Shipping a satellite by air, land and sea!

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GPM C5 Cargo Plane Shipping CrewThe Global Precipitation Management (GPM) C-5 cargo plane shipping crew showcased NASA’s Best Place to Work achievement after arriving in Kitakyushu, Japan. The GPM Core Observatory is a satellite (inside the container in the background of the picture) that launched from Tanegashima, Japan on February 28, 2014 at 3:37am (Japan time). Its objective is to measure precipitation (rain, snow, hail) around the globe in order to help study our climate, as well as provide valuable information that will help manage the consequences of too much precipitation or too little precipitation.

Designing a mission to Mars

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LaRC VASTS students

Students from the Virginia Aerospace Science and Technology Scholars (VASTS) program and  Astronaut Roger Crouch celebrated NASA’s designation as the Best Place to Work in the federal government. During the week-long VASTS Summer Academy at Langley Reseach Center, the students design a full human round-trip mission to Mars.

Agency Chief Information Officers celebrate BPTW 2013!

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Members of the CIO’s office celebrated NASA’s Best Place to Work achievement during their 2014 CIO Leadership Meeting.  Those present to showcase the plaque included Leigh Anne Girardi, Jim Rinaldi, Larry Freudinger, Sean Gallagher, Dana Mellerio, Lara Petze, Dennis Vandertuig, Dinna Cottrell, Annette Moore, Jeff Seaton, Gary Cox, Larry Sweet, Jonathan Pettus, Deborah Diaz, Vanessa Stromer, Terry Jackson, Jim Walker and Victor Thompson.

Agency Chief Information Officers (CIO) celebrated NASA’s Best Place to Work achievement during their 2014 CIO Leadership Meeting. Those present to showcase the plaque included Leigh Anne Girardi, Jim Rinaldi, Larry Freudinger, Sean Gallagher, Dana Mellerio, Lara Petze, Dennis Vandertuig, Dinna Cottrell, Annette Moore, Jeff Seaton, Gary Cox, Larry Sweet, Jonathan Pettus, Deborah Diaz, Vanessa Stromer, Terry Jackson, Jim Walker and Victor Thompson.

Keeping NASA Healthy

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KSC Medical Staff 1

Medical clerks and administrative assistants at Kennedy Space Center’s Occupational Health Facility coordinate scheduling for all certification and surveillance medical exams for the entire center.  They maintain the center medical records, greet and register patients, and facilitate the smooth running of the clinic. L-R: Nancy Zuhlke, Sue Wilkins, Dawn Sweeney, Anita Lewis-Bookhart, Debbie Stubli

Call Us Anytime!

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NSSC Call Center

Members of the NASA Shared Services Center’s Customer Contact Team at Stennis Space Center pose proudly with their BPTW plaque.  The NSSC Customer Contact Center is a disciplined approach to the management of customer interactions for timely resolution of customer issues, for follow-up and feedback on outstanding issues, for identifying process improvements, and for improving customer satisfaction.

Luck be a LADEE

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ARC LADEE

Some of Ames Research Center’s Lunar Atmosphere & Dust Experiment Explorer (LADEE) team in the ARC clean room highbay with the LADEE Observatory in the background. LADEE is a robotic mission that will orbit the moon to gather detailed information about the lunar atmosphere, conditions near the surface and environmental influences on lunar dust. The team recently celebrated a successful launch into orbit.

Looking Out for KSC’s Safety

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KSC safety and mission assurance

Kennedy Space Center’s Safety & Mission Assurance Institutional Safety Team takes safety very seriously.  Their jobs are to ensure the KSC Workforce goes home after every shift as healthy as when they arrived.  The team shares:  “We are diligent in our daily efforts of keeping a close eye on anything that can injure our KSC Family.  The worksites we keep a watchful eye over include everything from office areas and cafeterias to construction sites and laboratories.  We take safety to its highest level and help you do the same by encouraging employees to take ownership of their own safety.  Together we are safer.  We stand ready, willing, and able to help you anytime you need us!”

It’s a Dog’s (Happy) Life at NASA

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LARC Hangar

Evan Horowitz and Dee O Gee, his guide dog in training, pose in Langley Research Center’s flight hangar. Evan is LaRC’s Structural Airworthiness Engineer.  When an experiment is installed on NASA aircraft, research equipment is mounted inside and/or outside (in the breeze). Also, structural modifications to the aircraft may be needed to accommodate these equipment mounts.  Evan’s job is to make sure that all structural modifications are safe to fly.

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