NASA Education Express — Dec. 8, 2011

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Live Video Chat: Satellites and Space Junk
Audience: 6-12 Educators and Students
Event Date: Dec. 13, 2011

Ultraviolet Radiation and Yeast: Radiation Biology Web Seminar

Audience: 9-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Dec. 13, 2011

Educator Resource Showcase Webcast — Spaced Out Sports
Audience: 5-8 Educators
Event Date: Dec. 14, 2011

DEADLINE EXTENDED: YouTube Space Lab Competition

Audience: 9-12 Students

Entry Deadline: Dec. 14, 2011

Electrolysis of Water: Math and Science @ Work — A Breath of Fresh Air Web Seminar
Audience: 9-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Dec. 15, 2011

FINAL REMINDER: Lessons About Bioscience Challenge
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators and K-12 Students
Entry Deadline: Dec. 15, 2011

2011 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award Video Contest
Audience: Grade 3-12 Students
Registration Deadline: Jan. 3, 2011
Video Submission Deadline: Jan. 17, 2012

Host a Real Time Conversation With Crewmembers Onboard the International Space Station

Audience: All Educators
Proposal Deadline: Jan. 30, 2012

New Content on NASA’s Math and Science @ Work Website
Audience: 9-12 Educators

________________________________________________________________

Live Video Chat: Satellites and Space Junk
Audience: 6-12 Educators and Students
Event Date: Dec. 13, 2011, noon EST

Did you know there are approximately 19,000 man-made objects orbiting Earth that serve no useful purpose? And those are just the objects having a diameter of 10 centimeters (4 inches) or larger. The estimated population of objects between 1 and 10 cm in diameter is closer to 500,000! Now, think about launching new spacecraft or satellite into space without hitting any of these objects and you can appreciate the kind of work Danielle Margiotta does as an engineer for NASA. Join us at noon EST on Dec. 13, 2011, to ask Danielle questions about the ins and outs of contamination engineering, or how to help a spacecraft and satellites navigate and manage their inevitable encounters with space junk.

Submit questions during the chat through a chat window, or send them to
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

To learn more about NES, visit the
explorerschools.nasa.gov website.

To view the video chat or for more information, visit
https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/nes2/home/space-junk-chat.html

If you have any questions about the video chat, contact
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

________________________________________________________________

Ultraviolet Radiation and Yeast: Radiation Biology Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on Dec. 13, 2011, at 6:30 p.m. EST. The student activity featured in this seminar demonstrates the effects of radiation on living organisms. Participants will learn how sun-screening materials protect live yeast cells from harmful ultraviolet, or UV, radiation and countermeasures for UV radiation and discuss phenotypic changes in yeast as a result of radiation damage. Participants will learn how different sun protection factors, brands or even sunglasses may be used to expand the range of items tested in this lab. See how you can bring a real-world connection between science and education to your students.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar11.aspx .

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit
http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov
.

________________________________________________________________

Educator Resource Showcase Webcast — Spaced Out Sports

Join hosts Kelly Witherspoon and Cheryl Guilbeau from NASA’s Stennis Space Center in Mississippi for an hourlong, free webcast on Dec. 14, 2011, at 3 p.m. EST. This webcast will focus on Newton’s Laws of Motion and their effects on objects on Earth and in space.

“Spaced Out Sports” challenges students in grades 5-8 to apply Newton’s Laws of Motion by designing or redesigning a game for astronauts to play in space. The “Spaced Out Sports” workshop will highlight a variety of hands-on activities, brief demonstrations and video clips to help your students learn about Newton’s Laws of Motion. A curriculum guide and game examples are available online. To learn more, visit
http://education.ssc.nasa.gov/spacedoutsports.asp.

For more information and to view the webcast, visit https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/dln/index.html.

If you have any questions about the webcast, please email them to Renee Elias at RElias@lcjvs.net.

________________________________________________________________

DEADLINE EXTENDED: YouTube Space Lab Competition

YouTube Space Lab is a worldwide educational initiative that challenges 14-18 year-old students to design a science experiment that can be performed in space. The two winning experiments will be conducted aboard the International Space Station, or ISS, and live streamed on YouTube.

A prestigious panel of scientists, astronauts, and educators, including renowned professor Stephen Hawking, NASA’s Associate Administrator for Human Exploration and Operations William Gerstenmaier, NASA’s Associate Administrator of Education and former Astronaut Leland Melvin, ESA Astronaut Frank De Winne, JAXA Astronaut Akihiko Hoshide and Cirque du Soleil’s founder Guy Laliberté, will judge the entries with input from the YouTube community.

Students in two age categories, 14-16 years old and 17-18 years old, either alone or in groups of up to three, may submit a YouTube video describing their experiment to YouTube.com/SpaceLab.

The deadline for submissions has been extended to Dec. 14, 2011.

