NASA Education Express — Feb. 11, 2016

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.
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New This Week!
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Join STEM on Station for #mISSionimaginaTIon — Design Challenge #2
Audience: Grades 6-12 Educators and Students

Free NASA Educator Professional Development Webinars
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: Feb. 11, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EST

NASA Internships, Fellowships and Scholarships Online Fair
Audience: Higher Education Educators, Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Event Date: Feb. 17, 2016, from 1- 4:30 p.m. EST

Institute of Museum and Library Services Grants: STEM Expert Facilitation of Family Learning in Libraries and Museums
Audience: Libraries, Museums and Higher Education Institutions
Informational Webinars: Feb. 17 and 18, 2016
Application Deadline: May 1, 2016

NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellowships
Audience: Graduate Students and Ph.D. Scientists
Next Application Deadline: March 1, 2016

2016 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Promotion and Research Challenge
Audience: Students in Grades 3-12
Entry Deadline: March 8, 2016

Call for Proposals — NASA Research Announcement for Use of the NASA Physical Sciences Informatics System: Appendix B
Audience: Graduate Students
Proposal Deadline: March 17, 2016

2016 NASA STEM Enhancement in Earth and Space Science Internship
Audience: Current High School Sophomores and Juniors
Application Deadline: March 20, 2016

‘ISS: Science on Orbit’ Exhibit at U.S. Space & Rocket Center
Audience: All Educators and Students

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PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…
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Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators and 9-Higher Education Students
Next Lecture Date: Feb. 11, 2016, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)

2016 Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program
Audience: Undergraduate Students Majoring in Geology or a Related Science
Application Deadline: Feb. 12, 2016

Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy
Audience: Designed for Families With Children Ages 10 to 14, but Open to All
Next Event Date: Feb. 12, 2016, 10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. EST

Be an Astronaut! Apply Now for New Astronaut Candidate Class
Audience: All Educators and Graduate Students
Application Deadline: Mid-February 2016

2016 NASA Marshall Faculty Fellowship Program
Audience: Higher Education Educators
Application Deadline: Feb. 15, 2016

2016 NASA Glenn Faculty Fellowship Program
Audience: Higher Education Educators
Application Deadline: Feb. 15, 2016

National Space Biomedical Research Institute’s Mentored Research Program in Space Life Science
Audience: Students Pursuing Doctorate Degrees at Texas A&M University
Proposal Deadline: Feb. 15, 2016

2016 NASA Academy
Audience: Undergraduate and Graduate Students Who Are U.S. Citizens
Application Deadline: Feb. 16, 2016

2016 NASA Multidisciplinary Aeronautics Research Team Initiative
Audience: College Students Who Will Be Juniors, Seniors or Graduate Students in Fall 2016
Application Deadline: Feb. 16, 2016

“Where Over the World Is Astronaut Scott Kelly?” Geography From Space Trivia Contest
Audience: All Educators and Students
Deadline: Ongoing Through March 2016

National Park Service’s ‘Mosaics in Science’ Program
Audience: Undergraduate Students Ages 18-35 Years Old
Application Deadline: Feb. 19, 2016

Family Day Events at Smithsonian’s Air and Space Museum
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: Feb. 20, 2016

2016 Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships
Audience: Undergraduate Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 22, 2016

Google Plus Hangout Series: How to Survive in Space
Audience: All Educators and Students
First Event Date: Feb. 23, 2016, 9 – 10 a.m. EST

Call for Papers: 2016 International Space Station Research and Development Conference
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Abstract Submission Deadline: Feb. 25, 2016

Cassini Scientist for a Day Essay Contest
Audience: 5-12 Students
Entry Deadline: Feb. 26, 2016

‘Sky for All: Air Mobility for 2035 and Beyond’ Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Students and Faculty
Submission Deadline: Feb. 26, 2016

Call for Abstracts: 67th International Astronautical Congress
Audience: Full-time U.S. Graduate Students Attending U.S. Universities
Submission Deadline: Feb. 26, 2016

Library of Congress 2016 Summer Institutes — Teaching With Primary Sources
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: Feb. 29, 2016
Institute Dates: Multiple Dates in June and July 2016

2016 NASA Space Settlement Design Contest
Audience: K-12 Students
Entry Deadline: March 1, 2016

NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Seek Students for Climate Research Initiative

Audience: 9-12 and Undergraduate Students
Application Deadline: March 1, 2016

Now Accepting Applications for NASA Summer Internships
Audience: High School, Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Application Deadline: March 1, 2016

‘CineSpace’ Short Film Competition
Audience: All Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: July 31, 2016

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

Free “NASA’s Journey to Mars” Planetarium/Dome Show
Audience: All Formal and Informal Educators

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Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at https://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

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NEW THIS WEEK!
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Join STEM on Station for #mISSionimaginaTIon — Design Challenge #2

Do you like to talk trash? NASA and Texas Instruments present the second #mISSionImaginaTIon design challenge. We need your help to design a waste management plan for astronauts on a deep space mission.

To find out more about #mISSionimaginaTIon, visit www.missionimagination.com.

Learn more about this exciting opportunity and other ways you can bring the space station into your classroom by visiting NASA’s STEM on Station website. While you are there, stop by and learn more about the yearlong mission and how it is helping us on our #JourneytoMars. Opportunities, resources and more await at this space station-focused site!

To check out the website, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/STEMstation.

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Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Solar System and Beyond: Exploring Black Holes in Space
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-8
Event Date: Feb. 11, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EST
Explore black holes through NASA’s Space Math website for educators of grades 6-8. This STEM-based webinar uses NASA press releases, eClips videos, and math problems involving mathematical expressions. The content of this webinar is aligned with the NGSS: PS1, PS3, ESS1, and ESS2 and Common Core Math Standards. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/158868

Solar System and Beyond: Scale of Discovery
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades PK-12
Event Date: Feb. 16, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EST
Participants will learn about hands-on, standards-aligned activities that teach the concept of scale. Activities include using various-sized fruit to compare planet sizes and creating a scroll of the universe that shows the inner planets, outer planets and asteroid belt. Participants also will learn about the Dawn and New Horizons missions. The activities presented in this webinar address the NGSS ESS1, ESS2, and Common Core Math Standards. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/161484

Solar System and Beyond: Blue Marble Matches
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-10
Event Date: Feb. 17, 2016, at 6 p.m. EST
Explore the beauty of the dynamic images NASA has captured of Earth and other planets. Participants will learn about a matching game activity that introduces students to geologic processes on Earth. Through the activity, students learn how scientists use Earth to better understand other planetary bodies in the solar system. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/161616

Solar System and Beyond: Gravity-assisted Travel
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 3-6
Event Date: Feb. 18, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EST
Participants will explore Newton’s Laws through “Invisible Force,” an engineering design challenge activity for grades 3-6. Investigate gravity and magnetism using the engineering design process. The activities presented in this webinar are aligned to NGSS: PS1, PS3, ESS1 and ESS2. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/158873

For a full schedule of upcoming webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Please direct questions about this series of webinars to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.

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NASA Internships, Fellowships and Scholarships Online Fair

Launch your career with a NASA internship!

The NASA Internships, Fellowships and Scholarships Online Fair is scheduled on Feb. 17, 2016, from 1- 4:30 p.m. EST. Connect with NASA’s nine centers, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and NASA Headquarters. Engage with education program experts and former interns to learn about summer opportunities available across the agency.

Participating:
NASA Headquarters • Ames Research Center • Armstrong Flight Research Center • Glenn Research Center • Goddard Space Flight Center • Jet Propulsion Laboratory • Johnson Space Center • Kennedy Space Center • Langley Research Center • Marshall Space Flight Center • Stennis Space Center

Explore, Engage and Launch Your Career in STEM

To attend, please register at https://app.brazenconnect.com/events/nasa-fair-2016.

For more information, please contact nasaossi@hsf.net or Carolyn Knowles at carolyn.knowles-1@nasa.gov.

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Institute of Museum and Library Services Grants: STEM Expert Facilitation of Family Learning in Libraries and Museums

The Institute of Museum and Library Services seeks proposals for design-based research projects focused on inquiry-based STEM programs delivered by scientists, engineers, and related technical practitioners to children ages 6-10 and their families. Proposals should address the role of experts’ oral narratives (e.g., storytelling or personal histories) as part of object-based science inquiry and include information about how findings will be applicable in both museum and library settings.

Entities that are eligible to apply include libraries, agencies, institutions of higher education, museums, and other entities that advance the museum and library fields. Grant amounts up to $1,000,000 are available for a period of performance up to two years.

Applications are due May 1, 2016.

For more information, visit https://www.imls.gov/grants/available/stem-expert-facilitation-family-learning-libraries-and-museums-stemex.

Informational webinars about this grant opportunity will be presented on Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2016, at 4 p.m. EST and on Thursday, Feb. 18, 2016, at 3 p.m. EST. Visit the link above for details on how to access the webinar.

Library representatives with questions about this opportunity should email Sandra Toro at storo@imls.gov. Museum representatives with questions should email Helen Wechsler at hwechsler@imls.gov or Sandra Narva at snarva@imls.gov.

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NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellowships

The NASA Postdoctoral Program provides early-career and more senior scientists the opportunity to share in NASA’s mission. NPP Fellows work on one- to three-year assignments with NASA scientists and engineers at NASA centers and institutes to advance NASA’s missions in Earth science, heliophysics, planetary science, astrophysics, space bioscience, aeronautics, engineering, human exploration and space operations, astrobiology, and science management.

U.S. citizens, lawful permanent residents and foreign nationals eligible for J-1 status as a research scholar may apply. Applicants must have completed a doctorate or equivalent degree before beginning the fellowship, but they may apply while completing degree requirements. Applicants who earned the Ph.D. more than five years before the deadline date are categorized as senior fellows; all applicants, no matter their category, must apply and become eligible for an NPP award via the same process.

Interested applicants may apply by one of three annual application deadlines: March 1, July 1 and November 1.

For more information and application procedures, go to https://npp.usra.edu/.

Please direct questions about this fellowship opportunity to npphelp@usra.edu.

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2016 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Promotion and Research Challenge

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center is rolling out a new look and format for this year’s spinoff challenge. The OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Promotion and Research Challenge, or OPSPARC, challenges students to help raise awareness and understanding of NASA technologies and their many benefits to our everyday lives.

The newest incarnation of the challenge will provide contestants (students in grades 3 through 12) with a new tool, developed by Glogster, for creating and submitting their entries. Glogster is a cloud-based platform for presentation and interactive learning. The tool will allow contestants to combine different kinds of media on a virtual canvas to create multimedia posters and to access an existing library of educational content created by students and educators worldwide. Contestants will develop a Glog of their own as part of OPSPARC that will include information on spinoffs and NASA missions. The students also will create video describing their own ideas for a new NASA spinoff technology.

After completing their Glogs, 20 teams of students in grades 9 through 12 will be invited to work with college student mentors to further develop their spinoff concept within a 3-D, multi-user, virtual-world setting through creation of computer-aided design, or CAD, models and application of engineering and business analyses on their spinoff concepts. This year’s InWorld portion of the contest is being sponsored by NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope project.

Students who submit the winning entries in each age category will have the opportunity to visit NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, for an awards ceremony and workshop to be held in their honor. The workshop will include a behind-the-scenes look at Goddard, the chance to meet some of the top minds at NASA, and the opportunity for the students to design and create their own public service announcement video with guidance from NASA video producers and actor Peter Cullen, the voice of the TRANSFORMERS character OPTIMUS PRIME.

The deadline to register and submit Glogs is 11:59 PM EST on March 8, 2016.

To learn more about the challenge and to register to participate, visit http://itpo.gsfc.nasa.gov/opsparc/.

Please direct questions about this contest to Darryl Mitchell at Darryl.R.Mitchell@nasa.gov.

TRANSFORMERS and OPTIMUS PRIME are trademarks of Hasbro and are used with permission. © 2015 Hasbro. All rights reserved.

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Call for Proposals — NASA Research Announcement for Use of the NASA Physical Sciences Informatics System: Appendix B

NASA is seeking ground-based research proposals from graduate students to use NASA’s Physical Sciences Informatics system to develop new analyses and scientific insights. The PSI system is designed to be a resource for researchers to data mine information generated from completed physical sciences experiments performed on the International Space Station or from related ground-based studies.

This solicitation appendix focuses on the following five research areas: combustion science, complex fluids, fluid physics, fundamental physics and materials science.

For graduate students (students working toward an advanced degree), this NASA Research Announcement is soliciting proposals that advance fundamental research in one of the physical sciences disciplines identified above and also assist in the awarding of an advanced degree to the graduate student. This call is open to students who meet the following eligibility requirements:

— The student is pursuing an advanced degree directly related to a physical sciences discipline — only technical degrees are permitted (not degrees in policy or management).
— The student is a U.S. citizen, a permanent resident alien of the U.S., or on a student visa at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission.
— The student is enrolled in a master’s or doctoral degree program at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission, or, if the student is an undergraduate starting their graduate studies, he or she has been accepted to a master’s or doctoral degree program at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission and will start during the next academic year.
— The student has an academic graduate advisor who will submit the application for the graduate student. The student must perform the proposed research under the guidance of the assigned graduate advisor.

The agency expects to make approximately 10-15 awards in spring 2016. Research and development efforts will take place over two years. The typical award will be $75,000-$100,000 per year, for up to two years.

The deadline for submitting proposals is March 17, 2016.

For information concerning this NASA Research Announcement solicitation, visit http://tinyurl.com/NASA-15PSI-B.

For more information about the Physical Science Informatics System, visit http://psi.nasa.gov .

Please direct questions about this NASA Research Announcement to Dr. Francis Chiaramonte at francis.p.chiaramonte@nasa.gov.

Additional technical information about the Physical Science Informatics System for this NASA Research Announcement is available from the contact below:

Name: Teresa Miller
Title: Physical Sciences Informatics System – Technical POC
NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center
Email: teresa.y.miller@nasa.gov
Phone: 256-544-7815

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2016 NASA STEM Enhancement in Earth and Space Science Internship

STEM Enhancement in Earth and Space Science, or SEES, is a nationally competitive summer intern program for students in grades 10 and 11. NASA, the Texas Space Grant Consortium and The University of Texas at Austin Center for Space Research, or UT/CSR, have joined forces to provide this opportunity for high school students to increase their understanding of and interest in STEM careers.

Scientists and engineers at UT/CSR are conducting NASA-supported research in astronomy, remote sensing and space geodetic techniques to help understand Earth systems, natural hazards and climate science. The SEES project provides selected students with exposure to Earth and space research. Participants will learn how to interpret NASA satellite data while working with scientists and engineers in their chosen area of work.

The summer 2016 internship allows students to work remotely from July 1-15 and on-site in Austin, Texas, July 17-29. Housing, transportation and meals will be provided. Students are selected on the basis of their academic records, written application that includes essay questions, and interest in STEM.

Applications are due March 20, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.csr.utexas.edu/internship/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to Margaret Baguio at baguio@csr.utexas.edu.

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‘ISS: Science on Orbit’ Exhibit at U.S. Space & Rocket Center

The U.S. Space & Rocket Center’s “ISS: Science on Orbit” exhibit provides visitors with a true sense of what it’s like to live and work in space. This NASA grant-funded exhibit begins with a model of NASA’s Payload Operations Integration Center, where scientists and engineers on Earth manage the complex, international science experiments that astronauts conduct on the International Space Station.

Two mockups of space station modules contain 20 full-scale replica racks that illustrate the Environmental Control and Life Support Systems, the astronauts’ food, and a sleeping berth, among other necessary aspects of life and work aboard the station. A connecting node contains a full-scale replica of the Cupola Observation Module, which provides space station crew members with a view of Earth and space.

For more information, visit http://rocketcenter.com/.

Questions about the exhibit can be directed to Dr. Kay Taylor at kay.taylor@spacecamp.com.

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PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…
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Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions and museums to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

There will be a nominal shipping fee that must be paid online with a credit card.  To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.

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2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online

The Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, named after the founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and presented by JPL’s Office of Communication and Education, shares the excitement of the space program’s missions, instruments and other technologies.

Lectures take place twice per month, on consecutive Thursdays and Fridays. The Thursday lectures take place in JPL’s Theodore von Kármán Auditorium, and Friday lectures take place at Pasadena City College’s Vosloh Forum. Both start at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT). Admission and parking are free for all lectures. No reservations are required, but seating is limited. The Thursday evening lectures also are streamed live for viewing online. Archives of past lectures are also available online.

The next lecture in the series is “The Europa Mission.”

The Europa Mission
Event Date:
Feb. 11 and Feb. 12, 2016, at 7 pm. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2016&month=2
After many years of study, NASA has approved a new start for a spaceflight mission to investigate the mysteries of Jupiter’s moon Europa. Multiple flybys of the Jovian moon will allow scientists to explore its ice shell, ocean and geology. Join Europa Mission project manager Barry Goldstein and project scientist Bob Pappalardo, Ph.D., for a discussion about the new mission.

For more information about the Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, including a complete list of upcoming lectures, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.php.

Questions about this series should be directed to http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php.

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2016 Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program

The Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program, or PGGURP, pairs qualified undergraduate students with NASA-funded investigators at research locations across the U.S. for eight weeks during the summer. Students spend the summer at the NASA scientists’ home institutions. Selected students receive a cost-of-living stipend and compensation for housing and travel.

Undergraduate students majoring in geology or related sciences are eligible to apply. Students graduating in 2016 who have not started graduate school yet are also eligible. Preference is given to U.S. citizens and permanent residents.

Applications are due Feb. 12, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/~tgregg/pggurp_homepage.html.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please email Robyn Wagner, PGGURP administrator, at pggurp@buffalo.edu.

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Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy

Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy, at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia, is a free alternate-reality game that will challenge you to become an astronaut-in-training for a future trip to Mars. Choose what role you will play on the mission; engage in fun interactive activities; and explore the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics skills you will need as a next-generation space traveler. Along the way, you’ll learn about some of the museum’s fascinating artifacts.

Instructions and guidance are given via a special webpage accessed on your mobile device. Players should bring their own phones or devices equipped with an internet browser and a camera. Having a digital picture-taking device (smartphone, tablet, camera) is highly recommended but not required.

The game is aimed at upper elementary and middle school visitors and their families. Do you want to bring a group? Reservations are required for groups larger than 15.

The next offering of the Astronaut Academy is on Feb. 12, 2016. Begin your training with Astronaut Orientation in the Claude Moore Education Center Classroom 1 located on the first level across from the restrooms. Astronaut Orientation is offered at regular intervals between 10:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. The last opportunity to start the game is at 2:30 p.m. A self-guided activity, the game should take between 60 and 90 minutes, and staff will help you along the way.

For more information, including a full list of upcoming Astronaut Academy dates, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/techquest/.

Please direct questions about the Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy to the visitor service line at 202-633-2214.

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Be an Astronaut! Apply Now for New Astronaut Candidate Class

NASA soon will be selecting astronauts for the next class of space explorers! Between Dec. 14, 2015, and mid-February 2016, NASA will be accepting astronaut candidate applications. Selection announcements are targeted for mid-2017.

Teaching, including experience at the K-12 level, is considered to be qualifying experience to be an astronaut. Educators with the appropriate educational background are eligible to apply.

For additional details on this opportunity and how to submit an application, visit https://www.nasa.gov/astronauts.

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2016 NASA Marshall Faculty Fellowship Program

NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, is offering fellowships for qualified science, technology, mathematics and engineering faculty at U.S. colleges and universities. This program provides a 10-week summer residency at Marshall.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens who hold full-time teaching or research appointments at accredited universities or colleges in the United States. Women, underrepresented minorities and persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply.

Faculty fellows receive stipends based on academic level. And fellows living more than 50 miles from Marshall will receive a relocation allowance of $1,500 and a $500 travel supplement for one round-trip.

The deadline for applications is Feb. 15, 2016. For more information about this opportunity, visit https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/descriptions/MSFC-Faculty-Fellowship.html.

Inquiries about NASA’s Marshall Faculty Fellowship Program should be directed to Dr. Frank Six at frank.six@nasa.gov or to Mona Miller at Mona.Miller@nasa.gov.

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2016 NASA Glenn Faculty Fellowship Program

Applications are being accepted for the 2016 NASA Glenn Faculty Fellowship Program. This program provides a 10-week summer residency at NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio.

To be eligible for the program, applicants must be full-time science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, faculty members who are U.S. citizens. Applicants must be tenured faculty or in tenure-track positions at four-year accredited U.S. colleges and universities, or full-time faculty at two-year U.S. academic institutions. Faculty members from underrepresented groups and at U.S. Department of Education-designated Minority Serving Institutions are particularly encouraged to apply.

The program covers limited travel expenses for qualified and accepted faculty, as well as stipends for all accepted faculty. Please note that stipend payments or salaries from other federal funding sources, including research grants and contracts, may not be accepted during the 10-week tenure of a Glenn faculty fellowship appointment.

The deadline for applications has been extended to Feb. 15, 2016. For more information about this opportunity, visit https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/faculty_fellowship_final.pdf.

Inquiries about NASA’s Glenn Faculty Fellowship Program should be directed to Dr. M. David Kankam at Mark.D.Kankam@nasa.gov.

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National Space Biomedical Research Institute’s Mentored Research Program in Space Life Science

The National Space Biomedical Research Institute seeks solutions to health concerns facing astronauts on long missions. The institute′s research also benefits patients on Earth. This training program in space life sciences enables students to pursue doctoral degrees at Texas A&M University and to focus their research on space life sciences and fields related to the space initiative. Texas A&M currently is recruiting participants for fall 2016. Students will pursue degrees in biomedical engineering, genetics, kinesiology, health physics or nutrition, or an M.D./Ph.D. or a Ph.D. in medical sciences.

Application packages are due Feb. 15, 2016.

The graduate training program in Space Life Sciences at Texas A&M University is sponsored by NASA and the National Space Biomedical Research Institute.

For more information, visit http://SLSGraduateProgram.tamu.edu.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Dr. Nancy Turner at n-turner@tamu.edu.

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2016 NASA Academy

The 2016 NASA Academy is being offered at three locations: NASA’s Ames Research Center in California, NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Ohio, and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama. Applications are being solicited for this 10-week summer experience for college students with emphasis on immersive and integrated multidisciplinary exposure and training. Activities include laboratory research, a group project, lectures, meetings with experts and administrators, visits to NASA centers and space-related industries, and technical presentations. Students learn how NASA and its centers operate, gain experience in world-class laboratories, and participate in leadership development and team-building activities.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens (including citizens of the U.S. territories Puerto Rico, Guam, U.S. Virgin Islands and Northern Marianas) majoring in a STEM discipline. The applicants must be undergraduate or graduate students enrolled full-time in accredited universities and colleges in the U.S. and its territories. Students may apply to any of the NASA Academy opportunities by following these steps:

1. Log into the NASA One Stop Shopping Initiative, or OSSI, site at https://intern.nasa.gov.
2. Register and set up an account.
3. Select the “Search Opportunities” tab at the top bar.
4. Select “NASA Center(s) of Interest” under “NASA Center/Facility.”
5. Enter “Academy” in the “Keywords” block at the bottom of the screen.
6. Click the “Search” button at the very bottom of screen; a list of Academy Opportunities will then be displayed.
7. Click on the “View” icon in the first column under “Action” to read about the Opportunity of interest, followed by comments on additional instructions for completing the application, including two requested essays.

The deadline for receipt of NASA Academy application(s) and associated documents is Feb. 16, 2016.

Please direct questions about NASA Academy to NASA-Academy-Application@mail.nasa.gov.

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2016 NASA Multidisciplinary Aeronautics Research Team Initiative

This summer, NASA’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate is offering an integrated systems, multidisciplinary research opportunity for upper-level undergraduate and graduate students majoring in engineering, computer science or related disciplines. Student researchers will work as a team to propose innovative solutions for real-world aeronautics problems.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens who will be undergraduate juniors, undergraduate seniors or graduate students by the fall semester of 2016. Majors sought include aeronautical, aerospace, electrical, mechanical, software or systems engineering; mechatronics; and computer programming disciplines. A GPA of 3.2 or above is required. Veterans, women and persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply.

Applications are due Feb. 16, 2016.

For more information, visit https://www.martiapp.com/.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to info@MARTIapp.com.

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“Where Over the World Is Astronaut Scott Kelly?” Geography From Space Trivia Contest

During his year-long stay on the International Space Station, astronaut Scott Kelly wants to test your knowledge of the world through a geography trivia game on Twitter. Traveling more than 220 miles above Earth, and at 17,500 miles per hour, he circumnavigates the globe more than a dozen times a day. This gives Kelly the opportunity to see and photograph various geographical locations on Earth. In fact, part of his job while in space is to capture images of Earth for scientific observations.

Follow @StationCDRKelly on Twitter. Each Wednesday, Kelly will tweet a picture and ask the public to identify the place depicted in the photo. The first person to identify the place correctly will win an autographed copy of the picture. Kelly plans to continue posting weekly contest photos until he returns from the space station in March 2016.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/where-over-the-world-is-astronaut-scott-kelly.

To learn more about the One-Year Mission, visit https://www.nasa.gov/content/one-year-crew.

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National Park Service’s ‘Mosaics in Science’ Program

The National Park Service’s ‘Mosaics in Science’ Diversity Internship Program provides college students and recent graduates who are underrepresented in STEM career fields with on-the-ground, science-based work experience related to natural resources in the National Park System.

Participants spend 11 weeks working on a STEM project in a national park. After completing their projects, participants travel to the District of Columbia for a career workshop that provides opportunities to present their work, learn about how to apply for a federal job, and meet National Park Service staff and management. Participants receive a stipend of $4,800, plus housing and travel allowances.

To be eligible, applicants must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States between 18 and 35 years old. The applicants must attend or recently have graduated from an undergraduate institution, or they must be in the early stages of their career. Eligible students and young adults from groups historically underrepresented in STEM fields are strongly encouraged to seek nomination. These groups include but are not limited to African-American, American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian, Hispanic, and Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander.

Applications are due Feb. 19, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.nature.nps.gov/geology/mosaics/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Lisa Norby at lisa_norby@nps.gov.

This program is run in partnership with Environment for the Americas and Greening Youth Foundation.

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Family Day Events at Smithsonian’s Air and Space Museum

The Smithsonian’s Family Day event series celebrates the diverse ethnic and cultural communities that have contributed to aviation and space exploration. Events will commemorate historic and current contributions through presentations and activities for the entire family. The events are free and open to the public.

African-American Pioneers in Aviation and Space
Feb. 20, 2016, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. EST
National Air and Space Museum in Washington, District of Columbia

Celebrate the significant contributions African-Americans have made to flight and space exploration despite the overwhelming obstacles they had to overcome. Visitors will enjoy presentations, hands-on activities and stories. They may have the opportunity to meet astronauts, fighter pilots, and others who will share stories of their challenges and accomplishments.
http://airandspace.si.edu/events/heritage-days/african-american/

Women in Aviation and Space
March 12, 2016, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. EST
National Air and Space Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia
Throughout the history of aviation and space exploration, women have fought to be on equal terms with their male counterparts. Celebrate the incredible contributions of women in aviation and space exploration at this event featuring presentations by women in the field, hands-on activities and stories.
http://airandspace.si.edu/events/heritage-days/womens-history/

Explore the Universe
April 9, 2016, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. EST
National Air and Space Museum in Washington, District of Columbia
People around the world have always looked to the sky, but they don’t always see the same things. Bring your family to experience how different people study the sky and to hear their stories. Learn about telescopes and, if weather permits, do some daytime observations.
http://airandspace.si.edu/events/heritage-days/explore-universe/

Please direct questions about this series of events to the Visitor Service line at 202-633-2214.

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2016 Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships

Caltech’s Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships, or SURF, program introduces undergraduate students to research under the guidance of seasoned mentors at Caltech or NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, or JPL. Students experience the process of research as a creative intellectual activity and gain a more realistic view of the opportunities and demands of a professional research career.

SURF is modeled on the grant-seeking process. Students collaborate with potential mentors to define and develop a project and to write research proposals. Caltech faculty or JPL staff review the proposals and recommend awards. Students work over a 10-week period in the summer, mid-June to late August. At the conclusion of the project, each student submits a technical paper and gives an oral presentation at SURF Seminar Day.

All application materials must be received no later than Feb. 22, 2016. For more information, visit http://www.sfp.caltech.edu/programs/surf.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to the Caltech Student-Faculty Programs office at sfp@caltech.edu.

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Google Plus Hangout Series: How to Survive in Space

NASA’s Digital Learning Network is teaming up with The Royal Institution and Faraday Studios for a series of Google Hangout events in connection with British astronaut Tim Peake’s mission to the International Space Station. The live hourlong events will include selected classrooms from the United Kingdom and the U.S. These classes will pose questions to Dr. Kevin Fong (author of “Extreme Medicine”), Dr. Steven Jacobs (Mr. Wizard) and NASA experts. The events will be broadcast live on YouTube.

How to Survive in Space: Hangout #1
Tuesday, Feb. 23, 2016 — 9-10 a.m. EST; 2-3 p.m. UK
The most difficult part of any space journey is the first 400 kilometers, overcoming Earth’s gravity to reach low Earth orbit. Though Tim Peake’s journey to the space station took over six hours, reaching low Earth orbit lasted just eight and a half minutes. In this Hangout, experts will answer students’ questions about Peake’s journey from the launch pad to the space station. Host Dr. Steve Jacobs and Dr. Kevin Fong will be joined by NASA power and propulsion engineer Stephen J. Damico.

How to Survive in Space: Hangout #2
Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2016 — 10-11 a.m. EST; 3-4 p.m. UK
Tim Peake made it safely to the space station, and now he faces the next challenge — living in space. The International Space Station protects astronauts against space radiation, the vacuum of space and the extremes of temperature. In this Hangout, experts will answer students’ questions about the life of an astronaut aboard the International Space Station. Host Dr. Steve Jacobs and Dr. Kevin Fong will be joined by Lara (Liz) Warren, a member of the International Space Station NASA Communications Team.

How to Survive in Space: Hangout #3
Thursday, Feb. 25, 2016 — 9-10 a.m. EST; 2-3 p.m. UK

The space station orbits just 400 kilometers away. But the ultimate purpose of the International Space Station is to act as a training and learning platform for human missions much farther afield. Space agencies are designing missions that will take astronauts far beyond the moon, on to Mars and perhaps even to near-Earth asteroids. In this Hangout, students’ questions will focus on how science can help us propel crews across the vast chasms of space that separate the planets as we will look at the challenges of designing artificial life support systems for these marathon voyages. Host Dr. Steve Jacobs and Dr. Kevin Fong will be joined by NASA Kennedy Space Center researchers Trent Smith from aerospace flight systems and Massa Gioia (Joy-ya) from life sciences research.

For more information about these events, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/how-to-survive-in-space-hangout-1-tuesday-feb-23-9-10-am-est-2-3-pm-uk.

Please direct questions about these events to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com.

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Call for Papers: 2016 International Space Station Research and Development Conference

The fifth annual International Space Station Research and Development Conference will be held July 12-14, 2016, at the Town and Country Resort & Convention Center in San Diego, California.

NASA, the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space, and the American Astronautical Society are seeking abstracts under the categories of biology and medicine; human health in space; commercialization and nongovernment utilization; physical sciences and materials development; plant science; Earth science and remote sensing; technology development and demonstration; and science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, education. Topics should relate to science, exploration and technology activities (past, present, planned or under development) on the International Space Station.

Both the conference and abstract submittal are open to entrepreneurial, commercial, academic and government agency attendees, both from and outside the United States. Eligible attendees include professionals, young professionals, students and interested parties. The working language for the conference is English. The conference will include plenaries for topics of general interests and technical sessions for focused discussions.

Because of the large number of expected submissions, presenters are encouraged to submit abstracts early; the deadline is Feb. 25, 2016.

For more information about the conference and how to submit an abstract for consideration, visit http://www.issconference.org/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to ISSTechChair@atdl-inc.com.

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Cassini Scientist for a Day Essay Contest

The Cassini Scientist for a Day contest challenges students to become NASA scientists studying Saturn. Participants examine three possible targets for the Cassini spacecraft to observe and choose the one they think will yield the best scientific results. This year’s targets are Saturn’s rings and three of its moons; Jupiter as seen from approximately one billion miles away; and Saturn’s moon Tethys passing behind Rhea, another of Saturn’s moons. After researching the three options, students write an essay under 500 words explaining their choice.

The contest is open to all students in the United States in grades 5-12. The essays will be divided into three groups for scoring: grades 5-6, 7-8 and 9-12. All submissions must be students’ original work. Participants may enter as individuals or as part of a team of up to four students.

The deadline for entries is Feb. 26, 2016.

For more information, visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/education/scientistforaday2015/.

If you have questions about this contest, please email scientistforaday@jpl.nasa.gov.

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‘Sky for All: Air Mobility for 2035 and Beyond’ Challenge

NASA’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate is sponsoring the “Sky for All: Air Mobility for 2035 and Beyond” challenge. With a prize purse of $15,000, the challenge seeks innovative ideas for technologies that could be part of a clean-slate, revolutionary design and concept of operations for the airspace of the future.

Potential solvers are tasked with thinking outside the current air traffic management system box and with considering how to manage crowded skies, autonomous operations and cyber security of the system. The challenge is open to all individuals, age 18 or older, private teams, public teams and collegiate teams. Individual competitors and teams may originate from any country, as long as United States federal sanctions do not prohibit participation.

Registration is required and submissions are due Feb. 26, 2016.

For more information about this challenge, please visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/challenge-is-on-to-design-sky-for-all.

Questions about this challenge can be submitted via the HeroX website at https://herox.com/SkyForAll/comments.

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Call for Abstracts: 67th International Astronautical Congress

NASA announces its intent to participate in the 67th International Astronautical Congress, or IAC, and requests that full-time U.S. graduate students attending U.S. universities respond to this “Call for Abstracts.”

The IAC — which is organized by the International Astronautical Federation, or IAF; the International Academy of Astronautics, or IAA; and the International Institute of Space Law, or IISL — is the largest space-related conference worldwide and selects an average of 1,000 scientific papers every year. The upcoming IAC will be held Sept. 26-30, 2016, in Guadalajara, Mexico. NASA’s participation in this event is part of an ongoing effort to connect NASA with the astronautical and space international community.

This “Call for Abstracts” is a precursor to a subsequent submission of a final paper, which may be presented at the 67th IAC. Student authors are invited to submit an abstract regarding an original, unpublished paper that has not been submitted in any other forum. A NASA technical review panel will select abstracts from those that have been accepted by the International Astronautical Federation. This opportunity is for graduate students majoring in fields related to the IAF research topics. Students may submit technical (oral) presentations and/or posters. Students may submit abstracts that are co-authored with their Principal Investigators. However, the student must be the “lead author,” and only the student will present at the IAC. Students must be available to travel to the conference to represent NASA and their universities. Students must be U.S. citizens, attending a U.S. university, who plan to enter a career in space science or aeronautics. Pending the availability of funding, graduate students selected by NASA to participate in the IAC will be considered for subsidy funding from NASA.

Many students and professors currently are involved in NASA-related research that could be considered for this submission. Students submitting abstracts are strongly encouraged to seek advice from professors who are conducting NASA research and/or from NASA scientists and engineers. Abstracts must be related to NASA’s ongoing vision for space exploration and fit into one of the following IAC categories:

— Science and Exploration — Systems sustaining missions, including life, microgravity, space exploration, space debris and Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence, or SETI
— Applications and Operations — Ongoing and future operational applications, including earth observation, communication, navigation, human space endeavors and small satellites
— Technology — Common technologies to space systems including astrodynamics, structures, power and propulsion
— Infrastructure — Systems sustaining space missions including space system transportation, future systems and safety
— Space and Society — Interaction of space with society including education, policy and economics, history, and law

The criteria for the selection will be defined according to the following specifications:
— Abstracts should specify purpose, methodology, results, conclusions and areas for discussion.
— Abstracts should indicate that substantive technical and/or programmatic content is included.
— Abstracts should clearly indicate that the material is new and original; they should explain why and how.
— Prospective author(s) should certify that the paper was not presented at a previous meeting.

Abstracts must be written in English, and the length should not exceed 400 words. Tables or drawings are not allowed in the abstract.

NOTE: If you plan to seek assistance from NASA, you must submit to the International Astronautical Federation and to NASA.
— Submit your abstract to the IAF at their website
www.iafastro.org by Feb. 29, 2016 (14:00 CET).
— Submit your abstract to NASA at
https://iac.nasaprs.com no later than 11:59 p.m. EST on Friday, Feb. 26, 2016.

IAC Paper Selection
Submitted abstracts will be evaluated by the Session Chairs on the basis of technical quality and relevance to the session topics. Selected abstracts may be chosen for eventual oral or poster presentation. Any such choice is not an indication of quality of the submitted abstract. Their evaluation will be submitted to the Symposium Coordinators. They will make acceptance recommendations to the International Programme Committee, which will make the final decision. Please note that any relevance to the Congress main theme will be considered as an advantage.

The following information must be included in the submission: paper title, name of contact author, name of co-author(s), organization(s), full postal address, phone, email of the author and co-author(s). The abstract should specify purpose, methodology, results and conclusions. The abstract should indicate that substantive technical and/or programmatic content is included, as well as clearly indicate that the material is new and original and explain why and how.

Please check the IAF website (www.iafastro.org) regularly to get the latest updates on the Technical Programme.

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Library of Congress 2016 Summer Institutes — Teaching With Primary Sources

The Library of Congress is now accepting applications for its weeklong summer programs for K-12 educators. Held at the Library of Congress in the District of Columbia, this professional development opportunity provides educators with tools and resources to effectively integrate primary sources into K-12 classroom teaching, with an emphasis on student engagement, critical thinking and construction of knowledge.

The Library of Congress is offering five programs this summer: Four of the programs are open to teachers and librarians across all content areas and one focuses on primary sources in science, technology and engineering. During each five-day institute, participants work with Library of Congress education specialists and subject-matter experts to learn effective practices for using primary sources in the classroom, while exploring some of the millions of digitized historical artifacts and documents available on the library’s website.

General Institutes: Open to K-12 teachers and school librarians across the content areas.
— June 27-July 1, 2016
— July 11-15, 2016
— July 18-22, 2016
— July 25-29, 2016

Science, Technology and Engineering Institute: Recommended for K-12 educators who teach science, technology or engineering, or collaborate with those who do.
— June 20-24, 2016

Tuition and materials are free. Participants will be responsible for transportation to and from Washington, D.C., and any required overnight accommodations.

Applications are due Feb. 29, 2016, and require a letter of recommendation.

For more information and to submit an application, visit http://www.loc.gov/teachers/professionaldevelopment/teacherinstitute/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to teachinglcsummer@loc.gov.

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2016 NASA Space Settlement Design Contest

Design a space settlement! Space settlements are permanent communities in orbit, as opposed to a place to work for a few months and go home. Designing a space settlement involves physics, mathematics, space science, environmental science and many other disciplines.

The NASA Space Settlement Design Contest is for K-12 students throughout in the world. Individuals or teams may enter. Grade levels are judged separately, except for the grand prize. A certificate will be sent to each participant.

Submissions must be received by March 1, 2016.

For more information about the NASA Space Settlement Design Contest, visit http://settlement.arc.nasa.gov/Contest/.

Please email questions about the contest to Al Globus at aglobus@mail.arc.nasa.gov.

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NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Seek Students for Climate Research Initiative

The NASA GISS Climate Change Research Initiative is a summer internship opportunity for high school and undergraduate students to work directly with NASA scientists in a NASA research project associated with the science related to climate change.

During the summer session, high school interns will work for 40 hours per week for a six-week period and undergraduate students work full time for eight weeks to complete a research project. Interns will create a scientific research paper and presentation and present their scientific poster at a STEM symposium.

All applicants must be U.S. citizens who are at least 16 years old and reside within a 50-mile radius of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies located in New York City.

Applications are due March 1, 2016.

For more information, visit http://smdepo.org/post/8474.

Please direct inquiries about the NASA GISS Climate Change Research Initiative to Matthew Pearce at matthew.d.pearce@nasa.gov.

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Now Accepting Applications for NASA Summer Internships

Now is your chance to apply for exciting hands-on summer internship opportunities available at all NASA centers. High school, undergraduate and graduate students are needed to help NASA scientists and engineers with ongoing scientific and engineering research, technology development and spaceflight operations activities. Internship opportunities also exist in nontechnical areas such as communications, budget, procurement, education and human resources. NASA internships are stipend-paid and offer students mentor-directed, degree-related, real-time tasks. If you think you have what it takes to be part of NASA’s Journey to Mars, please visit https://intern.nasa.gov today to apply or to learn more about the numerous opportunities available to you.

The deadline for summer applications is March 1, 2016!

Please submit inquiries about the NASA Internships, Fellowships, and Scholarships One Stop Shopping Initiative, or NIFS OSSI, via https://intern.nasa.gov/oic/.

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‘CineSpace’ Short Film Competition

NASA and the Houston Cinema Arts Society once again will offer filmmakers around the world a chance to share their works inspired by — and using — actual NASA imagery through “CineSpace,” a short-film competition.

Films featuring NASA-captured imagery and video collected throughout the agency’s 50-year history will be judged on creativity, innovation and attention to detail. Works submitted to “CineSpace” will compete for cash prizes and the opportunity to be shown to audiences both on and off Earth. In addition to being screened at the “CineSpace” awards ceremony during the Houston Cinema Arts Festival, winners and finalists may be screened at other film festivals across the country, as well as on NASA TV and even on the International Space Station.

“CineSpace” is open to all filmmakers, both professional and aspiring. The competition will accept submissions of all genres, including narrative, documentary, comedy, drama, animation, experimental and others, of up to 10 minutes running time. Entries must use at least 10 percent publically available NASA imagery.

The submission period opens June 1, 2016, and closes July 31, 2016. Finalists and winners will be announced at a “CineSpace” event during the Houston Cinema Arts Festival in November. Entries will be competing for $26,000 in prizes with cash awards going to the top three submissions as well as the two films that best demonstrate the themes “Benefits of Space to Humanity” and “Future Space Exploration.”

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/cinespace-short-film-competition-returns-for-2016.

Please direct questions about this competition to cinespace@cinemartsociety.org.

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Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The Announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design (STEAMD); or activities culturally relevant to or focused on unrepresented in STEM careers populations, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or non-reimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA Announcement.

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Free “NASA’s Journey to Mars” Planetarium/Dome Show

Are you looking for ways to prepare your students for STEM-related career opportunities in the future? Do you want to spark their interest in pushing the boundaries of technology and innovation? Right now, NASA’s fleet of Mars robotic explorers is paving the way for human exploration of the solar system in the coming decades. Have your students join NASA in preparing for a monumental journey of a lifetime — to Mars!

“NASA’s Journey to Mars” is a short planetarium presentation that can be used in the educational domes of your school district, as well as local planetariums, to inspire interest in STEM. To learn more, including how you can acquire the show for use in your area, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/journey-of-a-lifetime-mars-education-resources/.

Please direct questions about the “NASA’s Journey to Mars” planetarium/dome show to Elsie Weigel at elsie.weigel@nasa.gov.

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Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at https://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

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