NASA Education Express — Aug. 4, 2011

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Engineering Design Challenge: Water Filtration Webinar
Audience: 9-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Aug. 11, 2011

Smart SkiesTM Webinar
Audience: 5-9 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Aug. 16, 2011

NASA Earth Ambassador Training Program
Audience: Informal Educators
Application Deadline: Aug. 17, 2011

Student Spaceflight Experiments Program
Audience: 5-Higher Education Educators and Students
Deadline for Letter of Commitment: Sept. 15, 2011

ARISSat-1 Satellite Launched
Audience: All Educators and Students

NASA Sponsors Odyssey of the Mind Long-Term Problem — Weird Science
Audience: All Educators and Students
Visit Website for Regional Competition Dates


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Engineering Design Challenge: Water Filtration Webinar


As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, the NASA Explorer Schools project is hosting a 60-minute webinar on Aug. 11, 2011, at 4 p.m. EDT. Learn how your students can work in teams to design, build, test and measure the performance of a water filtration device, analyze the data collected and use this information to improve their filtration designs. During the webinar, participants will receive an overview of the activity, explore the NASA connection, share tips and tricks for implementing this lesson in the classroom, watch videos of students engaged in the lesson and discuss possible modifications to the activity.

For more information and to register online, visit https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-water-filtration/.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

E-mail any questions about this opportunity to John Entwistle at
John.D.Entwistle@nasa.gov.

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Smart SkiesTM Webinar


As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, the NASA Explorer Schools project is hosting a 60-minute webinar on Aug. 16, 2011, at 4 p.m. EDT. Learn how to use an innovative air traffic control simulator to engage your students as they explore the mathematics involved in the role of an air traffic controller. In the three-plane problem featured in this lesson, the challenge is to change routes and speeds to line up the planes safely, with proper spacing, at a given route intersection.

For more information and to register online, visit https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-smart-skies/.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

E-mail any questions about this opportunity to John Entwistle at
John.D.Entwistle@nasa.gov.

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NASA Earth Ambassador Training Program

Informal educators are invited to apply to the Earth Ambassador Program, part of NASA Climate Days. The program will hold a two-day training workshop at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, in Greenbelt, Md., Oct. 13-14, 2011, with extended training on Oct. 15, for those not attending the ASTC (Association of Science – Technology Centers) Conference.

During the workshop, participants will interact with Earth scientists who are looking at the effect of climate change with respect to their research areas, learn effective ways of communicating global climate change with the public and become familiar with the online resources available to host their own events at their local institutions.

Transportation, lodging and meal per diem will be covered.

Applications are due Aug. 17, 2011.

For more information and to apply online, visit
http://mynasadata.larc.nasa.gov/NCD_Ambassador_Application.html.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please e-mail Heather Weir at
heather.weir@ssaihq.com.

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Student Spaceflight Experiments Program

The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education, in partnership with NanoRacks LLC, announces an immediate opportunity for communities across the U.S. to participate in the first Student Spaceflight Experiments Program, or SSEP, mission to America’s national laboratory in space — the International Space Station. The program is also open to space station partner nations.

Each participating community will be provided an experiment slot in a real microgravity research mini-laboratory scheduled to fly on the space station from March 30 to May 16, 2012. An experiment design competition in each community — engaging 300 to 1,000 students — allows student teams to design real experiments vying for their communities’ reserved experiment slot on the space station. Additional SSEP programming leverages the experiment design competition to engage the community, embracing a Learning Community Model for science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, education.

SSEP missions on STS-134 (Space Shuttle Endeavour) and STS-135 (Space Shuttle Atlantis) have recently been completed, with 1,027 student team proposals received, and 27 SSEP experiments selected and flown — representing the 27 communities that participated in SSEP on the space shuttle.

Letters of Commitment for this opportunity are due Sept. 15, 2011.

To learn more about this opportunity, visit the SSEP Mission 1 to ISS National Announcement of Opportunity at
http://ssep.ncesse.org/2011/07/immediate-historic-opportunity-for-schools-student-spaceflight-experiments-program-mission-1-to-the-international-space-station/.

The SSEP in-orbit research opportunity is enabled through NanoRacks LLC, which is working in partnership with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of using the International Space Station as a national laboratory.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please e-mail SSEP National Program Director Jeff Goldstein at
jeffgoldstein@ncesse.org.

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ARISSat-1 Satellite Launched

A satellite with amateur radio capabilities and a student-designed experiment was released into orbit around Earth on Aug. 3, 2011, during a spacewalk outside the International Space Station. The satellite is transmitting signals containing information that students around the world can access.

ARISSat-1, which stands for Amateur Radio on the International Space Station Satellite-1, contains a student-designed experiment and other equipment that students can use to learn more about space and space exploration. The rectangular spacecraft is covered by six solar panels that will charge the batteries in the satellite for about six months as it orbits Earth. Spoken telemetry values, with data such as temperature and battery life, are intended to promote science and mathematics education by encouraging school children to listen to the satellite, track its progress and plot the changes.

The project website provides free downloadable software that can be used to decode the data. In addition to data, the satellite will transmit 24 pre-recorded greetings in 15 different languages — French, Spanish, German, English and Chinese, to name a few.

Check out the ARISSat-1 website at
http://arissat1.org/ for information on data transmissions, contests and student activities.

Questions about ARISSat-1 should be directed to
teachers@arissat1.org.

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NASA Sponsors Odyssey of the Mind Long-Term Problem — Weird Science

NASA is sponsoring the Odyssey of the Mind Long-Term Problem — Weird Science.

Odyssey of the Mind is an international educational program that offers creative problem-solving opportunities for students from kindergarten through college. Participants apply their creativity to solve problems that range from building mechanical devices to presenting their own interpretation of literary classics. The teams then bring their solutions to competition on the local, state and international levels.

This year’s NASA-sponsored problem requires teams to create and present a performance about a team of scientists on an expedition to uncover the cause of mysterious events. The performance must include a technical representation of the mysterious events, a moving backdrop that helps portray traveling and a team-created device that the scientists use on the expedition.

For more information and to find dates for regional competitions, visit
http://www.odysseyofthemind.com/.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please e-mail
info@odysseyofthemind.com.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub