NASA Education Express — March 13, 2014

Check out the latest NASA Education opportunity announcements.

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Free Webinar Series — NASA STEM Mania: STEM in Sports
Audience: K-12 Educators
Next Webinar Date: March 13, 2014, at 4 p.m. EDT

Free Education Webinar Series from NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Next Webinar Date: March 13, 2014, at 6:30 p.m. EDT

American Meteorological Society’s Climate Studies Diversity Project
Audience: Faculty at Minority-Serving Institutions
Application Deadline: March 14, 2014

NASA Space Technology Grants for Early Career University Faculty
Audience: Higher Education Students
Proposal Deadline: March 14, 2014

2014 Space Life Sciences Training Program
Audience: Higher Education Educators
Application Deadline: March 15, 2014

Pennsylvania Space Grant Workshops
Audience: 6-12 Educators
Workshop Dates: Multiple dates July – August 2014
Application Deadline: March 16, 2014

Historical NASA Space Artifacts Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations
Request Deadline: March 17, 2014

2014-15 Virginia Space Grant Consortium STEM Bridge Scholarship
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: March 17, 2014

2014-15 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Community College STEM Scholarship
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: March 17, 2014

Celebrate Solar Week — Spring 2014
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Dates: March 17-21, 2014

NES Web Seminar — Engineering Design Challenge: Water Filtration
Audience: Grades 6-8 and Informal Educators
Event Date: March 18, 2014, at 7:30 p.m. EDT

“Ask NICE” Online Professional Development Series
Audience: K-12 Educators
Next Event Date: March 20, 2014, at 4 p.m. EDT

NES Web Seminar — Electromagnetic Spectrum: Remote Sensing Ices on Mars
Audience: 9-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: March 20, 2014, at 6:30 p.m.

Free NASA Online Course — Teaching Tomorrow’s Engineers
Audience: Grades 6-8 In-service, Pre-service, Informal and Home School Educators
Course Start Date: March 24, 2014

American Meteorological Society’s Project Atmosphere Workshop
Audience: K-12 Science Educators Who Teach Atmospheric Content
Application Deadline: March 28, 2014
Workshop Dates: July 13-25, 2014

NASA’s REEL Science Communication Contest
Audience: 9-12 Educators and Students
Deadline: March 31, 2014

Engineering for You Video Contest
Audience: All Educators and Students in Grades 6-College
Entry Deadline: March 31, 2014

Earth Observatory’s Tournament Earth 2014
Audience: All Educators and Students
Competition Dates: Through April 4, 2014

Center for Astronomy Education Teaching Excellence Workshops
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Event Dates: Multiple Dates May – September 2014

2014 Thacher Environmental Research Contest
Audience: 9-12 Students
Entry Deadline: May 5, 2014

What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website
Audience: K-6 Educators

Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

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Free Webinar Series — NASA STEM Mania: STEM in Sports

Kickoff your classroom activities with NASA STEM Mania: STEM in Sports! This series of free virtual educator professional development webinars will help you hit an education homerun. Discover ways that sports and NASA connect and energize your classroom with free student engagement opportunities.

Upcoming webinar events include:

How Is Bowling Connected to Mars?
March 13, 2014, at 4 – 5 p.m. EDT
Participants will learn about the links between the principles of an everyday sport — bowling — to the scientific principles used in the development of Mars rovers and landers.

Wash Out or Game On: Predicting Weather With Clouds
March 17, 2014, at 4 – 5 p.m. EDT
Discover how to use cloud types to predict weather through NASA’s Students’ Cloud Observations On-line program. Use NASA satellite data to plan sporting events in outdoor or indoor arenas depending on weather, climate and air quality.

Jump on Math: Stay Balanced
March 18, 2014, at 4 – 5 p.m. EDT
How does the mass of each planet in our solar system relate to gravitational force? Is there a difference between mass and weight? Jump on Earth and use math to calculate simulated jumps on each planet.

Mass vs. Weight: What’s the Big Difference Anyway?
March 19, 2014, at 4 – 5 p.m. EDT
Learn to use Newton’s Laws of Motion to investigate how objects with different masses behave and explore the difference between mass and weight on Earth and in space.

Engineering in Your Classroom
March 20, 2014, at 4 – 5 p.m. EDT
Participants will learn about engineering design and ways to integrate it into classes as both stand-alone and integrated lessons. We will discuss adaptations and a challenge to engineer basketball as a classroom example.

To register for these webinars, visit https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/dln/webcast/webcast.html.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Marilé Colón Robles at marile.colonrobles@nasa.gov.

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Free Education Webinar Series from NASA Educator Professional Development

NASA Educator Professional Development is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources to bring NASA into your classroom.

Understanding Our Sun Inside and Out
Audience:
Pre-service and in-service educators of grades 6-8
Event Date: March 13, 2014, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
During this 60-minute webinar, participants will learn about the structure of the sun and how to use NASA data to chart sunspot activity.

NASA Online Remote Sensing Resources for Use in the Classroom
Audience:
Pre-service and in-service educators of grades 5-8
Event Date:
March 18, 2014, at 6 p.m. EDT
Attend this 60-minute webinar to learn how to join the hundreds of teachers currently using NASA remote sensing technology in the classroom.

Webshop Facilitator Training
Audience:
Pre-service and in-service educators of grades 6-12
Event Date: March 19, 2014, at 2 p.m. EDT
During this 90-minute session, participants will learn how to be a facilitator for educator professional development webshops. Participants will be trained in preparation and roles of the facilitator during an event as well as possible pitfalls.

The Engineering Evolution: Question, Mathematics and Model
Audience:
Pre-service and in-service educators of grades 6-8
Event Date: March 20, 2014, at 4 p.m. EDT
During this 60-minute webinar, participants will learn an engaging hands-on activity that uses everyday materials to create a satellite model to demonstrate how NASA uses the engineering design process.

For more information about these webinars and to register online, visit https://paragon-tec.adobeconnect.com/admin/show-event-catalog.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to John Entwistle at john.d.entwistle@nasa.gov.

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American Meteorological Society’s Climate Studies Diversity Project

The American Meteorological Society, or AMS, in cooperation with NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA, invites faculty members at minority-serving institutions to apply for the AMS Climate Studies Diversity Project. Applicants must be from eligible institutions that plan to offer the full AMS climate studies course.

Project participants will have the opportunity to attend two expenses-paid workshops and will learn the latest in climate science and education from NASA, NOAA and university scientists.

The deadline for applications is March 14, 2014.

For more information, visit http://www.ametsoc.org/amsedu/online/climateinfo/diversity.html.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to onlineclimate@ametsoc.org.

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NASA Space Technology Grants for Early Career University Faculty

NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate is seeking proposals from accredited U.S. universities on behalf of outstanding early career faculty members who are beginning their independent careers. The grants will sponsor research in specific, high-priority areas of interest to America’s space program.

NASA expects to award about five grants this fall, funded up to $200,000 each per year for as many as three years, based on the merit of proposals and availability of funds. Funded research will investigate unique, disruptive or transformational space technologies in areas such as soft machines for robotic mobility and manipulation, science-based digital materials and manufacturing, and low -size, -weight and -power lasers.

The deadline to submit final proposals to the Early Career Faculty Appendix of NASA’s Research Announcement “Space Technology Research, Development, Demonstration and Infusion 2014 (SpaceTech-REDDI-2014)” is March 14, 2014.

For information on the solicitation, including specific technology areas of interest and how to submit notices of intent and proposals, visit http://tinyurl.com/kcglhca.

This solicitation is part of NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate, which is responsible for innovating, developing, testing and flying hardware for use in future missions. For more information about the directorate and Space Technology Research Grants Program, visit https://www.nasa.gov/spacetech.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to Bonnie F. James at HQ-STMD-SpaceTech-REDDI-2013@nasa.gov.

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2014 Space Life Sciences Training Program

Applications are currently being accepted for the 2014 Space Life Sciences Training Program at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif. This program provides junior- or senior-level undergraduate students with professional experience in space life science disciplines. The primary goal of this challenging 10-week summer program is to train the next generation of scientists and engineers, enabling NASA to meet future research and development challenges in the space life sciences.

Participants receive a stipend and housing accommodations for the summer. Applicants must maintain a 3.2 or higher grade point average and must be U.S. citizens.

The deadline for applications is March 15, 2014. Positions may be offered in early February, so students are encouraged to apply early.

For more information about this opportunity, visit http://spacebiosciences.arc.nasa.gov/slstp.

Inquiries about the Space Life Sciences Training Program should be directed to the Kristina Gibbs at kristina.gibbs@nasa.gov.

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Pennsylvania Space Grant Workshops

Keep pace with the latest science research, engage in standards-based classroom activities and explore ways to make science fun while working with Penn State faculty during these summer workshops for in-service science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, educators. Network with peers and earn graduate credits. Workshops are aligned with the national science education standards and Pennsylvania standards for science and technology.

All workshops take place on Penn State University Park campus facilities in Pennsylvania. Grants are awarded to all participants to cover lodging, parking and partial tuition.

Applications for all workshops are due March 16, 2014.

The Origins and Fate of Our Cosmos: Understanding Big Bang Cosmology (Grades 6-12) — July 21-25, 2014
Delve into the field of cosmology, the study of the universe as a whole. Learn what modern observational and theoretical work has shown about the origin, fate and nature of the universe. The pillars and successes of the Big Bang model will be examined in detail. Modern ideas about gravity, space and time will also be explored.
http://teachscience.psu.edu/workshops/cosmology.html

Hands-On Particle Astrophysics (Grades 9-12) — July 28 – Aug. 1, 2014
Participants will get a brief overview of modern particle physics and explore various astrophysics topics. Instructors will help participants build and use devices made from household materials to detect air showers generated by cosmic-ray protons.
http://teachscience.psu.edu/workshops/particle_astrophysics.html

Questions about the Pennsylvania Space Grant workshops should be directed to Alli Fox at spacegrant@psu.edu.

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Historical NASA Space Artifacts Available for Educational Use

NASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions, museums and other organizations to screen and request historical artifacts of significance to spaceflight. This is the 21st screening of artifacts since 2009.

Eligible schools, universities, museums, libraries and planetariums may view the artifacts and request specific items through March 17, 2014. Online registrations should include an assigned Department of Education number. Registration also can be made through the State Agency for Surplus Property (SASP) office in their state. For instructions, registration, and to view and make requests for artifacts online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/NASAWel.htm.

The artifacts are free of charge and are offered “as-is.” Organizations must cover shipping costs and any handling fees. Shipping fees on smaller items will be relatively inexpensive, while larger items may involve extensive disassembly, preparation, shipping and reassembly costs. NASA will work closely with eligible organizations to address any unique handling costs.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.

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2014-15 Virginia Space Grant Consortium STEM Bridge Scholarship

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium, or VSGC, is offering renewable scholarships to sophomore undergraduate students studying science, technology, engineering or mathematics, or STEM. The STEM Bridge Scholarships are $1,000 and are available to students who are U.S. citizens from any federally recognized minority group enrolled fulltime at one of the five VSGC member universities: The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia and Virginia Tech.

The STEM Bridge Program bridges students to future opportunities by mentoring and guiding them to future VSGC scholarships and NASA-related paid internships. The program encourages students to explore how their majors can apply to NASA’s Mission.

This is a competitive program, and awards are based on student academic merit, quality of interest essay as well as letters of recommendation from current college faculty who can attest to students’ interest in STEM areas.

The deadline for submitting applications is March 17, 2014.

For more information, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/Bridge/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to rkashiri@odu.edu.

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2014-15 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Community College STEM Scholarship

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium, or VSGC, encourages academically talented individuals to pursue studies and careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM. The VSGC is offering a limited number of scholarship opportunities to students majoring in STEM fields at any campus in the Virginia Community College System, or VCCS.

These $2,000 scholarships are competitive awards based on academic merit for students demonstrating an interest in NASA’s missions and STEM-related careers. The VSGC strongly supports students in technical career pathways who are preparing to transfer to institutions of higher learning while developing the essential skills for a competitive global workforce.

Underrepresented minority students, female students and students with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and enrolled in the VCCS.

The deadline for submitting applications is March 17, 2014.

For more information, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/ccstem/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to rkashiri@odu.edu.

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Celebrate Solar Week — Spring 2014

Solar Week, March 17-21, 2014, provides a weeklong series of Web-based educational classroom activities and games with a focus on the sun-Earth connection. Students in upper elementary, middle and high school students can learn about solar careers, sunspots, solar energy and solar storms through a series of activities, games and lessons.

Solar Week is ideal for students studying the solar system, the stars or astronomy in general. Many lessons are suitable for fun computer lab activities as well. After doing the activities, students can interact on the bulletin board with leading scientists at the forefront of sun-Earth research. Solar Week is great for learning about our nearest star, the sun.

To learn more and to register to participate, visit http://www.solarweek.org.

Questions about Solar Week may be emailed to solarweek@solarweek.org.

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NES Web Seminar — Engineering Design Challenge: Water Filtration

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminar on March 18, 2014, at 7:30 p.m. EDT. Get background information about water recycling on the International Space Station, and then see how to incorporate the information into an exciting hands-on, inquiry-based challenge requiring students to solve a problem. The featured student activity provides many opportunities for incorporating national science, technology and mathematics learning standards into the curriculum as well as addressing middle school Next Generation Science Standards.

This is the last time this Web seminar will be offered during the current school year.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES4/webseminar13.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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“Ask NICE” Online Professional Development Series

Join the NASA Innovations in Climate Education, or NICE, team for a series of Google Plus Hangout professional development sessions. Planned for the third Thursdays of upcoming months, the sessions will cover a variety of climate topics. This month’s webinar topic is:

Earth’s Energy Budget: Part II — March 20, 2014, at 4 p.m. EDT
This month’s webinar will build on the theme of Earth’s Energy Budget with an investigation into clouds and their role in Earth’s climate system. Participants will learn about resources from the Students’ Cloud Observations On-Line, or S’COOL, program that allows students to practice cloud identification and submit observations to NASA as citizen scientists. Participants will also take a closer look at posters and interactive features created using data from the CERES instrument that is aboard a variety of NASA satellites.

Certificates of professional development hours are available upon request. Additional session dates will be announced soon.

For more information, visit https://nice.larc.nasa.gov/asknice/. Questions about this series should be sent to Bonnie Murray at bonnie.murray@nasa.gov.

This series is sponsored by Minority University Research and Education Program and NICE, and is part of the Digital Learning Network program to expand the reach of NICE projects.

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NES Web Seminar — Electromagnetic Spectrum: Remote Sensing Ices on Mars

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute Web seminar on March 20, 2014, at 6:30 p.m. EDT. Learn how to use authentic NASA mission data to investigate the composition and distribution of ice in the high-latitude regions of Mars through analysis of visible light, infrared light and gamma rays. The seminar includes information about a unique student extension activity, where students access a free computer simulation illustrating how gamma rays are used to determine the chemical composition of Mars.

The featured activity provides many opportunities for incorporating national science, technology and mathematics learning standards into the curriculum as well as addressing high school Next Generation Science Standards.

This is the last time this Web seminar will be offered during the current school year.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES4/webseminar9.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to the NES Help Desk at NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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Free NASA Online Course — Teaching Tomorrow’s Engineers

NASA Educator Professional Development and the National Science Teachers Association have joined forces to create and offer this first-of-its-kind online course for middle school educators. Participants can earn a certificate acknowledging 15 hours of effort. Graduate credit is available for a fee.

Module 1: Introduction to the Engineering Design Process
Event Dates:
March 26, March 31, April 7 and April 17, 2014

Module 2 (optional): Implementing the Engineering Design Process in Your Classroom
Event Dates:
April 21 and April 28, 2014

For more information about the course and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/online_courses/NEScourse.aspx.

Questions about this series opportunity should be directed to John Entwistle at john.d.entwistle@nasa.gov.

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American Meteorological Society’s Project Atmosphere Workshop

Project Atmosphere is a two-week workshop offered by the American Meteorological Society. Designed for K-12 educators who teach science courses with atmospheric content, this workshop will introduce participants to the latest technologies and techniques for sensing, analyzing and forecasting weather. Each participant will be supplied with a variety of instructional resource materials, including those to be used in peer-led teacher training sessions.

The workshop will take place July 13-25, 2014, at the National Weather Service Training Center in Kansas City, Mo. Applications are due March 28, 2014.

For more information, visit http://www.ametsoc.org/amsedu/Proj_ATM/projatm.html.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to amsedu@ametsoc.org.

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NASA’s REEL Science Communication Contest

So you want to be a NASA producer? NASA is looking for talented high school students to create videos that engage younger students in earth science.

Students are consuming over 10 hours of media each day, and video is increasingly important to reach and engage this audience about science. NASA is hosting the second annual video contest, challenging high school students to produce a two-minute video for middle school students. The videos should communicate one of the following science concepts: how climate impacts ice and ice impacts climate, forest fire effects on air quality or water of the water planet.

Winning videos will be posted on NASA’s website. Winners will also get the opportunity to be a NASA producer working with NASA scientists and communication experts in July 2014 to produce an earth science feature video.

The deadline for submitting videos is March 31, 2014.

For more information and instructions for submitting a video, visit http://reelscience.gsfc.nasa.gov/.

Questions about this contest should be emailed to Tassia Owen at tassia.owen@nasa.gov.

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Engineering for You Video Contest

In celebration of its upcoming 50th anniversary, the National Academy of Engineering, or NAE, is launching the Engineering for You, or E4U, video contest to highlight the impact that engineering has or will have on society.

In the last 50 years, engineering achievements include helping to land astronauts on the moon, creating the Internet and decoding the human genome. What will engineering create in the next 50 years? Rev up your creativity, pull out your camera or phone and produce a one- to two-minute video showing the world how you see engineering enhancing quality of life and serving the needs of society.

The video must highlight a period during the years 1964-2064. The main prize is $25,000, and videos will be accepted through March 31, 2014.

For more information, visit www.e4uvideocontest.org.

Questions about the E4U Video Contest should be directed to E4Uvideocontest@nae.edu.

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Earth Observatory’s Tournament Earth 2014

Thirty-two Earth images will vie for the title, but only one will be the winner! From March 3 through April 4, 2014, visitors to NASA’s Earth Observatory website can vote for their favorite images from 2013, whittling them down each week in a tournament of remote-sensing science. The competition is divided into four categories: data, art, event and photograph.

Voting takes place online. A printable bracket is also available to let you pick your favorites and track your selections as the competition progresses.

To get started, visit http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/TournamentEarth/.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Kevin Ward at kevin.a.ward@nasa.gov.

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Center for Astronomy Education Teaching Excellence Workshops

NASA’s Center for Astronomy Education, or CAE, announces a series of educator workshops for astronomy and space science educators.

These workshops provide participants with experiences needed to create effective and productive active-learning classroom environments. Workshop leaders model best practices in implementing many different classroom-tested instructional strategies. But more importantly, workshop participants will gain first-hand experience implementing these proven strategies. During many microteaching events, you will have the opportunity to role-play the parts of student and instructor. You will assess and critique each other’s implementation in real time as part of a supportive learning community. You will have the opportunity to use unfamiliar teaching techniques in collaboration with mentors before using them with your students. CAE is funded through NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s Exoplanet Exploration Program.

May 3, 2014 — Oceanside, Calif.
CAE Southwest Regional Teaching Exchange

May 31-June 1, 2014 — Boston, Mass.
CAE Tier I Teaching Excellence Workshop for Current and Future Astronomy and Space Science Instructors

June 23-27, 2014 — College Park, Md.
New Faculty Workshop for Physics and Astronomy

August or September, 2014 — South Carolina
CAE Tier I Teaching Excellence Workshop for Current and Future Astronomy and Space Science Instructors

For more information and to register for workshops online, visit http://astronomy101.jpl.nasa.gov/workshops/index.cfm.

Inquiries about this series of workshops should be directed to Gina Brissenden at gbrissenden@as.arizona.edu.

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2014 Thacher Environmental Research Contest

The Institute for Global Environmental Strategies is pleased to invite U.S. high school students to participate in the 2014 Thacher Environmental Research Contest. This annual contest gives students the opportunity to show off their science and technology skills by submitting research projects focused on the use of remote sensing and analysis tools. Students are asked to identify a U.S. protected area of interest, and design a research project that identifies why the area is unique, why it significantly contributes to our society, how this area has changed over time, and ways remote sensing and geospatial tools can be used to monitor these environmental treasures.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens in grades 9-12. Students in public, private, parochial, Native American reservation and home schools are eligible. Entries may be submitted by individuals or teams. The grand prize winner will have their work featured in a geospatial publication. Cash awards will be given to students in the top three places. Awards will also be given to the winning students’ teachers.

Entries must be postmarked by May 5, 2014. Entries may also be submitted electronically.

For full contest rules and to enter, visit http://strategies.org/education/student-contests/thacher-contest/.

Questions about this contest should be emailed to ThacherContest@strategies.org.

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What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website

The Space Place prides itself on its ability to be useful to educators — informal and formal alike. In an effort to reach as wide an audience as possible, we have made our popular make-and-do activities available in a print-ready, downloadable PDF format. This enables educators with more students than computers to run these fun, educational activities without limitation. Check it out at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/make-do-pdf.

What’s New? The Lone Planet
What makes a planet a planet? In our own solar system we have a pretty clear definition — something that orbits our sun, and is large enough to have its gravity mold it into a sphere and clear out any objects floating around nearby. But what about outside our solar system? A recent discovery of a lonely planet hovering around in space without a star to call its sun makes classifying planets less straightforward. The Space Place tackles this new discovery and the debate about planethood with two new articles: http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/lone-planet and http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/planet-what-is.

Space Place en Español: Comet Quest
Not only is our popular game “Comet Quest” updated and better than ever. We also have a new Spanish version of the game on Space Place en Español. You get to land a rover on a comet and collect and transmit as much data as possible as you command a comet orbiter faced with an increasing number of challenges. http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/comet-quest/sp/

Spotlight on YouTube
The Space Place now has its own YouTube channel. Be sure to check for updates frequently. Not only will the channel be highlighting our popular “Space Place in a Snap” videos, but it will also feature our popular “Space Place Live” animated series re-released in honor of the series’ 10-year anniversary. https://www.youtube.com/user/nasaspaceplace

For the Classroom
We have created a new informational brochure that would be a great addition to any classroom. Interested in knowing a little bit more about the things in our solar system that are not our sun or the planets? Find out what these smaller bodies tell us about our cosmic neighborhood’s formation. Check out and download “Small Worlds, Big Discoveries” for your classroom today! http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/posters/en/#small-bodies

For Outside the Classroom
Snow day or heavy rain got you stuck inside? Why not give Space Place’s latest make-and-do activity a try. In this activity, you get to be the chief engineer for your own NASA mission. You will design a satellite, and all the choices will be yours. We provide some suggestions in terms of materials (both edible and not edible), outline some of the basic requirements of a NASA satellite and provide some examples of both real satellites and satellite models. http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/build-a-spacecraft

Special Days

March 14: Albert Einstein’s Birthday and Pi Day
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Not only was Einstein born on this day in 1875, but the day coincides with another very math-related holiday — Pi Day (π = 3.14 = March 14th)! Learn more about Einstein here: http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/what-is-gravity.

April 1: April Fool’s Day.
At least teach your nose not to be fooled! http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/e-nose

April 12: First Space Shuttle Launched in 1981.
See pictures of space shuttle launches and landings. http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/gallery-technology/#rockets

April 22: Earth Day.
Play “Missions to Planet Earth,” an online card game. http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/earth-card-game/

April 27: Tell a Story Day.
Read a couple of the storybooks on The Space Place, and then make up your own story about space! http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/menu/storybook

Share
Want some help spreading the word about NASA’s Space Place? Check out http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/share.

Send Feedback
Please let us know your ideas about ways to use The Space Place in your teaching. Send to info@spaceplace.nasa.gov.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

2 thoughts on “NASA Education Express — March 13, 2014”

  1. The Space Place prides itself on its ability to be useful to educators — informal and formal alike. In an effort to reach as wide an audience as possible, we have made our popular make-and-do activities available in a print-ready, downloadable PDF format.

  2. When thinking about gathering more light to be able to see farther into deep space it would be beneficial to have some well placed reflective panels that can be adjusted on a grander scale that would almost look like light going through a magnifying glass combined with an equally powerful scope it would have endless possibilities for how far we could see into space with a greater clarity. The scope itself could be attached to the space station with remote view from earth and the capability of mechanical adjustments from the astronauts living on the space station.

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