NASA Education Express — June 7, 2012

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Free Education Webinar Series from the Aerospace Education Services Project
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Dates: Various Dates During June 2012

2012 NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory Open House
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Dates: June 9-10, 2012

Skeletal System: Human Physiology in Space Web Seminar
Audience: 9-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: June 12, 2012, 6:30 p.m. EDT

NASA G.I.R.L.S. Mentoring Project

Audience: 5-8 Educators and Students
Application Deadline: June 15, 2012

Teachers Touch the Sky: An Astronomy Workshop
Audience: Grade 3-9 Educators

Registration Deadline: June 15, 2012
Workshop Dates: Aug. 6-10, 2012

NASA Tournament Lab: $10,000 Planetary Data System Mashup Challenge

Audience: Students Ages 13-18 Years Old
Entry Deadline: June 16, 2012

NASA Seeks Early Stage Innovations for Space Technologies From U.S. Universities
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Notice of Intent Deadline: June 21, 2012

2012 NASA Lunar Science Forum
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Deadline: July 1, 2012

Telstar 50th Anniversary Symposium at the National Air and Space Museum
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: July 12, 2012

Mars Day! 2012 at the National Air and Space Museum
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: July 13, 2012

Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 3 to the International Space Station
Audience: 5-Higher Education Educators and Students

Letter of Commitment Deadline: Sept. 12, 2012

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Free Education Webinar Series from the Aerospace Education Services Project

The Aerospace Education Services Project is presenting a series of free webinars through June 2012. All webinars can be accessed online. Join aerospace education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources to bring NASA into your classroom.

Fly Into NASA Aeronautics: Forces and Motion (Grades 3-8 and Informal)
June 7, 2012, 3:30 – 4:30 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Brian Hawkins will demonstrate lessons that explain how airplanes fly. The activities will help students understand the four forces of flight and three axes of motion. A review of NASA’s contributions in improving aircraft will be presented, and a high-performing classroom glider will be constructed.

I’m Signed up for NEON — Now What?? (Grades K-12)
June 9, 2012, 11 a.m. – noon EDT
Aerospace education specialist Anne Weiss will introduce participants to basic features of the NASA Educators Online Network, or NEON, professional/collaborative learning community. Participants will also learn how to use NEON to find appropriate NASA standards-aligned activities that satisfy state-specific teaching standards.

Understanding Earth, Moon and Sun Connections (Grades K-8)
June 12, 2012, 2 – 3 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Sonja Williams will introduce cultural perspectives related to the phases of the moon and the solar system. Attendees will participate in an activity based upon a Native American/Western science story. Participants will receive culturally relevant materials related to stars and constellations that they can share with their students.

NASA in the Classroom (Grades K-12)
June 12, 2012, 4 – 5 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Tom Estill will introduce K-12 teachers to various NASA education resources. Participants will learn how to find science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, lesson plans, current teacher/student opportunities and NASA videos for classroom use. Teachers will also be shown how to use local NASA-related resources.

The Real Lord of the Ring (Grades K-4)
June 13, 2012, 6 – 7 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Alexis Harry will introduce teachers to a set of lessons that enhance basic communication skills through scientific exploration based on the Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn. Throughout the lessons, participants practice a variety of language arts skills, including descriptive writing, note-taking, poetry, illustration and oral communication.

Mars Uncovered: Revealing the Geologic History of Mars (Grades 5-12)
June 18, 2012, 7:30 – 8:30 a.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Tony Leavitt will share an inquiry-based lesson that presents a critical-thinking approach of studying the surface of Mars. This process is similar to the approach used by NASA scientists. This lesson will teach students to examine geologic features of a planetary surface and use relative-age dating techniques to analyze the information and interpret the geologic history.

Sun-Earth-Moon Relationships (Grades 2-8)
June 20, 2012, noon – 1 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Rick Varner will present sun-Earth-moon models that help to explain the phases of the moon, and both lunar and solar eclipses. Additionally, the activity Kinesthetic Astronomy will be introduced for its explanation of the seasons.

I’m Signed up for NEON — Now What?? (Grades K-12)
June 20, 2012, 6- 7 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Anne Weiss will introduce participants to basic features of the NASA Educators Online Network, or NEON, professional/collaborative learning community. Participants will also learn how to use NEON to find appropriate NASA standards-aligned activities that satisfy state-specific teaching standards.

Our Solar System: A Model Overview (Grades 4-9)
June 25, 2012, 11 a.m. – noon EDT
Aerospace education specialist Steve Culivan will present NASA inquiry activities that demonstrate remote sensing and scale models to better visualize our sun, planets, asteroids and other objects as a whole system.

Our Solar System: A Model Overview (Grades 4-9)
June 25, 2012, 3 – 4 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Steve Culivan will present NASA inquiry activities that demonstrate remote sensing and scale models to better visualize our sun, planets, asteroids and other objects as a whole system.


For more information about these webinars, and to see a full list of webinars taking place through August 2012, visit http://neon.psu.edu/webinars/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Gwendolyn Wheatle at Gwendolyn.H.Wheatle@nasa.gov.

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2012 NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory Open House

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, or JPL, in Pasadena, Calif., invites the public to its annual Open House on Saturday, June 9, and Sunday, June 10, 2012, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. PDT. The event, themed “Great Journeys,” will take visitors on a ride through the wonders of space.

Highlights include a life-size model of Mars Science Laboratory, the NASA/JPL spacecraft currently bound for Mars; demonstrations from numerous space missions; JPL’s machine shop, where robotic spacecraft parts are built; and the Microdevices Lab, where engineers and scientists use tiny technology to revolutionize space exploration.

The Earth Science Center, the most recent addition to JPL, will show 3-D videos of our home planet and JPL’s earth science missions. Upon entering, visitors will pass an Earth globe with data from NASA’s Earth-orbiting satellites projected onto the sphere.

JPL Open House is suitable for all ages, with plenty of hands-on activities and opportunities to talk with scientists and engineers. For the first time ever, JPL invites cell phone users with text message capabilities to take part in a mobile scavenger hunt. Participants in “The Voyage” scavenger hunt can search for secret capsules hidden across JPL and unlock secret codes.

Admission to Open House is free. For more information, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2012-136&cid=release_2012-136.

Questions about this event should be directed to Priscilla Vega at Priscilla.R.Vega@jpl.nasa.gov.


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Skeletal System: Human Physiology in Space Web Seminar

NASA Explorer Schools and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on June 12, 2012, at 6:30 p.m. EDT.
The seminar focuses on human physiology. Obtain information about the effect microgravity has on the physiology of astronauts and learn about the countermeasures NASA uses to help overcome these effects when they return to Earth.

Outer space is an exciting part of our lives and promises to be an even more exciting part of the future for your students. It provides scientists with a unique laboratory, allowing scientific studies never possible in the history of civilization. Future space missions will continue to involve sending humans into space. But after extended stays in microgravity, astronauts must return safely to Earth and lead normal, healthy lives.

This seminar will provide instruction on how to integrate the Skeletal System: Human Physiology in Space lesson into your curriculum. There are two classroom activities in this lesson focusing on the effects of spaceflight on human physiology.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar26.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to the NASA Explorer Schools help desk at
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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NASA G.I.R.L.S. Mentoring Project

NASA is looking for the next generation of scientists, engineers and innovators. To jump start the future of potential explorers, Women@NASA has created a mentoring project that offers a one-of-a-kind experience for middle school girls. Participants will get to explore the possibilities of a career in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

The project will feature one-on-one mentoring from women working at NASA. Participants will complete online lessons with their mentors while virtually connected through Skype or Google Chat.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens in grades 5-8 or home-school equivalent. The mentoring project will take place over a five-week period during the summer.

Applications are due June 15, 2012. The NASA G.I.R.L.S. website and social media accounts will be updated when application submission is opened! For more information on how to follow along on Twitter or Facebook, go to http://women.nasa.gov/get-involved.

For more information and to register online, visit http://women.nasa.gov/nasa-g-i-r-l-s/.

Email any questions about this opportunity to hq-women@nasa.gov.

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Teachers Touch the Sky: An Astronomy Workshop

Space science is inherently interesting to students, less threatening to teachers than some other sciences and interdisciplinary in nature. These features make it the ideal vehicle for teaching basic scientific concepts to children in a concrete and captivating manner.

In August 2012, NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, or JPL, in Pasadena, Calif., will host a one-week educator workshop for teachers of grades 3 through 9. Attendees will learn about NASA education materials, including hands-on activities based on current projects in astronomy and space science at JPL, with a special focus on NASA’s current Dawn Mission to the asteroid Vesta. Participants will take a field trip to JPL’s Table Mountain Observatory, tour JPL’s facilities and to talk to real scientists about their work.

Registration for this workshop closes on June 15, 2012.

For more information and to download the workshop application, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/education/index.cfm?page=273.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Dr. Bonnie Buratti at Bonnie.J.Buratti@jpl.nasa.gov.

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NASA Tournament Lab: $10,000 Planetary Data System Mashup Challenge

The NASA Tournament Lab is looking for the best student-built mobile and Web-based applications. Do you have what it takes?

NASA’s Planetary Data System has tons and tons of data (over 100 terabytes), but they need a better way to share it. The NASA Tournament Lab asked for ideas on how to share this data with its Idea Generation Contest in April 2012. And now it’s looking for ways to translate these ideas into great mobile or Web-based apps.

Not only are there $10,000 in prizes, but the first-place winner will earn an invitation to NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California to witness the Mars Science Lab lander touch down on Mars!

Mobile and Web apps will be accepted through June 16, 2012, and there is no limit on the number of ideas you can submit. This contest is open to 13-18 year olds in the United States.

Ready to get your hands dirty? To learn more and to sign up for the challenge, visit https://www.nonamesite.com/web/cs-stem/pds-stem-mashup-challenge.

Email any questions about this opportunity to nonamesite-support@topcoder.com.

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NASA Seeks Early Stage Innovations for Space Technologies From U.S. Universities

NASA is seeking proposals from accredited U.S. universities focused on innovative, early-stage space technologies that will improve shielding from space radiation, spacecraft thermal management and optical systems.

Each of these technology areas requires dramatic improvements over existing capabilities for future science and human exploration missions. Early stage, or low technology readiness level concepts, could mature into tools that solve the hard challenges facing future NASA missions. Researchers should propose unique, disruptive or transformational space technologies that address the specific topics described in this new solicitation.

NASA expects to make approximately 10 awards this fall, based on the merit of proposals received. The awards will be made for one year, with an additional year of research possible. The typical annual award value is expected to be approximately $250,000. Second year funding will be contingent on the availability of appropriated funds and technical progress. Only accredited U.S. universities may submit proposals to this solicitation.

Notices of intent are due by June 21, 2012, with proposals due July 12.

For more information, visit http://tinyurl.com/NASAESI.

Questions about this forum should be directed to Claudia Meyer at hq-stro-esi-call@mail.nasa.gov.


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2012 NASA Lunar Science Forum

Join the NASA Lunar Science Institute for the fifth annual NASA Lunar Science Forum being held July 17-19, 2012, at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif.

This year’s forum will feature sessions on in-depth scientific results from the following missions: Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO; the Acceleration Reconnection Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon’s Interaction with the Sun, or ARTEMIS, mission; the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer, or LADEE; and the Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory, or GRAIL, satellites. The forum will also feature a dedicated side-conference for graduate students and young professionals. As in past years, science sessions are structured to report on both recent results and future opportunities for lunar science, exploration, education and outreach.

Before the forum, join
the NASA Lunar Science Institute for the third annual Lunar Graduate Conference on Sunday, July 15, 2012. And make plans to attend the Next Generation Lunar Scientists and Engineers Workshop on Monday, July 16, 2012.

This forum is free and open to anyone interested in participating in the lunar science community.

Pre-registration is required. Participants must register by July 1, 2012.

For more information, visit http://lunarscience.nasa.gov/lsf2012/.

Questions about this forum should be directed to Shirley Berthold at Shirley.Berthold@nasa.gov.


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Telstar 50th Anniversary Symposium at the National Air and Space Museum

Join the National Air and Space Museum’s Space History and Education departments, in collaboration with the French Embassy, for a symposium to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Telstar satellite, representing the birth of global telecommunications.

Telstar 1 launched on July 10, 1962, from Cape Canaveral and was the first privately sponsored spacefaring mission. It was the first of its kind to handle a variety of transmissions, including telephone, fax, data, still pictures and television signals, from a variety of locations across the United States and Europe.

The symposium is free and will take place July 12, 2012, from 1:30 – 5 p.m. at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.

For more information, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/eventDetail.cfm?eventID=4057.

Questions about this event should be directed to the Visitor Service line at 202-633-1000.


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Mars Day! 2012 at the National Air and Space Museum

Mars Day! is an annual National Air and Space Museum event that celebrates the Red Planet with educational and fun family activities. Visitors can take part in a variety of activities, see a real meteorite that came from Mars, talk to scientists active in Mars research and learn about current and future missions.

Mars Day! 2012 will take place on Friday, July 13, 2012, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.

For more information, visit
http://airandspace.si.edu/marsday/.

Questions about this event should be directed to the Visitor Service line at 202-633-1000.

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Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 3 to the International Space Station

The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education, in partnership with NanoRacks LLC, announces a new opportunity for communities across the U.S. and space station partner nations. The newest Student Spaceflight Experiments Program, or SSEP, flight opportunity, Mission 3 to the International Space Station, or ISS, gives students across a community the ability to design and propose real experiments to fly in low Earth orbit on the International Space Station.

Each participating community will be provided an experiment slot in a real microgravity research minilaboratory scheduled to fly on the space station from mid-April to mid-May 2013. An experiment design competition in each community — engaging 300 to 1,000 students — allows student teams to design real experiments vying for their communities’ reserved experiment slot on the space station. Additional SSEP programming leverages the experiment design competition to engage the community, embracing a Learning Community Model for science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, education.

This competition is open to students in grades 5-12 and college. Informal education groups and organizations are also encouraged to participate. All participating communities must be aboard by Sept. 12, 2012. The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education is available to help interested communities secure the needed funding. 

Through previous SSEP missions on the space shuttle and International Space Station, more than 70,000 students in almost 200 schools have had the opportunity to design and propose real experiments to fly aboard the space station. A total of 27 experiments, reflecting the 27 communities, flew on the final two space shuttle flights. The third SSEP flight opportunity, Mission 1 to the ISS, engaged 12 communities, and 15 experiments have been selected to fly on SpaceX’s Dragon capsule scheduled to launch later this month. The Mission 2 experiments are slated to fly to the space station in fall 2012.

To learn more about this opportunity, visit the SSEP Mission 3 to ISS National Announcement of Opportunity at http://ssep.ncesse.org/?p=9708.

The SSEP in-orbit research opportunity is enabled through NanoRacks LLC, which is working in partnership with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of using the International Space Station as a national laboratory.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please email SSEP National Program Director Jeff Goldstein at jeffgoldstein@ncesse.org.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

1 thought on “NASA Education Express — June 7, 2012”

  1. A non ocular astronomer who don’t see the stars it’s so important to see and to feel If I don’t see I don’t feel that is why I feel my planet

    The Earth is more intelligent if there are rules ?

    Who rules the Earth as object practic ideas from x = n = Time = x Time = n Time = x n Time = x n (Time) = ray of Light = silence x n Time (ray of Light) = intelligence silence x n ray of Light (thought) !!!!

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