NASA Education Express — August 30, 2012

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community.Full descriptions are listed below.

2012-2013 NASA’s University Student Launch Initiative
Audience: Higher Education Students
Proposal Deadline: Aug. 31, 2012

Become a NASA Galileo EducatorNetwork Fellow
Audience: K-12 Educator Professional Development Providers
Application Deadline: Aug. 31, 2012

Minorities Striving and Pursuing HigherDegrees of Success in Earth System Science
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Aug. 31, 2012

‘Blast Back toSchool’ International Space Station Downlink and Webcast
Audience:K-12 Educators and Students
EventDate: Sept. 4, 2012, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. EDT

NASA’s Glenn Research Center’s Exploring Project
Audience: 9-12 Students
Application Deadline: Sept. 5, 2012

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Presents”Roving on Mars With Curiosity”
Audience: Grades 5-12
Event Date: Sept. 8, 2012, 1:30-2:30 p.m. EDT

Presenters Needed for2013 Space Exploration Educators Conference
Audience: All Educators
Proposal Deadline: Sept. 6, 2012

REGISTRATIONOPEN: Zero Robotics High School Tournament 2012
Audience:9-12 Educators and Students
CompetitionBegins: Sept. 8, 2012

2013 NASA’s Reduced Gravity EducationFlight Program
Audience: Higher Education Educators & Students
Proposal Deadline: Oct. 24, 2012

NASA’s Glenn Research Center’s HighSchool Shadowing Project
Audience: Students in Grades 10-12
Session I Application Deadline: Nov. 2, 2012
Session II Application Deadline: Jan. 25, 2013
Sessions III and IV Application Deadline: Feb. 22, 2013

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2012-2013 NASA’s University Student Launch Initiative

NASA’s University Student Launch Initiative, orUSLI, is a competition that challenges university-level students to design,build and launch a reusable rocket with a scientific or engineering payload toone mile above ground level. The project engages students in scientificresearch and real-world engineering processes with NASA engineers.

Once selected, teams design their rockets and payloads throughout the academicyear. USLI requires a NASA review of the teams’ preliminary and critical designs.The project also requires flight and launch readiness reviews before therockets and payloads are approved for launch. Teams complete a Post-LaunchAssessment Review to include conclusions from their science or engineeringexperiment and the overall flight performance. The Preliminary Design Review,Critical Design Review and Flight Readiness Review are conducted by a panel ofscientists and engineers from NASA, NASA contactors and external partners.

NASA’s Student Launch Projects are sponsored by ATK Aerospace Systems. Theannual launch event is hosted at Bragg Farms in Toney, Ala., and launchservices are provided by the National Association of Rocketry. The 2012-2013launch will be on April 20, 2013. Proposals are due Aug. 31, 2012.

The Statement of Work and instructions for submitting a proposal can be foundon the USLI website at http://education.msfc.nasa.gov/usli.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Julie Clift at julie.d.clift@nasa.gov.

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Becomea NASA Galileo Educator Network Fellow

The NASA Galileo Educator Network is accepting applications for a professional development institute in September 2012, atthe Adler Planetarium in Chicago, Ill.

The 15-hour institute will focus on the integration of science content, sciencepractices and the nature of science as outlined in thenational Framework for K–12 Science Education. The goal of this program is totrain participants to assist K-12 teachers with the implementation of the NextGeneration Science Standards, in the context of astronomy and space science.

Lodging support for out-of-town participants and stipends for all participantsare available.

Applications are due Aug. 31,2012.

For more information about the NASA Galileo Educator Network and to apply forthe professional development institute online, visit http://astrosociety.org/education/GEN/index.html.

Questions about this opportunity should be emailed to Brian Kruse at bkruse@astrosociety.org.

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MinoritiesStriving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Earth System Science

The Minorities Striving and Pursuing HigherDegrees of Success in Earth System Science, or MS PHD’S, initiative wasdeveloped by and for underrepresented minorities to facilitate increasedparticipation in earth system science. Each year, the initiative engages approximately 25 minorityundergraduate and graduate students in a series of activities.

The project starts with orientation and a broad earth system science andengineering exposure during MS PHD’S community-building activities at the American Geophysical Unionfall meeting in San Francisco, Calif.

Participants will engage in additional professional development activities atone of the MS PHD’S organizational partners’ meetings. These activities couldinclude attending meetings of the American Meteorological Society, the Associationfor the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography, the National Association ofBlack Geologists and Geophysicists, and the Ecological Society of America,among others. Each participant will attend the meeting that most closely alignswith his or her specific academic and professional interests.

The final phase will occur at the National Academies in Washington, D.C., whereparticipants will visit government agencies and engage in dialogs withprofessional society and foundation representatives. Each student will alsoreceive a scholarship award of up to $1,000 and participate in a tour of NASA’sGoddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

The deadline for submitting the online applicationis Aug. 31, 2012.

For more information about the MSPHD’S initiative and how to apply, visit http://www.msphds.org/.

Questions about this opportunity should be emailed to pdp@msphds.org.

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‘Blast Back to School’ International SpaceStation Downlink and Webcast

Join astronauts Suni Williams and Joe Acaba live from the International SpaceStation, orbiting 250 miles above Earth for a downlink on Sept. 4, 2012, at 11:30 a.m. EDT.

During this hour webcast presented by NASA Explorer Schools, students and thepublic will learn about life aboard the space station, current research, andthe path to becoming a NASA scientist, engineer or astronaut. Also featured inthe program are Ray Lugo, director of NASA’s Glenn Research Center, andastronaut Greg (Box) Johnson.

For more information, visit http://go.nasa.gov/OJQtav.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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NASA’sGlenn Research Center’s Exploring Project

NASA’s Glenn Research Center, or GRC, in Cleveland, Ohio, is acceptingapplications for the Exploring Project. This opportunity allows students toexplore the variety of science, technology, engineering and mathematics careerchoices available at NASA and at Glenn Research Center.

During the months of October through April, participants spend two hours afterschool, once per week, meeting with Exploring advisors to take part inactivities relating to one of five tracks. Applicants can choose from focusareas in Aeronautics, Computer Technology, Balloon Sat Technology, Human SpaceFlight and eXtreme Green.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens and between the ages of 14 and 20. Applicationsare due Sept. 5, 2012.

For more information about this opportunity, please visit https://www.nasa.gov/centers/glenn/education/NASAExplorers_GRC.html.

Questions about the GRC Exploring Projectshould be directed by email to GRC-Intern@mail.nasa.govor by telephone to 216-433-6656.

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NASA’sDigital Learning Network Presents “Roving on Mars With Curiosity”

Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network, or DLN, on Sept. 6, 2012, at 1:30 p.m. EDT for a special event to launch thenewly updated “Next Step Mars” module. Help your students get acloser look at Mars by studying alongside the Curiosity rover. See how Curiosity made itsway to the Red Planet, and engage in the data that comes from approximately 78million kilometers (48,360,000 miles) away.

This webcast launch is part of the Rockets to Racecars activitiestaking place at Richmond International Raceway. After this kick-off event, the module will be availableonline for teacher use.

For more information and to watch the webcast online, visit the DLN website at http://dln.nasa.gov.

Inquiries about this webcast should be directed to Bonnie Murray at bonnie.murray@nasa.gov.

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Presenters Needed for 2013 Space ExplorationEducators Conference

The 19th Annual Space Exploration EducatorsConference, or SEEC, is taking place Feb. 7-9, 2013, at Space Center Houston.The goal of SEEC is to encourage K-12 educators to use space to teach allsubjects in their classrooms. Over 700 educators gather for this event eachyear.

Conference organizers are looking for 170interactive sessions that present exciting classroom activities. All sessionsmust have a hands-on component; lecture sessions will not be accepted.Proposals are due Sept.6, 2012.

For more information, visit http://spacecenter.org/TeachersSEEC.html.

If you have any questions about the conference,please call 281-244-2149 or email seec@spacecenter.org.

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REGISTRATIONOPEN: Zero Robotics High School Tournament 2012

NASA, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA, andMassachusetts Institute of Technology’s, or MIT’s, Space Systems Laboratory areproud to announce that the next Zero Robotics High School Tournament will takeplace this fall, offering high school students the opportunity to designexperiments that will be tested in space.

Zero Robotics challenges high school student teams to write their ownalgorithms to fly the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient,Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. The competition starts online where teamscompete to solve an annual challenge guided by mentors. Students can create,edit, share, save, simulate and submit code, all from a Web browser. Afterseveral phases of virtual competition, finalists are selected to compete in alive championship aboard the International Space Station!

Teams may register now:
1) Go to http://zerorobotics.mit.edu/.
2) Log In or Create an Account. (Note: You can start programming in the onlineintegrated development environment at this point!)
3) Click “Tournaments” and register for the High School Tournament.
4) Create a team and invite other users.
5) Visit Resources to get started.

The competition starts on Sept. 8, 2012 with a live webcast kickoff, and youcan try out the site right now just by creating an account.

The Zero Robotics High School Tournament 2012 is brought to you by NASA andDARPA, and facilitated by the MIT Space Systems Laboratory, TopCoder and AuroraFlight Sciences.

To see a promotional video for the competition, visit https://www.youtube.com/roboticsinspace.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to zerorobotics@mit.edu.

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2013NASA’s Reduced Gravity Education Flight Program

NASA is offering undergraduate students an opportunity to test experiments inmicrogravity aboard NASA’s reduced gravity aircraft.

The opportunity is part of NASA’s Reduced Gravity Education Flight Program,which gives aspiring explorers a chance to propose, design and fabricate areduced-gravity experiment. Selected teams will test and evaluate theirexperiment aboard NASA’s reduced-gravity airplane. The aircraft flies about 30roller-coaster-like climbs and dips during experiment flights to produceperiods of weightlessness and hypergravity ranging from 0 g to 2 g.

Proposals are due Oct.24, 2012.

Interested students also should submit a letter of intent by Sept. 12, 2012.This step is optional but serves as an introductory notice that a team plans tosubmit a proposal for the upcoming competition.

NASA will announce selected teams Dec. 5, 2012. The teams will fly in thesummer of 2013. Once selected, teams also may invite a full-time, accreditedjournalist to fly with them and document the team’s experiment and experiences.All applicants must be full-time undergraduate students, U.S. citizens and atleast 18 years old.

For more information about the opportunity and instructions for submitting aproposal, visit http://microgravityuniversity.jsc.nasa.gov.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to jsc-reducedgravity@nasa.gov.

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NASA’sGlenn Research Center’s High School Shadowing Project

NASA’s Glenn Research Center, or GRC, in Cleveland, Ohio, is acceptingapplications for its High School Shadowing Project sessions for the 2012-2013school year. This opportunity provides students with a one- to five-day careerexploration experience at Glenn Research Center.

The project provides high school students with an opportunity to explore careerpossibilities in a research and development environment while under theguidance of a NASA scientist, engineer, technician or administrativeprofessional that serves as the student’s mentor. Students are providedinformation about various careers, career paths and Glenn Research Centereducational resources and programs.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens and at least 16 years old by the applicationdeadline. Four sessions are scheduled for the 2012-2013 school year.

Session I —
Application Deadline: Nov. 2, 2012
Session Date: Dec. 4, 2012

Session II —
Application Deadline: Jan. 25, 2013
Session Date: Feb. 27, 2013

Session III —
Application Deadline: Feb. 22, 2013
Session Date: March 26, 2013

Session IV —
Application Deadline: Feb. 22, 2013
Session Date: April 24, 2013

For more information about this opportunity, please visit https://www.nasa.gov/centers/glenn/education/ShadowingProgram_GRC.html.

Questions about the GRC High SchoolShadowing Project should be directed by email to GRC-Intern@mail.nasa.gov or bytelephone to 216-433-6656.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunitiesavailable from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — August 23, 2012

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community.Full descriptions are listed below.

2012-2013 NASA’s University Student Launch Initiative
Audience: Higher Education Students
Proposal Deadline: Aug. 31, 2012

Become a NASA Galileo EducatorNetwork Fellow
Audience: K-12 Educator Professional Development Providers
Application Deadline: Aug. 31, 2012

Minorities Striving and Pursuing HigherDegrees of Success in Earth System Science
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Aug. 31, 2012

Presenters Neededfor 2013 Space Exploration Educators Conference
Audience: All Educators
Proposal Deadline: Sept. 6, 2012

NASA’s Science Mission Directorate Education Professional Development Survey
Audience: All Educators
Survey Deadline: Sept. 10, 2012

2013 NASA Lunabotics Mining Competition
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Limited to 50 Teams

Green Strides WebinarSeries
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Dates: Multiple dates through May 2013

New DIYPodcast Module Available — Recycling
Audience: 5-12 Educators and Students

New NASA eClips Videos Available
Audience: 6-12 Educators

What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website
Audience: K-6 Educators

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2012-2013 NASA’s University Student Launch Initiative

NASA’s University Student Launch Initiative, orUSLI, is a competition that challenges university-level students to design,build and launch a reusable rocket with a scientific or engineering payload toone mile above ground level. The project engages students in scientificresearch and real-world engineering processes with NASA engineers.

Once selected, teams design their rockets and payloads throughout the academicyear. USLI requires a NASA review of the teams’ preliminary and criticaldesigns. The project also requires flight and launch readiness reviews beforethe rockets and payloads are approved for launch. Teams complete a Post-LaunchAssessment Review to include conclusions from their science or engineeringexperiment and the overall flight performance. The Preliminary Design Review,Critical Design Review and Flight Readiness Review are conducted by a panel ofscientists and engineers from NASA, NASA contactors and external partners.

NASA’s Student Launch Projects are sponsored by ATK Aerospace Systems. Theannual launch event is hosted at Bragg Farms in Toney, Ala., and launchservices are provided by the National Association of Rocketry. The 2012-2013launch will be on April 20, 2013. Proposals are due Aug. 31, 2012.

The Statement of Work and instructions for submitting a proposal can be foundon the USLI website at http://education.msfc.nasa.gov/usli.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Julie Clift at julie.d.clift@nasa.gov.

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Becomea NASA Galileo Educator Network Fellow

The NASA Galileo Educator Network is accepting applications for a professional development institute in September 2012, atthe Adler Planetarium in Chicago, Ill.

The 15-hour institute will focus on the integration of science content, sciencepractices and the nature of science as outlined in thenational Framework for K–12 Science Education. The goal of this program is totrain participants to assist K-12 teachers with the implementation of the NextGeneration Science Standards, in the context of astronomy and space science.

Lodging support for out-of-town participants and stipends for all participantsare available.

Applications are due Aug. 31,2012.

For more information about the NASA Galileo Educator Network and to apply forthe professional development institute online, visit http://astrosociety.org/education/GEN/index.html.

Questions about this opportunity should be emailed to Brian Kruse at bkruse@astrosociety.org.

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MinoritiesStriving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Earth System Science

The Minorities Striving and Pursuing HigherDegrees of Success in Earth System Science, or MS PHD’S, initiative wasdeveloped by and for underrepresented minorities to facilitate increasedparticipation in earth system science. Each year, the initiative engages approximately 25 minorityundergraduate and graduate students in a series of activities.

The project starts with orientation and a broad earth system science andengineering exposure during MS PHD’S community-building activities at the American Geophysical Union fallmeeting in San Francisco, Calif.

Participants will engage in additional professional development activities atone of the MS PHD’S organizational partners’ meetings. These activities couldinclude attending meetings of the American Meteorological Society, the Associationfor the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography, the National Association ofBlack Geologists and Geophysicists, and the Ecological Society of America,among others. Each participant will attend the meeting that most closely alignswith his or her specific academic and professional interests.

The final phase will occur at the National Academies in Washington, D.C., whereparticipants will visit government agencies and engage in dialogs withprofessional society and foundation representatives. Each student will alsoreceive a scholarship award of up to $1,000 and participate in a tour of NASA’sGoddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

The deadline for submitting the online applicationis Aug. 31, 2012.

For more information about the MSPHD’S initiative and how to apply, visit http://www.msphds.org/.

Questions about this opportunity should be emailed to pdp@msphds.org.

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Presenters Needed for 2013 Space ExplorationEducators Conference

The 19th Annual Space Exploration EducatorsConference, or SEEC, is taking place Feb. 7-9, 2013, at Space Center Houston.The goal of SEEC is to encourage K-12 educators to use space to teach allsubjects in their classrooms. Over 700 educators gather for this event eachyear.

Conference organizers are looking for 170interactive sessions that present exciting classroom activities. All sessionsmust have a hands-on component; lecture sessions will not be accepted.Proposals are due Sept.6, 2012.

For more information, visit http://spacecenter.org/TeachersSEEC.html.

If you have any questions about the conference,please call 281-244-2149 or email seec@spacecenter.org.

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NASA’s Science Mission Directorate EducationProfessional Development Survey

NASA’s Science MissionDirectorate, or SMD, is strongly committed to enhancing the nation’s science,technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, education. As part of thatcommitment, each of the four divisions within the SMD established an Educationand Public Outreach, or E/PO, Forum. Each Forum consists of a team ofscientists and educators that coordinates activities using NASA sciencecontent, expertise and facilities.

One of the areas for the Forums is teacher professional development. In aneffort to continue offering the most valuable professional developmentexperience possible, the Forums are seeking your expert input.

Please fill in the survey found at the website listed below. The survey shouldtake less than 20 minutes. We are asking for your response by Sept. 10,2012.

http://bit.ly/NASAscienceteacher

Please email any questions about this survey toTheresa Schwerin at theresa_schwerin@strategies.org.

Thank you very much for your contribution to NASA Science E/PO Forums!

The NASA Science E/PO Forums
Cassie Soeffing, Institute for Global Environmental Strategies
Earth Science Forum

Lindsay Bartolone, Adler Planetarium
Astrophysics Forum

Ruth Paglierani, University of California, Berkeley
Heliophysics Forum

Sheri Klug Boonstra, Arizona State University
Planetary Science Forum

Liz Burck, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Wyle Information Systems, LLC
Earth Science Forum

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2013 NASA Lunabotics Mining Competition

NASA is challenging U.S.and international undergraduate and graduate student teams to design and builda telerobotic or autonomous excavator, called a Lunabot, that may result inclever ideas and solutions which could be applied to an actual lunar excavationdevice or payload. The lunabot must be able to mine and deposit a minimum of 10kilograms (22 pounds) of lunar simulant in 10 minutes.

Design teams must include one faculty advisor from a college or university andat least two undergraduate or graduate students. Universities may work incollaboration, and multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

Selected teams will compete in the Lunabotics Mining Competition at NASA’sKennedy Space Center in Florida on May 20-24, 2013. Registration is limited tothe first 50 approved teams. Registration is limited to one team per universitycampus. Internationally, registration is limited to five teams per country.

Registration will end when NASA approves 50applications.

For more information about the competition andto apply online, visit https://www.nasa.gov/lunabotics.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to Susan Sawyer at Susan.G.Sawyer@nasa.gov.

Like NASA Lunabotics on Facebook at www.facebook.com/Lunabotics.
Watch Lunabotics videos on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/user/Lunabotics.
Follow Lunabotics on Twitter at http://twitter.com/#!/NASALunabotics.

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Green Strides Webinar Series

The U.S. Department of Education presents theGreen Strides Webinar Series. These webinars feature experts from variousfederal programs. The webinars are free, and events are scheduled through theend of the 2012-2013 school year.

For more information and registration, visit http://www2.ed.gov/programs/green-ribbon-schools/webinar-series.doc.

Questions about this opportunity should be directedto Green.Ribbon.Schools@ed.gov.

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New DIY Podcast Module Available — Recycling

NASA’s Do-It-Yourself Podcast offers resources for educators and students tocreate podcasts using free NASA images, video footage and audio clips. Thenewest DIY Podcast topic module focuses on recycling. While recycling may be arelatively new task for humans, it is common practice for Mother Nature. Air andwater are constantly recycled by nature for use on Earth. NASA recycles too, onEarth and in space.

NASA centers recycle paper, plastic, batteries, excess materials fromconstruction and demolition projects, and other items. But what does NASArecycle in space?

NASA uses special purification systems on the space station to recycle water,sweat, urine and air so that astronauts have clean water to drink and use andhave fresh air to breathe.

Challenge your students to brainstorm about how to make recycling a common partof their lives. And then visit NASA’s DIY Podcast site today to integratepodcasting into your classroom. Encourage your students to mashup audio andvideo clips to develop informative and creative podcasts about recycling. Videoand audio clips feature interviews with astronauts and NASA specialists. Thesite also provides background information on recycling.

Additionally, educators may visit the DIY Podcast blog for tips and ideas onhow to use podcasting in your lessons.

For more information and to access the Recycling topic module, visit NASA’s DIYPodcast site today at https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/diypodcast/index.html.

If you have questions or comments about NASA’s DIY Podcast, please email educationpodcast@nasa.gov.

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NewNASA eClips Videos Available

Check out the new videos that NASA eClips™ has rolled out for August.

RealWorld: NASA Harnesses Half Life (Grades 6-8) — Learn about isotopes andradioactive decay. See how NASA uses the predictable decay of certain elementsto power spacecraft in remote locations. Find out why a Radioisotope PowerSystem, or RPS, provides dependable energy for the Mars Science Laboratory.
Launchpad:What Are Radioisotope Power Systems? (Grades 9-12) — NASA usesRadioisotope Power Systems, or RPS, to convert heat from radioactive decay toelectricity, creating predictable, continuous power for long missions inextreme environments. But learn how a next generation Radioisotope StirlingEngine will perform four times more efficiently and help NASA use even less ofa precious resource.
Launchpad:History, Benefits and Safety of Radioisotope Power Systems (Grades 9-12) –With safety designed from inside out and outside in, see how NASA has usedRadioisotope Power Systems, or RPS, for more than 20 missions over the last 50years. Discover the advantages of an RPS that allow spacecraft like Voyager todo important scientific maneuvers even after being in the extreme environmentof space for 30 years! Find out where an RPS could take us in the future.

To learn more about NASA eClips, visit www.nasa.gov/nasaeclips.

Follow NASA eClips on Facebook and Twitter!

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What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website

NASA’s Curiosity rover gears up tobegin its study of Mars just in time for the start of school. FollowingCuriosity’s adventures of exploration can help keep kids excited about scienceand space. The Space Place, along with our new mobile applications, can helptoo.

Introducing Space Place Prime!
Space Place Prime is a spinoff of The Space Place, but for the iPad and amultigenerational audience. It is a content presentation app, updated daily viawireless connection, which gathers some of the best and most recent offeringsfrom NASA. It taps timely educational and easy-to-read articles from thewebsite, as well as daily updates of NASA space and Earth images and the latestinformative videos.

The interface is a grid of images, which you can slide with your finger anywhich way to your heart’s content. Each feature is represented by a uniqueimage, labeled with an icon to show whether it is an image, video, article oractivity. Tapping on the image takes you to the feature.

For a more organized view, a list mode presents separate menus of images,videos and articles (including activity articles).

You can share the images and short videos with your class using a digitalprojector and a high-definition multimedia interface adapter for the iPad.

Space Place Prime is available free in the Apple App Store. See iTunes previewat http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/space-place-prime/id543935008?mt=8.

New Resource for Space Place enEspañol
This year has been an amazing one for daytime sky watchers. On May20, we had a solar eclipse, partial or annular, depending on your viewinglocation. And on June 5 (or 6), a very rare Venus transit occurred, which issimilar to an eclipse. Both of these events and the basic concept of eclipsesare explained in a new “Explore” page in both English and Spanish on The SpacePlace. Check it out at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/sp/venus-transit/.

Spotlight on Mars
“Let’s go to Mars!” The Mars adventure game gives kids the task ofpicking items that would be useful to take on a long trip to Mars. The player’sgame success depends on the usefulness and practicality of the items chosen.For example, dumb-bells wouldn’t be very useful for exercising in a weightlessenvironment. And potato chips take up too much space. But notepaper and somecrayons might come in handy, as would a first-aid kit. Blast off at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/mars-adventure/.

For the Classroom
What’s the difference between a comet and an asteroid? Most of usknow that a comet has a tail and maybe a certain level of predictability. Butwhat, fundamentally, distinguishes one from the other? Or is there a fuzzy areawhere either term could apply? Our new “Comets vs. Asteroids” four-page flyertells all with pictures, easy explanations, fun facts and even a word searchpuzzle. Download and print it at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/posters/#asteroids.

Forout-of-school time
Make Space Place t-shirts. Print our beautiful Space Place art oniron-on transfer paper you can buy at a crafts store. Iron the transfer ontoany t-shirt, old or new. You can also iron a colorful solar system transfergraphic onto the back of the shirt to help students (either the ones wearingthe shirt or the ones looking at their backs) learn the names of the planets.

Alternatively, Lands’ End® has created an embroidered Space Placeinsignia, which you can order on any Lands’ End® shirt, hat, bag or otherproduct. Either way, go to http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/t-shirt/to get started.

Special Days

Sept. 15: Respect for the Aged Day in Japan
(Why don’t we have such a holiday in the U.S.?) A fun way to observe thisday is to play the “How Old Do I Look?” game. Go to http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/whats-older/.

Sept. 16: Collect Rocks Day
You never know when the rock you pick up might have fallen from Mars oranother extraterrestrial locale. See what rock collecting did for one NASAscientist by watching a Space Place Live episode at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/space-place-live/#burnett.

Sept. 23, 1846: Johan G. Galle Discovered Neptune
This smallest of the gas giants would still hold 60 Earths! Find out moreabout Neptune and all the other planets by reading the interactive or .pdfstorybook, “The First Annual Planet Awards!” It’s at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/story-planet-awards/.

October: Energy Awareness Month
The “Power Up!” game on our sister website, NASA’s Climate Kids, will helpstudents become more aware of renewable energy sources. Go to http://climate.nasa.gov/kids/powerupcleanly/.

Oct. 13: Train Your Brain Day
Flex your memory muscles by playing “Spitzer Concentration.” Match spaceimages from the Spitzer Space Telescope. Go to http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/spitzer-concentration/.

Oct. 21: Orionids Meteor Shower Peaks
Find out all about meteor showers and the best way to watch them at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/meteor-shower/.

AReminder…
The Space Place monthly wall calendar for this school year isavailable to print at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/calendar/.Also, back issues of this newsletter are available, with timeless suggestionson using The Space Place to enrich classroom and out-of-school experiences forstudents. Check them out at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/educator-newsletter/.

iPad and iTunes are registered trademarks of Apple Inc.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For afull list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club:
https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub


NASA Education Express — August 16, 2012

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community.Full descriptions are listed below.

OnlineClimate Research Applications Course
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: Aug. 20, 2012

GLOBE Student Climate ResearchCampaign Phase 2 Webinar
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Date: Aug. 21 and Aug. 22, 2012

2012 Humans inSpace Youth Art Competition
Audience: K-12 Students
Deadline: Oct. 21, 2012

NASA Announces NextOpportunity for CubeSat Space Missions
Audience: Higher Education Educators &Students
Application Deadline: Nov. 12, 2012

New Educational Materials Available at NASA.gov
Microgravity Square Bookmark –Grades K-12
Rocketry Bookmark — All Grade Levels
STEM on Station Bookmark — All Grade Levels
Bag of Bones Activity — Grades K-8

Have a Blast LearningAbout the Moon With New Selene Video Game
Audience: All Educators and Grade 5-HigherEducation Students

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OnlineClimate Research Applications Course

The University ofNebraska-Lincoln, or UNL, offers K-12 science educators the opportunity to takepart in the development of a new online master’s-level course in ClimateResearch Applications funded by the NASA Innovations in Climate Educationprogram.

Climate change issues will serve as a context to develop research questions anddesign a discrete, locally oriented research project through which they definea problem, analyze data and develop conclusions to potentially impactdecision-making in their communities. Educators are encouraged to utilize thisopportunity to expand their knowledge of climate change, as well as their availabletools for educating students and their local communities. Participants willearn three graduate-level credit hours through UNL, as well as a stipend tocover tuition costs.

Applications are due Aug. 20, 2012.

For more information, visit http://www.smdeponews.org/programs-events/online-climate-research-applications-course-with-tuition-stipened-for-k-12-educators-apply-by-aug-20/.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Christine Haney Douglassat chaney3@unl.edu.

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GLOBEStudent Climate Research Campaign Phase 2 Webinar

The second phase of the Global Learning andObservations to Benefit the Environment, or GLOBE, Student Climate ResearchCampaign, or SCRC, will launch in September 2012. Students will develop andconduct climate science research projects using GLOBE data and other long-termdata sets. Learn more by participating in the “SCRC Phase 2: Using GLOBEProtocols and Data to Study Local Climate” webinar. The webinar occursmultiple times on Aug. 21 and Aug. 22,2012.

For more information, visit http://www.globe.gov/web/scrc/overview.

Questions about the webinar may be sent to climatecampaign@globe.gov.

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2012 Humans in SpaceYouth Art Competition

The international 2012 Humans in Space Youth ArtCompetition invites students ages 10-18 to express their ideas about the futureof human space exploration through visual, literary, musical or digital art.

Artwork submissions will be judged oncreativity, skill and demonstration of meaning relevant to expressing “How willhumans use science and technology to explore space, and what mysteries will weuncover?”

Winning art will be showcased at displays andmultimedia performances worldwide from 2013 to 2014, as well as in an onlinegallery. Submissions must be received by Oct.21, 2012.

For additional information and a complete listof guidelines, visit www.humansinspaceart.org.

Inquiries about this opportunity should bedirected to Jancy McPhee at jancy.c.mcphee@nasa.gov.

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NASA Announces Next Opportunity for CubeSatSpace Missions

NASA is seeking proposals for small satellite payloads to fly on rocketsplanned to launch between 2013 and 2016. These miniature spacecraft, known asCubeSats, could be auxiliary payloads on previously planned missions.

CubeSats are a class of research spacecraft called nanosatellites. Thesecube-shaped satellites are approximately four inches long, have a volume ofabout one quart and weigh less than three pounds.

Proposed CubeSat investigations must be consistent with NASA’s Strategic Planand the NASA education vision and goals. The research must address aspects ofscience, exploration, technology development, education or operations.

Applicants must submit proposals electronically by 4:30 p.m. EST, Nov. 12,2012. NASA will select the payloads by Jan. 31, 2013. Selection does notguarantee a launch opportunity. The selected spacecraft will be eligible forflight after final negotiations when a launch opportunity arises. NASA will notprovide funding for the development of the small satellites.

NASA recently announced the results from the third round of the CubeSat LaunchInitiative. From the first three launch initiatives, 64 payloads made the shortlist for launch opportunities between 2011 and 2014. They are eligible forlaunch pending an appropriate opportunity and final negotiations. Thesatellites come from 25 states: Alabama, Alaska, California, Colorado, Florida,Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts,Michigan, Missouri, Montana, North Dakota, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York,Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, Utah, Vermont and Virginia.

For additional information about NASA’s CubeSat Launch Initiative program,visit http://go.nasa.gov/puk9K2 and http://go.nasa.gov/CubeSatOp.

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New Educational Materials Available at NASA.gov

The Educational Materials section of NASA’s Web site offers classroomactivities, educator guides, posters and other types of resources that areavailable for use in the classroom. Materials are listed by type, grade leveland subject. The following items are now available for downloading.

Microgravity Square Bookmark — Grades K-12

The uniquely shaped bookmark highlights the microgravity resources for K-12educators found on the Microgravity education website. The website offerslesson plans, research information, opportunities for educators and students,and multimedia highlighting NASA’s microgravity research.

https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/Microgravity_Square.html

Rocketry Bookmark — All Grade Levels
Blast off to the exciting world of rocketry! Thedownloadable bookmark has the Web address for NASA’s Rocketry education site.Visit the site to explore incredible rocketry resources for educators andstudents.

https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/Rocketry_Bookmark.html

STEM on Station Bookmark — All Grade Levels
Think beyond textbooks and use the InternationalSpace Station as a teaching resource. The bookmark has the Web address forNASA’s STEM on Station education site. Visit the site to download videos,access lesson plans and find space station opportunities for students andeducators.

https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/STEMStation_Bookmark.html

Bag of Bones Activity — Grades K-8
Students test bone density using plastic snackbags, corn puff cereal and a heavy book. They apply the scientific method todetermine degrees of bone loss and learn why healthy bones are important inspace and on Earth.

https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/Bag_of_Bones_Activity.html

To find more NASA educational materials, visit http://search.nasa.gov/search/edFilterSearch.jsp?empty=true.

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Have a Blast Learning About the Moon With NewSelene Video Game

Use your computer to journey back some 4.5billion years, and prepare to blast away — you’re going to make a moon justlike Earth’s. All you need to do is to register to play the award-winning”Selene” online video game from the Center for EducationalTechnologies, or CET. CET is the home of NASA-sponsored Classroom of the Futureat Wheeling Jesuit University in Wheeling, W.Va.

In “Selene: A Lunar ConstructionGame,” you and your students learn about basic geological processes onEarth and in the solar system while helping educational researchers study howand when people learn through educational video games.

Funded by NASA and the National ScienceFoundation, “Selene” has won numerous awards, and research has shownthat the game aids learning. But we need players. To register your students,email selene@cet.edu with your contact infoand times when you would be available for a short 30-minute orientation.

New for the 2012-2013 school year is aSpanish-language version of the game. The game is open to ages 9 and up and canbe played anytime, anyplace. To learn more about “Selene,” readtestimonials about it or see how it aligns with national and state sciencestandards. Visit the “Selene” website at http://selene.cet.edu.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For afull list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub


NASA Education Express — August 9, 2012

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community.Full descriptions are listed below.

FreeEducation Webinar Series from the Aerospace Education Services Project
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Dates: Various Dates Through August 2012

NASA Office ofEducation Solicits Proposals for the NASA Experimental Program to StimulateCompetitive Research, or EPSCoR
Audience: Higher Education Institutions inEligible States
Proposal Deadline: Aug. 14, 2012

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event– Radiation Belt Storm Probes
Audience: Grades 5-12
Event Date: Aug. 16, 2012, 1 – 2 p.m. EDT

Online Climate Research ApplicationsCourse
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: Aug. 20, 2012

GLOBE Student Climate ResearchCampaign Phase 2 Webinar
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Date: Aug. 21 and Aug. 22, 2012

2012-2013NASA’s University Student Launch Initiative
Audience: Higher Education Students
Proposal Deadline: Aug. 31, 2012

Become a NASA Galileo EducatorNetwork Fellow
Audience: K-12 Educator Professional Development Providers
Application Deadline: Aug. 31, 2012

Minorities Striving and Pursuing HigherDegrees of Success in Earth System Science
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Aug. 31, 2012

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Free Education Webinar Series from the AerospaceEducation Services Project

The Aerospace Education Services Project ispresenting a series of free webinars throughout July 2012. All webinars can beaccessed online. Join aerospace education specialists to learn aboutactivities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources to bring NASA into yourclassroom.

Exploring Our Earth From Above (Grades 4-12)
Aug. 9, 2012, 4:30 – 5:30 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Steve Culivan will integrate science,technology, engineering, mathematics and geography, or STEM-G, with Earthobservations, remote sensing and maps. NASA curriculum products, missions andother resources will be utilized to demonstrate an inquiry-based teachingstrategy to better understand Earth and the processes that shape it.

Kepler Mission: Searching for Earth-like Planets (Grades 6-12)
Aug. 13, 2012, 7:30 – 8:45 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Tony Leavitt will discuss NASA’s KeplerMission.  Kepler has been in space forthree years searching for planets that are orbiting stars in the Milky Waygalaxy. Participants will learn how transits are used to find planets and determinetheir sizes and distances from the stars they orbit.

Living and Working in Space (Grades K-5)
Aug. 16, 2012, 10 – 11 a.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Wil Robertson will introduce teachers to someof the obstacles humans face while traveling in space. The webinar will reviewthe major difficulties and concerns of adapting to the space environment, fromeveryday living and personal hygiene to safety.

“Flying to Mars… In an Airplane?” (Grades 3-9)
Aug. 16, 2012, 4 – 5 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Brian Hawkins will present anoverview of the Mars Science Laboratory mission with its Curiosity rover and explorethe proposed Aerial Regional-Scale Environmental Survey of Mars, or ARES,mission. ARES is also known as the Mars Airplane. Two hands-on activities willbe demonstrated during this session.

For more information about these webinars, andto see a full list of webinars taking place through August 2012, visit http://neon.psu.edu/webinars/.

Questions about this series of webinars shouldbe directed to Gwendolyn Wheatle at Gwendolyn.H.Wheatle@nasa.gov.

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NASA Office of Education Solicits Proposals forthe NASA Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research, or EPSCoR

The National Aeronautics and SpaceAdministration (NASA) Office of Education, in cooperation with NASA’sAeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD), Human Exploration &Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), and Science Mission Directorates (SMD),the Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT), and NASA’s ten Centers, solicitsproposals for the NASA Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research(EPSCoR). Each funded NASA EPSCoR proposal is expected to establish researchactivities that will make significant contributions to the strategic researchand technology development priorities of one or more of the Mission Directoratesor the OCT and contribute to the overall research infrastructure, science andtechnology capabilities, higher education, and economic development of thejurisdiction. Proposals are due on Aug.14, 2012.

Public Law 102-588, passed in 1992, authorizedNASA to initiate NASA EPSCoR to strengthen the research capability ofjurisdictions that have not in the past participated equably in competitiveaerospace research activities. The goal of NASA EPSCoR is to provide seedfunding that will enable jurisdictions to develop an academic researchenterprise directed toward long-term, self-sustaining, nationally-competitivecapabilities in aerospace and aerospace-related research. This capability will,in turn, contribute to the jurisdiction’s economic viability and expand thenation’s base for aerospace research and development. Since its inception, NASAEPSCoR has been closely linked to the National Space Grant College andFellowship Program (Space Grant).

While proposals can be accepted only frominstitutions for which the NASA EPSCoR Directors are currently serving, allinstitutions of higher education within the jurisdiction should be given theopportunity and must be made aware of the FY 2012 NASA EPSCoR CAN. The NationalScience Foundation (NSF) determines overall jurisdiction eligibility for NASAEPSCoR.

Details regarding general eligibility areavailable athttp://www.nsf.gov/od/oia/programs/epscor/eligible.jsp.

The following jurisdictions are eligible tosubmit up to two proposals that must be submitted through the jurisdiction PIto this NASA EPSCoR solicitation: Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Delaware, Hawaii,Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana,Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, PuertoRico, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Vermont, West Virginia, andWyoming.

South Carolina may submit up to three proposals,provided at least one of the proposals represents a project from the U.S.Virgin Islands (which currently falls under South Carolina’s jurisdiction).

For more information, visit http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId={36283FDE-A756-ED4D-426B-A7C0EA1FD9A3}&path=open.

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NASA’sDigital Learning Network Event — Radiation Belt Storm Probes

Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network, or DLN, host hosts Joshua Santora andRachel Power for a live interactive education event on Aug. 16, 2012, at 1 p.m. EDT to discuss the Radiation Belt StormProbes, or RBSP, project. Understanding the radiation belt environment and itsvariability has extremely important practical applications in the areas ofspacecraft operations, spacecraft and spacecraft system design, missionplanning and astronaut safety. Interact with RBSP Deputy Project ScientistNicky Fox during this live webcast.

For more information and to take part in the webcast, visit the DLN website at http://dln.nasa.gov.

Inquiries about this webcast should be directed to Joshua Santora at joshua.santora@nasa.gov.

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OnlineClimate Research Applications Course

The University ofNebraska-Lincoln, or UNL, offers K-12 science educators the opportunity to takepart in the development of a new online master’s-level course in ClimateResearch Applications funded by the NASA Innovations in Climate Educationprogram.

Climate change issues will serve as a context to develop research questions anddesign a discrete, locally oriented research project through which they definea problem, analyze data and develop conclusions to potentially impactdecision-making in their communities. Educators are encouraged to utilize thisopportunity to expand their knowledge of climate change, as well as theiravailable tools for educating students and their local communities.Participants will earn three graduate-level credit hours through UNL, as wellas a stipend to cover tuition costs.

Applications are due Aug. 20, 2012.

For more information, visit http://www.smdeponews.org/programs-events/online-climate-research-applications-course-with-tuition-stipened-for-k-12-educators-apply-by-aug-20/.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Christine Haney Douglassat chaney3@unl.edu.

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GLOBEStudent Climate Research Campaign Phase 2 Webinar

The second phase of the Global Learning andObservations to Benefit the Environment, or GLOBE, Student Climate ResearchCampaign, or SCRC, will launch in September 2012. Students will develop andconduct climate science research projects using GLOBE data and other long-termdata sets. Learn more by participating in the “SCRC Phase 2: Using GLOBEProtocols and Data to Study Local Climate” webinar. The webinar occursmultiple times on Aug. 21 and Aug. 22,2012.

For more information, visit http://www.globe.gov/web/scrc/overview.

Questions about the webinar may be sent to climatecampaign@globe.gov.

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2012-2013 NASA’s University Student Launch Initiative

NASA’s University Student Launch Initiative, orUSLI, is a competition that challenges university-level students to design,build and launch a reusable rocket with a scientific or engineering payload toone mile above ground level. The project engages students in scientificresearch and real-world engineering processes with NASA engineers.

Once selected, teams design their rockets and payloads throughout the academicyear. USLI requires a NASA review of the teams’ preliminary and criticaldesigns. The project also requires flight and launch readiness reviews beforethe rockets and payloads are approved for launch. Teams complete a Post-LaunchAssessment Review to include conclusions from their science or engineeringexperiment and the overall flight performance. The Preliminary Design Review,Critical Design Review and Flight Readiness Review are conducted by a panel ofscientists and engineers from NASA, NASA contactors and external partners.

NASA’s Student Launch Projects are sponsored by ATK Aerospace Systems. Theannual launch event is hosted at Bragg Farms in Toney, Ala., and launchservices are provided by the National Association of Rocketry. The 2012-2013launch will be on April 20, 2013. Proposals are due Aug. 31, 2012.

The Statement of Work and instructions for submitting a proposal can be foundon the USLI website at http://education.msfc.nasa.gov/usli.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Julie Clift at julie.d.clift@nasa.gov.

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Becomea NASA Galileo Educator Network Fellow

The NASA Galileo Educator Network is accepting applications for a professional development institute in September 2012, atthe Adler Planetarium in Chicago, Ill.

The 15-hour institute will focus on the integration of science content, sciencepractices and the nature of science as outlined in thenational Framework for K–12 Science Education. The goal of this program is totrain participants to assist K-12 teachers with the implementation of the NextGeneration Science Standards, in the context of astronomy and space science.

Lodging support for out-of-town participants and stipends for all participantsare available.

Applications are due Aug. 31,2012.

For more information about the NASA Galileo Educator Network and to apply forthe professional development institute online, visit http://astrosociety.org/education/GEN/index.html.

Questions about this opportunity should be emailed to Brian Kruse at bkruse@astrosociety.org.

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MinoritiesStriving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Earth System Science

The Minorities Striving and Pursuing HigherDegrees of Success in Earth System Science, or MS PHD’S, initiative wasdeveloped by and for underrepresented minorities to facilitate increasedparticipation in earth system science. Each year, the initiative engages approximately 25 minorityundergraduate and graduate students in a series of activities.

The project starts with orientation and a broad earth system science andengineering exposure during MS PHD’S community-building activities at the American Geophysical Unionfall meeting in San Francisco, Calif.

Participants will engage in additional professional development activities atone of the MS PHD’S organizational partners’ meetings. These activities couldinclude attending meetings of the American Meteorological Society, the Associationfor the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography, the National Association ofBlack Geologists and Geophysicists, and the Ecological Society of America,among others. Each participant will attend the meeting that most closely alignswith his or her specific academic and professional interests.

The final phase will occur at the National Academies in Washington, D.C., whereparticipants will visit government agencies and engage in dialogs withprofessional society and foundation representatives. Each student will alsoreceive a scholarship award of up to $1,000 and participate in a tour of NASA’sGoddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

The deadline for submitting the online applicationis Aug. 31, 2012.

For more information about the MSPHD’S initiative and how to apply, visit http://www.msphds.org/.

Questions about this opportunity should be emailed to pdp@msphds.org.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For afull list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — August 2, 2012

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Celebrate the Landing of the Mars Curiosity Rover
Audience: All Educators and Students
Landing Date: Aug. 5-6, 2012

Free Education Webinar Series from the Aerospace Education Services Project
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Dates: Various Dates Through August 2012

Satellites & Education Conference XXV
Audience: All Educators

Event Date: Aug. 9-11, 2012

NASA Office of Education Solicits Proposals for the NASA Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research, or EPSCoR

Audience: Higher Education Institutions in Eligible States
Proposal Deadline: Aug. 14, 2012

Green Strides Webinar Series
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Dates: Multiple dates through May 2013

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Celebrate the Landing of the Mars Curiosity Rover

In a few weeks, NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity is set to land on Mars. What will this rover do? Curiosity will look for things that sustain life: signs of long-term water in the past or present and the right chemical ingredients for life (e.g., carbon-based molecules, the chemical building blocks of life). Use this historic occasion to introduce current real-world science and engineering to your students.

Curiosity is scheduled to land on Mars at 1:31 a.m. EDT on Monday, Aug. 6, 2012. (That’s 10:31 p.m. PDT, Sunday, Aug. 5.) That evening, Mars will be visible in the night sky with a telescope or with the naked eye. Take this opportunity to host a Mars-gazing party! Just after sunset, Mars will be roughly 150 million miles away from Earth, and the Curiosity Rover will be only hours away from arriving to this distant orange dot in the night sky. Submit your events to https://www.nasa.gov/mars.

— Looking for activities to get students excited about the upcoming landing? A number of short, hands-on activities relating to the mission are available at http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/participate/marsforeducators/soi/.

— For a basic overview of the Red Planet, visit the following websites:

Basic Information on Mars
http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/profile.cfm?Object=Mars

Mars Image Collection
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/

3-D Images of Mars
http://mars3d.jpl.nasa.gov/

— Want to know more about the area where the Curiosity rover will be landing on Mars? Visit the following websites to learn more about Gale Crater.

Destination Gale Crater: August 5, 2012 at 10:31 pm PDT
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/images/?ImageID=3852

Gale’s Mount Sharp Compared to Three Big Mountains on Earth
https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/multimedia/pia15292-Fig2.html

National Parks as Mars Analog Sites
http://www.nps.gov/deva/parknews/mars-and-mojave.htm

— The Curiosity rover will landing using a bold new landing technique. Check out the “Seven Minutes of Terror” video at the link below to see how rockets, parachutes and a “sky crane” will help Curiosity make a soft landing on Mars.
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/videos/index.cfm?v=49

— Live media coverage of the Curiosity landing begins at midnight EDT (9 p.m. PDT) on NASA TV. To find NASA TV on your local cable provider, or to view the coverage online, visit https://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv.

— Curiosity also has a presence on Twitter and Facebook.
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity
Facebook:
http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity

For up-to-the-minute mission information about the Curiosity rover and progress toward its Mars landing, visit https://www.nasa.gov/mars and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov.

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Free Education Webinar Series from the Aerospace Education Services Project

The Aerospace Education Services Project is presenting a series of free webinars throughout July 2012. All webinars can be accessed online. Join aerospace education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources to bring NASA into your classroom.

Exploring Our Earth From Above (Grades 4-12)
Aug. 9, 2012, 4:30 – 5:30 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Steve Culivan will integrate science, technology, engineering, mathematics and geography, or STEM-G, with Earth observations, remote sensing and maps. NASA curriculum products, missions and other resources will be utilized to demonstrate an inquiry-based teaching strategy to better understand Earth and the processes that shape it.

Kepler Mission: Searching for Earth-like Planets (Grades 6-12)
Aug. 13, 2012, 7:30 – 8:45 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Tony Leavitt will discuss NASA’s Kepler Mission.  Kepler has been in space for three years searching for planets that are orbiting stars in the Milky Way galaxy. Participants will learn how transits are used to find planets and determine their sizes and distances from the stars they orbit.

Living and Working in Space (Grades K-5)
Aug. 16, 2012, 10 – 11 a.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Wil Robertson will introduce teachers to some of the obstacles humans face while traveling in space. The webinar will review the major difficulties and concerns of adapting to the space environment, from everyday living and personal hygiene to safety.

“Flying to Mars… In an Airplane?” (Grades 3-9)
Aug. 16, 2012, 4 – 5 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Brian Hawkins will present an overview of the Mars Science Laboratory mission with its Curiosity rover and explore the proposed Aerial Regional-Scale Environmental Survey of Mars, or ARES, mission. ARES is also known as the Mars Airplane. Two hands-on activities will be demonstrated during this session.



For more information about these webinars, and to see a full list of webinars taking place through August 2012, visit http://neon.psu.edu/webinars/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Gwendolyn Wheatle at Gwendolyn.H.Wheatle@nasa.gov.

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Satellites & Education Conference XXV

Join the Satellite Educators Association for an education conference being held Aug. 9-11, 2012, in Los Angeles, Calif. The annual conference is for educators interested in discovering ways to use satellites and related technologies in the classroom. Participants learn ways to help students appreciate and understand the complex interrelationships among science, technology, individuals, societies and the environment. Conference attendees learn to develop and apply inquiry and technology skills to study authentic questions and problems.

In conjunction with this year’s conference, a two-day training session for the GLOBE program will take place Aug. 10-11.

The conference is hosted by California State University, Los Angeles. The event is sponsored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, NASA, Aerospace Institute, Boeing, Raytheon, SpaceX, Lockheed-Martin, Sally Ride Science Festivals, Traveling Space Museum, Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence’s West location and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

For more information, visit http://www.sated.org/.

If you have questions about this event, please contact conference coordinator Dr. Paula Arvedson at parveds@calstatela.edu.

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NASA Office of Education Solicits Proposals for the NASA Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research, or EPSCoR

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Office of Education, in cooperation with NASA’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD), Human Exploration & Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), and Science Mission Directorates (SMD), the Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT), and NASA’s ten Centers, solicits proposals for the NASA Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR). Each funded NASA EPSCoR proposal is expected to establish research activities that will make significant contributions to the strategic research and technology development priorities of one or more of the Mission Directorates or the OCT and contribute to the overall research infrastructure, science and technology capabilities, higher education, and economic development of the jurisdiction. Proposals are due on Aug. 14, 2012.

Public Law 102-588, passed in 1992, authorized NASA to initiate NASA EPSCoR to strengthen the research capability of jurisdictions that have not in the past participated equably in competitive aerospace research activities. The goal of NASA EPSCoR is to provide seed funding that will enable jurisdictions to develop an academic research enterprise directed toward long-term, self-sustaining, nationally-competitive capabilities in aerospace and aerospace-related research. This capability will, in turn, contribute to the jurisdiction’s economic viability and expand the nation’s base for aerospace research and development. Since its inception, NASA EPSCoR has been closely linked to the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program (Space Grant).

While proposals can be accepted only from institutions for which the NASA EPSCoR Directors are currently serving, all institutions of higher education within the jurisdiction should be given the opportunity and must be made aware of the FY 2012 NASA EPSCoR CAN. The National Science Foundation (NSF) determines overall jurisdiction eligibility for NASA EPSCoR.

Details regarding general eligibility are available at http://www.nsf.gov/od/oia/programs/epscor/eligible.jsp.

The following jurisdictions are eligible to submit up to two proposals that must be submitted through the jurisdiction PI to this NASA EPSCoR solicitation: Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Vermont, West Virginia, and Wyoming.

South Carolina may submit up to three proposals, provided at least one of the proposals represents a project from the U.S. Virgin Islands (which currently falls under South Carolina’s jurisdiction).

For more information, visit http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId={36283FDE-A756-ED4D-426B-A7C0EA1FD9A3}&path=open.

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Green Strides Webinar Series

The U.S. Department of Education presents the Green Strides Webinar Series. These webinars feature experts from various federal programs. The webinars are free, and events are scheduled through the end of the 2012-2013 school year.

For more information and registration, visit http://www2.ed.gov/programs/green-ribbon-schools/webinar-series.doc.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to
Green.Ribbon.Schools@ed.gov.

________________________________________________________________

Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub