Learning Network event. Orion will launch atop a Delta IV heavy rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. This two-orbit, four-hour flight will evaluate launch and high-speed re-entry systems such as avionics, attitude control, parachutes and the heat shield. The webcast including video of launch, special guests and more will be streamed on the NASA DLiNfo Channel.

The event will be webcast on the NASA DLiNfo Channel on Dec. 4, 2014, at 1:30 p.m. EST.

For more information and to view the webcast, visit http://dln.nasa.gov.

Questions about this event should be directed to Rachel Power at rachel.b.power@nasa.gov.

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Free Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series

Curious about icy bodies in the outer reaches of our solar system, the effects of space junk on deep-space observation, the latest discoveries about the origins of the universe and new ways galaxy formation is mapped? Come to the Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series presented by Smithsonian researchers who are exploring the sun, the moon, planets, stars, galaxies and the universe. These speakers will share behind-the-scenes details about how their research is done and about technologies that advance new discoveries. The lectures will be held at the Albert Einstein Planetarium at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.

Each lecture begins at 5:15 p.m. EST and is followed by a Q&A session. Stay after the lecture to visit the museum’s observatory, weather permitting.

Dec. 6, 2014 — Rubble Trouble: How Space Junk Impacts Astronomy
The incredible information and images gathered using space telescopes have revolutionized what we know about the cosmos. Could space junk hinder future findings? Research associate Lisa Rand will discuss this question and the impact space junk has on astronomy.

Jan. 24, 2015 — Observing the Origin of the Universe From the South Pole
After three years of observing from the South Pole, scientists may have found confirmation that the universe underwent a burst of inflationary growth at the time of the Big Bang. Cosmologist Colin Bischoff will discuss these findings as well as the excitement of astronomy from Antarctica.

Feb. 21, 2015 — Tracing the Structure of the Universe With Galaxy Surveys
Studies of galaxy formation and cosmology have exploded in recent years due to the immense data obtained from large galaxy surveys. Postdoctoral fellow Cameron McBride will discuss how observational data and theory are combined to better understand fundamental questions in our universe, and will highlight some exciting results from ongoing research.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/lectures/smithsonian-stars/.

Questions about this lecture series should be directed to the visitor service line at 202-633-2214.

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Host a Real-Time Conversation With Crew Members Aboard the International Space Station

ARISS-US is now accepting proposals from U.S. schools, museums, science centers and community youth organizations to host an Amateur Radio on the International Space Station, or ARISS, contact between May 1 – Dec. 31, 2015. To maximize these radio contact opportunities, ARISS-US is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed education plan. Proposals are due Dec. 15, 2014.

Using amateur radio, students can ask astronauts questions about life in space and other space-related topics. Students fully engage in the ARISS contact by helping set up an amateur radio ground station at the school and then using that station to talk directly with a crew member on the International Space Station for approximately 10 minutes. ARISS provides experienced mentors and relies on local amateur radio volunteers to help organizations obtain the technology required to host this once in a lifetime opportunity for students.

Interested parties should visit http://www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact to obtain complete information including how the technology works, what is expected of the host organization and how to submit the proposal form.

Questions about this opportunity should be emailed to ariss@arrl.org.

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Future Engineers 3-D Printing in Space: Design a Space Tool Challenge

NASA, in conjunction with the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Foundation, has issued a series of Future Engineers 3-D Space Challenges for students focused on solving real-world space exploration problems. Students will become the creators and innovators of tomorrow by using 3-D modeling software to submit their designs. Multiple prizes are available, but the grand prize winner will have the opportunity for his or her design to be printed on the first 3-D printer aboard the International Space Station while watching from NASA′s Payload Operations Center with the mission control team.

The Design a Space Tool Challenge is the first in series of challenges where students in grades K-12 will create and submit a digital 3-D model of a tool that they think astronauts might need in space. Future Engineers is a multiyear education initiative that consists of 3-D space challenges and curriculum videos on the site that parents and educators can use to get kids designing today.

Entries must be submitted by Dec. 15, 2014.

For more information about the challenge and to watch an introductory video from astronaut Doug Wheelock, visit http://www.nasa.gov/content/printing-challenges-for-the-first-3d-printer-aboard-the-international-space-station/.

If you have any questions about the Design a Space Tool Challenge, please email info@futureengineers.org.

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DEADLINE EXTENDED: Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 8 to the International Space Station

The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education and the Arthur C. Clarke Institute for Space Education, in partnership with NanoRacks LLC, announce an authentic science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, opportunity for school districts across the U.S. and space station partner nations. The newest flight opportunity, Mission 8 to the International Space Station, or ISS, gives students across a community the ability to design and propose real experiments to fly in low-Earth orbit on the ISS. This opportunity is part of the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program, or SSEP.

Each participating community will receive a real microgravity research minilaboratory capable of supporting a single microgravity experiment and all launch services to fly the minilab to the space station in fall 2015 and return it to Earth. An experiment design competition in each community — engaging typically 300+ students — allows student teams to design and propose real experiments vying for their community′s reserved minilab. Content resources for teachers and students support foundational instruction on science in microgravity and experimental design. Additional SSEP programming leverages the experiment design competition to engage the community, embracing a learning community model for STEM education.

This competition is open to students in grades 5-12 and college. Informal education groups and organizations are also encouraged to participate. Interested communities must inquire about the program no later than Dec. 15, 2014. The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education is available to help interested communities in the U.S. secure the needed funding.

To learn more about this opportunity, visit the SSEP Mission 8 to International Space Station National Announcement of Opportunity at http://ssep.ncesse.org/2014/10/new-flight-opportunity-for-school-districts-announcing-student-spaceflight-experiments-program-ssep-mission-8-to-the-international-space-station-starting-february-2015/.

SSEP is enabled through a strategic partnership with NanoRacks LLC working with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the utilization of the International Space Station as a national laboratory. The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (http://www.iss-casis.org/) is a national partner on SSEP. To view a list of all SSEP national partners, visit http://ssep.ncesse.org/national-partners/.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please email SSEP National Program Director Jeff Goldstein at jeffgoldstein@ncesse.org.

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NASA Space Technology Game Changing Program Solicitation for Ultralightweight Core Materials for Efficient Load-Bearing Composite Sandwich Structures

NASA is seeking proposals to develop and manufacture ultralightweight materials for aerospace vehicles and structures of the future. Proposals will demonstrate lower-mass alternatives to honeycomb or foam cores currently used in composite sandwich structures.

The goal of this Game Changing Development Program is to develop and demonstrate scalable and cost-effective manufacturing approaches to produce ultralightweight core materials both as flat panels and curved structures. The final products will have half or less the area density of conventional honeycomb cores, with equal or better mechanical properties.

Proposals will be accepted from U.S. organizations, including NASA centers and other government agencies, federally funded research and development centers, educational institutions, industry and nonprofit organizations. NASA expects to make two awards of up to $550,000 each for this first development phase.

Proposals are due Dec. 16, 2014.

For information on the solicitation and how to submit proposals, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/october/nasa-seeks-ultra-lightweight-materials-to-help-enable-journey-to-mars/.

This solicitation is part of NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate, which is responsible for innovating, developing, testing and flying hardware for use in future missions. For more information about the directorate and Space Technology Research Grants Program, visit http://www.nasa.gov/spacetech.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to Ryan Stephens at HQ-STMD-GCDC1@mail.nasa.gov.

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2015 NASA High-Altitude Student Platform Opportunity

NASA is accepting applications from students at U.S. colleges and universities who want to send experiments to the edge of space on a high-flying scientific balloon.

The annual NASA project provides near-space access for 12 undergraduate and graduate student experiments to be carried by a NASA high-altitude research balloon. The flights typically last 15 to 20 hours and reach an altitude of 23 miles. Experiments may include compact satellites or prototypes.

The experiments are flown aboard the High-Altitude Student Platform, or HASP, a balloon-born instrument stack launched from the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility’s remote site in Fort Sumner, New Mexico. The goals of the project are to provide a space test platform to encourage student research and stimulate the development of student satellite payloads and other space-engineering products.

HASP seeks to enhance the technical skills and research abilities of students in critical science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines. The project is a joint effort between NASA and the Louisiana Space Consortium. The Science Missions Directorate Astrophysics division manages the NASA scientific balloon program; Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia oversees Balloon Flight Operations.

The deadline for applications is Dec. 19, 2014.

For application information and technical details about the program, visit http://laspace.lsu.edu/hasp.

Questions about the High-Altitude Student Platform opportunity should be directed to T. Gregory Guzik at guzik@phunds.phys.lsu.edu.

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SOFIA Airborne Astronomy Ambassador Program

NASA’s Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, or SOFIA, is a 747SP aircraft carrying a 2.5 meter-diameter telescope. The SOFIA project is now accepting applications for the Cycle 3 — 2015 Airborne Astronomy Ambassadors, or AAA, program. The AAA program is an exciting and unique opportunity for teams of two educators to receive online astronomy instruction and a trip to NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in California to participate in two SOFIA science flights. The science flights offer educators interaction with astronomers, engineers and technicians aboard the aircraft and a view to the collaboration that leads to astronomical data collection and the research papers that follow.

One team member must be a science teacher; the other team member may be a teacher, informal educator or amateur astronomer. The eligibility and program requirements are detailed at http://www.seti.org/sofia. The program pays all costs.

Applications are due Dec. 22, 2014.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Pamela Harman at pharman@seti.org.

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2014-2015 FIRST Robotic Competitions

The FIRST Robotics Competition challenges teams of young people and their mentors to create a robot designed to solve a common problem in a six-week timeframe. Teams experience the entire engineering life cycle while building robots to compete in games that change every year. FIRST Robotics Competition teams are composed of high school students, with professional engineers acting as mentors. Additional FIRST programs are available for students of ages 6-18.

FIRST is a national organization founded in 1989 by inventor Dean Kamen in Manchester, New Hampshire, to inspire young people to pursue careers in science and technical fields.

The FRC Kickoff, the official start of the FIRST Robotics Competition design-and-build season, is set for Jan. 3, 2015. Teams have the opportunity to meet at local kickoff events to compare notes, get ideas, make friends, find mentoring teams, learn the game, pick up the Kit of Parts and get geared up for the exciting competition season. To find kickoff events in your area, visit http://www.usfirst.org/roboticsprograms/frc/kickoff.

For more information about FIRST Robotics and to register your team to participate, visit http://www.usfirst.org/.

Questions about FIRST Robotics should be submitted via http://www.usfirst.org/contactform.

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2015 NASA and Worcester Polytechnic Institute Sample Return Robot Challenge

NASA and the Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Worcester, Massachusetts, are seeking teams to compete in a robot technology demonstration competition with a potential $1.5 million prize purse.

During the Sample Return Robot Challenge, teams will compete to demonstrate a robot that can locate and retrieve geologic samples from a wide and varied terrain without human control. The objective of the competition is to encourage innovations in automatic navigation and robotic manipulator technologies. Innovations stemming from this challenge may improve NASA’s capability to explore a variety of destinations in space, as well as enhance the nation’s robotic technology for use in industries and applications on Earth.

The competition is planned for June 8-13, 2015, in Worcester, and is anticipated to attract hundreds of competitors from industry and academia nationwide.

Registration is open until Jan. 6, 2015.

For more information about the Sample Return Robot Challenge and to register online for the competition, visit http://challenge.wpi.edu.

The Centennial Challenges program is part of NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate, which is innovating, developing, testing and flying hardware for use in NASA’s future missions. For more information about NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate, visit http://www.nasa.gov/spacetech.

Questions about the Sample Return Robot Challenge should be sent to challenge@wpi.edu.

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2015 RASC-AL Aerospace Concepts Design Competition

NASA and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2015 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts-Academic Linkage, or RASC-AL, Aerospace Concepts competition. RASC-AL is a design project competition for university-level engineering students and faculty.

The 2015 RASC-AL contest challenges participants to design projects based on real NASA problems, responding to one of four themes:
— Earth-Independent Mars Pioneering Architecture
— Earth-Independent Lunar Pioneering Architecture
— Mars’ Moons Prospector Mission
— Large-Scale Mars Entry, Decent and Landing Pathfinder Mission

Concepts derived from the design projects could potentially be implemented by NASA.

Teams must submit an abstract for their proposed project by Jan. 11, 2015. The RASC-AL Steering Committee of NASA and industry experts will evaluate the proposals and select as many as 11 undergraduate and five graduate teams to compete against each other at a forum in June 2015 in Florida.

The RASC-AL competition is open to full-time undergraduate or graduate students majoring in engineering or science at an accredited university. University design teams must include one faculty or industry advisor with a university affiliation and two or more undergraduate or graduate students. A group of universities may also collaborate on a design project entry. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

For more information about this competition, visit http://nianet.org/RASCAL.

If you have questions about this competition, please contact Stacy Dees at stacy.dees@nianet.org or Shelley Spears at Shelley.Spears@nianet.org.

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2014-2015 NASA Goddard OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Challenge

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center is launching the 2014-2015 TRANSFORMERS OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Challenge, hosted by the Innovative Technology Partnerships Office. The purpose of the challenge is to raise awareness of NASA’s Technology Transfer Program and to inspire interest in all NASA missions, programs and projects.

This year the scope of the contest is being expanded to include two challenges. In the first challenge, students in grades 3-12 are asked to submit a video describing their favorite NASA Goddard spinoff. In a new twist, participants in this year′s contest must also use the engineering design process to develop and propose a new spinoff application of their own for the technology. Spinoffs are technologies originally created for space and modified into everyday products used on Earth. Examples include memory foam, invisible braces and scratch-resistant lenses for eyeglasses.

The second challenge, the TRANSFORMERS OPTIMUS PRIME InWorld Challenge, offers students in grades 6-12 an opportunity to take their video spinoff ideas to another level. Interested teams must study James Webb Space Telescope spinoff technology and post their completed spinoff videos for review by college engineering students. Engineering college mentors will select 20 teams to continue the collaborative design process within a multiuser virtual world to build a 3-D model of the team′s design solutions.

Winning students from each grade category will be invited to Goddard to participate in a behind-the-scenes workshop, attend a VIP awards ceremony and meet actor Peter Cullen, the voice of OPTIMUS PRIME.

The deadline to register and upload videos is Jan. 12, 2015.

For more information, visit http://itpo.gsfc.nasa.gov/optimus/.

Questions about this contest should be directed to Darryl Mitchell at Darryl.R.Mitchell@nasa.gov.

TRANSFORMERS and OPTIMUS PRIME are trademarks of Hasbro and are used with permission. © 2014 Hasbro. All rights reserved.

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National Science Foundation’s Community College Innovation Challenge

The National Science Foundation’s Community College Innovation Challenge is underway and seeking teams to propose innovative science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, -based solutions for real-world problems. Teams must comprise community college students, a faculty mentor and a community or industry partner.

Challenge entries consist of two components: a written entry and a video entry. Each team’s entry must address one of the five themes outlined by the National Science Foundation. This year’s themes are Big Data, Infrastructure Security, Sustainability, Broadening Participation in STEM and Improving STEM Education.

Finalist teams will be invited to attend an Innovation Boot Camp, a professional development workshop on innovation and entrepreneurship.

The entry submission deadline is Jan. 15, 2015.

For additional information about the challenge, visit http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/communitycollege/.

Questions about this challenge should be directed to InnovationChallenge@nsf.gov.

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2015 Alan Shepard Technology in Education Award

Do you know K-12 teachers or district-level administrators who are making a difference in education through the use of technology? Recognize their achievements by nominating them for the Alan Shepard Technology in Education Award. The Astronauts Memorial Foundation, in partnership with NASA and the Space Foundation, will recognize the accomplishments of one outstanding individual and his or her contributions to lifelong learning through the application of technology in the classroom or in the professional development of teachers.

Technology personnel and K-12 classroom teachers who have demonstrated exemplary use of technology to enhance learning in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, are eligible for this award. School principals, superintendents or associate superintendents may nominate eligible candidates. The award will be presented in April 2015 at the Space Foundation’s 31st Space Symposium in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The deadline for applications is Jan. 16, 2015.

Applications and more information are available online at http://www.astronautsmemorial.org/alan-shepard-award.html .

Questions about this award should be directed to amfreg@amfcse.org.

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DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2014 NASA EONS Solicitation New Appendix

NASA’s Office of Education is accepting new proposals under the Education Opportunities in NASA STEM, or EONS, 2014 NASA Research Announcement for the Minority University Research and Education Program, or MUREP, Institutional Research Opportunity, or MIRO appendix. This effort was previously titled as the NASA University Research Centers Project, and has now been consolidated into the MUREP Program within the NASA Office of Education.

Through the EONS omnibus solicitation, the opportunity MIRO has been released. Through MIRO awards, NASA aims to promote science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM literacy and to enhance and sustain the capability of minority serving institutions to perform NASA-related research and education, which directly support NASA’s four mission directorates — Aeronautics Research, Human Exploration and Space Operations, Science, and Space Technology.

The deadline for proposals has been extended to Jan. 30, 2015.

For more information regarding the MIRO solicitation, please visit the NASA EONS page on the NASA Solicitation and Proposal Integrated Review and Proposal System, or NSPIRES, website at: http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId=%7bB6C61D04-5793-EF52-3497-1AA57FA424A5%7d&path=open .

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NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowships Program Accepting Proposals for 2015-2016 Academic Year

The NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, or NESSF, is soliciting applications from accredited U.S. universities on behalf of individuals pursuing master’s or doctoral degrees in earth and space sciences, or related disciplines, for the 2015-2016 academic year. The purpose of NESSF is to ensure continued training of a highly qualified workforce in disciplines needed to achieve NASA’s scientific goals. Awards resulting from the competitive selection will be training grants to the respective universities, with the advisor serving as the principal investigator. The financial support for the NESSF program comes from the Science Mission Directorate’s four science divisions: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Planetary Science and Astrophysics.

Initially, NESSF awards are made for one year. They may be renewed for up to two additional years, contingent upon satisfactory progress (as reflected in academic performance, research progress and recommendation by the faculty advisor) and the availability of funds.

The maximum amount of a NESSF award is $30,000 per year.

Proposals for this opportunity are due Feb. 2, 2015.

For more information about this solicitation, visit http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId={B6CDCEA6-8EDD-A48A-FAF8-E588F66661C3}&path=open.

Questions about Earth Science Research NESSF opportunities should be directed to Claire Macaulay at Claire.I.Macaulay@nasa.gov.

Questions about Heliophysics Research, Planetary Science Research and Astrophysics Research opportunities should be directed to Dolores Holland at hq-nessf-Space@nasa.gov.

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2020 Electric General Aviation NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge

Electric-powered aircraft have the potential to revolutionize the way we travel. NASA invites college teams to take part in the 2015 NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate’s 2020 Electric General Aviation Design Challenge. Student teams are invited to design an electric (i.e., no combustion) general aviation aircraft that meets performance requirements and is operational by 2020.

The contest is open to teams of full-time students enrolled in higher education institutions of the United States or its territories. This category includes universities, colleges, trade schools, community colleges, professional schools, etc. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

Letters of intent will be accepted through Jan. 16, 2015. Final entries are due May 8, 2015.

For more information and a complete list of rules, visit http://aero.larc.nasa.gov/university-contest/.

Questions about the challenge should be directed to Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.

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NASA Robotic Mining Competition 2015

The Sixth Annual NASA Robotic Mining Competition will be held at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center May 18-22, 2015. NASA’s Robotic Mining Competition is for university-level students, enrolled in a U.S. college or university. Teams are challenged to design and build a mining robot that can traverse the simulated Martian chaotic terrain, excavate Martian regolith and deposit the regolith into a collector bin within 10 minutes. There is particular relevance to NASA’s recently announced mission to find an asteroid by 2016 and then bring it to cislunar space. NASA will directly benefit from the competition by encouraging the development of innovative excavation concepts from universities, which may result in ideas and solutions that could be applied to an actual excavation device or payload.

The winning team will receive the Joe Kosmo Award for Excellence trophy, KSC launch invitations, team certificates for each member and a monetary team scholarship. Awards for other categories include monetary team scholarships, a school trophy or plaque, team and individual certificates, and KSC launch invitations.

Design teams must include at least one college or university faculty member and at least two undergraduate or graduate students. NASA has not set an upper limit on team members. A team should have a sufficient number of members to successfully operate their mining robot. Teams will compete in up to five major competition categories, including onsite mining, systems engineering paper, outreach project, slide presentation and demonstration (optional) and team spirit (optional).

Registration opened on Sept. 3, 2014, and is limited to 50 teams.

For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/centers/kennedy/technology/nasarmc.html.

Follow the NASA Robotic Mining Competition on Twitter at https://twitter.com/NASARMC.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Bethanné Hull at Bethanne.Hull@nasa.gov.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

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