Monthly Archives: December 2011

NASA Education Express — Dec. 15, 2011

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Teach STEM? NASA Explorer Schools Can Help With That!
Audience: 4-12 Educators

Electromagnetic Spectrum: Remote Sensing Ices on Mars Web Seminar
Audience: 8-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Dec. 19, 2011

Expedition 31 and 32 In-flight Education Downlink Opportunity
Audience: All Educators
Proposal Deadline: Dec. 21, 2011

National Space Biomedical Research Institute Summer Internship Program
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: Dec. 31, 2011

Algebraic Equations: Transit Tracks — Finding Habitable Planets Web Seminar
Audience: Algebra Teachers and Informal Educators
Event Date: Jan. 3, 2011

2011 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award Video Contest
Audience: Grade 3-12 Students
Registration Deadline: Jan. 3, 2011
Video Submission Deadline: Jan. 17, 2012

2012-13 Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship
Audience: K-12 STEM Educators
Application Deadline: Jan. 5, 2012

Engineering Design: Forces and Motion — Balloon Aerodynamics Challenge Web Seminar
Audience: 6-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Jan. 5, 2012

4th Digital Media and Learning Competition Enters Stage Two
Audience: All Educators, Designers, and Students
Deadline: Jan. 12, 2012

Solving the Challenges of Space in the RealWorld and InWorld
Audience: 7-12 Educators and Students
Deadline: Jan. 27, 2012

FameLab Astrobiology — Science Communication Competition
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Competition Finals: April 12-16, 2012

2012 Summer Workshops — Climate Science Research for Educators and Students
Audience: 9-12 Educators
Application Deadline: June 1, 2012

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Teach STEM? NASA Explorer Schools Can Help With That!

Teachers across the country, regardless of school size, type or geographic location, have seen the benefit of participating in the NASA Explorer Schools project. These teachers have access to free NASA classroom materials and student engagement activities, as well as educator support resources, through the NES Virtual Campus. NES classroom resources are designed to help teachers increase student interest and achievement in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, subjects.

Are you looking for fun, exciting and interactive ways to connect your students to NASA? Designed for teachers in grades 4-12, NES provides a forum for accessing free lessons, student engagement activities, and professional development opportunities centered on NASA missions and STEM topics and careers. NES also offers multiple pathways for you to connect with other motivated STEM educators across the country to share best practices and classroom implementation ideas. Visit the NASA Explorer Schools website to read firsthand stories from participating teachers about the benefits of joining the NES project and implementing NASA resources in the classroom!

https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/nes2/recognition/profiles-index.html.


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Electromagnetic Spectrum: Remote Sensing Ices on Mars Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute web seminar on Dec. 19, 2011, at 6:30 p.m. EST. Learn how to use authentic NASA mission data to investigate the composition and distribution of ices in the high latitude regions of Mars through analysis of visible light, infrared light and gamma rays. The seminar includes information about a unique student extension activity, where students access a free computer simulation illustrating how gamma rays are used to determine the chemical composition of Mars.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar1.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov
.

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Expedition 31 and 32 In-flight Education Downlink Opportunity

NASA is seeking formal and informal educational organizations, individually or working together, to host a live, in-flight education downlink during Expedition 31 and 32 (approximately from March 2012 to September 2012). To maximize these downlink opportunities, NASA is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the downlink into a well-developed education plan.

The deadline to submit a proposal is Dec. 21, 2011.

During Expeditions 31 and 32, crew members aboard the International Space Station will participate in downlinks. Downlinks are approximately 20 minutes in length and allow students and educators to interact with astronauts through a question and answer session. Downlinks afford education audiences the opportunity to learn firsthand from astronauts what it is like to live and work in space. Downlinks are broadcast live on NASA TV and are streamed on the NASA website. Because of the nature of human spaceflight, organizations must demonstrate the flexibility to accommodate changes in downlink dates and times.

Interested organizations should contact Teaching From Space, a NASA Education office, to obtain information related to expectations, format, audience, guidelines and forms by sending an email to JSC-Teaching-From-Space@mail.nasa.gov or calling 281-244-7608.

To learn more about this opportunity, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/teachingfromspace/students/downlinks.html.

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National Space Biomedical Research Institute Summer Internship Program

Interns selected for the NSBRI’s summer program join ongoing project activities and gain hands-on experience in space biomedical research at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas; Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio; or Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif. The program is open to graduate students, medical students and undergraduate students who have completed their second year of studies.

Applicants are asked to send a curriculum vitae or resume, a letter of interest indicating available dates during the summer, two letters of recommendation, and college transcripts. The program is open to U.S. citizens.

Applications for the 2012 program are due Dec. 31, 2011.

For more information and to apply online, visit http://www.nsbri.org/summerinternship/. Questions about this opportunity should be directed to info@nsbri.org.


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Algebraic Equations: Transit Tracks — Finding Habitable Planets Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, the NASA Explorer Schools and Learning Environments and Research Network, or LE&RN, projects are hosting a 60-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on Jan. 3, 2012, at 8 p.m. EST. Discover how an algebra activity called “Finding Habitable Planets” will help you teach students to use their skills to analyze NASA data. Students learn about the possibility of discovering planets in habitable zones of solar systems.

For more information and to register online, visit https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-algebraic-equations/.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to the NES Help Desk at NASA.Explorer.Schools@mail.nasa.gov.


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2011 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award Video Contest

NASA has opened registration for the 2011 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award Contest. Featuring OPTIMUS PRIME, the leader of the popular TRANSFORMERS brand, the contest highlights spinoffs from NASA technologies that are used on Earth. The goal is to help students understand the benefits of NASA technology to their daily lives. Last year’s contest was open to students in grades 3-8 and resulted in 76 video submissions from over 190 students in 31 states.

For 2011, the OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award Contest has been expanded to include students in grades 3-12. Each student, or group of students, will submit a three- to five-minute video on a selected NASA spinoff technology listed in NASA’s 2010 “Spinoff” publication. Videos must demonstrate an understanding of the NASA spinoff technology and the associated NASA mission, as well as the commercial application and public benefit associated with the spinoff technology.

Participants must register for the contest by Jan. 3, 2012. Video entries are due Jan. 17, 2012.

Video entries will be posted on the NASA YouTube channel, and the public will be responsible for the first round of judging. The top five submissions from each of the three grade groups (Elementary [3rd-5th], Middle [6th-8th] and High School [9th-12th]) will advance for final judging. A NASA panel will select a winning entry from each group. Among other prizes, a crystal OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award Trophy will be given to winners at a special awards ceremony being held in Florida in April 2012. The innovators associated with the NASA technology highlighted in the winning videos also will receive trophies, as will their commercial partners.

For more information, visit the OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award website at http://ipp.gsfc.nasa.gov/optimus.

Questions about this contest should be directed to Darryl Mitchell at Darryl.R.Mitchell@nasa.gov.


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2012-13 Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship

Applications are currently available for the 2012-13 Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program. This program is open to current public or private elementary and secondary mathematics, technology, engineering and science classroom teachers with demonstrated excellence in teaching. Applications are due Jan. 5, 2012.

Selected teachers spend a school year in Washington, D.C., sharing their expertise with policy makers. Einstein Fellows may serve with one of several government agency sponsors, such as the Department of Energy, NASA or the National Science Foundation.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens and be currently employed full time in a public or private elementary or secondary school or school district. Applicants must have been teaching full time in a public or private elementary or secondary school for at least five of the last seven years.

For more information about this opportunity and to apply online, visit www.einsteinfellows.org.

Inquiries about the Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program should be directed to einsteinfellows@triangle-coalition.org.

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Engineering Design: Forces and Motion — Balloon Aerodynamics Challenge Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on Jan. 5, 2012, at 6:30 p.m. EST. This Web seminar will introduce the Forces and Motion: Balloon Aerodynamics Challenge for students. This activity provides first-hand information about density, neutral buoyancy and drag, which is then used to solve a problem. The activity provides many opportunities for incorporating national mathematics, science and technology learning standards into your curriculum.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar23.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to the NES Help Desk at NASA.Explorer.Schools@mail.nasa.gov.


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4th Digital Media and Learning Competition Enters Stage Two

The HASTAC/MacArthur Foundation’s 4th Digital Media and Learning Competition, held in collaboration with the Mozilla Foundation, encourages individuals and organizations to create badges that are designed to publicly validate new skills, knowledge and achievements.

The Design and Technology stage (Stage Two) of the Competition is now open for organizations, teams, or individuals skilled in design to submit initial prototypes for badge systems based on the content or programs developed by official collaborators (including NASA’s robotics badges) and winning applicants from Stage One. Submissions will be displayed online for public comment and assessed by an expert panel of judges. Stage Two winners will be matched with content and programs teams from Stage One and proceed on to Stage Three.

Stage Two applicants should submit visual materials that will graphically represent their proposed badge system, as well as a 1500-word written proposal that describes in detail how the badge system will perform. Submissions, due no later than Jan. 12 at 5 p.m. PST, should be submitted through the DML Competition web site: http://dmlcompetition.net.

Visit http://dmlcompetition.net to explore collaborator content as well as the 60 winning competitor entries selected from among the hundreds of badge ideas submitted in Stage One of the competition. Several Federal agencies are listed as collaborators, including NASA. The proposed badge content addresses a breadth of topics — from the promotion of civic engagement and community volunteerism, to STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics) learning in and out of the classroom, to digital literacy, to workforce preparedness and beyond.

For more information about the 4th Digital Media and Learning Competition, visit http://dmlcompetition.net.


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Solving the Challenges of Space in the RealWorld and InWorld

The RealWorld-InWorld NASA Engineering Design Challenge encourages students in grades 7-12 to explore and build skills essential for successful careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics through two phases of project-based learning and team competition.

RealWorld (Phase 1): Teams of middle- and high-school-aged students with support of their teachers/coaches/parents work collaboratively as engineers and scientists to explore and design solutions related to the James Webb Space Telescope and Robonaut 2.

RealWorld Phase ends: January 27, 2012. To be considered to move to the InWorld phase, all RealWorld work must be submitted by this deadline.

Recognition: Submitted final project solutions will be featured on the RealWorld-InWorld website, and teams will receive recognition for their work once they complete the RealWorld challenge and InWorld registration.

InWorld (Phase 2): Participating college students select teams of two to four middle- and high-school-aged students who have completed the RealWorld phase to build their InWorld teams. Participation is limited to U.S. citizens. Teams work in a 3-D virtual online environment using 21st Century tools to refine designs and to create 3-D models of their design solutions.

InWorld Phase begins: January 28, 2012.
InWorld Phase ends: April 20, 2012.

Recognition: InWorld teams will compete for cash awards ($1,000 per member, including team leader, for each winning team). Contest rules apply.

NASA scientists and engineers visit and “chat” virtually throughout both phases of the challenge.

To learn more about the challenge and to register for online resources for this free and flexible project, visit
www.nasarealworldinworld.org.

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FameLab Astrobiology — Science Communication Competition

FameLab Astrobiology is a science communication competition focused on graduate students and post doctoral researchers doing research in astrobiology. Via four preliminary and one final competition, early career astrobiologists will compete to convey their own research or related science concepts. Each contestant has the spotlight for only three minutes — slides and charts are not allowed. A panel of experts in both science and science communication will judge the events. Events will take place on the following dates:

— Jan. 13, 2012 — Houston, Texas — Lunar and Planetary Institute
— Feb. 10, 2012 — Denver, Colo. — Denver Museum of Nature and Science
— March 9, 2012 — Washington, D.C. — NASA Headquarters/National Geographic Society
— Jan. – March 2012 — Online via YouTube
— FINAL: April 12-16, 2012 — Atlanta, Ga. — Astrobiology Science Conference

Each preliminary event will feature science communication training and enrichment activities, providing exposure to alternative careers. There will be a two-day master class for finalists prior to the final event in April.

The winner will go on to compete in the International FameLab Final in the United Kingdom in June 2012.

For more information, visit http://astrobiologyfamelab.arc.nasa.gov/.

Questions about this competition may be directed to Daniella Scalice at the NASA Astrobiology Institute via email at daniella.m.scalice@nasa.gov.


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2012 Summer Workshops — Climate Science Research for Educators and Students

The Institute for Earth Science Research and Education, in collaboration with Queens College/City University of New York, is seeking participants for summer professional development workshops in the second year of its Climate Science Research for Educators and Students project. Funded by the NASA Innovations in Climate Education program, this project seeks to improve student engagement in climate science by helping teachers and students develop authentic climate-related science research projects.

During summer 2012, two climate science workshops will take place in New York City. The first workshop will be held in late June or early July. The workshop will focus on understanding sun/Earth/atmosphere interactions and Earth’s radiative balance, a fundamental concept for climate science. All participants will build pyranometers, instruments for monitoring solar radiation. A follow-up workshop will take place in August. During the summer, participants are expected to conduct their own research. 

All workshop participants in 2011 were from New York City or within commuting distance. In 2012, teachers from other places are encouraged to attend the early summer workshop, with follow-on activities to be conducted online in place of attendance at the August workshop. On-campus housing at Queens College should be available, and travel support for teachers from outside the NYC area may be available.

Applications are due June 1, 2012.

For more information, visit http://www.instesre.org/GCCE/GCCEHome.htm.

Questions about this competition should be directed to David Brooks via email at brooksdr@drexel.edu or by phone at 610-584-5619.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — Dec. 8, 2011

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Live Video Chat: Satellites and Space Junk
Audience: 6-12 Educators and Students
Event Date: Dec. 13, 2011

Ultraviolet Radiation and Yeast: Radiation Biology Web Seminar

Audience: 9-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Dec. 13, 2011

Educator Resource Showcase Webcast — Spaced Out Sports
Audience: 5-8 Educators
Event Date: Dec. 14, 2011

DEADLINE EXTENDED: YouTube Space Lab Competition

Audience: 9-12 Students

Entry Deadline: Dec. 14, 2011

Electrolysis of Water: Math and Science @ Work — A Breath of Fresh Air Web Seminar
Audience: 9-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Dec. 15, 2011

FINAL REMINDER: Lessons About Bioscience Challenge
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators and K-12 Students
Entry Deadline: Dec. 15, 2011

2011 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award Video Contest
Audience: Grade 3-12 Students
Registration Deadline: Jan. 3, 2011
Video Submission Deadline: Jan. 17, 2012

Host a Real Time Conversation With Crewmembers Onboard the International Space Station

Audience: All Educators
Proposal Deadline: Jan. 30, 2012

New Content on NASA’s Math and Science @ Work Website
Audience: 9-12 Educators

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Live Video Chat: Satellites and Space Junk
Audience: 6-12 Educators and Students
Event Date: Dec. 13, 2011, noon EST

Did you know there are approximately 19,000 man-made objects orbiting Earth that serve no useful purpose? And those are just the objects having a diameter of 10 centimeters (4 inches) or larger. The estimated population of objects between 1 and 10 cm in diameter is closer to 500,000! Now, think about launching new spacecraft or satellite into space without hitting any of these objects and you can appreciate the kind of work Danielle Margiotta does as an engineer for NASA. Join us at noon EST on Dec. 13, 2011, to ask Danielle questions about the ins and outs of contamination engineering, or how to help a spacecraft and satellites navigate and manage their inevitable encounters with space junk.

Submit questions during the chat through a chat window, or send them to
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

To learn more about NES, visit the
explorerschools.nasa.gov website.

To view the video chat or for more information, visit
https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/nes2/home/space-junk-chat.html

If you have any questions about the video chat, contact
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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Ultraviolet Radiation and Yeast: Radiation Biology Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on Dec. 13, 2011, at 6:30 p.m. EST. The student activity featured in this seminar demonstrates the effects of radiation on living organisms. Participants will learn how sun-screening materials protect live yeast cells from harmful ultraviolet, or UV, radiation and countermeasures for UV radiation and discuss phenotypic changes in yeast as a result of radiation damage. Participants will learn how different sun protection factors, brands or even sunglasses may be used to expand the range of items tested in this lab. See how you can bring a real-world connection between science and education to your students.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar11.aspx .

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit
http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov
.

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Educator Resource Showcase Webcast — Spaced Out Sports

Join hosts Kelly Witherspoon and Cheryl Guilbeau from NASA’s Stennis Space Center in Mississippi for an hourlong, free webcast on Dec. 14, 2011, at 3 p.m. EST. This webcast will focus on Newton’s Laws of Motion and their effects on objects on Earth and in space.

“Spaced Out Sports” challenges students in grades 5-8 to apply Newton’s Laws of Motion by designing or redesigning a game for astronauts to play in space. The “Spaced Out Sports” workshop will highlight a variety of hands-on activities, brief demonstrations and video clips to help your students learn about Newton’s Laws of Motion. A curriculum guide and game examples are available online. To learn more, visit
http://education.ssc.nasa.gov/spacedoutsports.asp.

For more information and to view the webcast, visit https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/dln/index.html.

If you have any questions about the webcast, please email them to Renee Elias at RElias@lcjvs.net.

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DEADLINE EXTENDED: YouTube Space Lab Competition

YouTube Space Lab is a worldwide educational initiative that challenges 14-18 year-old students to design a science experiment that can be performed in space. The two winning experiments will be conducted aboard the International Space Station, or ISS, and live streamed on YouTube.

A prestigious panel of scientists, astronauts, and educators, including renowned professor Stephen Hawking, NASA’s Associate Administrator for Human Exploration and Operations William Gerstenmaier, NASA’s Associate Administrator of Education and former Astronaut Leland Melvin, ESA Astronaut Frank De Winne, JAXA Astronaut Akihiko Hoshide and Cirque du Soleil’s founder Guy Laliberté, will judge the entries with input from the YouTube community.

Students in two age categories, 14-16 years old and 17-18 years old, either alone or in groups of up to three, may submit a YouTube video describing their experiment to YouTube.com/SpaceLab.

The deadline for submissions has been extended to Dec. 14, 2011.

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Electrolysis of Water: Math and Science @ Work — A Breath of Fresh Air Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, NASA Explorer Schools and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on Dec. 15, 2011, at 3 p.m. EST. Learn how to implement a chemistry lab activity called “A Breath of Fresh Air.” During the activity, students create their own electrolysis apparatus to generate oxygen and use a Texas Instruments TI-Nspire calculator to collect data. Note: You do not need to have a TI-Nspire calculator during this professional development.

For more information and to register online, visit
http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar13.aspx

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit
http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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FINAL REMINDER: Lessons About Bioscience Challenge

Don’t miss out! Submit your best life science experiment procedures by Dec. 15, 2011!


The National Institutes of Health, or NIH, is making a collection of engaging, inexpensive experiments for K-12 students, and they need your help. Through the Lessons About Bioscience, or LAB, Challenge, NIH is looking for science enthusiasts — students, teachers, parents, scientists and organizations — to submit their best experiments. The experiment should be original, inexpensive, related to health and life science and easily accessible for use in a K-12 classroom.

For challenge details, visit
http://LAB.challenge.gov/.

The deadline to submit experiment ideas is Dec. 15, 2011. Winners will be announced on March 1, 2012. Each winning experiment and submitter’s name and affiliation will be featured online and published in an NIH best-experiments collection, and each winner will receive an exclusive NIH LAB Challenge electronic badge to display online.

Help to spread the word about this challenge by sharing this information. Feature it on your website and Facebook page, and tweet about it. More information is available at the NIH Office of Science Education website: http://science.education.nih.gov/NIHLABChallenge.nsf, or from
Carla Easter (easterc@mail.NIH.gov) or Cindy Allen (allency@od.nih.gov).

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2011 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award Video Contest

NASA has opened registration for the 2011 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award Contest. Featuring OPTIMUS PRIME, the leader of the popular TRANSFORMERS brand, the contest highlights spinoffs from NASA technologies that are used on Earth. The goal is to help students understand the benefits of NASA technology to their daily lives. Last year’s contest was open to students in grades 3-8 and resulted in 76 video submissions from over 190 students in 31 states.

For 2011, the OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award Contest has been expanded to include students in grades 3-12. Each student, or group of students, will submit a three- to five-minute video on a selected NASA spinoff technology listed in NASA’s 2010 “Spinoff” publication. Videos must demonstrate an understanding of the NASA spinoff technology and the associated NASA mission, as well as the commercial application and public benefit associated with the spinoff technology.

Participants must register for the contest by Jan. 3, 2012. Video entries are due Jan. 17, 2012.

Video entries will be posted on the NASA YouTube channel, and the public will be responsible for the first round of judging. The top five submissions from each of the three grade groups (Elementary [3rd-5th], Middle [6th-8th] and High School [9th-12th]) will advance for final judging. A NASA panel will select a winning entry from each group. Among other prizes, a crystal OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award Trophy will be given to winners at a special awards ceremony being held in Florida in April 2012. The innovators associated with the NASA technology highlighted in the winning videos also will receive trophies, as will their commercial partners.

For more information, visit the OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award website at
http://ipp.gsfc.nasa.gov/optimus.

Questions about this contest should be directed to Darryl Mitchell at
Darryl.R.Mitchell@nasa.gov.

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Host a Real Time Conversation With Crewmembers Onboard the International Space Station


NASA is now accepting proposals from U.S. schools, museums, science centers and community youth organizations to host an Amateur Radio on the International Space Station, or ARISS, contact between July 15, 2012, and Jan. 15, 2013. To maximize these radio contact opportunities, NASA is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed education plan. Proposals are due Jan. 30, 2012.

Using amateur radio, students can ask astronauts questions about life in space and other space-related topics. Students fully engage in the ARISS contact by helping set up an amateur radio ground station at the school and then using that station to talk directly with a crew member on the International Space Station for approximately 10 minutes. The technology is easier to acquire than ever before. ARISS has a network of mentors to help you obtain the technology required to host this once in a lifetime opportunity for your students.


Interested parties should contact Teaching From Space, a NASA Education office, to obtain complete information including how the technology works, what is expected of the host organization and how to obtain the proposal/application form by sending an email to JSC-TFS-ARISS@mail.nasa.gov or by calling 281-244-1919.

Additional information can be found at https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/teachingfromspace/students/ariss.html.

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New Content on NASA’s Math and Science @ Work Website

NASA’s Math and Science @ Work project has recently added new education content to its website.

This project provides activities teachers can download for use in high school advanced-placement mathematics and science courses. There are now more than 30 activities that will engage students in physics, chemistry, biology, calculus and statistics while giving them insight into NASA’s programs, projects and careers.

To download the free Math and Science @ Work activities, visit
www.nasa.gov/education/mathandscience.

Get current information about the project and interact with the Math and Science @ Work team by becoming a fan on Facebook. www.facebook.com/mathandscienceatwork.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators:
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students:
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club:
https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — Dec. 1, 2011

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

New Microgravity Page for Educators and Students
Audience: All Educators and Students

Algebraic Equations: Calculator Controlled Robots Web Seminar

Audience: Algebra Teachers and Informal Educators
Event Date: Dec. 5, 2011

Engineering Design Challenge: Thermal Protection System Web Seminar
Audience: 8-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Dec. 7, 2011

Linear Equations: NASA CONNECT — Breaking Barriers Web Seminar
Audience: 6-8 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Dec. 8, 2011

YouTube Space Lab Competition
Audience: 9-12 Students
Entry Deadline: Dec. 14, 2011

Electrolysis of Water: Math and Science @ Work — A Breath of Fresh Air Web Seminar
Audience: 9-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Dec. 15, 2011

2012 NASA Space Technology Research Fellowships
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Jan. 11, 2012

NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowships Program Accepting Proposals for 2012-2013 Academic Year
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Proposal Deadline: Feb. 1, 2012

Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 2 to the International Space Station
Audience: 5-Higher Education Educators and Students
Letter of Commitment Deadline: Feb. 27, 2012

Additional Frequently Asked Questions — NASA Research Announcement (NRA) Competitive Program for Science Museums and Planetariums Plus Opportunities for NASA Visitor Centers and Other Informal Education Institutions (CP4SMP+) (Announcement Number: NNH11ZHA004N, Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 43.008) — Available For Download
Audience: Informal Education Institutions

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New Microgravity Page for Educators and Students

NASA Education has launched a new website for students and educators about NASA’s microgravity laboratories on Earth and on the International Space Station.

Visit the new site to learn about the types of platforms that researchers use to study the effects of the microgravity environment. Watch and download video and multimedia features. Answer the question: What Is Microgravity? Shoot some hoops and test your basketball skills in gravity and microgravity in Free Fall Ball. Build a Do-It-Yourself podcast with video and audio clips from NASA. And stay in touch about opportunities for students and educators.

Educators can find lesson plans for the classroom and keep students in-the-know with up-to-date information about research on the International Space Station.

Visit the new website at www.nasa.gov/education/microgravity.

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Algebraic Equations: Calculator Controlled Robots Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute Web seminar on Dec. 5, 2011, at 6:30 p.m. EST. Discover a unique way of integrating robotic technology into your algebra classes. Robotic missions engage students and provide a unique way of bringing to life the concepts you are teaching. Learn to use programmable Texas Instruments, or TI, calculators and Norland Research Robots to solve problems requiring substituting values for variables in formulas.

You do not need to have a Norland Research Robot or programmable TI calculator to participate in this seminar, or know how to program the calculator. This seminar provides an overview of using robotics in algebra so you can make an informed decision about purchasing the robots and other equipment.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar8.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to the NASA Explorer Schools help desk at NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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Engineering Design Challenge: Thermal Protection System Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on Dec. 7, 2011, at 6:30 p.m. EST. Learn about the science of heat transfer and heat dissipation related to NASA vehicles, and receive an introduction to the associated engineering design challenge, Thermal Protection System. This activity challenges students to design a thermal protection system and test it using a propane torch.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar10.aspx .

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to the NASA Explorer Schools help desk at
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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Linear Equations: NASA CONNECT — Breaking Barriers Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, NASA Explorer Schools and NASA’s
Learning Environments and Research Network, or LE&RN, projects are hosting a 60-minute Web seminar on Dec. 8, 2011, at 7 p.m. EST. During this professional development session, participants will receive information about the applications of linear equations at NASA and learn how to implement the Breaking Barriers activity. Breaking Barriers provides students an opportunity to step into the shoes of a NASA engineer to design, build and test a Balloon X-1.

For more information and to register online, visit https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-linear-equations/.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to the NASA Explorer Schools help desk at
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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YouTube Space Lab Competition

YouTube Space Lab is a worldwide educational initiative that challenges 14-18 year-old students to design a science experiment that can be performed in space. The two winning experiments will be conducted aboard the International Space Station, or ISS, and live streamed on YouTube.

A prestigious panel of scientists, astronauts, and educators, including renowned professor Stephen Hawking, NASA’s Associate Administrator for Human Exploration and Operations William Gerstenmaier, NASA’s Associate Administrator of Education and former Astronaut Leland Melvin, ESA Astronaut Frank De Winne, JAXA Astronaut Akihiko Hoshide and Cirque du Soleil’s founder Guy Laliberté, will judge the entries with input from the YouTube community.

Students in two age categories, 14-16 years old and 17-18 years old, either alone or in groups of up to three, may submit a YouTube video describing their experiment to YouTube.com/SpaceLab.

Submissions close on Dec. 14, 2011.

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Electrolysis of Water: Math and Science @ Work — A Breath of Fresh Air Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, NASA Explorer Schools and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on Dec. 15, 2011, at 3 p.m. EST. Learn how to implement a chemistry lab activity called “A Breath of Fresh Air.” During the activity, students create their own electrolysis apparatus to generate oxygen and use a Texas Instruments TI-Nspire calculator to collect data. Note: You do not need to have a TI-Nspire calculator during this professional development.

For more information and to register online, visit
http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar13.aspx

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit
http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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2012 NASA Space Technology Research Fellowships

NASA is seeking applications from current and prospective graduate students for the agency’s second class of Space Technology Research Fellows. Applications will be accepted from accredited U.S. universities on behalf of individuals pursuing or planning to pursue Master’s (e.g., M.S.) or Doctoral (e.g., Ph.D.) degrees in relevant space technology disciplines at their respective institutions beginning in fall 2012.

The fellowships will sponsor U.S. graduate student researchers who show significant potential to contribute to NASA’s strategic space technology objectives through their studies. Sponsored by NASA’s Office of the Chief Technologist and the Space Technology Program, the fellowships’ continuing goal is to provide the nation with a pipeline of highly skilled engineers and technologists to improve America’s technological competitiveness. Fellows will perform innovative space technology research today while building the skills necessary to become future technological leaders.

