A Look at Today’s Key Milestones for NASA’s SpaceX Crew-1 Mission

The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and Crew Dragon spacecraft stand on the launch pad at Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39A.
The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and Crew Dragon spacecraft stand on the launch pad at Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Complex 39A during final preparations for launch on NASA’s SpaceX Crew-1 mission. Liftoff is scheduled for 7:27 p.m. EST.

Below are some key milestones for today’s Crew-1 mission. Launch is targeted for 7:27 p.m. EST.

  • 3:12 p.m. Crew weather brief
  • 3:22 p.m. Crew handoff
  • 3:27 p.m. Suit donning and checkouts
  • 4:05 p.m. Crew walkout from Neil Armstrong Operations & Checkout Building
  • 4:12 p.m. Crew transportation to Launch Complex 39A
  • 4:32 p.m. Crew arrives at pad
  • 4:52 p.m. Crew ingress
  • 5:07 p.m. Communication check
  • 5:12 p.m. Verify ready for seat rotation
  • 5:13 p.m. Suit leak checks
  • 5:32 p.m. Hatch close
  • 6:42 p.m. SpaceX Launch Director verifies go for propellant load
  • 6:45 p.m. Crew access arm retracts
  • 6:49 p.m. Dragon spacecraft launch escape system is armed
  • 6:52 p.m. RP-1 (rocket grade kerosene) loading begins; first stage liquid oxygen loading begins
  • 7:11 p.m. Second stage liquid oxygen loading begins
  • 7:20 p.m. Falcon 9 begins engine chill prior to launch
  • 7:22 p.m. Dragon transitions to internal power
  • 7:26 p.m. Command flight computer to begin final prelaunch checks;
    propellant tank pressurization to flight pressure begins
  • 7:26 p.m. SpaceX Launch Director verifies go for launch
  • 7:27:12 p.m. Engine controller commands engine ignition sequence to start
  • 7:27:15 p.m. Liftoff!
  • 7:28 p.m. Max Q (moment of peak mechanical stress on the rocket)
  • 7:29:52 p.m. First stage main engine cutoff (MECO)
  • 7:29 p.m. First and second stages separate
  • 7:30 p.m. Second stage engine starts
  • 7:34 p.m. First stage entry burn
  • 7:36:05 p.m. Second stage engine cutoff (SECO-1)
  • 7:36:14 p.m. First stage entry burn
  • 7:36:44 p.m. First stage landing
  • 7:39 p.m. Crew Dragon separates from second stage
  • 7:40 p.m. Dragon nosecone open sequence begins

NASA’s SpaceX Crew-1 Mission Coverage Starts Now!

Crew-1 rocket and spacecraft on the pad
NASA astronauts Michael Hopkins, Victor Glover, and Shannon Walker, and astronaut Soichi Noguchi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) will fly to the International Space Station  for a six-month science mission. Launch is slated for 7:27 p.m. EST today from Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Complex 39A.

Good afternoon and welcome to live coverage of NASA’s SpaceX Crew-1 mission — the first crew rotation flight of a U.S. commercial spacecraft with astronauts to the space station following the spacecraft system’s official human rating certification.

Here at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, topped by the company’s Crew Dragon spacecraft — named Resilience by the crew — awaits liftoff later today. NASA astronauts Michael HopkinsVictor Glover, and Shannon Walker, and astronaut Soichi Noguchi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), will fly to the International Space Station for a six-month science mission. Launch is slated for 7:27 p.m. EST from Kennedy’s historic Launch Complex 39A.

The countdown is proceeding according to schedule. At the Florida spaceport’s Neil A. Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building, the astronauts have eaten and will undergo medical checks and get a weather briefing before suiting up.

Stay with us as the countdown continues. We’ll keep you updated on the key milestones throughout this historic mission. Starting at 3:15 p.m. EST, on NASA Television and the agency’s website, there will be continuous live coverage of important Crew-1 activities.

NASA’s SpaceX Crew-1: Weather Remains 50% Favorable for Today’s Launch

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket with the company’s Crew Dragon spacecraft onboard is seen just before sunrise on the launch pad at Launch Complex 39A as preparations continue for the Crew-1 mission, Sunday, Nov. 15, 2020, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA’s SpaceX Crew-1 mission is the first crew rotation mission of the SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft and Falcon 9 rocket to the International Space Station as part of the agency’s Commercial Crew Program. NASA astronauts Mike Hopkins, Victor Glover, and Shannon Walker, and astronaut Soichi Noguchi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) are scheduled to launch at 7:27 p.m. EST on Sunday, Nov. 15 from Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

NASA and SpaceX are preparing to launch an international crew of astronauts to the International Space Station today. Lift off of the first NASA-certified, commercial human spacecraft system, a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and Crew Dragon, from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center is set for 7:27 p.m. EST.

NASA astronauts Michael Hopkins, Victor Glover, and Shannon Walker, and astronaut Soichi Noguchi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) will begin their launch day preparations for the Crew-1 mission shortly before noon. NASA TV coverage begins at 3:15 p.m. Sunday for their prelaunch preparations, including their spacesuit fits and walkout shortly after 4 p.m. so they can travel to the launch pad.

The U.S. Air Force 45th Weather Squadron continues to predict a 50% chance of favorable weather conditions at the launch pad for lift off of NASA’s SpaceX Crew-1 mission based on Falcon 9 Crew Dragon launch weather criteria. Teams also are monitoring weather conditions downrange across the Atlantic on the spacecraft’s ascent path to orbit; conditions downrange currently are “go.” The primary weather concerns for launch will be cumulus clouds and associated precipitation, along with electric fields from any more robust showers.

FORECAST DETAILS

Clouds                      Coverage           Bases (feet)             Tops (feet)

Cumulus                    Broken                   3,000                         14,000

Weather/Visibility: Scattered showers/7 miles

Temperature:  77 degrees

Follow along with launch activities and get more information about the mission at: http://www.nasa.gov/crew-1. Learn more about commercial crew and space station activities by following @Commercial_Crew, @space_station, and @ISS_Research on Twitter as well as the Commercial Crew Facebook, ISS Facebook and ISS Instagram accounts.