________________________________________________________________

Electrolysis of Water: Math and Science @ Work — A Breath of Fresh Air Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, NASA Explorer Schools and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on Dec. 15, 2011, at 3 p.m. EST. Learn how to implement a chemistry lab activity called “A Breath of Fresh Air.” During the activity, students create their own electrolysis apparatus to generate oxygen and use a Texas Instruments TI-Nspire calculator to collect data. Note: You do not need to have a TI-Nspire calculator during this professional development.

For more information and to register online, visit
http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar13.aspx

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit
http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

________________________________________________________________

FINAL REMINDER: Lessons About Bioscience Challenge

Don’t miss out! Submit your best life science experiment procedures by Dec. 15, 2011!


The National Institutes of Health, or NIH, is making a collection of engaging, inexpensive experiments for K-12 students, and they need your help. Through the Lessons About Bioscience, or LAB, Challenge, NIH is looking for science enthusiasts — students, teachers, parents, scientists and organizations — to submit their best experiments. The experiment should be original, inexpensive, related to health and life science and easily accessible for use in a K-12 classroom.

For challenge details, visit
http://LAB.challenge.gov/.

The deadline to submit experiment ideas is Dec. 15, 2011. Winners will be announced on March 1, 2012. Each winning experiment and submitter’s name and affiliation will be featured online and published in an NIH best-experiments collection, and each winner will receive an exclusive NIH LAB Challenge electronic badge to display online.

Help to spread the word about this challenge by sharing this information. Feature it on your website and Facebook page, and tweet about it. More information is available at the NIH Office of Science Education website: http://science.education.nih.gov/NIHLABChallenge.nsf, or from
Carla Easter (easterc@mail.NIH.gov) or Cindy Allen (allency@od.nih.gov).

________________________________________________________________

2011 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award Video Contest

NASA has opened registration for the 2011 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award Contest. Featuring OPTIMUS PRIME, the leader of the popular TRANSFORMERS brand, the contest highlights spinoffs from NASA technologies that are used on Earth. The goal is to help students understand the benefits of NASA technology to their daily lives. Last year’s contest was open to students in grades 3-8 and resulted in 76 video submissions from over 190 students in 31 states.

For 2011, the OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award Contest has been expanded to include students in grades 3-12. Each student, or group of students, will submit a three- to five-minute video on a selected NASA spinoff technology listed in NASA’s 2010 “Spinoff” publication. Videos must demonstrate an understanding of the NASA spinoff technology and the associated NASA mission, as well as the commercial application and public benefit associated with the spinoff technology.

Participants must register for the contest by Jan. 3, 2012. Video entries are due Jan. 17, 2012.

Video entries will be posted on the NASA YouTube channel, and the public will be responsible for the first round of judging. The top five submissions from each of the three grade groups (Elementary [3rd-5th], Middle [6th-8th] and High School [9th-12th]) will advance for final judging. A NASA panel will select a winning entry from each group. Among other prizes, a crystal OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award Trophy will be given to winners at a special awards ceremony being held in Florida in April 2012. The innovators associated with the NASA technology highlighted in the winning videos also will receive trophies, as will their commercial partners.

For more information, visit the OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award website at
http://ipp.gsfc.nasa.gov/optimus.

Questions about this contest should be directed to Darryl Mitchell at
Darryl.R.Mitchell@nasa.gov.

________________________________________________________________

Host a Real Time Conversation With Crewmembers Onboard the International Space Station


NASA is now accepting proposals from U.S. schools, museums, science centers and community youth organizations to host an Amateur Radio on the International Space Station, or ARISS, contact between July 15, 2012, and Jan. 15, 2013. To maximize these radio contact opportunities, NASA is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed education plan. Proposals are due Jan. 30, 2012.

Using amateur radio, students can ask astronauts questions about life in space and other space-related topics. Students fully engage in the ARISS contact by helping set up an amateur radio ground station at the school and then using that station to talk directly with a crew member on the International Space Station for approximately 10 minutes. The technology is easier to acquire than ever before. ARISS has a network of mentors to help you obtain the technology required to host this once in a lifetime opportunity for your students.


Interested parties should contact Teaching From Space, a NASA Education office, to obtain complete information including how the technology works, what is expected of the host organization and how to obtain the proposal/application form by sending an email to JSC-TFS-ARISS@mail.nasa.gov or by calling 281-244-1919.

Additional information can be found at https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/teachingfromspace/students/ariss.html.

________________________________________________________________

New Content on NASA’s Math and Science @ Work Website

NASA’s Math and Science @ Work project has recently added new education content to its website.

This project provides activities teachers can download for use in high school advanced-placement mathematics and science courses. There are now more than 30 activities that will engage students in physics, chemistry, biology, calculus and statistics while giving them insight into NASA’s programs, projects and careers.

To download the free Math and Science @ Work activities, visit
www.nasa.gov/education/mathandscience.

Get current information about the project and interact with the Math and Science @ Work team by becoming a fan on Facebook. www.facebook.com/mathandscienceatwork.

________________________________________________________________

Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators:
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students:
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club:
https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub