NASA Education Express — Feb. 6, 2014

Check out the latest NASA Education opportunity announcements.

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

NES Web Seminar — Electrolysis of Water: Math and Science @ Work — A Breath of Fresh Air
Audience: 9-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Feb. 6, 2014, at 6:30 p.m. EST

2014 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge
Audience: 9-12 and Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Deadline for U.S. Teams: Feb. 7, 2014

2014 NASA Student Airborne Research Program
Audience: Junior Year Undergraduate Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 7, 2014

2014 NASA Aeronautics Academy at NASA’s Langley Research Center
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 7, 2014

National Air and Space Museum Super Science Saturday Events
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: Feb. 8, 2014

Free Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series
Audience: All Educators and 9-Higher Education Students
Next Lecture Date: Feb. 8, 2014, at 5:15 p.m. EST

2014-15 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Undergraduate STEM Research Scholarship
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 10, 2014

2014-15 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Graduate STEM Research Fellowship
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 10, 2014

NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowships Program Accepting Proposals for 2014-2015 Academic Year
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Proposal Deadline: Feb. 10, 2014

Free Education Webinar Series from NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: K-8 and Informal Educators
Event Dates: Feb. 11-12, 2014

NES Web Seminar — Engineering Design: Forces and Motion — Balloon Aerodynamics Challenge
Audience: 6-8 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Feb. 12, 2014, at 6:30 p.m. EST

NES Web Seminar — Ultraviolet Radiation and Yeast: Radiation Biology
Audience: 9-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Feb. 13, 2014, at 6:30 p.m. EST

NASA Space Technology Grants for Early Career University Faculty
Audience: Higher Education Students
Notice of Intent Deadline: Feb. 14, 2014
Proposal Deadline: March 14, 2014

Call for Abstracts: 65th International Astronautical Congress
Audience: Full-time Graduate Students
Submission Deadline: Feb. 21, 2014

NASA’s REEL Science Communication Contest
Audience: 9-12 Educators and Students
Deadline: Feb. 21, 2014

NASA Research Opportunities in Aeronautics
Audience: Higher Education Community
Proposals Due Dates Begin No Sooner Than Feb. 28, 2014

Workshop: International Space Station Research Results and Post-Graduate Research Opportunities
Audience: Graduate Students and Post-Doctoral Fellows and Advisors
Workshop Date: March 2, 2014

American Meteorological Society’s Project Atmosphere Workshop
Audience: K-12 Science Educators Who Teach Atmospheric Content
Application Deadline: March 28, 2014
Workshop Dates: July 13-25, 2014

RockOn 2014 University Rocket Science Workshop
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Deadline: May 2, 2014
Workshop Dates: June 14-19, 2014

2014 NASA Unmanned Aerial Systems Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Students and Faculty
Entry Deadline: May 2, 2014

NASA Exploration Design Challenge
Audience: K-12 Educators and Students
Virtual Crew Registration Deadline: June 30, 2014

2014 Lunar Workshop for Educators
Audience: 6-9 Educators
Workshop Dates: July 14-18, 2014

Send Your Name to the Asteroid Bennu!
Audience: Educators and Students Worldwide
Deadline: Sept. 30, 2014

New Education Publications Available from the National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science
Audience: All Educators

Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

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NES Web Seminar — Electrolysis of Water: Math and Science @ Work — A Breath of Fresh Air

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, NASA Explorer Schools and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on Feb. 6, 2014, at 6:30 p.m. EST. Learn how to implement a chemistry lab activity called “A Breath of Fresh Air.” During the activity, your students create their own electrolysis apparatus to generate oxygen and use a Texas Instruments TI-Nspire calculator to collect data. The featured student activity provides many opportunities for incorporating national science, technology, and mathematics learning standards into the curricula and addressing high school Next Generation Science Standards. Note: You do not need to have a TI-Nspire calculator during this professional development.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES4/webseminar8.aspx

This is the only time this Web seminar will be offered during the current school year.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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2014 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge

NASA is seeking high school and college/university student teams to compete in the NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge (formerly NASA’s Great Moonbuggy Race). In this engineering design challenge that begins in the classroom, students work with teacher advisors to create a human-powered vehicle designed to traverse the simulated surface of another world while meeting certain NASA specifications. Student teams of up to six members are challenged to design, build and test technologies that enable vehicles to perform in a wide variety of environments.

The culminating event of the rover competition is scheduled for April 10-12, 2014, at the U. S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Ala., home of U.S. Space Camp and the official visitor center for NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The student teams will be timed, ranked and scored based on design, safety and how well they traverse the set course, which is a rugged half mile track of 15 obstacles meant to mimic some of the real terrain challenges of solar system exploration.

Corporate sponsors will award prizes for first, second and third place winners in both high school and college/university categories. Other prizes include a Featherweight Award, System Safety Design Award and a Telemetry/Electronics Award.

U.S. teams must register by Feb. 7, 2014.

For more information about the competition and to register online, visit https://www.nasa.gov/roverchallenge/home/index.html.

International teams with questions about this event or registration may email Amy McDowell at Amy.McDowell@nasa.gov. U.S. teams with questions may contact Diedra Williams at MSFC-RoverChallenge2014@mail.nasa.gov.

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2014 NASA Student Airborne Research Program

The NASA Airborne Science Program invites highly motivated undergraduate students currently in their junior year to apply for the 2014 NASA Student Airborne Research Program, also known as SARP. The program provides students with hands-on research experience in all aspects of a major scientific campaign, from detailed planning on how to achieve mission objectives to formal presentation of results and conclusions to peers and others. Students will assist in the operation of airborne instruments onboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft.

The program takes place in summer 2014. Preparatory information and data analysis will take place at the University of California, Irvine. Instrument and flight preparations, and the research flights themselves, will occur at NASA’s Dryden Aircraft Operations Facility in Palmdale, Calif.

Successful applicants will be awarded a stipend and meals allowance for eight weeks of participation in the program. Round-trip travel to California, housing and transportation will be provided.

The deadline for applications is Feb. 7, 2014.

For more information and to download the program application, visit http://www.nserc.und.edu/sarp/sarp-2014.

Specific questions about the program should be directed to SARP2014@nserc.und.edu.

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2014 NASA Aeronautics Academy at NASA’s Langley Research Center

The NASA Aeronautics Academy offers a 10-week summer experience for college students with emphasis on integrated systems research and training. Activities include laboratory research, subject matter lectures and technical presentations. Students learn how a NASA center functions, gain experience in research laboratories and participate in leadership development and team-building activities.

To be eligible to apply, students must be undergraduate juniors or seniors or early graduate level in an accredited U.S. college or university. Applicants must be U.S. citizens aged 18 or over. Applications are due Feb 7, 2014.

For more information, including instruction for submitting an application, visit http://aero.larc.nasa.gov/langley-aero-academy/.

Questions about this opportunity should be emailed to Elizabeth.b.ward@nasa.gov.

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National Air and Space Museum Super Science Saturday Events

Join the National Air and Space Museum on the second Saturday of each month for Super Science Saturday at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va. Through demonstrations and hands-on activities, visitors of all ages will become immersed in science, technology, engineering and mathematics topics related to aviation and space exploration. Each event takes place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Eastern Time. Admission is free, and parking is $15.

Upcoming topics include:

Feb. 8, 2014 — Scientists & Inventors
March 8, 2014 — Space Exploration

For more information, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/superscience/.

Questions about this series of lectures should be directed to nasmpubliclectures@si.edu.

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Free Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series

Curious about our nearest star, water on Mars, the first trip to Pluto and other wonders of the universe? Come to the Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series presented by Smithsonian researchers who are exploring the sun, the moon, planets, stars, galaxies and the universe. These speakers will share behind-the-scenes details about how their research is done and technologies that advance new discoveries. The lectures will be held at the Albert Einstein Planetarium at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.

Each lecture begins at 5:15 p.m. ET and is followed by a question-and-answer session. A Discovery Station activity will take place at 4 p.m. prior to each lecture. Stay after the lecture to visit the museum’s observatory, weather permitting.

Feb. 8, 2014 — On-Orbit Observing: An Astronaut’s View of Our Universe
Astronauts have played an important role in astronomy since 1962. Learn how, as in-orbit surrogate astronomers, they provide images and impressions of astronomical sights and events beyond Earth’s atmosphere. Museum specialist Jennifer Levasseur will discuss in-orbit astronomical observations.

Feb. 22, 2014 — How to Color the Universe
Pink planets? Green galaxies? Purple blobs? Take a colorful tour of the multiwavelength universe with telescopic data. Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory’s Kim Arcand and Megan Watzke will discuss how images are made, and how we perceive and understand them.

March 8, 2014 — Rediscovering the Milky Way
We know more about the structure of other galaxies than our own. Alyssa Goodman, professor of astronomy at Harvard University, will discuss how the Milky Way would look if viewed from another galaxy and why this is important.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/lectures/smithsonian-stars/.

Questions about this lecture series should be directed to the visitor service line at 202-633-1000.

The Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series is made possible by a grant from NASA.

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2014-15 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Undergraduate STEM Research Scholarship

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium is offering undergraduate research scholarships of up to $8,500 to encourage talented individuals to conduct research in science, technology, engineering or mathematics, or STEM, fields.

Applicants must participate in an active faculty-mentored research experience that aligns with the aerospace sector and meets NASA’s mission. Student stipends and research support totaling $4,000 during the academic year and $4,500 during a summer semester are available.

These one-year awards are nonrenewable and based on student academic merit, quality of the research proposal and alignment of research with the goals of NASA and the aerospace sector. Underrepresented minority students, female students and students with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and enrolled at one of the five Virginia Space Grant member universities: The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia and Virginia Tech.

The deadline for submitting applications is Feb.10, 2014.

For more information, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/undergrad/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to rkashiri@odu.edu.

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2014-15 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Graduate STEM Research Fellowship

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium’s Graduate STEM Research Fellowship Program provides fellowships of $5,000 in add-on support to graduate students to supplement and enhance basic research support. The objective of this science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, research fellowship opportunity is to encourage talented individuals to pursue careers in STEM industries that support NASA’s mission.

Participants in the Graduate STEM Research Fellowship Program must take part in an active faculty-mentored research experience that aligns with the aerospace sector and meets NASA’s mission. Awards are made annually and are renewable for one year for students making satisfactory academic and research progress.

This is a competitive fellowship program, and awards are based on merit recognizing high academic achievement and promise. Underrepresented minority students, female students and students with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and enrolled at one of the five Virginia Space Grant member universities: The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia and Virginia Tech.

The deadline for submitting applications is Feb.10, 2014.

For more information about this opportunity and to apply online, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/gradfellow/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to rkashiri@odu.edu.

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NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowships Program Accepting Proposals for 2014-2015 Academic Year

The NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, or NESSF, is soliciting applications from accredited U.S. universities on behalf of individuals pursuing master’s or doctoral degrees in earth and space sciences, or related disciplines, for the 2014-2015 academic year. The purpose of NESSF is to ensure continued training of a highly qualified workforce in disciplines needed to achieve NASA’s scientific goals. Awards resulting from the competitive selection will be training grants to the respective universities, with the advisor serving as the principal investigator. The financial support for the NESSF program comes from the Science Mission Directorate’s four science divisions: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Planetary Science and Astrophysics.

Initially, NESSF awards are made for one year. They may be renewed for no more than two additional years, contingent upon satisfactory progress (as reflected in academic performance, research progress and recommendation by the faculty advisor) and the availability of funds.

The maximum amount of a NESSF award is $30,000 per year.

Proposals for this opportunity are due Feb. 10, 2014.

For more information about this solicitation, visit http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId={95EC29B1-C074-F67B-F246-79B14642063D}&path=open.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to:

For Earth Science, Claire Macaulay at Claire.I.Macaulay@nasa.gov.

For Heliophysics, Planetary Science and Astrophysics, Dolores Holland at hq-nessf-Space@nasa.gov.

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Free Education Webinar Series from NASA Educator Professional Development

NASA Educator Professional Development is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources to bring NASA into your classroom.

Our Solar System: A Model Overview
Audience:
Grades 4-8 Pre-service and In-service Educators
Event Date:
Feb. 11, 2014, at 4:30 p.m. EST
Attend this 90-minute Web seminar to explore our solar system through NASA missions and STEM activities.

Rocket Scientists Write?
Audience:
K-12, Education Administrators, In-service, Pre-service, Informal and Home School Educators
Event Date: Feb. 12, 2014, at 6:30 p.m. EST
During this 60-minute webinar, participants will learn about language arts activities and lessons that utilize NASA materials found within NASA educator guides. Session materials will cover reading comprehension and composition.

For more information about these webinars and to register online, visit https://paragon-tec.adobeconnect.com/admin/show-event-catalog.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to John Entwistle at john.d.entwistle@nasa.gov.

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NES Web Seminar — Engineering Design: Forces and Motion — Balloon Aerodynamics Challenge

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on Feb. 12, 2014, at 6:30 p.m. EST. This Web seminar will introduce the Forces and Motion: Balloon Aerodynamics Challenge for students. This activity provides first-hand information about density, neutral buoyancy and drag, which is then used to solve a problem. The activity provides opportunities for incorporating national science, technology and mathematics learning standards into the curriculum and addresses middle school Next Generation Science Standards.

This is the last time this seminar will be offered during the current school year.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES4/webseminar16.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to the NES Help Desk at NASA.Explorer.Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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NES Web Seminar — Ultraviolet Radiation and Yeast: Radiation Biology

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on Feb. 13, 2014 at 6:30 p.m. EST.

The student activity featured in this seminar demonstrates the effects of radiation on living organisms. Learn how sun-screening materials protect live yeast cells from harmful ultraviolet, or UV, radiation, learn countermeasures for UV radiation and discuss phenotypic changes in yeast as a result of radiation damage. Also see how you can expand the range of items tested in this lab by using different sun protection materials. Use this activity to establish a connection for your students between science and a real-world situation. The activity provides opportunities for incorporating national science, technology and mathematics learning standards into the curricula and addresses high school Next Generation Science Standards.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES4/webseminar30.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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NASA Space Technology Grants for Early Career University Faculty

NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate is seeking proposals from accredited U.S. universities on behalf of outstanding early career faculty members who are beginning their independent careers. The grants will sponsor research in specific, high-priority areas of interest to America’s space program.

NASA expects to award about five grants this fall, funded up to $200,000 each per year for as many as three years, based on the merit of proposals and availability of funds. Funded research will investigate unique, disruptive or transformational space technologies in areas such as soft machines for robotic mobility and manipulation, science-based digital materials and manufacturing, and low -size, -weight and -power lasers.

Notices of intent to submit proposals to the Early Career Faculty Appendix of NASA’s Research Announcement “Space Technology Research, Development, Demonstration and Infusion 2014 (SpaceTech-REDDI-2014)” are due Feb. 14, 2014. The deadline for submitting final proposals is March 14, 2014.

For information on the solicitation, including specific technology areas of interest and how to submit notices of intent and proposals, visit http://tinyurl.com/kcglhca.

This solicitation is part of NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate, which is responsible for innovating, developing, testing and flying hardware for use in future missions. For more information about the directorate and Space Technology Research Grants Program, visit https://www.nasa.gov/spacetech.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to Bonnie F. James at HQ-STMD-SpaceTech-REDDI-2013@nasa.gov.

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Call for Abstracts: 65th International Astronautical Congress

NASA announces its intent to participate in the 65th International Astronautical Congress (IAC) and requests that full-time graduate students attending U.S. universities or colleges respond to this “Call for Abstracts.” The IAC — which is organized by the International Astronautical Federation (IAF), the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA), and the International Institute of Space Law (IISL) — is the largest space-related conference worldwide and selects an average of 1,000 scientific papers every year. The upcoming IAC will be held Sept. 29 – Oct. 3, 2014, in Toronto, Canada. NASA’s participation in this event is an on-going effort to continue to bridge NASA with the astronautical and space international community.

This “Call for Abstracts” is a precursor to a subsequent submission of a final paper, which may be presented at the 65th IAC. Student authors are invited to submit an abstract regarding an original, unpublished paper that has not been submitted in any other forum. A NASA technical review panel of scientists and/or officials will select abstracts. Many students and professors are involved in NASA-related research. Persons submitting abstracts are strongly encouraged to seek advice from their research advisors, professors who are conducting NASA research, and/or from NASA scientists and engineers.

Abstract Preparation:
— Abstracts must be 400 words or less.
— Abstracts must be written in English.
— Abstracts cannot include formulas, tables or drawings.
— Select the Symposium and Session in which you wish to post the abstract. Please view the IAC brochure at http://www.iafastro.com/index.php/events/iac/iac-2014 and select “IAC 2014 call for papers” for list of sessions and more details.

Abstracts must be related to NASA’s ongoing vision for space exploration and fit into one of the following categories:
— Science and Exploration — Systems sustaining missions including life, microgravity, space exploration, space debris and Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence (SETI)
Applications and Operations — On-going and future operational applications, including Earth observation, communication, navigation, human space endeavors and small satellites
Technology — Common technologies to space systems including astrodynamics, structures, power and propulsion
Infrastructures — Systems sustaining space missions including space system transportation, future systems and safety
Space and Society — Interaction of space with society including education, policy and economics, history and law

The full text of the abstract must be submitted electronically in the prescribed format to the IAC website (www.iafastro.org) no later than Feb. 24, 2014, and to NASA by Feb. 21, 2014.

If you have a question or concern about how to submit your abstract to NASA, please email abstract@nasaprs.com and you will receive a response within two (2) business days.

NOTE: Abstracts are due to the IAF by Feb. 24, 2014. Applicants must be selected by the IAF to be eligible for sponsorship by NASA. However, all IAF accepted applicants may not be sponsored by NASA.

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NASA’s REEL Science Communication Contest

So you want to be a NASA producer? NASA is looking for talented high school students to create videos that engage younger students in earth science.

Students are consuming over 10 hours of media each day, and video is increasingly important to reach and engage this audience about science. NASA is hosting the second annual video contest, challenging high school students to produce a two-minute video for middle school students. The videos should communicate one of the following science concepts: how climate impacts ice and ice impacts climate, forest fire effects on air quality or water of the water planet.

Winning videos will be posted on NASA’s website. Winners will also get the opportunity to be a NASA producer working with NASA scientists and communication experts in July 2014 to produce an earth science feature video.

The deadline for submitting videos is Feb. 21, 2014.

For more information and instructions for submitting a video, visit http://reelscience.gsfc.nasa.gov/.

Questions about this contest should be emailed to Tassia Owen at tassia.owen@nasa.gov.

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NASA Research Opportunities in Aeronautics

NASA’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate is seeking proposals from higher education institutions that are interested in conducting research related to a variety of topics in aeronautics fundamental research that are being pursued by NASA personnel. Awards will be made as grants, cooperative agreements or contracts, depending on the nature of the proposing organization and/or program requirements.

Proposals related to five specific aeronautics topics are being accepted: (1) Fundamental Aeronautics Program, (2) Aviation Safety Program, (3) Airspace Systems Program, (4) Integrated Systems Research Program and (5) Aeronautics Strategy and Management Program.

Proposal due dates begin Feb. 28, 2014 and end Dec. 31, 2014.

For more information, visit http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId=%7b278524A1-D118-6CFB-0FCD-799EE6C88320%7d&path=open .

Questions about this solicitation should be directed to Susan Minor at NASA-roa@nasa.gov.

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Workshop: International Space Station Research Results and Post-Graduate Research Opportunities

NASA’s Space Life and Physical Sciences Division and the International Space Station Program Office are sponsoring a workshop at the American Physical Society’s March Meeting 2014 in Denver, Colo. The workshop, titled International Space Station Research Results and Post-Graduate Opportunities in Physical Science, will take place on March 2, 2014, from 1:30 – 6 p.m. CST.

The purpose of this workshop is to allow members of the American Physical Society, and in particular, students and post-doctoral students, to gain some familiarity with the interesting gravity-dependent phenomena that have been discovered from physical sciences research carried out on the International Space Station, or ISS. Presenters will cover recent results from experiments in fluid physics, complex fluids and combustion science.

The workshop will provide a better understanding of existing and planned ISS research capabilities and current funding opportunities for graduate students. Attendees will have an opportunity to interact with NASA flight experiment principal investigators and ISS Program Office staff in a panel discussion at the conclusion of the session. A noteworthy participant will be an ISS astronaut with experience in operating physical sciences experiments on the space station.

For more information, visit http://www.aps.org/meetings/march/events/iss.cfm.

This event is free for attendees and registration is not required.

Questions about the workshop should be directed to Dr. Camille Alleyne at camille.alleyne@nasa.gov or Dr. Fred Kohl at fred.j.kohl@nasa.gov.

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American Meteorological Society’s Project Atmosphere Workshop

Project Atmosphere is a two-week workshop offered by the American Meteorological Society. Designed for K-12 educators who teach science courses with atmospheric content, this workshop will introduce participants to the latest technologies and techniques for sensing, analyzing and forecasting weather. Each participant will be supplied with a variety of instructional resource materials, including those to be used in peer-led teacher training sessions.

The workshop will take place July 13-25, 2014, at the National Weather Service Training Center in Kansas City, Mo. Applications are due March 28, 2014.

For more information, visit http://www.ametsoc.org/amsedu/Proj_ATM/projatm.html.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to amsedu@ametsoc.org.

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RockOn 2014 University Rocket Science Workshop

University and community college faculty and students are invited to a weeklong workshop to learn how to build and launch a scientific experiment into space. NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia is hosting the RockOn 2014 workshop June 14-19, 2014, in partnership with the Colorado and Virginia Space Grant Consortia. Workshop participants must be U.S. citizens. The registration deadline for the workshop is May 2, 2014.

The hands-on workshop teaches participants to build experiments that fly on sounding rockets. During the week, participants will work in teams of three to construct and integrate a sounding rocket payload from a kit. On the fifth day of the workshop, the experiments will fly on a sounding rocket expected to reach an altitude of more than 70 miles.

Each experiment will provide valuable scientific data, analyzed as part of the student-led science and engineering research. The program engages faculty and students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics skills critical to NASA’s future engineering, scientific and technical missions.

Register before April 4, 2014, and save $50 on workshop registration.

For more information about RockOn and to register online, visit http://spacegrant.colorado.edu/rockon/.

Questions about the workshop or the registration process should be directed to Chris Koehler by email at koehler@colorado.edu or by telephone at 303-492-4750.

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2014 NASA Unmanned Aerial Systems Challenge

NASA invites college teams to take part in the 2014 NASA Aeronautics Mission Directorate’s Unmanned Aerial Systems Challenge. Students are invited to propose a high-altitude, long-endurance unmanned aerial system to track hurricanes. Design assessment will be based on projected effectiveness, cost, innovation and ease of use and operation inside the National Air Space.

The contest is open to teams of full-time students enrolled in higher education institutions of the United States or its territories. This category includes universities, colleges, trade schools, community colleges, professional schools, etc. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

A notice of intent will be accepted through March 1, 2014. Final entries are due May 2, 2014.

For more information and a complete list of rules, visit http://aero.larc.nasa.gov/university-contest/.

Questions about the challenge should be directed to Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.

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NASA Exploration Design Challenge

Students from Kindergarten through 12th grade will have the opportunity to play a unique role in the future of human spaceflight through participation in NASA’s Exploration Design Challenge, or EDC. NASA EDC invites students around the world to think and act like scientists in order to overcome one of the major hurdles of deep space long-duration exploration — the dangers associated with space radiation. Students taking part in the challenge will discover how to plan and design improved radiation shielding aboard the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle, currently being developed by NASA, Lockheed Martin and other partners to carry astronauts to space, venturing farther than humans have ever gone before.

Through a series of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, engagement activities, students in grades K-8 will analyze different materials that simulate space radiation shielding and recommend materials that best block radiation and protect astronauts. Students in grades 9-12 will think and act like engineers as they apply what they learn to design shielding to protect a sensor on the Orion crew module from space radiation. After a review of the design solutions submitted by teams in the grades 9-12 challenge, five finalist teams will be selected and matched with a mentor from NASA to test their designs in a virtual simulator. The winning team will build a prototype radiation shield that will be analyzed and submitted to Lockheed Martin for flight certification on the inaugural flight of the Orion Exploration Flight Test, or EFT-1.

The five U.S. finalist teams from the grades 9-12 challenge will be invited to attend the EFT-1 launch, currently scheduled for November 2014. The names of all students, grades K-12, participating in the NASA EDC will fly aboard the spacecraft as honorary virtual crewmembers for Orion’s first flight. The deadline to register students for the virtual crew is June 30, 2014.

For more information and to register online, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/spacelife/explorationdesign/overview/index.html#.UdLvoBZU3dI.

For more information about Orion, visit https://www.nasa.gov/orion.

Email any questions about this opportunity to nasaedc@nianet.org.

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2014 Lunar Workshop for Educators

NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, mission is sponsoring a workshop for educators of students in grades 6-9. This workshop will focus on lunar science, exploration and how our understanding of the moon is evolving with the new data from current and recent lunar missions.

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has allowed scientists to measure the coldest known place in the solar system, map the surface of the moon in unprecedented detail and accuracy, find evidence of recent lunar geologic activity, characterize the radiation environment around the moon and its potential effects on future lunar explorers and much, much more!

Workshop participants will learn about these and other recent discoveries, reinforce their understanding of lunar science concepts, gain tools to help address common student misconceptions about the moon, interact with lunar scientists and engineers, work with LRO data and learn how to bring these data and information to their students using hands-on activities aligned with grades 6-9 National Science Education Standards and Benchmarks.

The workshop will take place July 14-18, 2014, at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. Workshop participants will have the opportunity to tour the LRO Mission Operation Center and the Goddard spacecraft testing facilities.

Participants will receive a $200 stipend to help offset travel expenses.

For more information and to register for the workshop, visit http://lunar.gsfc.nasa.gov/lwe/index.html.

Questions about this workshop should be directed to Brooke Hsu at Brooke.C.Hsu@nasa.gov.

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Send Your Name to the Asteroid Bennu!

NASA is inviting people around the world to submit their names to be etched on a microchip aboard a spacecraft headed to the asteroid Bennu in 2016.

The “Messages to Bennu!” microchip will travel to the asteroid aboard the Origins Spectral Interpretation Resource Identification Security Regolith Explorer, or OSIRIS-REx, spacecraft. The robotic mission will spend more than two years at the asteroid, which has a width of approximately 1,760 feet (500 meters). The spacecraft will collect a sample of Bennu’s surface and return it to Earth in a sample return capsule.

The deadline to submit names online is Sept. 30, 2014. Participants who submit their names to the “Messages to Bennu!” campaign will be able to print a certificate of appreciation to document their involvement.

For more information and to submit your name, visit http://planetary.org/bennu.

Participants who “follow” or “like” the mission on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/OSIRISREx) will receive updates on the location of their names in space from launch time until the asteroid samples return to Earth in 2023. Facebook fans also will receive mission progress and late-breaking news through regular status updates.

For more information about the OSIRIS-REx mission, visit https://www.nasa.gov/osiris-rex and http://osiris-rex.lpl.arizona.edu.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to tps@planetary.org.

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New Education Publications Available from the National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Two new education publications are now available from the National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

The Power of Partnerships: A Guide from the Graduate STEM Fellows in K-12 Education (GK-12) Program
This guide provides effective practices for anyone — university faculty, K-12 teachers, administrators and others — who wants to create a project that partners science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, professionals with K-12 teachers on a sustained basis. These recommendations came from the community of faculty members, graduate students, K-12 teachers, program managers and evaluators who participated in the National Science Foundation Graduate STEM Fellows in K-12 Education program from 1999 through 2012. While the focus in this volume is on STEM graduate students partnering with teachers, the ideas and strategies presented are useful for any groups developing teacher-scientist partnerships. To view an online version of the guide, visit http://www.gk12.org/2013/06/10/the-power-of-partnerships-a-guide-from-the-nsf-gk-12-program/. For a hard copy of the guide, contact Betty Calinger at bcalinge@aaas.org.

The Science Inside: Learning
This title from the acclaimed “Science Inside” book series is written in easy to understand and engaging text and provides an introduction to how people learn, from infancy to old age. Drawing upon what we have learned from exciting new research on learning and the brain, the book places the study of learning in an everyday context that makes it appropriate for a wide range of audiences, especially informal and formal educators and parents. Contact Betty Calinger at bcalinge@aaas.org.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

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