NASA Education Express — Dec. 15, 2011

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Teach STEM? NASA Explorer Schools Can Help With That!
Audience: 4-12 Educators

Electromagnetic Spectrum: Remote Sensing Ices on Mars Web Seminar
Audience: 8-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Dec. 19, 2011

Expedition 31 and 32 In-flight Education Downlink Opportunity
Audience: All Educators
Proposal Deadline: Dec. 21, 2011

National Space Biomedical Research Institute Summer Internship Program
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: Dec. 31, 2011

Algebraic Equations: Transit Tracks — Finding Habitable Planets Web Seminar
Audience: Algebra Teachers and Informal Educators
Event Date: Jan. 3, 2011

2011 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award Video Contest
Audience: Grade 3-12 Students
Registration Deadline: Jan. 3, 2011
Video Submission Deadline: Jan. 17, 2012

2012-13 Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship
Audience: K-12 STEM Educators
Application Deadline: Jan. 5, 2012

Engineering Design: Forces and Motion — Balloon Aerodynamics Challenge Web Seminar
Audience: 6-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Jan. 5, 2012

4th Digital Media and Learning Competition Enters Stage Two
Audience: All Educators, Designers, and Students
Deadline: Jan. 12, 2012

Solving the Challenges of Space in the RealWorld and InWorld
Audience: 7-12 Educators and Students
Deadline: Jan. 27, 2012

FameLab Astrobiology — Science Communication Competition
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Competition Finals: April 12-16, 2012

2012 Summer Workshops — Climate Science Research for Educators and Students
Audience: 9-12 Educators
Application Deadline: June 1, 2012

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Teach STEM? NASA Explorer Schools Can Help With That!

Teachers across the country, regardless of school size, type or geographic location, have seen the benefit of participating in the NASA Explorer Schools project. These teachers have access to free NASA classroom materials and student engagement activities, as well as educator support resources, through the NES Virtual Campus. NES classroom resources are designed to help teachers increase student interest and achievement in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, subjects.

Are you looking for fun, exciting and interactive ways to connect your students to NASA? Designed for teachers in grades 4-12, NES provides a forum for accessing free lessons, student engagement activities, and professional development opportunities centered on NASA missions and STEM topics and careers. NES also offers multiple pathways for you to connect with other motivated STEM educators across the country to share best practices and classroom implementation ideas. Visit the NASA Explorer Schools website to read firsthand stories from participating teachers about the benefits of joining the NES project and implementing NASA resources in the classroom!

https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/nes2/recognition/profiles-index.html.


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Electromagnetic Spectrum: Remote Sensing Ices on Mars Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute web seminar on Dec. 19, 2011, at 6:30 p.m. EST. Learn how to use authentic NASA mission data to investigate the composition and distribution of ices in the high latitude regions of Mars through analysis of visible light, infrared light and gamma rays. The seminar includes information about a unique student extension activity, where students access a free computer simulation illustrating how gamma rays are used to determine the chemical composition of Mars.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar1.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov
.

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Expedition 31 and 32 In-flight Education Downlink Opportunity

NASA is seeking formal and informal educational organizations, individually or working together, to host a live, in-flight education downlink during Expedition 31 and 32 (approximately from March 2012 to September 2012). To maximize these downlink opportunities, NASA is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the downlink into a well-developed education plan.

The deadline to submit a proposal is Dec. 21, 2011.

During Expeditions 31 and 32, crew members aboard the International Space Station will participate in downlinks. Downlinks are approximately 20 minutes in length and allow students and educators to interact with astronauts through a question and answer session. Downlinks afford education audiences the opportunity to learn firsthand from astronauts what it is like to live and work in space. Downlinks are broadcast live on NASA TV and are streamed on the NASA website. Because of the nature of human spaceflight, organizations must demonstrate the flexibility to accommodate changes in downlink dates and times.

Interested organizations should contact Teaching From Space, a NASA Education office, to obtain information related to expectations, format, audience, guidelines and forms by sending an email to JSC-Teaching-From-Space@mail.nasa.gov or calling 281-244-7608.

To learn more about this opportunity, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/teachingfromspace/students/downlinks.html.

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National Space Biomedical Research Institute Summer Internship Program

Interns selected for the NSBRI’s summer program join ongoing project activities and gain hands-on experience in space biomedical research at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas; Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio; or Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif. The program is open to graduate students, medical students and undergraduate students who have completed their second year of studies.

Applicants are asked to send a curriculum vitae or resume, a letter of interest indicating available dates during the summer, two letters of recommendation, and college transcripts. The program is open to U.S. citizens.

Applications for the 2012 program are due Dec. 31, 2011.

For more information and to apply online, visit http://www.nsbri.org/summerinternship/. Questions about this opportunity should be directed to info@nsbri.org.


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Algebraic Equations: Transit Tracks — Finding Habitable Planets Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, the NASA Explorer Schools and Learning Environments and Research Network, or LE&RN, projects are hosting a 60-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on Jan. 3, 2012, at 8 p.m. EST. Discover how an algebra activity called “Finding Habitable Planets” will help you teach students to use their skills to analyze NASA data. Students learn about the possibility of discovering planets in habitable zones of solar systems.

For more information and to register online, visit https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-algebraic-equations/.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to the NES Help Desk at NASA.Explorer.Schools@mail.nasa.gov.


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2011 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award Video Contest

NASA has opened registration for the 2011 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award Contest. Featuring OPTIMUS PRIME, the leader of the popular TRANSFORMERS brand, the contest highlights spinoffs from NASA technologies that are used on Earth. The goal is to help students understand the benefits of NASA technology to their daily lives. Last year’s contest was open to students in grades 3-8 and resulted in 76 video submissions from over 190 students in 31 states.

For 2011, the OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award Contest has been expanded to include students in grades 3-12. Each student, or group of students, will submit a three- to five-minute video on a selected NASA spinoff technology listed in NASA’s 2010 “Spinoff” publication. Videos must demonstrate an understanding of the NASA spinoff technology and the associated NASA mission, as well as the commercial application and public benefit associated with the spinoff technology.

Participants must register for the contest by Jan. 3, 2012. Video entries are due Jan. 17, 2012.

Video entries will be posted on the NASA YouTube channel, and the public will be responsible for the first round of judging. The top five submissions from each of the three grade groups (Elementary [3rd-5th], Middle [6th-8th] and High School [9th-12th]) will advance for final judging. A NASA panel will select a winning entry from each group. Among other prizes, a crystal OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award Trophy will be given to winners at a special awards ceremony being held in Florida in April 2012. The innovators associated with the NASA technology highlighted in the winning videos also will receive trophies, as will their commercial partners.

For more information, visit the OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award website at http://ipp.gsfc.nasa.gov/optimus.

Questions about this contest should be directed to Darryl Mitchell at Darryl.R.Mitchell@nasa.gov.


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2012-13 Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship

Applications are currently available for the 2012-13 Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program. This program is open to current public or private elementary and secondary mathematics, technology, engineering and science classroom teachers with demonstrated excellence in teaching. Applications are due Jan. 5, 2012.

Selected teachers spend a school year in Washington, D.C., sharing their expertise with policy makers. Einstein Fellows may serve with one of several government agency sponsors, such as the Department of Energy, NASA or the National Science Foundation.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens and be currently employed full time in a public or private elementary or secondary school or school district. Applicants must have been teaching full time in a public or private elementary or secondary school for at least five of the last seven years.

For more information about this opportunity and to apply online, visit www.einsteinfellows.org.

Inquiries about the Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program should be directed to einsteinfellows@triangle-coalition.org.

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Engineering Design: Forces and Motion — Balloon Aerodynamics Challenge Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on Jan. 5, 2012, at 6:30 p.m. EST. This Web seminar will introduce the Forces and Motion: Balloon Aerodynamics Challenge for students. This activity provides first-hand information about density, neutral buoyancy and drag, which is then used to solve a problem. The activity provides many opportunities for incorporating national mathematics, science and technology learning standards into your curriculum.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar23.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to the NES Help Desk at NASA.Explorer.Schools@mail.nasa.gov.


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4th Digital Media and Learning Competition Enters Stage Two

The HASTAC/MacArthur Foundation’s 4th Digital Media and Learning Competition, held in collaboration with the Mozilla Foundation, encourages individuals and organizations to create badges that are designed to publicly validate new skills, knowledge and achievements.

The Design and Technology stage (Stage Two) of the Competition is now open for organizations, teams, or individuals skilled in design to submit initial prototypes for badge systems based on the content or programs developed by official collaborators (including NASA’s robotics badges) and winning applicants from Stage One. Submissions will be displayed online for public comment and assessed by an expert panel of judges. Stage Two winners will be matched with content and programs teams from Stage One and proceed on to Stage Three.

Stage Two applicants should submit visual materials that will graphically represent their proposed badge system, as well as a 1500-word written proposal that describes in detail how the badge system will perform. Submissions, due no later than Jan. 12 at 5 p.m. PST, should be submitted through the DML Competition web site: http://dmlcompetition.net.

Visit http://dmlcompetition.net to explore collaborator content as well as the 60 winning competitor entries selected from among the hundreds of badge ideas submitted in Stage One of the competition. Several Federal agencies are listed as collaborators, including NASA. The proposed badge content addresses a breadth of topics — from the promotion of civic engagement and community volunteerism, to STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics) learning in and out of the classroom, to digital literacy, to workforce preparedness and beyond.

For more information about the 4th Digital Media and Learning Competition, visit http://dmlcompetition.net.


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Solving the Challenges of Space in the RealWorld and InWorld

The RealWorld-InWorld NASA Engineering Design Challenge encourages students in grades 7-12 to explore and build skills essential for successful careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics through two phases of project-based learning and team competition.

RealWorld (Phase 1): Teams of middle- and high-school-aged students with support of their teachers/coaches/parents work collaboratively as engineers and scientists to explore and design solutions related to the James Webb Space Telescope and Robonaut 2.

RealWorld Phase ends: January 27, 2012. To be considered to move to the InWorld phase, all RealWorld work must be submitted by this deadline.

Recognition: Submitted final project solutions will be featured on the RealWorld-InWorld website, and teams will receive recognition for their work once they complete the RealWorld challenge and InWorld registration.

InWorld (Phase 2): Participating college students select teams of two to four middle- and high-school-aged students who have completed the RealWorld phase to build their InWorld teams. Participation is limited to U.S. citizens. Teams work in a 3-D virtual online environment using 21st Century tools to refine designs and to create 3-D models of their design solutions.

InWorld Phase begins: January 28, 2012.
InWorld Phase ends: April 20, 2012.

Recognition: InWorld teams will compete for cash awards ($1,000 per member, including team leader, for each winning team). Contest rules apply.

NASA scientists and engineers visit and “chat” virtually throughout both phases of the challenge.

To learn more about the challenge and to register for online resources for this free and flexible project, visit
www.nasarealworldinworld.org.

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FameLab Astrobiology — Science Communication Competition

FameLab Astrobiology is a science communication competition focused on graduate students and post doctoral researchers doing research in astrobiology. Via four preliminary and one final competition, early career astrobiologists will compete to convey their own research or related science concepts. Each contestant has the spotlight for only three minutes — slides and charts are not allowed. A panel of experts in both science and science communication will judge the events. Events will take place on the following dates:

— Jan. 13, 2012 — Houston, Texas — Lunar and Planetary Institute
— Feb. 10, 2012 — Denver, Colo. — Denver Museum of Nature and Science
— March 9, 2012 — Washington, D.C. — NASA Headquarters/National Geographic Society
— Jan. – March 2012 — Online via YouTube
— FINAL: April 12-16, 2012 — Atlanta, Ga. — Astrobiology Science Conference

Each preliminary event will feature science communication training and enrichment activities, providing exposure to alternative careers. There will be a two-day master class for finalists prior to the final event in April.

The winner will go on to compete in the International FameLab Final in the United Kingdom in June 2012.

For more information, visit http://astrobiologyfamelab.arc.nasa.gov/.

Questions about this competition may be directed to Daniella Scalice at the NASA Astrobiology Institute via email at daniella.m.scalice@nasa.gov.


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2012 Summer Workshops — Climate Science Research for Educators and Students

The Institute for Earth Science Research and Education, in collaboration with Queens College/City University of New York, is seeking participants for summer professional development workshops in the second year of its Climate Science Research for Educators and Students project. Funded by the NASA Innovations in Climate Education program, this project seeks to improve student engagement in climate science by helping teachers and students develop authentic climate-related science research projects.

During summer 2012, two climate science workshops will take place in New York City. The first workshop will be held in late June or early July. The workshop will focus on understanding sun/Earth/atmosphere interactions and Earth’s radiative balance, a fundamental concept for climate science. All participants will build pyranometers, instruments for monitoring solar radiation. A follow-up workshop will take place in August. During the summer, participants are expected to conduct their own research. 

All workshop participants in 2011 were from New York City or within commuting distance. In 2012, teachers from other places are encouraged to attend the early summer workshop, with follow-on activities to be conducted online in place of attendance at the August workshop. On-campus housing at Queens College should be available, and travel support for teachers from outside the NYC area may be available.

Applications are due June 1, 2012.

For more information, visit http://www.instesre.org/GCCE/GCCEHome.htm.

Questions about this competition should be directed to David Brooks via email at brooksdr@drexel.edu or by phone at 610-584-5619.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

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