The deadline for submitting applications is Jan. 11, 2012.

For more information on the fellowships, visit
https://www.nasa.gov/offices/oct/early_stage_innovation/grants/index.html.

All material related to this fellowship opportunity, including eligibility requirements and detailed instructions on how to submit an application, may be accessed from http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId={1C36FF5F-549C-2349-F37F-B72365FD9D1B}&path=open.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to Claudia Meyer at hq-nstrf-call@mail.nasa.gov.

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NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowships Program Accepting Proposals for 2012-2013 Academic Year

The NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, or NESSF, is soliciting applications from accredited U.S. universities on behalf of individuals pursuing master’s or doctoral degrees in earth and space sciences, or related disciplines, for the 2012-2013 academic year. The purpose of NESSF is to ensure continued training of a highly qualified workforce in disciplines needed to achieve NASA’s scientific goals. Awards resulting from the competitive selection will be training grants to the respective universities, with the advisor serving as the principal investigator. The financial support for the NESSF program comes from the Science Mission Directorate’s four science divisions: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Planetary Science and Astrophysics.

Initially, NESSF awards are made for one year. They may be renewed for no more than two additional years, contingent upon satisfactory progress (as reflected in academic performance, research progress and recommendation by the faculty advisor) and the availability of funds.

The maximum amount of a NESSF award is $30,000 per year.

Proposals for this opportunity are due Feb. 1, 2012.

For more information about this solicitation, visit
http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId={1DC0EDEE-32A0-0EAE-ED78-B1F6B624B473}&path=open.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to:

For earth science, Ming-Ying Wei at
mwei@nasa.gov.

For heliophysics, planetary science and astrophysics, Dolores Holland at
hq-nessf-Space@nasa.gov.

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Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 2 to the International Space Station

The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education, in partnership with NanoRacks LLC, announces a new opportunity for communities across the U.S. and space station partner nations. The newest Student Spaceflight Experiments Program, or SSEP, flight opportunity, Mission 2 to the International Space Station, gives students across a community the ability to design and propose real experiments to fly in low Earth orbit on the International Space Station.

Each participating community will be provided an experiment slot in a real microgravity research minilaboratory scheduled to fly on the space station from Sept. 28 to Nov. 12, 2012. An experiment design competition in each community — engaging 300 to 1,000 students — allows student teams to design real experiments vying for their communities’ reserved experiment slot on the space station. Additional SSEP programming leverages the experiment design competition to engage the community, embracing a Learning Community Model for science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, education.

This competition is open to students in grades 5-12 and college. Informal education groups and organizations are also encouraged to participate. All participating communities must submit letters of commitment of funding by
Feb. 27, 2012. The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education is standing by to help interested communities secure funding. 

Through previous SSEP missions on the space shuttle and International Space Station, more than 70,000 students in almost 200 schools have had the opportunity to design and propose real experiments to fly aboard the space station. All 27 experiments selected to date, reflecting the 27 communities that participated in the program on the final two space shuttle flights, have flown in space.

To learn more about this opportunity, visit the SSEP Mission 2 to ISS National Announcement of Opportunity at
http://ssep.ncesse.org/2011/11/announcing-communities-participating-in-ssep-mission-1-to-iss-and-new-flight-opportunity-mission-2-to-iss/.

The SSEP in-orbit research opportunity is enabled through NanoRacks LLC, which is working in partnership with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of using the International Space Station as a national laboratory.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please email SSEP National Program Director Jeff Goldstein at
jeffgoldstein@ncesse.org.
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Additional Frequently Asked Questions — NASA Research Announcement (NRA) Competitive Program for Science Museums and Planetariums Plus Opportunities for NASA Visitor Centers and Other Informal Education Institutions (CP4SMP+) (Announcement Number: NNH11ZHA004N, Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 43.008) — Available For Download

Additional Frequently Asked Questions received after the proposal due date (including information about the Fiscal Year 2012 Appropriation) and/or about NASA Visitor Centers will be available at 6 p.m. EST on Friday, Dec. 2, 2011 (estimated date/time) on the CP4SMP+ portal page on NSPIRES at the following URL:

Visit: http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId={75AAC7BF-2F69-6C73-2980-B1DCF25EA665}&path=closed

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub