Monthly Archives: January 2012

NASA Education Express — Jan. 26, 2012

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Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community.Full descriptions are listed below.

New NASA Kids’ Club Activity: Window to Earth
Audience: K-4 Educators and Students

New DIY Podcast Module Available — Micro-g
Audience: 5-12 Educators and Students

NASA’s Orion Spacecraft to Land in Texas andAlabama
Audience: All Educators and Students
Tour Stop in Dallas, Texas: Jan. 27-29, 2012
Tour Stop in Huntsville, Ala.: Feb. 1-2, 2012

AlgebraicEquations: Calculator Controlled Robots Web Seminar
Audience: Algebra Teachers and Informal Educators
Event Date: Jan. 30, 2012


NASA’s DEVELOP Program– 2012 Summer Session
Audience: 9-12 and Higher Education Educators and Students
Summer Session Deadline: Jan. 30, 2012

Host a Real TimeConversation With Crewmembers Onboard the International Space Station
Audience: All Educators
Proposal Deadline: Jan. 30, 2012

Scholarship Announcement: 2011 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award Video Contest
Audience: Grade 3-12 Students
Video Submission Deadline: Jan. 31, 2012

International Space Apps Challenge
Audience: All Educators and 9-Higher Education Students
Submission Deadline: Jan. 31, 2012

Distance/Rate/Time Problems: Smart Skies Web Seminar
Audience: 5-9 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Feb. 1, 2012

NASA’s DigitalLearning Network Webcast Series — Flying Through African-American History Withthe Tuskegee Airmen
Audience: K-12 Educators and Students
Event Dates: Multiple Dates StartingFeb. 2, 2012

Engineering Design: Forces andMotion — The Great Boomerang Challenge Web Seminar
Audience: 9-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Feb. 2, 2012

Join the Worldwide GLOBEat Night 2012 Campaign
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Now through April 20, 2011

Women In STEM High School AerospaceScholars
Audience: 9-12 Educators and Students
Deadline: Feb. 15, 2012

NASA’s DigitalLearning Network Webcast — National African American History Month andEngineers Week
Audience: K-12 Educators and Students
Event Date: Feb. 22, 2012

OSSI: SOLAR — Summer 2012 Opportunities
Audience: Higher Education Students
Deadline: March 16, 2012

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New NASA Kids’ Club Activity: Window to Earth

Astronauts have a spectacular view of Earth from space. Move through the pagesof Window to Earth and see images taken from space of these geographicalfeatures: peninsula, glacier, lake, desert, cape, island, upheaval dome,strait, waterfall, reef and volcano.

To take a peek and see how Earth looks from space, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forkids/kidsclub/flash/clubhouse/Window_to_Earth.html

For more fun activities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub.

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New DIY Podcast Module Available — Micro-g

The newest Do-It-Yourself, or DIY, Podcast module, Micro-g, is live and ready for use.

This module includes four NASA experts explaining microgravity and how to livein it. Nancy Hall is a microgravity researcher on Earth. Mike Fincke is theU.S. astronaut who has spent the most total time in orbit (more than a year).And we have footage of flight engineers Nicole Stott and Bob Thirsk from theInternational Space Station.

Several video clips and images on the photo index page show microgravitydemonstrations on Earth and objects and astronauts floating through the spacestation.

Other DIY Podcast topic modules are:
— Fitness
— Lab Safety
— Newton’s Laws
— Robots
— Rocket Science
— Solar Arrays
— Spacesuits
— Sports Demo

Students use the video clips, pictures and audio clips to build podcastepisodes and other multimedia projects.

A companion blog offers tips andsuggestions for incorporating the DIY Podcast into the classroom.

To learn more and to start building podcasts, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/diypodcast/index.html.

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NASA’s Orion Spacecraft to Land in Oklahoma,Texas and Alabama

A test version of NASA’s Orion spacecraft soonwill make a cross-country journey, giving residents the chance to see afull-scale test version of the vehicle that will take humans into deep space.

The crew module will make stops during a tripfrom the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico to the Kennedy Space Center inFlorida. The planned stops include Jan.27-29 at Victory Park and the American Airlines Center in Dallasand Feb. 1-2 at the U.S.Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Ala. Engineers, programofficials, astronauts and NASA spokespeople will be available to speak with themedia and the public.

The full-scale test vehicle was used by groundcrews in advance of the launch abort system flight test that took place in NewMexico in 2010. Orion will serve as the vehicle that takes astronauts beyondlow-Earth orbit, and the first orbital flight test is scheduled for 2014.

To see photos of the pad abort test, visit https://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/mpcv/gallery/abort_test/index.htm.

For more information on the each of the sites,visit

American Airlines Center: http://www.americanairlinescenter.com.

U.S. Space and Rocket Center: http://www.ussrc.com.

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Algebraic Equations: Calculator Controlled Robots Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, theNASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association arehosting a 90-minute Web seminar on Jan.30, 2012, at 6:30 p.m. EST. Discovera unique way of integrating robotic technology into your algebra classes.Robotic missions engage students and provide a unique way of bringing to lifethe concepts you are teaching. Learn to use programmable Texas Instruments, orTI, calculators and Norland Research Robots to solve problems requiringsubstituting values for variables in formulas.

You do not need to have a Norland Research Robot or programmable TI calculatorto participate in this seminar, or know how to program the calculator. Thisseminar provides an overview of using robotics in algebra so you can make aninformed decision about purchasing the robots and other equipment.

For more information and to registeronline, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar8.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to the NASA Explorer Schools helpdesk at NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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NASA’s DEVELOP Program — 2012 Summer Session

DEVELOP is a NASA Science Mission DirectorateApplied Sciences-sponsored internship that fosters the training and developmentof students in the atmospheric and earth sciences. The DEVELOP Program extendsthe application of NASA earth science research and technology to meet societalneeds.

Students conduct projects that focus on thepractical application of NASA’s earth science research and demonstrate howresults can benefit partner organizations and local communities. Advisors andmentors, from NASA and partner institutions, provide guidance and support forthe program. Students gain experience using NASA science and technology in aprofessional setting.

Students from high school through doctorallevels are selected through a competitive application process. Students chosenby DEVELOP work on teams onsite at 10 locations nationwide. Activities areconducted during three 10-week terms per year: spring, summer and fall. Toapply to a DEVELOP center at a NASA location, applicants must be a citizen ofthe U.S. However, international students currently registered at an accreditedschool in the U.S. are eligible to apply to DEVELOP regional locations.International applicants must already have a visa that permits them to work inthe U.S.

Applications for the summer 2012 session are dueJan. 30, 2012.

For more information about this uniqueinternship opportunity, please visit the DEVELOP website at http://develop.larc.nasa.gov.

Questions about the DEVELOP Program should bedirected by email to NASA-DL-DEVELOP@mail.nasa.govor by telephone to 757-864-3761.

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Host a Real Time Conversation With CrewmembersOnboard the International Space Station

NASA is now accepting proposals from U.S.schools, museums, science centers and community youth organizations to host anAmateur Radio on the International Space Station, or ARISS, contact betweenJuly 15, 2012, and Jan. 15, 2013. To maximize these radio contactopportunities, NASA is looking for organizations that will draw large numbersof participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed education plan.Proposals are due Jan.30, 2012.

Using amateur radio, students can ask astronauts questions about life inspace and other space-related topics. Students fully engage in the ARISScontact by helping set up an amateur radio ground station at the school andthen using that station to talk directly with a crew member on the InternationalSpace Station for approximately 10 minutes. The technology is easier to acquirethan ever before. ARISS has a network of mentors to help you obtain thetechnology required to host this once in a lifetime opportunity for yourstudents.

Interested parties should contact Teaching FromSpace, a NASA Education office, to obtain complete information including howthe technology works, what is expected of the host organization and how toobtain the proposal/application form by sending an email to JSC-TFS-ARISS@mail.nasa.gov or bycalling 281-244-1919.

Additional information can be found at https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/teachingfromspace/students/ariss.html.

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Scholarship Announcement: 2011 OPTIMUS PRIMESpinoff Award Video Contest

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center is pleased toannounce that the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, or ASME, Foundationis offering scholarships to the winners of the 2011 NASA OPTIMUS PRIME SpinoffContest. These scholarships, with a combined value of $25,000, will be awardedby the ASME Foundation to students whose video submissions best represent aselected NASA spinoff technology featured in the Agency’s 2010 Spinoffpublication.

Featuring OPTIMUS PRIME, the leader of thepopular TRANSFORMERS brand, the 2011 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award Contest highlightsspinoffs from NASA technologies that are used on Earth. The goal is to helpstudents understand the benefits of NASA technology to their daily lives. Lastyear’s contest was open to students in grades 3-8 and resulted in 76 videosubmissions from over 190 students in 31 states.

For the 2011, the OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award Contest has been expanded toinclude students in grades 3-12. Each student, or group of students, willsubmit a three- to five-minute video on a selected NASA spinoff technologylisted in NASA’s 2010 “Spinoff” publication. Videos must demonstrate anunderstanding of the NASA spinoff technology and the associated NASA mission,as well as the commercial application and public benefit associated with thespinoff technology.

Video entries are due Jan. 31, 2012.

Video entries will be posted on the NASA YouTube channel, and the public willbe responsible for the first round of judging. The top five submissions fromeach of the three grade groups (Elementary [3rd-5th], Middle [6th-8th] and HighSchool [9th-12th]) will advance for final judging. A NASA panel will select awinning entry from each group. Among other prizes, a crystal OPTIMUS PRIMESpinoff Award Trophy will be given to winners at a special awards ceremonybeing held in Florida in April 2012. The innovators associated with the NASAtechnology highlighted in the winning videos also will receive trophies, aswill their commercial partners.

The NASA OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Contest is brought about through a collaborationbetween NASA and Hasbro. For more information, visit the OPTIMUS PRIME SpinoffAward website at http://ipp.gsfc.nasa.gov/optimus.

Questions about this contest should be directedto Darryl Mitchell at Darryl.R.Mitchell@nasa.gov.

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International Space Apps Challenge

NASA is working with the Open Government Partnership, or OGP, and internationalspace agencies to coordinate an International Space Apps Challenge. The competitionwill culminate in an event taking place in April 2012 that will enable thegovernment to use the expertise and entrepreneurial spirit of citizens to helpaddress global challenges.

Through the end of January, NASA and the event partners will receive anddevelop ideas for potential projects via the online platform. During the eventin April, NASA representatives and officials from international space agencieswill gather with scientists and citizens to use publicly released scientificdata to create solutions for issues, such as weather impact on the globaleconomy and depletion of ocean resources.

The deadline to submit ideas is Jan. 31,2012.

The OGP is a new, multilateral initiative that aims to secure concretecommitments from governments to promote transparency, empower citizens, fightcorruption and harness new technologies. NASA’s participation in the UnitedStates Domestic Plan will promote innovation through internationalcollaboration.

NASA is a leader in the U.S. Open Government Initiative. The president’s fiscalyear 2012 budget request focuses NASA’s efforts on a vigorous path ofinnovation and technological development. The path leads to an array ofchallenging and inspiring missions to destinations with incredible potentialfor discovery, increasing knowledge about our solar system, developingtechnologies to improve life on Earth, expanding our presence in space,increasing space commerce and engaging the public.

To learn more about the International Space Apps Competition, get the latestupdates and submit your ideas, visit http://open.nasa.gov/appschallenge.

To learn more about the Open Government Partnership, visit http://www.opengovpartnership.org/.

If you have questions about the International Space Apps Competition, please visithttp://open.nasa.gov/appschallenge/contact/.

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Distance/Rate/TimeProblems: Smart Skies Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, the NASAExplorer Schools project is hosting a 60-minute professional development Webseminar for educators on Feb. 1, 2012,at 8 p.m. EST. Learn how to use an innovative air traffic control simulatorto engage your students as they explore the mathematics involved in the role ofan air traffic controller. In the three-plane problem featured in this lesson,the challenge is to change routes and speeds to line up the planes safely, withproper spacing, at a given route intersection.

For more information and to registeronline, visit https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-distanceratetime/.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

E-mail any questions about this opportunity to the NES Help Desk at NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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NASA’s Digital Learning Network Webcast Series — Flying ThroughAfrican-American History With the Tuskegee Airmen

In honor of National African American HistoryMonth, NASA’s Digital Learning Network is hosting a webcast series titledFlying Through African-American History With the Tuskegee Airmen. The webcastseries will focus on this elite group of African-American pilots who fought warand racism in World War II and the challenges faced by early African-Americanaviators.

The Tuskegee Airmen Balance Warfare WithScience
Feb. 2, 2012, 1-2 p.m. EST
Learn more about the Tuskegee Airmen and their pivotal role during WorldWar II. These pilots fought war and racism with one of World War II’s greatestweapons, the science of the P-51 Mustang fighter aircraft.

Technology Advances the Tuskegee Airmen
Feb. 7, 2012, 1-2 p.m. EST
The onset of World War II spurred the aerospace industry, one of America’smost notable accomplishments. Aircrafts were plentiful, but pilots were scarce.Technology supported the Tuskegee Airman’s victory over Nazism and Fascism inthe European skies and racism on American soil.

Engineering a Proud Heritage
Feb. 14, 2012, 1-2 p.m. EST
Moton Field in Tuskegee, Alabama became the historic site that launchedproof that African-Americans could fly and maintain sophisticated combataircraft. Engineering schools such as the Tuskegee Institute provided the edgeneeded for African-Americans to make a significant impact during World War II.

Mathematics Fuels the Tuskegee Airmen
Feb. 14, 2012, 1-2 p.m. EST
Over 900 men graduated as pilots from the Tuskegee Institute pilot trainingprogram. The elite class of airmen was granted the opportunity to fuel flightsuccess with calculated risks.

Teachers interested in having their classes participate in the live audienceshould visit the DLN website for details to register. Requests will be taken ona first-come, first-served basis.

Classes not chosen to participate in the live audience may still join thewebcast via live streaming on the DLN website.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/dln/special/TuskegeeAirmen.html.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Karen.Ricks@nasa.gov.

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EngineeringDesign: Forces and Motion — The Great Boomerang Challenge Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professionaldevelopment experiences, the NASAExplorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association arehosting a 90-minute professional development Web seminar for educators on Feb. 2, 2012, at 8:15 p.m. EST. Learnhow NASA aerodynamics research can be applied to boomerang design to increaseperformance. During the session, participants will be introduced to theBoomerang Design Challenge and learn how to incorporate this activity intoscience classes. The seminar also includes information about two uniqueextensions. In the first, students access a free computer simulationillustrating the airflow around an airfoil to determine the correct flowequation, and a second extension uses an interactive simulation to determinethe airflow around various shapes of airfoils.

For more information and toregister online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar24.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to the NES Help Desk at NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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Join the Worldwide GLOBE at Night 2012 Campaign

GLOBE at Night is a worldwide, hands-on scienceand education program for primary and secondary schools. The GLOBE at Nightproject encourages citizen-scientists worldwide to record the brightness of thenight sky. During four select sets of dates, children and adults match theappearance of a constellation (Orion or Leo in the northern hemisphere, andOrion and Crux in the southern hemisphere) with seven star charts ofprogressively fainter stars. The map is located at http://www.globeatnight.org. Participants then submit their choice of star chartonline with their date, time and location to help create a light-pollution mapworldwide.

The GLOBE at Night 2012 campaign dates are Feb. 12-21, March 13-22 and April 11-20,2012. Over 68,000 measurements have been contributed from more than 115countries over the last six years of two-week campaigns.

Children and adults can submit theirmeasurements in real time if they have a smart phone or tablet. To do this, usethe Web application at http://www.globeatnight.org/webapp/. With smart phones and tablets, the location, dateand time are put in automatically. And if you do not have a smart phone ortablet, there are user-friendly tools on the GLOBE at Night report page to findlatitude and longitude.

Through GLOBE at Night, students, teachers,parents and community members are amassing a data set from which they canexplore the nature of light pollution locally and across the globe. Make a differenceand join the GLOBE at Night efforts in 2012. Activity packets, one-page flyersand postcards advertising the campaign are available at http://www.globeatnight.org.

Please email any questions about GLOBE at Nightto globeatnight@noao.edu.

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WomenIn STEM High School Aerospace Scholars

Engineer your dream job. The Women in STEM High School Aerospace Scholars projectoffers a one-of-a-kind experience for female high school juniors to jump-start theirfutures and explore the possibilities of a major or career in science, technology,engineering and mathematics. Participants begin their adventure in an onlinecommunity. The project culminates with a summer experience at NASA’s JohnsonSpace Center in Houston, Texas. Collaborate with girls from across the countryand female NASA engineers and interns.

Applications are due Feb. 15, 2012.

For more information and to download the application, visit http://wish.aerospacescholars.org/.

Questions should be directed to JSC-NHAS@mail.nasa.gov.

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NASA’s Digital Learning Network Webcast — National African American History Month and Engineers Week

In observance of National African AmericanHistory Month and Engineers Week in February, the Office of Education at NASA’sGoddard Space Flight Center in Maryland will host a live webcast for teachersand students in grades K-12.

On Feb. 22, 2012, from 1-2 p.m. EST,students will interact live with African-American engineers and scientists whowill share how they use science, technology, engineering and mathematics, orSTEM, in their careers. Presenters will discuss what sparked their careerchoices and how students can prepare for future careers in STEM fields. Theevent will be streamed on the Digital Learning Network “DLiNfo”webcast channel, and during the event students can submit questions for thescientists to answer via an email address that will be provided by the on-airhost.

Also during the month of February, GSFC will release two videos featuring Dr.Aprille Ericsson and James Fraction. These videos will give an inside look at whatengineers do during the day. This is a great opportunity for educators andstudents to learn more about engineering careers at NASA.

For more information on these events and how to participate, please visit theDLiNfo webcast section at the Digital Learning Network site, http://dln.nasa.gov.

Questions about these opportunities should be directed to Trena Ferrell at Trena.M.Ferrell@nasa.gov.

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OSSI:SOLAR — Summer 2012 Opportunities

The NASA One Stop Shopping Initiative, or OSSI,strives to provide students at all institutions of higher education access to aportfolio of internship, fellowship and scholarship opportunities offered byNASA mission directorates and centers.

Visit the OSSI LaunchPad to find information on internship, fellowship andscholarship opportunities. The site features the OSSI: Student OnlineApplication for Recruiting Interns, Fellows and Scholars, or SOLAR. This innovativesystem allows students to search and apply for all types of higher-educationNASA internship, fellowship and scholarship opportunities in one location. Asingle application places the student in the applicant pool for considerationby all NASA mentors.

Applications for summer 2012 opportunities are due March 16, 2012.

To find available opportunities and to fill out a SOLAR application, visit http://intern.nasa.gov/index.html.

Inquiries about the OSSI: SOLAR should be directed to Mabel Matthews at Mabel.Matthews@nasa.gov.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For afull list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club:
https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclu

NASA's Orion Spacecraft to Land in Oklahoma, Texas and Alabama

Posted on by .

A test version of NASA’s Orion spacecraft soonwill make a cross-country journey, giving residents in three states the chanceto see a full-scale test version of the vehicle that will take humans into deepspace.

The crew module will make stops during a trip from the White Sands MissileRange in New Mexico to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The planned stopsinclude Jan. 24-25 at Science MuseumOklahoma in Oklahoma City; Jan.27-29 at Victory Park and the American Airlines Center in Dallas; and, Feb. 1-2 at the U.S. Space and RocketCenter in Huntsville, Ala. Engineers, program officials, astronauts andNASA spokespeople will be available to speak with the media and the public.

The full-scale test vehicle was used by ground crews in advance of the launchabort system flight test that took place in New Mexico in 2010. Orion willserve as the vehicle that takes astronauts beyond low-Earth orbit, and thefirst orbital flight test is scheduled for 2014.

To see photos of the pad abort test, visit https://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/mpcv/gallery/abort_test/index.htm.

For more information on the each of the sites, visit

Science Museum Oklahoma: http://www.sciencemuseumok.org.

American Airlines Center: http://www.americanairlinescenter.com.

U.S. Space and Rocket Center: http://www.ussrc.com.

NASA Education Express — Jan. 19, 2012

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Weather and Climate: Satellite Meteorology Web Seminar

Audience: 7-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Jan. 23, 2012

Voting Open — YouTube Space Lab Competition
Audience: All Educators and Students
Voting Deadline:
Jan. 24, 2012

Geometry: Space Math Problems — Solar Storms Web Seminar
Audience: Algebra Teachers and Informal Educators
Event Date: Jan. 24, 2012

Live Video Chat:
Sea Level Rising
Audience: 4-9 Educators and Students
Event Date: Jan. 25, 2012, noon EST

Educator Resource Showcase Webcast — New Microgravity Website and Activities
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Date: Jan. 25, 2012

Analyzing Solar Energy Graphs: MY NASA DATA Web Seminar

Audience: 9-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Jan 25, 2012

RealWorld-InWorld Engineering Design Challenge
Audience: 7-12 Educators and Students
Deadline: Jan. 27, 2012

National Spaced Out Sports Design Challenge
Audience: 5-8 Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: Mar. 16, 2012


2011-2012 NASA Aeronautics High School Contest
Audience: 9-12 Students
Deadline: March 19, 2012

RockOn 2012 University Rocket Science Workshop
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Deadline: May 1, 2012
Workshop Dates: June 16-21, 2012

2010-2011 Green Aviation University Engineering Contest
Audience: Higher Education Students
Deadline: May 7, 2012

What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website
Audience: K-6 Educators

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Weather and Climate: Satellite Meteorology Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute professional development Web seminar for educators on Jan. 23, 2012, at 6:30 p.m. EST.

Participants will learn to use the data from NASA’s research satellite program in their meteorology lessons. This Web seminar features “Monitoring the Global Environment,” one of eight modules within the Satellite Meteorology course. The activities within this module incorporate the use of authentic data acquired by NASA’s Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites and Polar Operational Environmental Satellites. Attendees will learn how to locate and download satellite data, create graphs and learn how to interpret them.

For more information and to register online, visit URL http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar5.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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Voting Open — YouTube Space Lab Competition

Vote in the YouTube Space Lab Competition!

NASA has collaborated with Space Adventures©, Google, and BioServe Space Technologies to conduct student-designed life sciences and physics experiments on the International Space Station later this year through the YouTube Space Lab Competition.

Until Jan. 24, 2012, you can vote for your favorites from the 60 finalists selected from 2,000 submissions representing over 80 countries. This is even better than American Idol® because the ideas all came from middle and high school students wanting to do real science in microgravity!

Check out the finalist videos at
https://www.youtube.com/user/spacelab/spacelab and vote for the best entries once a day. The winners get an experience that is truly out of this world, whether they choose to watch their experiments launch from Japan or take cosmonaut training in Russia when they turn 18.

Do your part to help inspire the next generation of space scientists!


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Geometry: Space Math Problems — Solar Storms Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, the NASA Explorer Schools and Learning Environments and Research Network projects are hosting a 60-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on Jan 24, 2012, at 8 p.m. EST. Solar Storms provides teachers with a unique opportunity to have students use their knowledge of geometry and trigonometry to analyze NASA images of a solar tsunami. During this seminar, participants will get an overview of the problem sets, preview a video about solar storms, get suggestions for implementing best practices and some learn about some extension activities.

For more information and to register online, visit https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-geometry-space-math/.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit
http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.


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Live Video Chat: Sea Level Rising

Students have the opportunity to ask questions of a NASA oceanographer and climate scientist. Dr. Josh Willis is an oceanographer and climate scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Having served as the deputy project scientist and member of the science team on Jason 1 and 2 projects, Willis currently serves as the lead project scientist for the Jason 3 project.

One result of global climate change is the melting of ice sheets around the world. Over the past century, many mountain glaciers and large portions of the ice sheets in both Greenland and Antarctica have lost mass. During this video chat, Willis will answer student questions about the effects of sea-level rise and climate change caused by greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.

The live video chat will take place on Jan. 25, 2012, at noon EST.

Submit questions during the chat through a chat window, or send them to
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

To learn more about NES, visit the
explorerschools.nasa.gov
website.

To view the video chat or for more information, visit
https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/nes2/home/chat-sea-level.html.

If you have any questions about the video chat, contact
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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Educator Resource Showcase Webcast — New Microgravity Website and Activities

Join host Elaine Lapka and presenters Teresa Sindelar and Dynae Fullwood from NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, for an hourlong, free webcast on Jan. 25, 2012, at 3 p.m. EST.

This webcast will provide a virtual tour of NASA’s new Microgravity Education website. Use the resources on this new website to learn about NASA’s microgravity laboratories on Earth and in space. The webcast hosts will also demonstrate an inquiry-based student activity that K-12 educators can use to investigate the microgravity environment.

For more information and to view the webcast, visit
https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/dln/index.html.

Check out the Microgravity Education website at
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/microgravity/home/index.html
.

If you have any questions about the webcast, please email them to Renee Elias at
RElias@lcjvs.net
.

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Analyzing Solar Energy Graphs: MY NASA DATA Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute Web seminar for educators on Jan 25, 2012, at 8:15 p.m. EST.

Become familiar with the MY NASA DATA activity, “Solar Cell Energy Availability From Around the Country.” Compare monthly averages of downward radiation in locations around the U.S. and analyze areas where conditions would be conducive to having solar panels. Access data on the NASA Live Access Server as you “journey” around the U.S. to determine the amount of solar radiation and analyze overlay plots to compare data from NASA satellites.

For more information and to register online, visit
http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar6.aspx.


To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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RealWorld-InWorld Engineering Design Challenge

There is still time to submit entries to RealWorld-InWorld, or RWIW, NASA’s engineering design challenge. The activity encourages students in grades 7-12 to explore and build skills essential for successful science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, careers through a RealWorld (face-to-face) and an InWorld (unique online virtual reality) phase of project-based learning and team competition.

RealWorld (Phase 1): Teams of middle- and high-school-aged students with support of their sponsoring adult work collaboratively as engineers and scientists to explore and design solutions related to the James Webb Space Telescope and Robonaut 2.

NOTE: The RealWorld Phase can be completed by teams in about two weeks.

RealWorld Phase ends: Jan. 27, 2012. To be considered to move to the InWorld phase, all RealWorld work must be submitted by this deadline.

Recognition: Submitted final project solutions will be featured on the RWIW website, and teams will receive recognition for their work once they complete the RealWorld challenge and InWorld registration.

InWorld (Phase 2): Participating college students select teams of two to four middle- and high-school-aged students who have completed the RealWorld phase to build their InWorld teams. Participation is limited to U.S. citizens. Teams work in a 3-D virtual environment using 21st century tools to refine designs and to create 3-D models of their design solutions.

InWorld Phase begins: Jan. 28, 2012.
InWorld Phase ends: April 20, 2012.

Recognition: InWorld teams will compete for cash awards ($1,000 per member, including team leader, for each winning team). Contest rules apply.

To learn more about the challenge and to register for online resources for this free and flexible project, visit www.nasarealworldinworld.org.

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National Spaced Out Sports Design Challenge

Students in grades 5-8 throughout the United States are invited to participate in Spaced Out Sports, a national design challenge that applies Newton’s Laws of Motion by designing a game for the International Space Station astronauts to play in space. The goal is for students to learn the science behind the game on Earth and in microgravity.

Students will submit game demonstrations via a playbook and video. Submissions will be accepted from schools, home school groups, after-school or enrichment programs. Awards include: First Place — NASA school-wide or program-wide celebration (U.S. teams only); top three teams — games played on the space station and recorded for a future broadcast; all contributing schools and programs — opportunity to participate in a Digital Learning Network webcast with astronauts on the space station.

Entries are due March 16, 2012.

Spaced Out Sports student and educator resources include posters, bookmarks, curriculum guides, career videos and Digital Learning Network modules. All include NASA astronauts, engineers and celebrity sports figures engaging students in relevant space-sports connections by explaining and demonstrating the science behind their work and/or games. Featured are: former astronaut and NASA Associate Administrator for Education Leland Melvin and astronaut Nicole Stott; Olympic gymnast Nastia Liukin; NASCAR’s Juan Pablo Montoya; basketball’s Temeka Johnson; football/Super Bowl champions New Orleans Saints; and hockey’s Ryan O’Reilly and the Colorado Avalanche.

Spaced Out Sports is managed by NASA’s Stennis Space Center Education through the Teaching From Space Office at NASA’s Johnson Space Flight Center in Houston.

For more information and to register for the challenge, visit
http://education.ssc.nasa.gov/spacedoutsports.

If you have questions about Spaced Out Sports, please email inquiries to
SpacedOutSports@nasa.gov.


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2011-2012 NASA Aeronautics High School Contest

The Environmentally Responsible Aviation project invites students in grades 9-12 to submit a well-documented research paper up to 12 pages to demonstrate understanding of the environmental impact of aircraft noise and emissions. Specific topics are listed on the contest website.

Participants must be enrolled in an accredited high school, secondary school or home school.
International students may participate but are not eligible for cash prizes. The deadline to enter is March 19, 2012.

For more information about the contest, visit
http://aero.larc.nasa.gov/competitions_high_era.htm.

Questions about the contest should be directed to Dr. Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.


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RockOn 2012 University Rocket Science Workshop

U.S. university faculty and students are invited to a weeklong workshop to learn how to build and launch a scientific experiment into space. NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia is hosting the RockOn 2012 workshop June 16-21, 2012, in partnership with the Colorado and Virginia Space Grant Consortia. The registration deadline for the workshop is May 1, 2012.

The hands-on workshop teaches participants to build experiments that fly on sounding rockets. During the week, participants will work together in teams of three to construct and integrate a sounding rocket payload from a kit. On the fifth day of the workshop, the experiments will fly on a sounding rocket expected to reach an altitude of more than 70 miles.

Each experiment will provide valuable scientific data, analyzed as part of the student-led science and engineering research. The program engages faculty and students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics skills critical to NASA’s future engineering, scientific and technical missions.

For more information about RockOn and to register online, visit
http://spacegrant.colorado.edu/rockon/2012/index_2011.html.

Questions about the workshop or the registration process should be directed to Chris Koehler by email at
koehler@colorado.edu or by telephone at 303-492-3141.


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2011-2012 Green Aviation University Engineering Contest

The Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project invites undergraduate and graduate students to submit a well-documented design paper for a large cargo aircraft that produces less noise, fewer emissions and is more fuel efficient than current models.

Participants, either teams or individuals, must be enrolled full time in an accredited college or university. International students may participate but are not eligible for cash prizes or student internships. Entries are due May 7, 2012.

For more information about the contest, visit http://aero.larc.nasa.gov/era_univ/competitions_univ_era.htm.

Questions about the contest should be directed to Dr. Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.


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What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website

Science and technology permeate all our activities from driving a car to cooking to writing poetry. So when we study science and technology, why not incorporate some of those other activities? Why not use interests like art and music to think about and express our understanding of nature? The Space Place has lots of cross-disciplinary opportunities to help make nature unforgettable.


New at spaceplace.nasa.gov
Get the key to the treasure chest! The new “Go with the Flow” game at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/ocean-currents/en/
has you playing with salinity and heat, which have opposing effects on vertical water movement. Using heat and salt as tools, as well as horizontal currents and walls, you set up flow patterns that your little submarine can follow in order to reach the key that will open the treasure chest and get the gold.

After playing “Flow,” students are not likely to forget the roles that heat and salinity play on ocean currents. These are important principles to learn in order to understand the potential effects of climate change.


Space Place en español

¡Haz un mapa topográfico! But first, make a clay sculpture of a mountain. This hands-on arts and crafts activity shows how 3-D topography can be represented very accurately on a 2-D map. Using clay (or our recipe for modeling dough), dental floss, paper, pencil, ruler and toothpicks, students make a mountain of any shape, slice it horizontally using dental floss and outline the slices on a piece of paper. It could be an art project or a geography project. Either way, it’s lots of fun, and clearly explains the mystery of topo maps, which many people never understand. Go to http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/sp/topomap-clay.

Spotlight on Music
Music is science and technology in the service of art. At least that’s one way to look at it. See (and hear) an example at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/violins
. Musical instruments are technologies. The most exquisite-sounding instruments represent technological excellence. But what makes the best instrument sound better than the second best instrument? In the case of Stradivarius violins, it’s believed to be the unique density of the wood, which grew only during a certain period of history. Why? Because of a lack of sunspots!

Another example of technology as a delivery mechanism for art is the Golden Records on each of the two Voyager spacecraft, now nearing interstellar space. These records are meant as messages from Earth in the event that intelligent alien beings someday encounter the probes. Students can see some of the photos of Earth and try to guess the identity of some of the sounds on the records at
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/voyager-to-stars.


For the classroom
Drumming is a form of music, but it can also be a form of precise verbal communication.

When people figured out how to add meaning to an electromagnetic wave, which is essentially a rhythm, a universe of possibilities opened up. Speaking in Phases is a classroom activity that demonstrates the difference between amplitude modulated (AM), frequency modulated (FM) and phase modulated signals. It’s not as hard as you might think. In this case, all that’s required is something to beat on — like drums or desks — and maybe a metronome or electronic keyboard that can make a steady beat.

Students learn the basics of how information is added to a carrier signal. Then they add their own meaning to the signal and communicate with each other using only the timing of beats. It truly teaches the most basic concept underlying all electronic communication, including radio, TV, phones, satellites and spacecraft far away in deep space. See
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/classroom-activities/#phases.


For out-of-school time
Almost everyone loves to eat. Why not make it even more fun by combining snack preparation with space exploration? The Space Place has several projects you can make, and then eat.

One project is Asteroid Potatoes, spaceplace.nasa.gov/asteroid-potatoes. To cut down on mess, you can make the mashed potatoes ahead of time, and let the kids do the sculpting, baking (with supervision) and eating.

Another creative activity is making edible spacecraft or rockets. Tortillas make a wonderful base. You can even paint them (or paint small, cut-out pieces) with food coloring. Also provide colorful vegetables and fruits of many kinds, olives, cream cheese (for glue), chips and anything else you can think of that’s good to eat. Take pictures before they’re gobbled up. See some examples and recipes at
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/tortilla-spacecraft.


Special Days

January is National Whale Watching Month
Some species are endangered. See how satellites can help, and play “Migration Concentration” at
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/migration
.

Jan. 6: Take a Poet to Lunch Day
Try writing some cosmic poetry such as the poems at
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/art
.

Jan. 17, 1706: Benjamin Franklin’s Birthday
He learned a lot about electricity flying a kite during a lightning storm. You can learn about electricity using a balloon (and without risking your life) at
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/ion-balloons
.

Feb. 12, 1809: Charles Darwin’s Birthday
Darwin is known for his theory of the evolution of species. Play with the “Emoticonstructor” and see one way evolution works at
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/emoticonstructor
.

Feb. 22: Thinking Day
Exercise your brain by going “Vec
àTouring” at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/vec-touring
.

Feb. 25: Quiet Day
Even the most violent events in space make no sound. Make a Sound Cone to hear even very quiet sounds. See how at
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/sound-cone
.

Last words . . .
Have a wonderful and productive 2012. We hope you continue to find The Space Place helpful in your important work.


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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators:
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students:
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club:
https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

 

NASA Education Express — Jan. 12, 2012

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

NASA Aeronautics Scholarship Program
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: Jan. 15, 2012

2012 Alan Shepard Technology in Education Awards
Audience: K-12 Educators

Application Deadline: Jan. 16, 2012

Meteorology: How Clouds Form Web Seminar
Audience: 5-8 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Jan. 17, 2012

Engineering Design Process: On the Moon Web Seminar
Audience: 6-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Jan. 19, 2012

2012 RASC-AL Competition
Audience: Higher Education Students
Deadline: Jan. 20, 2012

International Space Station EarthKAM Winter 2012 Mission
Audience: 5-8 Educators
Event Date: Jan. 31 – Feb. 3, 2012

Langley Aerospace Research Student Scholars — Summer 2012 Session
Audience: Higher Education Students
Deadline: Feb. 1, 2012

Registration Open for the 19th Annual NASA Great Moonbuggy Race

Audience: 9-12 & Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Deadline for U.S. Teams: Feb. 10, 2012

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Call for Papers: Solar System Exploration @ 50 Symposium
Audience: Higher Education Educators Students

New Deadline: Feb. 21, 2012

Polar Science Weekend at the Pacific Science Center
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: March 1-4, 2012

Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching
Audience: All Educators and Students
Nomination Deadline: April 1, 2012

STEMconnector Website Launched
Audience: All Educators

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NASA Aeronautics Scholarship Program

NASA’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate is accepting scholarship applications from graduate and undergraduate students for the 2012 academic year. The application deadline is Jan. 15, 2012.

Graduate students must apply under a specific research topic to align with NASA’s aeronautics research programs. The list of available topics is posted online.

NASA expects to award 20 undergraduate and five graduate scholarships to students in aeronautics or related fields. Undergraduate students entering their second year of study will receive up to $15,000 per year for two years and the opportunity to receive a $10,000 stipend by interning at a NASA research center during the summer.

Graduate students will receive up to $35,000 per year for up to three years, with an opportunity to receive a $10,000 stipend interning at a NASA research center for up to two consecutive summers.

Students not committed to a specific academic institution or program still may apply. If accepted, they must be admitted by fall 2012 into an aeronautical engineering program or related field of study at an accredited U.S. university. Applicants must be U.S. citizens. Scholarship money may be used for tuition and other school-related expenses.

NASA’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate conducts cutting-edge, fundamental and integrated systems research in traditional and emerging disciplines. The intent is to help transform the nation’s air transportation system and to support development of future air and space vehicles.

Its goals include improving airspace capacity and flexibility; aviation safety and aircraft performance; reducing overall noise, engine emissions and fuel usage.

For details about this scholarship program, a list of available research topics and the application process, visit http://nasa.asee.org/.

For more information about aeronautics research at NASA, visit: http://www.aeronautics.nasa.gov.

Questions about this scholarship should be directed to nasa.asp@asee.org.

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2012 Alan Shepard Technology in Education Awards

Do you know K-12 teachers or district-level administrators who are making a difference in education through the use of technology? Recognize their achievements by nominating them for the Alan Shepard Technology in Education Award. The Astronauts Memorial Foundation, in partnership with NASA and the Space Foundation, will recognize the accomplishments of one outstanding individual and his or her contributions to lifelong learning through the application of technology in the classroom or professional development of teachers.

Technology personnel and K-12 classroom teachers who have demonstrated exemplary use of technology to enhance learning are eligible for this award. School principals, superintendents or associate superintendents may nominate eligible candidates. The award will be presented in April 2012 at the 28th National Space Symposium in Colorado Springs, Colo. The deadline for applications is Jan. 16, 2012.

Applications and more information are available online at http://www.amfcse.org/Alan%20Shepard%20Award/alan_shepard_award.htm.

Questions about this award should be directed to amfreg@amfcse.org.

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Meteorology: How Clouds Form Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute Web seminar on Jan. 17, 2012, at 6:30 p.m. EST. Learn about the relationships between air pressure, temperature, volume and cloud formation. The presenter will provide an overview of the necessary conditions for cloud formation and then show how to apply them to making a cloud in a bottle. Information will be provided about an extension activity, the S’COOL Project, which involves student participation in authentic science.

For more information and to register online, visit URL  http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar2.aspx

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to the NASA Explorer Schools help desk at
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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Engineering Design Process: On the Moon Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminar on Jan. 19, 2012, at 6:30 p.m. EST. This seminar showcases two lessons from the On the Moon educator guide: On Target and Feel the Heat. Participants will learn how to use the engineering design process to challenge students to solve problems related to exploring the moon. This session will fully prepare attendees to implement these activities in the classroom.

For more information and to register online, visit URL http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar4.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to the NASA Explorer Schools help desk at
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

________________________________________________________________

2012 RASC-AL Competition

NASA and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2012 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts Academic Linkage Competition. RASC-AL is a design project competition aimed at university-level engineering students.

The RASC-AL contest challenges participants to design projects based on real NASA projects. Participants can choose from four different themes. These design projects potentially could be implemented by NASA.

Interested teams are requested to submit a notice of intent as soon as practical, and teams must submit an abstract for their proposed project by Jan. 20, 2012. The RASC-AL Steering Committee of NASA and industry experts will evaluate the proposals and select as many as ten undergraduate and five graduate teams to compete against each other at a forum in June 2012 in Florida.

The RASC-AL competition is open to full-time undergraduate or graduate students majoring in engineering or science at an accredited university. University design teams must include one faculty or industry advisor with a university affiliation and two or more undergraduate or graduate students. A group of universities may also work in collaboration on a design project entry. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

For more information about this competition, visit http://www.nianet.org/rascal/index.html.

If you have questions about this competition, please contact Shelley Spears at Shelley.Spears@nianet.org.

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International Space Station EarthKAM Winter 2012 Mission

Middle school educators are invited to join NASA for the International Space Station EarthKAM Fall 2011 Mission from Jan. 31 – Feb. 3, 2012. Find out more about this exciting opportunity that allows students to take pictures of Earth from a digital camera aboard the International Space Station.

International Space Station EarthKAM is a NASA-sponsored project that provides stunning, high-quality photographs of Earth taken from the space shuttle and the space station. Since 1996, EarthKAM students have taken thousands of photographs of Earth by using the World Wide Web to direct a digital camera on select spaceflights and, currently, on the space station.

For more information about the project and to register for the upcoming mission, visit the EarthKAM home page
www.EarthKAM.ucsd.edu.

If you have questions about the EarthKAM project, please email
ek-help@earthkam.ucsd.edu.

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Langley Aerospace Research Student Scholars — Summer 2012 Session

Langley Aerospace Research Student Scholars, or LARSS, is offering a 10-week summer internship at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va. Internships are available for rising undergraduate juniors, seniors and graduate students at accredited U.S. colleges, universities and community colleges. Students of all majors are encouraged to apply. GPA requirement is a 3.0 out of a 4.0.

The internship includes doing a research project under the supervision of a researcher, attending technical lectures by prominent engineers and scientists and presenting project results at a poster session. Additional elements include tours of Langley wind tunnels, computational facilities and laboratories, as well as several networking activities.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens. Applications are due Feb. 1, 2012.

Note: 15-week fall and spring sessions are also offered. Please see the website for details.

For more information and to apply online, visit http://www.nianet.org/LARSS-2012/index.aspx.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to
Debbie Murray at Deborah.B.Murray@nasa.gov or Sarah Pauls at Sarah.E.Pauls@nasa.gov.

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Registration Open for the 19th Annual NASA Great Moonbuggy Race

Registration is open for the 19th Annual NASA Great Moonbuggy Race. High school and college students are challenged to design and build a vehicle that addresses a series of engineering problems similar to those faced by the original lunar-roving vehicle team. Each school may enter up to two teams. International teams are limited to 10 teams per country. The race will take place April 13-14, 2012, in Huntsville, Ala., at the U.S. Space & Rocket Center.

U.S. teams must register by Feb. 10, 2012.

For more information about the competition and to register online, visit http://moonbuggy.msfc.nasa.gov/index.html.

International teams with questions about this event and registration should email Marilyn Lewis at Marilyn.H.Lewis@nasa.gov. U.S. teams with questions should contact Diedra Williams at Diedra.A.Williams@nasa.gov.

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DEADLINE EXTENDED: Call for Papers: Solar System Exploration @ 50 Symposium

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the first successful planetary mission, Mariner 2 sent to Venus, the NASA History Program Office and the Division of Space History at the National Air and Space Museum invite papers for a conference relating to the history of planetary exploration. This historical symposium will be held in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 25-27, 2012.

Entitled “Solar System Exploration @ 50,” the purpose of this symposium is to consider what we have learned about the other bodies of the solar system and the process whereby we have learned it. This symposium seeks to pursue broader questions relating to the history of planetary exploration.

International scholars and graduate students seeking exposure to the history of the planetary sciences are particularly welcome. Proposals for papers should include a title and abstract, as well as the author’s curriculum vita. Please send all proposals, in the form of a 300-word abstract and a brief vita electronically to Dr. William P. Barry, NASA chief historian, at bill.barry@nasa.gov, and Dr. Roger D. Launius, senior curator in space history at the National Air and Space Museum, launiusr@si.edu.

The new deadline for abstract submissions is Feb. 21, 2012.

For more information, visit http://history.nasa.gov/Solar%20System%20Exploration%20@%2050%20Call%20for%20Papers.pdf.


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Polar Science Weekend at the Pacific Science Center

Polar Science Weekend at the Pacific Science Center in Seattle, Wash., is taking place March 1-4, 2012. The event is four days of hands-on activities, live demonstrations and exhibits presented by scientists who work in some of the most remote and challenging places on Earth. Learn about ice sheets and sea ice, polar bears and penguins, scientific instruments and polar expeditions.

Polar Science Weekend highlights NASA-funded work in the polar regions, and is supported by a grant from NASA’s Science Mission Directorate.

For more information, visit http://psc.apl.washington.edu/wordpress/education/polar-science-weekend/.

Questions about this event should be directed to psw@apl.washington.edu.

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Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching

The National Science Foundation is currently accepting nominations and applications for the Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching, or PAEMST, program. PAEMST is the highest recognition that a kindergarten through 12th-grade mathematics or science teacher may receive for outstanding teaching in the United States. Since 1983, more than 4,100 teachers have been recognized for their contributions to mathematics and science education. Awardees serve as models for their colleagues, inspiration to their communities and leaders in the improvement of mathematics and science education. Up to 108 awardees may be recognized each year.

Presidential awardees receive a certificate signed by the president of the United States, a trip for two to Washington, D.C., to attend a series of recognition events and professional development opportunities, and a $10,000 award from the National Science Foundation. The National Science Foundation administers PAEMST on the behalf of The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.

The PAEMST program is open to outstanding mathematics and science teachers in the 50 states and the four U.S. jurisdictions (Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico, Department of Defense Education Activity schools and the U.S. territories as a group). Anyone — principals, teachers, parents, students or members of the general public — may nominate a teacher by completing the nomination form available on the PAEMST website. Teachers may also apply directly.

Nominations for elementary school teachers (grades K-6) are due April 1, 2012. Secondary school teachers (Grades 7-12) are eligible to apply in 2013.

For more information, visit http://www.paemst.org/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to info@paemst.org.

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STEMconnector Website Launched

The new STEMconnector™ website launched on Nov. 30, 2011. This new website serves as a national gateway to “who is doing what” in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM.

STEMConnector™ is a nationwide collaboration of companies, nonprofit associations and professional societies, STEM-related research and policy organizations, and academic institutions concerned about the plight of STEM education in the United States. STEMConnector™ is designed to link “all things STEM” by constructing a comprehensive website that provides connections to national, state and local STEM entities and their own content through a variety of search tools.

Visit the new site to find state-by-state information, a blog, events and resources related to STEM.

http://www.stemconnector.org/


________________________________________________________________

Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — Jan. 5, 2012

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Properties of Living Things: Searching for Life on Mars Web Seminar
Audience: 4-8 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Jan. 9, 2012

Graph Analysis: Genesis — Exploring Data Web Seminar
Audience: 9-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Jan. 9, 2012

High Power Microscopes: The Virtual Lab Web Seminar
Audience: 9-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Jan. 11, 2012

Live Video Chat: Let’s Talk About Meteors, Meteorites and Comets
Audience: 6-12 Educators and Students
Event Date: Jan. 12, 2012, noon EST

American Meteorological Society’s DataStreme Earth’s Climate System Professional Development Course
Audience: K-12 Educators
Course Begins: Jan. 16, 2012

RealWorld-InWorld Entries Due January 27
Audience: 7-12 Educators and Students
Deadline: Jan. 27, 2012

2012 Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Jan. 30, 2012

Call for Papers: Solar System Exploration @ 50 Symposium
Audience: Higher Education Educators Students
Deadline: Feb. 1, 2012

NASA History Division Summer 2012 Internships
Audience: Higher Education Students
Deadline: Feb. 4, 2012

4th Annual NASA STEM Educators Workshop Series
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Registration Deadline: Feb. 15, 2012

2012 Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 22, 2012

2012 Jet Propulsion Laboratory Summer Faculty Research Program
Audience: Higher Education Educators
Deadline:
April 27, 2012

Additional Frequently Asked Questions — NASA Research Announcement (NRA) Competitive Program for Science Museums and Planetariums Plus Opportunities for NASA Visitor Centers and Other Informal Education Institutions (CP4SMP+) (Announcement Number: NNH11ZHA004N, Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 43.008) — Available For Download
Audience: Informal Education Institutions

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Properties of Living Things: Searching for Life on Mars Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute Web seminar for educators on Jan. 9, 2012, at 6:30 p.m. EST. Review criteria for determining if something is alive and learn how students can apply the criteria in a hands-on activity. A video will be shown that connects the activity to a NASA mission. Collaborate with other participants about ways of using and adapting the activity. Extension activities for students interested in the topic will be provided.

For more information and to register online, visit URL http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar7.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

E-mail any questions about this opportunity to the NASA Explorer Schools help desk at NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

________________________________________________________________

Graph Analysis: Genesis — Exploring Data Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, the NASA Explorer Schools and Learning Environments and Research Network, or LE&RN, projects are hosting a 60-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on Jan. 9, 2012, at 8 p.m. EST.

Through an active, hands-on approach, learn how your students can work in production design teams to explore Genesis solar wind data located on the Los Alamos National Laboratory Genesis data website. The seminar consists of background material related to the Genesis mission and a data analysis component. Learn how to access and review the data, and discuss questions that might arise from this activity.

For more information and to register online, visit https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-graph-analysis/.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to the NASA Explorer Schools help desk at NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.


________________________________________________________________

High Power Microscopes: The Virtual Lab Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute web seminar for educators on Jan. 11, 2012, at 8:15 p.m. EST. Learn to use a computer program simulating three high-power virtual microscopes: an atomic force microscope, a scanning electron microscope and a fluorescence light microscope. Viewing specimens include one-celled organisms, human tissue, computer chips, insects and fungi. You will get an overview of the software, watch videos of students exploring specimens and learn to use the Virtual Lab website and software.

For more information and to register online, visit URL http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar3.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to the NASA Explorer Schools help desk at NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.


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Live Video Chat: Let’s Talk About Meteors, Meteorites and Comets

Join Dr. Bill Cooke and Rhiannon Blaauw, two meteor experts, during this video Web chat at noon EST on Jan 12, 2012, and get answers to your questions about meteors, meteorites and comets and their potential danger to spacecraft.

Cooke, the lead for NASA’s Meteoroid Environmental Office, and Blaauw, a meteor physicist, both have astronomy degrees and work in the Meteoroid Environment Office at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. They provide NASA with models of the meteoroid environment, which are used in the design of protective shields on spacecraft. They analyze meteor observations data collected by equipment such as radar and all-sky and low-light-level cameras.


Submit questions during the chat through a chat window, or send them to
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

To learn more about NES, visit the
explorerschools.nasa.gov website.

To view the video chat or for more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/nes2/home/meteors-meteorites-comets-chat.html.

If you have any questions about the video chat, contact
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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American Meteorological Society’s DataStreme Earth’s Climate System Professional Development Course

The American Meteorological Society, with support from NASA and in partnership with the State University of New York’s College at Brockport, is developing a national cadre of K-12 teachers highly trained in climate science and familiar with climate modeling. Teachers are trained through DataStreme Earth’s Climate System, or ECS, a semester-long, graduate level, precollege teacher professional development course.

DataStreme ECS uses NASA Earth Observing System data and visualizations, and introduces the Educational Global Climate Modeling developed by the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, to explore the fundamentals of climate change. Teachers completing the course construct and execute a plan of action to advance public climate science literacy and affect curriculum change within their local schools and districts.

DataStreme ECS is administered through Local Implementation Teams across the country. The course is free to all participants, and the teachers are awarded three graduate credits upon successful completion of the course.

The spring 2012 course begins on Jan. 16, 2012.

For more information, including a listing of course offerings by state, and an application form, visit http://ametsoc.org/amsedu/ECS/index.html#participates.

Questions about these courses should be directed to amsedu@ametsoc.org.


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RealWorld-InWorld Entries Due January 27

There is still time to submit entries to
RealWorld-InWorld, or RWIW, NASA’s engineering design challenge. The activity encourages students in grades 7-12 to explore and build skills essential for successful science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, careers through a RealWorld (face-to-face) and an InWorld (unique online virtual reality) phase of project-based learning and team competition.

RealWorld (Phase 1): Teams of middle- and high-school-aged students with support of their sponsoring adult work collaboratively as engineers and scientists to explore and design solutions related to the James Webb Space Telescope and Robonaut 2.

NOTE: The RealWorld Phase can be completed by teams in about two weeks.

RealWorld Phase ends: Jan. 27, 2012. To be considered to move to the InWorld phase, all RealWorld work must be submitted by this deadline.

Recognition: Submitted final project solutions will be featured on the RWIW website, and teams will receive recognition for their work once they complete the RealWorld challenge and InWorld registration.

InWorld (Phase 2): Participating college students select teams of two to four middle- and high-school-aged students who have completed the RealWorld phase to build their InWorld teams. Participation is limited to U.S. citizens. Teams work in a 3-D virtual environment using 21st century tools to refine designs and to create 3-D models of their design solutions.

InWorld Phase begins: Jan. 28, 2012.
InWorld Phase ends: April 20, 2012.

Recognition: InWorld teams will compete for cash awards ($1,000 per member, including team leader, for each winning team). Contest rules apply.

To learn more about the challenge and to register for online resources for this free and flexible project, visit
www.nasarealworldinworld.org.

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2012 Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program

The Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program, or PGGURP, pairs qualified undergraduate students with NASA-funded investigators at research locations across the U.S. for eight weeks during the summer. Students will spend the summer at the NASA scientists’ home institutions. Selected students receive a cost-of-living stipend and compensation for housing and travel.

Undergraduate students interested in learning about research in planetary geoscience are eligible to apply. Students graduating in 2012 who have not started graduate school yet are also eligible. Preference is given to U.S. citizens and permanent residents.

Applications are due Jan. 30, 2012.

For more information, visit http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/~tgregg/pggurp.html. If you have questions about this opportunity, please email Robyn Wagner, PGGURP administrator, at rlwagner@buffalo.edu.


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Call for Papers: Solar System Exploration @ 50 Symposium

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the first successful planetary mission, Mariner 2 sent to Venus, the NASA History Program Office and the Division of Space History at the National Air and Space Museum invite papers for a conference relating to the history of planetary exploration. This historical symposium will be held in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 25-27, 2012.

Entitled “Solar System Exploration @ 50,” the purpose of this symposium is to consider what we have learned about the other bodies of the solar system and the process whereby we have learned it. This symposium seeks to pursue broader questions relating to the history of planetary exploration.

International scholars and graduate students seeking exposure to the history of the planetary sciences are particularly welcome. Proposals for papers should include a title and abstract, as well as the author’s curriculum vita. Please send all proposals, in the form of a 300-word abstract and a brief vita electronically to Dr. William P. Barry, NASA chief historian, at bill.barry@nasa.gov, and Dr. Roger D. Launius, senior curator in space history at the National Air and Space Museum, launiusr@si.edu.

The deadline for abstract submissions is Feb. 1, 2012.

For more information, visit
http://history.nasa.gov/Solar%20System%20Exploration%20@%2050%20Call%20for%20Papers.pdf.


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NASA History Division Summer 2012 Internships

The NASA History Division is seeking undergraduate and graduate students for summer 2011 internships. The History Division maintains archival materials to answer research questions from NASA personnel, journalists, scholars, students at all levels and others from around the world. The division also edits and publishes several books and monographs each year. It maintains a large number of websites on NASA history.

Students of all majors are welcome to apply. While detailed prior knowledge of the aeronautics and space fields is not necessary, a keen interest and some basic familiarity with these topics are needed. Strong research, writing and editing skills are essential. Experience with computers, especially HTML formatting, is a plus.

Intern projects are flexible. Typical projects include handling a wide variety of information requests, editing historical manuscripts, doing research and writing biographical sketches, updating and creating websites, and identifying and captioning photos.

Applications are due Feb. 4, 2012. For more information, visit
http://history.nasa.gov/interncall.htm.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please contact Steve Garber at
stephen.j.garber@nasa.gov.

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4th Annual NASA STEM Educators Workshop Series

Join NASA for the 4th Annual NASA STEM Educators Workshop Series taking place Feb. 28 – March 1, 2012, in Charlotte, N.C.

This workshop series will explore engineering design challenges, problem-based learning activities, distance learning modules, inquiry-based lessons and hands-on projects. Each workshop will be led by experienced educators and education public outreach specialists who will model pedagogical techniques and methods to foster problem-based learning, science as inquiry, technology integration and best practices. Workshops target inservice, informal and preservice teachers who serve the K-12 education community.

Registration is free. The deadline for registration is Feb. 15, 2012.

For more information and to register for the workshops, visit
http://aesp.psu.edu/register/.

If you have any questions about the workshops, please contact Brandon Hargis at
Brandon.Hargis@nasa.gov.

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2012 Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships

Caltech’s Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships, or SURF, project introduces undergraduate students to research under the guidance of seasoned mentors at Caltech or NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, or JPL. Students experience the process of research as a creative intellectual activity and gain a more realistic view of the opportunities and demands of a professional research career.

SURF is modeled on the grant-seeking process. Students collaborate with potential mentors to define and develop a project and to write research proposals. Caltech faculty or JPL staff review the proposals and recommend awards. Students work over a 10-week period in the summer, mid-June to late August. At the conclusion of the project, each student will submit a technical paper and give a SURF Seminar Day oral presentation.

All application materials must be received no later than Feb. 22, 2012. For more information, visit http://www.surf.caltech.edu/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to the Caltech Student-Faculty Programs office at sfp@caltech.edu.

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2012 Jet Propulsion Laboratory Summer Faculty Research Program

Applications are currently being accepted for NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory 2012 Summer Faculty Research Program. This program provides opportunities for science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, faculty to engage in research of mutual interest to the faculty member and a JPL researcher. Non-STEM faculty will be considered based on available opportunities.

To be eligible to participate in the program, a potential fellow must hold a full-time appointment at an accredited university or college in the U.S. Special requirements for foreign national faculty members may apply. Fellows are required to submit a research report and present their work at the end of the session.

The program awards $13,500 fellowships for the 10-week session. A housing allowance will be offered for awardees who live beyond a 50-mile radius of JPL. Please note that stipend payments or salaries from other federal funding sources, including research grants and contracts, may not be accepted during the 10-week tenure of a JPL faculty research appointment.

The deadline for applications is April 27, 2012. For more information about this opportunity, visit http://jsfrp.jpl.nasa.gov/.

Inquiries about NASA’s JPL Summer Faculty Research Program should be directed to the Petra Kneissl-Milanian at Petra.A.Kneissl-Milanian@jpl.nasa.gov.

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Additional Frequently Asked Questions — NASA Research Announcement (NRA) Competitive Program for Science Museums and Planetariums Plus Opportunities for NASA Visitor Centers and Other Informal Education Institutions (CP4SMP+) (Announcement Number: NNH11ZHA004N, Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 43.008) — Available For Download

Additional Frequently Asked Questions received after the proposal due date and/or about NASA Visitor Centers were made available on Tuesday, Dec. 20, 2011 on the CP4SMP+ portal page on NSPIRES at the following URL:

Visit: http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId=%7b75AAC7BF-2F69-6C73-2980-B1DCF25EA665%7d&path=closed

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub