NASA Education Express — Jan. 9, 2014

Check out the latest NASA Education opportunity announcements.

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

NES Web Seminar — Heat Transfer: MESSENGER — My Angle on Cooling
Audience: 5-8 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Jan. 9, 2014, at 6:30 p.m. EST

2014 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge
Audience: 9-12 & Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Deadline for International Teams: Jan. 10, 2014
Registration Deadline for U.S. Teams: Feb. 7, 2014

White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities — 2014 All-Star Students
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Jan. 10, 2014

National Air and Space Museum Super Science Saturday Events
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: Jan. 11, 2014

Free Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series
Audience: All Educators and 9-Higher Education Students
Next Lecture Date: Jan. 11, 2014, at 5:15 p.m. EST

Free Education Webinar Series from NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: K-8 and Informal Educators
Event Dates: Jan. 13-15, 2014

NES Web Seminar — Engineering Design Challenge: Lunar Plant Growth Chamber
Audience: 6-8 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Jan. 13, 2014, at 6:30 p.m. EST

National Science Foundation Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program Preparation Webinars and Workshop
Audience: Higher Education Faculty
Informational Webinar Date: Jan. 14, 2014, at 3 p.m. EST
Proposal Deadline: March 5, 2014

NES Web Seminar — Weather and Climate: Satellite Meteorology
Audience: 6-8 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Jan. 15, 2014, at 6:30 p.m. EST

NASA Science Mission Directorate — Summer 2014 Space Grant Internships
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: Jan. 15, 2014

Virginia Space Grant Consortium’s 2014-2016 Integrative STEM for Pre-service Teachers Program
Audience: Pre-service Educators in Virginia
Application Deadline: Jan. 15, 2014

“Ask NICE” Online Professional Development Series
Audience: K-12 Educators
Next Event Date: Jan. 16, 2013, at 4 p.m. EST

NES Web Seminar — Meteorology: How Clouds Form
Audience: 6-8 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Jan. 16, 2014, at 6:30 p.m. EST

MAVEN Workshop — Red Planet: Read, Write, Explore!
Audience: Elementary Educators
Application Deadline: Jan. 17, 2014
Workshop Date: Jan. 25, 2014

2014 RASC-AL Competition
Audience: Higher Education Students
Deadline: Jan. 19, 2014

American Meteorological Society’s DataStreme Earth’s Climate System Professional Development Course
Audience: K-12 Educators
Course Begins: Jan. 20, 2014

NASA Announcement for High-Impact, National, Strategic STEM Education Partnerships — Amended
Audience: Potential STEM Education Partners
Response Date: Jan. 23, 2014

What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website
Audience: K-6 Educators

Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

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NES Web Seminar — Heat Transfer: MESSENGER — My Angle on Cooling

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, the NASA Explorer Schools and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute Web seminar on Jan. 9, 2014 at 6:30 p.m. EST. Learn how the MESSENGER mission to Mercury takes advantage of passive cooling methods to keep the spacecraft functioning in a high-temperature environment.

The featured activities provide opportunities for incorporating national science, technology and mathematics learning standards into the curriculum and address the Next Generation Science Standards

This is the only time this seminar will be offered during the current school year.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES4/webseminar19.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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2014 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge

NASA is seeking high school and college/university student teams to compete in the NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge (formerly NASA’s Great Moonbuggy Race). In this engineering design challenge that begins in the classroom, students work with teacher advisors to create a human-powered vehicle designed to traverse the simulated surface of another world while meeting certain NASA specifications. Student teams of up to six members are challenged to design, build and test technologies that enable vehicles to perform in a wide variety of environments.

The culminating event of the rover competition is scheduled for April 10-12, 2014, at the U. S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Ala., home of U.S. Space Camp and the official visitor center for NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The student teams will be timed, ranked and scored based on design, safety and how well they traverse the set course, which is a rugged half mile track of 15 obstacles meant to mimic some of the real terrain challenges of solar system exploration.

Corporate sponsors will award prizes for first, second and third place winners in both high school and college/university categories. Other prizes include a Featherweight Award, System Safety Design Award and a Telemetry/Electronics Award.

International teams must register by Jan. 10, 2014. U.S. teams must register by Feb. 7, 2014.

For more information about the competition and to register online, visit https://www.nasa.gov/roverchallenge/home/index.html.

International teams with questions about this event or registration may email Amy McDowell at Amy.McDowell@nasa.gov. U.S. teams with questions may contact Diedra Williams at MSFC-RoverChallenge2014@mail.nasa.gov.

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White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities — 2014 All-Star Students

The White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities, or HBCUs, works to promote HBCU excellence, innovation and sustainability. The Initiative will recognize current HBCU students for their dedication to academics, leadership and civic engagement as 2014 HBCU All-Star Students.

Nominees must be current undergraduate or graduate students at an HBCU. Applications must be submitted by 11:59 p.m. EST on Jan. 10, 2014.

For more information and to download an application, visit http://www.ed.gov/edblogs/whhbcu/2013/12/16/whi-hbcu-presents-2014-hbcu-all-star-students/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to oswhi-hbcu@ed.gov.

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National Air and Space Museum Super Science Saturday Events

Join the National Air and Space Museum on the second Saturday of each month for Super Science Saturday at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va. Through demonstrations and hands-on activities, visitors of all ages will become immersed in science, technology, engineering and mathematics topics related to aviation and space exploration. Each event takes place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Eastern Time. Admission is free, and parking is $15.

Upcoming topics include:

Jan. 11, 2014 — From the Wright Brothers to the Right Stuff
Feb. 8, 2014 — Scientists & Inventors
March 8, 2014 — Space Shuttle

For more information, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/superscience/.

Questions about this series of lectures should be directed to nasmpubliclectures@si.edu.

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Free Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series

Curious about our nearest star, water on Mars, the first trip to Pluto and other wonders of the universe? Come to the Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series presented by Smithsonian researchers who are exploring the sun, the moon, planets, stars, galaxies and the universe. These speakers will share behind-the-scenes details about how their research is done and technologies that advance new discoveries. The lectures will be held at the Albert Einstein Planetarium at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.

Each lecture begins at 5:15 p.m. ET and is followed by a question-and-answer session. A Discovery Station activity will take place at 4 p.m. prior to each lecture. Stay after the lecture to visit the museum’s observatory, weather permitting.

Jan. 11, 2014 — Solar Loops: Tackling a 40-Year-Old Mystery
The loops that cover the sun’s outer atmosphere have been studied for over 40 years, but their basic properties remain unknown. Astrophysicist Henry “Trae” Winter will discuss the attempts to unravel these mysteries.

Jan. 25, 2014 — River Deposits on Mars
Alluvial fans provide evidence for water-related activity. Recent studies on Mars suggest the fans are younger than previously thought, providing new insight into the late-stage climate and habitability of the planet. Geologist Sharon Wilson Purdy will delve into river deposits on the Red Planet.

Feb. 8, 2014 — On-Orbit Observing: An Astronaut’s View of Our Universe
Astronauts have played an important role in astronomy since 1962. Learn how, as in-orbit surrogate astronomers, they provide images and impressions of astronomical sights and events beyond Earth’s atmosphere. Museum specialist Jennifer Levasseur will discuss in-orbit astronomical observations.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/lectures/smithsonian-stars/.

Questions about this lecture series should be directed to the visitor service line at 202-633-1000.

The Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series is made possible by a grant from NASA.

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Free Education Webinar Series from NASA Educator Professional Development

NASA Educator Professional Development is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources to bring NASA into your classroom.

NASA Literature for K-5 Students
Audience:
K-5, Education Administrators, In-service, Pre-service, Informal and Home School Educators
Event Date:
Jan. 13, 2014, at 3 p.m. EST
Attend this 90-minute Web seminar to learn how to use NASA literacy resources to expose students to a rich science vocabulary, inquiry and scientific thinking.

Mass vs. Weight: What’s the Big Difference Anyway?
Audience:
6-8 Education Administrators, In-service, Pre-service, Informal and Home School Educators
Event Date: Jan. 14, 2014 at 4:30 p.m. EST
Explore the concepts of mass and weight using a NASA video filmed aboard the International Space Station, NASA resources, Newton’s Laws of Motion and inquiry activities.

MESSENGER: Exploring the Surface of Mercury
Audience:
5-8 Education Administrators, In-service, Pre-service, Informal and Home School Educators
Event Date: Jan. 15, 2014 at 6:30 p.m. EST
Discover how the Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and Ranging, or MESSENGER,  mission is providing compelling support for the hypothesis that Mercury harbors abundant water, ice and other frozen volatile materials in its permanently shadowed polar craters.

For more information about these webinars and to register online, visit https://paragon-tec.adobeconnect.com/admin/show-event-catalog.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to John Entwistle at john.d.entwistle@nasa.gov.

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NES Web Seminar — Engineering Design Challenge: Lunar Plant Growth Chamber

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on Jan. 13, 2014, at 6:30 p.m. EST. Learn how to incorporate exciting space exploration problems into your technology or life science classes. See how you can use the engineering design process to have students design, build and evaluate the effectiveness of a lunar plant growth chamber while engaging them in research and standards-based learning experiences.

The featured activity provides opportunities for incorporating national science, technology and mathematics learning standards into the curricula and addresses middle school Next Generation Science Standards.

This is the only time this seminar will be offered during the current school year.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES4/webseminar10.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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National Science Foundation Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program Preparation Webinars and Workshop

The National Science Foundation’s Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program seeks to encourage talented science, technology, engineering and mathematics majors and professionals to become K-12 mathematics and science teachers.

A Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Proposal Preparation Webinar is scheduled to take place Jan. 14, 2014. This 90-minute webinar will begin at 3 p.m. EST. The webinar is recommended for those considering submitting proposals.

A notice of intent from applicants is requested by Feb. 5, 2014. Full proposals for the Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program are due March 5, 2014.

For more information about the scholarship program and the informational webinars and workshop, visit http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5733.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Betty Calinger at bcalinge@aaas.org.

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NES Web Seminar — Weather and Climate: Satellite Meteorology

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute professional development Web seminar for educators on Jan. 15, 2014, at 6:30 p.m. EST.

Participants will learn to use the data from NASA’s research satellite program in their meteorology lessons. This Web seminar features “Monitoring the Global Environment,” one of eight modules within the satellite meteorology course. The activities within this module incorporate the use of authentic data acquired by NASA’s Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites and Polar Operational Environmental Satellites. Attendees will learn how to locate and download satellite data then use the data to create graphs.

The featured activity provides opportunities for incorporating national science, technology and mathematics learning standards into the curricula and addresses the Next Generation Science Standards and Common Core State Standards for grade 8.

This Web seminar will be offered again on April 10, 2014.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES4/webseminar31.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to the NES Help Desk at NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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NASA Science Mission Directorate — Summer 2014 Space Grant Internships

NASA’s Science Mission Directorate is looking to fill Space Grant-sponsored internships for Summer 2014 sessions. Internship opportunities are available with two NASA missions.

Chandra X-Ray Observatory
Chandra interns will assist the Northrop Grumman Flight Operations Team in analysis and software development in support of the Chandra X-ray Observatory mission. Interns will work side by side with Northrop engineers at the Chandra Operations Control Center in Cambridge, Mass. Work will include analysis of spacecraft data and/or development of software tools and Web utilities to be used in operations of the vehicle. Required skills vary by project, however, all candidates must have a basic education in physics, mathematics, computer science or engineering.

Hubble Space Telescope
The Hubble Space Telescope program is seeking an intern to assist in creating scientific visualizations of Hubble images and other astronomical data sets. Tasks may include image processing, video production, 3-D modeling and rendering, and visualization, scientific and/or astronomical programming. This internship provides a special opportunity to combine scientific, computational and artistic skills into a project with tangible, high-impact results.

Applicants for these internships must be U.S. citizens. Individual Space Grants will submit names and application materials for students interested in applying for these internships. Note that not all Space Grants are participating, due to funding constraints.

Application materials are due Jan. 15, 2014.

For more information, visit http://md.spacegrant.org/index.php?page=smd-sg-intern-program-description. Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Dr. Terry Teays at tteays1@jhu.edu.

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Virginia Space Grant Consortium’s 2014-2016 Integrative STEM for Pre-service Teachers Program

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium is seeking applications for the 2014-2016 Integrative STEM for Pre-service Teachers program, or InSTEP. This two-year program serves to increase future educators’ understanding of STEM and how to teach integrative STEM in the classroom.

Applicants must have demonstrated interest in teaching in grades 4-8, as well as science, technology, engineering and/or mathematics. The program includes $2,500 scholarship each year, For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology, or FIRST, Lego robotics training, conference travel and registration, travel support to two NASA centers for innovative STEM training and more.

To be eligible, applicants must be rising juniors (third year of a pre-service teacher program) in summer 2014 at a partnering Virginia college/university. Preference will be given to students currently enrolled in programs at College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, Virginia Tech, The University of Virginia, Norfolk State University and Virginia State University.

The deadline for submitting applications is Jan. 15, 2014.

For more information, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/inSTEP/index.html. Please email any questions about this opportunity to Elizabeth Joyner at ejoyner@odu.edu or to Chris Carter at cxcarter@odu.edu.

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“Ask NICE” Online Professional Development Series

Join the NASA Innovations in Climate Education, or NICE, team for a series of Google+ Hangout professional development sessions. Planned for the third Thursdays of upcoming months, the sessions will cover a variety of climate topics. This month’s webinar topic is:

Impacts of Climate Change/The GLOBE Program: Green-Up
Jan. 16, 2013, at 4 p.m. EST
What changes have occurred in various climate regions as global temperatures have risen? How have these changes affected birds, bugs, trees and plants? Understand the answers to these and other climate-related questions, and learn how to use the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment, or GLOBE, Budburst protocols to explore these concepts with your students.

Certificates of professional development hours are available upon request. Additional session dates will be announced soon.

For more information, visit https://nice.larc.nasa.gov/asknice/. Questions about this series should be sent to Bonnie Murray at bonnie.murray@nasa.gov.

This series is sponsored by Minority University Research and Education Program and NICE, and is part of the Digital Learning Network program to expand the reach of NICE projects.

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NES Web Seminar — Meteorology: How Clouds Form

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a free 90-minute Web seminar on Jan. 16, 2014, at 6:30 p.m. EST. Learn about the relationships between air pressure, temperature, volume and cloud formation. Get an overview of the necessary conditions for cloud formation, and then see how to make a cloud in a bottle. Information will be provided about an extension activity, the Students’ Cloud Observations Online, or S’COOL, Project, which involves student participation in authentic science.

The featured activity provides opportunities for incorporating national science, technology and mathematics learning standards into the curricula and addresses middle school Next Generation Science Standards.

This is the last time this seminar will be offered during the current school year.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES4/webseminar23.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to the NASA Explorer Schools help desk at NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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MAVEN Workshop — Red Planet: Read, Write, Explore!

The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN, or MAVEN, mission will explore the planet’s upper atmosphere, ionosphere and interactions with the solar wind. Set to arrive at Mars in 2014, the mission will provide invaluable insights into the history of Mars’ atmosphere and climate, liquid water and planetary habitability.

Join the MAVEN education team for a one-day workshop on the MAVEN mission, and the accompanying elementary program, Red Planet: Read, Write, Explore! This program features six standards-based lessons that combine science, literacy and art to help students understand planetary habitability and the MAVEN mission. The workshop will introduce participants to these lessons and concepts. The workshop will also have a session devoted to Spanish speaking English Language Learner and English as a Second Language students. Attendees will receive free classroom materials.

The workshop will take place on Jan. 25, 2014, in Houston, Texas. Registration is $15 and includes a continental breakfast and lunch. Applications are due Jan. 17, 2014, but space is limited so interested educators are encouraged to apply early.

For more information about the workshop and to apply online, visit http://lasp.colorado.edu/home/maven/education-outreach/for-educators/red-planet/houston-workshop/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to epomail@lasp.colorado.edu.

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2014 RASC-AL Competition

NASA and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2014 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts Academic Linkage, or RASC-AL, Competition. RASC-AL is a design project competition aimed at university-level engineering students.

The RASC-AL contest challenges participants to design projects based on real NASA projects. Concepts derived from the design projects could potentially be implemented by NASA. Participants can choose from three different themes:

— Enabling Long-Duration Missions through Holistic Habitat Design
— Human-Assisted Sample Return
— Tele-Operated Robot

Teams must submit an abstract for their proposed project by Jan. 19, 2014. The RASC-AL Steering Committee of NASA and industry experts will evaluate the proposals and select as many as 13 undergraduate and five graduate teams to compete against each other at a forum in June 2014 in Florida.

The RASC-AL competition is open to full-time undergraduate or graduate students majoring in engineering or science at an accredited university. University design teams must include one faculty or industry advisor with a university affiliation and two or more undergraduate or graduate students. A group of universities may also work in collaboration on a design project entry. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

For more information about this competition, visit http://nia-cms.nianet.org/RASCAL/index.aspx.

If you have questions about this competition, please contact Shelley Spears at Shelley.Spears@nianet.org or Stacy Dees at stacy.dees@nianet.org.

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American Meteorological Society’s DataStreme Earth’s Climate System Professional Development Course

The American Meteorological Society, with support from NASA and in partnership with the State University of New York’s College at Brockport, is developing a national cadre of K-12 teachers highly trained in climate science and familiar with climate modeling. Teachers are trained through DataStreme Earth’s Climate System, or ECS, a semester-long, graduate level, precollege teacher professional development course.

DataStreme ECS uses NASA Earth Observing System data and visualizations, and introduces the Educational Global Climate Model developed by the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, to explore the fundamentals of climate change. Teachers completing the course construct and execute a plan of action to advance public climate science literacy and affect curriculum change within their local schools and districts.

DataStreme ECS is administered through Local Implementation Teams across the country. The course is free to all participants, and the teachers are awarded three graduate credits upon successful completion of the course.

The spring 2014 course begins on Jan. 20, 2014.

For more information, including a listing of course offerings by state, and an application form, visit http://ametsoc.org/amsedu/ECS/index.html.

Questions about these courses should be directed to amsedu@ametsoc.org.

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NASA Announcement for High-Impact, National, Strategic STEM Education Partnerships — Amended

NASA’s Office of Education has amended the NASA Announcement for High-Impact, National, Strategic STEM Education Partnerships [EDUCATION01SP13] to reflect a new response date. The new response date is Jan. 23, 2014. NASA’s Education portfolio is being strategically rescoped. NASA anticipates reissuing the announcement. NASA will not accept responses to this announcement after Jan. 23, 2014.

To access the Announcement home page, please visit http://go.nasa.gov/VgRZYt.

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What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website

NASA’s Space Place doesn’t just bring you great educational material across a wide range of topics, it also presents that material in many different formats. From games and activities to articles and illustrations, Space Place makes it easy for students to learn in whatever format suits them best. This philosophy is the driving force behind our latest product — Space Place in a Snap. These pages combine animated videos with posters and reading material for a cross-disciplinary learning experience.

What’s New? Space Place in a Snap
Space Place is pleased to announce an entirely new and totally exciting product — Space Place in a Snap! These short animations provide quick narrated explanations of some of the most interesting science questions by taking you on a guided tour of an infographic. The best part: You can download a poster of the infographic after you watch the animation. We have already released our first Snap — How Did Our Solar System Come to Be? Check it out at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/solar-system-formation. Stay tuned for more Snaps in the very near future!

Space Place en Español: Loopy Legends
Why limit yourself to telling stories in only one language? Our popular mad-libs-style activity, “Loopy Legends,” is now available in both English and Spanish. Kids get to create their own zany adventures in this Web activity. You might find yourself traveling toward the center of a black hole. Or maybe you’ll become lost because an angry sun’s space weather knocked out some global positioning system satellites. Who knows, you might even go surfing on Jupiter’s moon Titan! Check it out at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/loopy-legends/sp.

Spotlight on a Solar Mystery
The surface of the sun is a scalding 10,000 degrees Fahrenheit. But the sun’s atmosphere can reach millions of degrees. That doesn’t make too much sense, does it? Why would the stuff around the sun be warmer than the sun itself? And if the atmosphere were so hot, then why wouldn’t it warm the surface up to a temperature closer to the atmosphere? Check out one of Space Place’s newest articles to learn more about this solar mystery. http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/sun-corona.

For the Classroom
Looking for a hands-on activity that reinforces engineering concepts? Look no further than Space Place’s moon habitat activity. Have you ever wondered what it would take for humans to have an extended stay on the moon? Surely they would need some sort of place to live. But how would such a structure make the long journey through space? Learn all about what astronauts might want in their moon habitat. Then build your own! http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/moon-habitat.

For Out-of-School Time
How about an exciting Web game to teach students all about solar weather in their out-of-school time? The sun is a scorching mass of hot gas that is constantly shooting energy and particles out into space. In “Shields up!” you must use a Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite – R Series weather satellite to detect the first signs of any crazy solar weather and warn other satellites to protect themselves before it is too late. http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/shields-up.

Special Days

January 11:
Amelia Earhart is the first woman to fly solo across the Pacific in 1935.
How did her airplane stay up? http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/dr-marc-technology

January 13: Galileo discovers Jupiter’s moon Ganymede in 1610.
Jupiter and Ganymede play tug o’ war with little moon Io. http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/io-tides

January 25: Mars rover Opportunity landed on Mars in 2004.
Get the inside story on the latest Mars rover — Curiosity. http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/mission-chronicles/en/#milkovich 

February 6: Apollo 14 astronauts played golf on the moon in 1971.
See astronauts at work and play: http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/gallery-technology/#astronauts

February 12: Charles Darwin born this day in 1809.
You will understand evolution of species after playing with the “Emoticonstructor.” http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/emoticonstructor/en/ 

February 20: Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day.
Watch Space Place Live! and meet a woman engineer. http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/space-place-live/#douglas

February 25: Quiet Day.
Did you know the most violent events in space make no sound? Make a Super Sound Cone, and listen for very tiny sounds. http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/sound-cone

Send Feedback
Please let us know your ideas about ways to use The Space Place in your teaching. Send to info@spaceplace.nasa.gov.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

3 thoughts on “NASA Education Express — Jan. 9, 2014”

  1. hello:
    Very good article for its educational opportunities that give, I’m Chilean, should provide articles on education in Spanish for Latinos ….

    greetings.

  2. Would someone please explain to me why NASA or the commercial space industry , would waste our earth’s resoures by sending cargo ships to the ISS that are destroyed when they finish the mission of resupply ? PLEASE, Will someone stop this wasteful process when we have ways to do it and re-use the supplies and also return things to earth from the ISS.

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