NASA Education Express — Feb. 18, 2016

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.
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New This Week!
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Free NASA Educator Professional Development Webinars
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: Feb. 18, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EST

Free Education Webinar Series From the GOES-R Education Proving Ground
Audience: 6-12 Educators
Next Event Date: Feb. 20, 2016, at 11:30 a.m. EST

Free Webinar — Dynamic Mars: A Virtual, Interactive Professional Opportunity for Secondary Educators
Audience: 7-12 Educators
Event Date: Feb. 24, 2016, at 7 p.m. EST

NASA’s Kennedy Space Center Celebrating Women’s History Month With “Inspiring Girls Through STEM” Day
Audience: Underserved/Underrepresented Girls, Grades 4-12, From Collaborating Partners in Brevard County, Florida, and Surrounding Areas
Registration Deadline: Feb. 29, 2016

“Museum Day Live!” Sponsored by the Smithsonian Institution
Audience: Informal Institutions
Registration Deadline: March 1, 2016
Event Date: March 12, 2016

Host a Real-Time Conversation With Crew Members Aboard the International Space Station
Audience: All Educators
Next Optional Informational Session: Feb. 29, 2016, at 4 p.m. EST
Proposal Deadline: April 15, 2016

NASA Digital Learning Network Webcast: Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: March 1, 2016, 3-3:40 p.m. EST

NASA Digital Learning Network Webcast: NASA Space Grant Student Presentations
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: March 3, 2016, 3:15-5 p.m. EST

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PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…
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National Park Service’s ‘Mosaics in Science’ Program
Audience: Undergraduate Students Ages 18-35 Years Old
Application Deadline: Feb. 19, 2016

Family Day Events at Smithsonian’s Air and Space Museum
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: Feb. 20, 2016

Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy
Audience: Designed for Families With Children Ages 10 to 14, but Open to All
Next Event Date: Feb. 20, 2016, 10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. EST

2016 Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships
Audience: Undergraduate Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 22, 2016

Google Plus Hangout Series: How to Survive in Space
Audience: All Educators and Students
First Event Date: Feb. 23, 2016, 9 – 10 a.m. EST

“Where Over the World Is Astronaut Scott Kelly?” Geography From Space Trivia Contest
Audience: All Educators and Students
Deadline: Ongoing Through March 2016

Call for Papers: 2016 International Space Station Research and Development Conference
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Abstract Submission Deadline: Feb. 25, 2016

Cassini Scientist for a Day Essay Contest
Audience: 5-12 Students
Entry Deadline: Feb. 26, 2016

‘Sky for All: Air Mobility for 2035 and Beyond’ Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Students and Faculty
Submission Deadline: Feb. 26, 2016

Call for Abstracts: 67th International Astronautical Congress
Audience: Full-time U.S. Graduate Students Attending U.S. Universities
Submission Deadline: Feb. 26, 2016

White House Office of Science and Technology Policy’s Summer 2016 Policy Internship Program
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 26, 2016

Library of Congress 2016 Summer Institutes — Teaching With Primary Sources
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: Feb. 29, 2016
Institute Dates: Multiple Dates in June and July 2016

Mars Survival Kit: Lessons and Activities to Guide Your Exploration of Mars!
Audience: K-12 Educators

2016 NASA Space Settlement Design Contest
Audience: K-12 Students
Entry Deadline: March 1, 2016

NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Seek Students for Climate Research Initiative

Audience: 9-12 and Undergraduate Students
Application Deadline: March 1, 2016

Now Accepting Applications for NASA Summer Internships
Audience: High School, Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Application Deadline: March 1, 2016

NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellowships
Audience: Graduate Students and Ph.D. Scientists
Next Application Deadline: March 1, 2016

2016 MAVEN Elementary Teachers’ Summit
Audience: Elementary Educators
Application Deadline: March 18, 2016
Workshop Dates: June 14-17, 2016

NASA/Applied Physics Laboratory Summer Internship 2016
Audience: Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Application Deadline: March 25, 2016

2016 LiftOff Summer Institute
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: April 15, 2016
Institute Dates: June 26-July 1, 2016

Call for Papers: NASA in the ‘Long’ Civil Rights Movement Symposium
Audience: Academics, Graduate Students and Independent Scholars
Abstract Submission Deadline: July 31, 2016
Symposium Dates: March 16-17, 2017

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

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Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at https://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

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NEW THIS WEEK!
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Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Solar System and Beyond: Gravity-assisted Travel
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 3-6
Event Date: Feb. 18, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EST
Participants will explore Newton’s Laws through “Invisible Force,” an engineering design challenge activity for grades 3-6. Investigate gravity and magnetism using the engineering design process. The activities presented in this webinar are aligned to NGSS: PS1, PS3, ESS1 and ESS2. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/158873

Sports Injuries and Space Injuries: Prevention and Treatment
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 3-12
Event Date: Feb. 23, 2016, at 5 p.m. EST
Flight surgeon Dr. Rick Schuering will present the similarities and differences between sports injuries and space injuries. He also will discuss methods and precautions taken to prevent injuries and treat injuries in space. Live tweet your questions during the event to @BigBlueNASA or email your questions to brandon.m.hargis@nasa.gov for live answers from this subject matter expert. This event will air on the NASA Johnson Space Center USTREAM Channel located at http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-jsc. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/161047

Solar System and Beyond: Modeling Our Solar System
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-8
Event Date: Feb. 23, 2016, at 6 p.m. EST
Explore our solar system with NASA STEM activities and missions. This webinar will investigate classifying, graphing and using scale models to better understand and visualize our sun, planets, asteroids and other objects as a true system — our solar system. The Next Generation Science Standards will be explored and integrated into this out-of-this-world webinar. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/159281

Solar System and Beyond: Extrasolar Planets
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: Feb. 25, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EST
Participants will get an overview of the methods of identifying extrasolar planets and NASA resources for teaching about them. The activities presented in this webinar address the Next Generation Science Standards PS2, PS4 and ESS1. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/155799

For a full schedule of upcoming webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Please direct questions about this series of webinars to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.

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Free Education Webinar Series From the GOES-R Education Proving Ground

The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites — R Series is the next generation of geostationary Earth-observing systems. The GOES-R series satellites will provide continuous imagery and atmospheric measurements of Earth’s Western Hemisphere. The satellites will collect lightning data and monitor space weather to provide critical atmospheric, hydrologic, oceanic, climatic, solar and space data. The first satellite in the GOES-R series is scheduled to launch in October 2016.

To help educators prepare for the new satellite imagery and data that will be available during the GOES-R era, the GOES-R Education Proving Ground is hosting a series of education webcasts leading up to launch.

The webinars will take place on the following Saturday mornings at 11:30 a.m. Eastern Time.

Feb. 20, 2016: Satellites 101 and GOES-R Overview
March 12, 2016: GOES-R Lesson Plans: For Teachers, By Teachers
April 23, 2016: Additional GOES-R Resources and Educational Tools
Sept. 17, 2016: Countdown to Launch!

For more information, including log-in instructions for the webinars, visit http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/education/goesr/.

Please direct questions about this series of webinars to Margaret Mooney at Margaret.Mooney@ssec.wisc.edu.

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Free Webinar — Dynamic Mars: A Virtual, Interactive Professional Opportunity for Secondary Educators

The Endeavor STEM Teaching Certificate Project is presenting a virtual, interactive professional development webinar for middle school and high school educators. Science content experts and educators who teach mathematics, geology, earth science, astronomy and planetary science are invited to attend this free event.

Join Dr. Marjorie Chan from the University of Utah team as she shares ways to use Mars data to teach about life science, chemistry, physical science and even Earth. Participants will receive an exclusive high school curricular unit that features STEM-integrated activities and lessons.

The 50-minute webinar will take place on Feb. 24, 2016, at 7 p.m. EST.

For complete details and to register to attend, visit http://www.us-satellite.net/dynamicmars/k12/.

Please direct questions about this webinar to Glen Schuster at gschuster@us-satellite.net.

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NASA’s Kennedy Space Center Celebrating Women’s History Month With “Inspiring Girls Through STEM” Day

On March 5, 2016, the Education Projects and Youth Engagement Office at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida is celebrating Women’s History Month with an “Inspiring Girls through STEM” Day. The event will take place at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor’s Complex and Public Engagement Center.

The daylong event’s activities will include the following:

— Panel discussions with five NASA Kennedy career women.
— Lunch with an astronaut.
— Educational workshops where students engage in STEM hands-on activities.

Event organizers are seeking 40 underserved/underrepresented girls in grades 4-12 from collaborating partners in Brevard County and surrounding areas to participate. The invitations to this event have been sent and are for the Kennedy Educate To Innovate, or KETI, Saturday Academy collaborating partners.

Registration for this event closes on Feb. 29, 2016. For more information about the event and to register to attend, contact Liz Wise at liz.wise-1@nasa.gov or 321-867-3307.

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“Museum Day Live!” Sponsored by the Smithsonian Institution

On March 12, 2016, the Smithsonian Institution will sponsor a special edition of “Museum Day Live!” This annual nationwide event gets people into their local museums, science centers and other cultural institutions. Taking place during Women’s History Month, the March event welcomes all visitors but is specifically themed towards inspiring the nation’s girls.

NASA is very supportive of the project and through its Museum Alliance is working to have strong participation by STEM organizations. If your institution is interested in participating, visit http://www.smithsonianmag.com/museumday/museum-day-live-march-2016/registration/. Registration closes on March 1, 2016.

To find participating venues in your area and to reserve tickets, visit http://www.smithsonianmag.com/museumday/museum-day-live-march-2016/.

Please direct inquiries about NASA’s Museum Alliance to Amelia Chapman at Amelia.J.Chapman@jpl.nasa.gov. A Museum Alliance resource list for engaging girls in STEM may be found at https://informal.jpl.nasa.gov/museum/sites/default/files/ResourceLibrary/Engaging%20Girls%20in%20STEM_0.pdf.

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Host a Real-Time Conversation With Crew Members Aboard the International Space Station

ARISS-US is now accepting proposals from U.S. schools, museums, science centers and community youth organizations to host an Amateur Radio on the International Space Station, or ARISS, contact between Jan. 1 – June 30, 2017. To maximize these radio contact opportunities, ARISS-US is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed education plan. Proposals are due April 15, 2016.

Using amateur radio, students can ask astronauts questions about life in space and other space-related topics. Students fully engage in the ARISS contact by helping set up an amateur radio ground station at the school and then using that station to talk directly with a crew member on the International Space Station for approximately 10 minutes. ARISS provides experienced mentors and relies on local amateur radio volunteers to help organizations obtain the technology required to host this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for students.

Informational Sessions
To help organizations in preparing their proposals, the ARISS program coordinator will offer hourlong online information sessions. These are designed to provide more information regarding U.S. ARISS contacts and the proposal process, and offer an opportunity to ask questions. While attending an online information session is not required, it is strongly encouraged.

Informational sessions will be offered Feb. 29, 2016, at 4 p.m. EST and March 10, 2016, at 7 p.m. EST.

Advance registration is necessary. Email ARISS (ariss@arrl.org) to sign up for an information session.

For proposal information and more details such as expectations, proposal guidelines and proposal form, visit http://www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.

ARISS-US is offered through a partnership between NASA; the American Radio Relay League, or ARRL; and the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation, or AMSAT. ARISS was created and is managed by an international working group, including several countries in Europe as well as Japan, Russia, Canada, and the USA.

Questions about this opportunity should be emailed to ariss@arrl.org.

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NASA Digital Learning Network Webcast: Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission

NASA is developing a first-ever robotic mission to visit a large near-Earth asteroid, collect a multi-ton boulder from its surface, and redirect it into a stable orbit around the moon. Learn more about this mission during a special webcast event hosted by the Digital Learning Network at NASA’s Langley Research Center.

Education specialist Dr. Caryn Long will be interviewing Scott Belbin from the Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission. In addition to sharing information and insight into the mission, the webcast also will feature a virtual tour of the ARRM facility.

The 40-minute event will take place on March 1, 2016, at 3 p.m. EST. To watch the event, visit https://plus.google.com/events/ckcu4hd35earjjr7667gntlqlcc.

To learn more about the Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission, visit https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/asteroids/initiative/index.html.

Please direct questions about this event to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com.

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NASA Digital Learning Network Webcast: NASA Space Grant Student Presentations

The National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program is a national network that includes over 850 affiliates from universities, colleges, industry, museums, science centers, and state and local agencies. Each year, Space Grant sponsors interns at NASA facilities. Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network for presentations from three of these Space Grant interns.

On Thursday, March 3, 2016, at 3:15 p.m. EST, Eric Day will moderate the webcast event. Presentations will include the following:

— David Hinckley, University of Vermont: “Interplanetary Spacecraft Trajectory Optimization”
— Rachel Carmichael, University of Nevada, Reno: “Efficient Cyclization Methodology for Biologically Relevant Precursors”
— Jeff Tessein, University of Delaware: “Effect of Coherent Structures on Energetic Particle Intensity in the Solar Wind”

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln/special-events.

Please direct questions about this event to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com.

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PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…
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National Park Service’s ‘Mosaics in Science’ Program

The National Park Service’s ‘Mosaics in Science’ Diversity Internship Program provides college students and recent graduates who are underrepresented in STEM career fields with on-the-ground, science-based work experience related to natural resources in the National Park System.

Participants spend 11 weeks working on a STEM project in a national park. After completing their projects, participants travel to the District of Columbia for a career workshop that provides opportunities to present their work, learn about how to apply for a federal job, and meet National Park Service staff and management. Participants receive a stipend of $4,800, plus housing and travel allowances.

To be eligible, applicants must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States between 18 and 35 years old. The applicants must attend or recently have graduated from an undergraduate institution, or they must be in the early stages of their career. Eligible students and young adults from groups historically underrepresented in STEM fields are strongly encouraged to seek nomination. These groups include but are not limited to African-American, American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian, Hispanic, and Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander.

Applications are due Feb. 19, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.nature.nps.gov/geology/mosaics/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Lisa Norby at lisa_norby@nps.gov.

This program is run in partnership with Environment for the Americas and Greening Youth Foundation.

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Family Day Events at Smithsonian’s Air and Space Museum

The Smithsonian’s Family Day event series celebrates the diverse ethnic and cultural communities that have contributed to aviation and space exploration. Events will commemorate historic and current contributions through presentations and activities for the entire family. The events are free and open to the public.

African-American Pioneers in Aviation and Space
Feb. 20, 2016, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. EST
National Air and Space Museum in Washington, District of Columbia

Celebrate the significant contributions African-Americans have made to flight and space exploration despite the overwhelming obstacles they had to overcome. Visitors will enjoy presentations, hands-on activities and stories. They may have the opportunity to meet astronauts, fighter pilots, and others who will share stories of their challenges and accomplishments.
http://airandspace.si.edu/events/heritage-days/african-american/

Women in Aviation and Space
March 12, 2016, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. EST
National Air and Space Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia
Throughout the history of aviation and space exploration, women have fought to be on equal terms with their male counterparts. Celebrate the incredible contributions of women in aviation and space exploration at this event featuring presentations by women in the field, hands-on activities and stories.
http://airandspace.si.edu/events/heritage-days/womens-history/

Explore the Universe
April 9, 2016, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. EST
National Air and Space Museum in Washington, District of Columbia
People around the world have always looked to the sky, but they don’t always see the same things. Bring your family to experience how different people study the sky and to hear their stories. Learn about telescopes and, if weather permits, do some daytime observations.
http://airandspace.si.edu/events/heritage-days/explore-universe/

Please direct questions about this series of events to the Visitor Service line at 202-633-2214.

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Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy

Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy, at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia, is a free alternate-reality game that will challenge you to become an astronaut-in-training for a future trip to Mars. Choose what role you will play on the mission; engage in fun interactive activities; and explore the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics skills you will need as a next-generation space traveler. Along the way, you’ll learn about some of the museum’s fascinating artifacts.

Instructions and guidance are given via a special webpage accessed on your mobile device. Players should bring their own phones or devices equipped with an internet browser and a camera. Having a digital picture-taking device (smartphone, tablet, camera) is highly recommended but not required.

The game is aimed at upper elementary and middle school visitors and their families. Do you want to bring a group? Reservations are required for groups larger than 15.

The next offering of the Astronaut Academy is on Feb. 20, 2016. Begin your training with Astronaut Orientation in the Claude Moore Education Center Classroom 1 located on the first level across from the restrooms. Astronaut Orientation is offered at regular intervals between 10:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. The last opportunity to start the game is at 2:30 p.m. A self-guided activity, the game should take between 60 and 90 minutes, and staff will help you along the way.

For more information, including a full list of upcoming Astronaut Academy dates, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/techquest/.

Please direct questions about the Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy to the visitor service line at 202-633-2214.

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2016 Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships

Caltech’s Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships, or SURF, program introduces undergraduate students to research under the guidance of seasoned mentors at Caltech or NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, or JPL. Students experience the process of research as a creative intellectual activity and gain a more realistic view of the opportunities and demands of a professional research career.

SURF is modeled on the grant-seeking process. Students collaborate with potential mentors to define and develop a project and to write research proposals. Caltech faculty or JPL staff review the proposals and recommend awards. Students work over a 10-week period in the summer, mid-June to late August. At the conclusion of the project, each student submits a technical paper and gives an oral presentation at SURF Seminar Day.

All application materials must be received no later than Feb. 22, 2016. For more information, visit http://www.sfp.caltech.edu/programs/surf.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to the Caltech Student-Faculty Programs office at sfp@caltech.edu.

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Google Plus Hangout Series: How to Survive in Space

NASA’s Digital Learning Network is teaming up with The Royal Institution and Faraday Studios for a series of Google Hangout events in connection with British astronaut Tim Peake’s mission to the International Space Station. The live hourlong events will include selected classrooms from the United Kingdom and the U.S. These classes will pose questions to Dr. Kevin Fong (author of “Extreme Medicine”), Dr. Steven Jacobs (Mr. Wizard) and NASA experts. The events will be broadcast live on YouTube.

How to Survive in Space: Hangout #1
Tuesday, Feb. 23, 2016 — 9-10 a.m. EST; 2-3 p.m. UK
The most difficult part of any space journey is the first 400 kilometers, overcoming Earth’s gravity to reach low Earth orbit. Though Tim Peake’s journey to the space station took over six hours, reaching low Earth orbit lasted just eight and a half minutes. In this Hangout, experts will answer students’ questions about Peake’s journey from the launch pad to the space station. Host Dr. Steve Jacobs and Dr. Kevin Fong will be joined by NASA power and propulsion engineer Stephen J. Damico.

How to Survive in Space: Hangout #2
Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2016 — 10-11 a.m. EST; 3-4 p.m. UK
Tim Peake made it safely to the space station, and now he faces the next challenge — living in space. The International Space Station protects astronauts against space radiation, the vacuum of space and the extremes of temperature. In this Hangout, experts will answer students’ questions about the life of an astronaut aboard the International Space Station. Host Dr. Steve Jacobs and Dr. Kevin Fong will be joined by Lara (Liz) Warren, a member of the International Space Station NASA Communications Team.

How to Survive in Space: Hangout #3
Thursday, Feb. 25, 2016 — 9-10 a.m. EST; 2-3 p.m. UK

The space station orbits just 400 kilometers away. But the ultimate purpose of the International Space Station is to act as a training and learning platform for human missions much farther afield. Space agencies are designing missions that will take astronauts far beyond the moon, on to Mars and perhaps even to near-Earth asteroids. In this Hangout, students’ questions will focus on how science can help us propel crews across the vast chasms of space that separate the planets as we will look at the challenges of designing artificial life support systems for these marathon voyages. Host Dr. Steve Jacobs and Dr. Kevin Fong will be joined by NASA Kennedy Space Center researchers Trent Smith from aerospace flight systems and Massa Gioia (Joy-ya) from life sciences research.

For more information about these events, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/how-to-survive-in-space-hangout-1-tuesday-feb-23-9-10-am-est-2-3-pm-uk.

Please direct questions about these events to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com.

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“Where Over the World Is Astronaut Scott Kelly?” Geography From Space Trivia Contest

During his year-long stay on the International Space Station, astronaut Scott Kelly wants to test your knowledge of the world through a geography trivia game on Twitter. Traveling more than 220 miles above Earth, and at 17,500 miles per hour, he circumnavigates the globe more than a dozen times a day. This gives Kelly the opportunity to see and photograph various geographical locations on Earth. In fact, part of his job while in space is to capture images of Earth for scientific observations.

Follow @StationCDRKelly on Twitter. Each Wednesday, Kelly will tweet a picture and ask the public to identify the place depicted in the photo. The first person to identify the place correctly will win an autographed copy of the picture. Kelly plans to continue posting weekly contest photos until he returns from the space station in March 2016.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/where-over-the-world-is-astronaut-scott-kelly.

To learn more about the One-Year Mission, visit https://www.nasa.gov/content/one-year-crew.

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Call for Papers: 2016 International Space Station Research and Development Conference

The fifth annual International Space Station Research and Development Conference will be held July 12-14, 2016, at the Town and Country Resort & Convention Center in San Diego, California.

NASA, the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space, and the American Astronautical Society are seeking abstracts under the categories of biology and medicine; human health in space; commercialization and nongovernment utilization; physical sciences and materials development; plant science; Earth science and remote sensing; technology development and demonstration; and science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, education. Topics should relate to science, exploration and technology activities (past, present, planned or under development) on the International Space Station.

Both the conference and abstract submittal are open to entrepreneurial, commercial, academic and government agency attendees, both from and outside the United States. Eligible attendees include professionals, young professionals, students and interested parties. The working language for the conference is English. The conference will include plenaries for topics of general interests and technical sessions for focused discussions.

Because of the large number of expected submissions, presenters are encouraged to submit abstracts early; the deadline is Feb. 25, 2016.

For more information about the conference and how to submit an abstract for consideration, visit http://www.issconference.org/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to ISSTechChair@atdl-inc.com.

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Cassini Scientist for a Day Essay Contest

The Cassini Scientist for a Day contest challenges students to become NASA scientists studying Saturn. Participants examine three possible targets for the Cassini spacecraft to observe and choose the one they think will yield the best scientific results. This year’s targets are Saturn’s rings and three of its moons; Jupiter as seen from approximately one billion miles away; and Saturn’s moon Tethys passing behind Rhea, another of Saturn’s moons. After researching the three options, students write an essay under 500 words explaining their choice.

The contest is open to all students in the United States in grades 5-12. The essays will be divided into three groups for scoring: grades 5-6, 7-8 and 9-12. All submissions must be students’ original work. Participants may enter as individuals or as part of a team of up to four students.

The deadline for entries is Feb. 26, 2016.

For more information, visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/education/scientistforaday2015/.

If you have questions about this contest, please email scientistforaday@jpl.nasa.gov.

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‘Sky for All: Air Mobility for 2035 and Beyond’ Challenge

NASA’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate is sponsoring the “Sky for All: Air Mobility for 2035 and Beyond” challenge. With a prize purse of $15,000, the challenge seeks innovative ideas for technologies that could be part of a clean-slate, revolutionary design and concept of operations for the airspace of the future.

Potential solvers are tasked with thinking outside the current air traffic management system box and with considering how to manage crowded skies, autonomous operations and cyber security of the system. The challenge is open to all individuals, age 18 or older, private teams, public teams and collegiate teams. Individual competitors and teams may originate from any country, as long as United States federal sanctions do not prohibit participation.

Registration is required and submissions are due Feb. 26, 2016.

For more information about this challenge, please visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/challenge-is-on-to-design-sky-for-all.

Questions about this challenge can be submitted via the HeroX website at https://herox.com/SkyForAll/comments.

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Call for Abstracts: 67th International Astronautical Congress

NASA announces its intent to participate in the 67th International Astronautical Congress, or IAC, and requests that full-time U.S. graduate students attending U.S. universities respond to this “Call for Abstracts.”

The IAC — which is organized by the International Astronautical Federation, or IAF; the International Academy of Astronautics, or IAA; and the International Institute of Space Law, or IISL — is the largest space-related conference worldwide and selects an average of 1,000 scientific papers every year. The upcoming IAC will be held Sept. 26-30, 2016, in Guadalajara, Mexico. NASA’s participation in this event is part of an ongoing effort to connect NASA with the astronautical and space international community.

This “Call for Abstracts” is a precursor to a subsequent submission of a final paper, which may be presented at the 67th IAC. Student authors are invited to submit an abstract regarding an original, unpublished paper that has not been submitted in any other forum. A NASA technical review panel will select abstracts from those that have been accepted by the International Astronautical Federation. This opportunity is for graduate students majoring in fields related to the IAF research topics. Students may submit technical (oral) presentations and/or posters. Students may submit abstracts that are co-authored with their Principal Investigators. However, the student must be the “lead author,” and only the student will present at the IAC. Students must be available to travel to the conference to represent NASA and their universities. Students must be U.S. citizens, attending a U.S. university, who plan to enter a career in space science or aeronautics. Pending the availability of funding, graduate students selected by NASA to participate in the IAC will be considered for subsidy funding from NASA.

Many students and professors currently are involved in NASA-related research that could be considered for this submission. Students submitting abstracts are strongly encouraged to seek advice from professors who are conducting NASA research and/or from NASA scientists and engineers. Abstracts must be related to NASA’s ongoing vision for space exploration and fit into one of the following IAC categories:

— Science and Exploration — Systems sustaining missions, including life, microgravity, space exploration, space debris and Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence, or SETI
— Applications and Operations — Ongoing and future operational applications, including earth observation, communication, navigation, human space endeavors and small satellites
— Technology — Common technologies to space systems including astrodynamics, structures, power and propulsion
— Infrastructure — Systems sustaining space missions including space system transportation, future systems and safety
— Space and Society — Interaction of space with society including education, policy and economics, history, and law

The criteria for the selection will be defined according to the following specifications:
— Abstracts should specify purpose, methodology, results, conclusions and areas for discussion.
— Abstracts should indicate that substantive technical and/or programmatic content is included.
— Abstracts should clearly indicate that the material is new and original; they should explain why and how.
— Prospective author(s) should certify that the paper was not presented at a previous meeting.

Abstracts must be written in English, and the length should not exceed 400 words. Tables or drawings are not allowed in the abstract.

NOTE: If you plan to seek assistance from NASA, you must submit to the International Astronautical Federation and to NASA.
— Submit your abstract to the IAF at their website
www.iafastro.org by Feb. 29, 2016 (14:00 CET).
— Submit your abstract to NASA at
https://iac.nasaprs.com no later than 11:59 p.m. EST on Friday, Feb. 26, 2016.

IAC Paper Selection
Submitted abstracts will be evaluated by the Session Chairs on the basis of technical quality and relevance to the session topics. Selected abstracts may be chosen for eventual oral or poster presentation. Any such choice is not an indication of quality of the submitted abstract. Their evaluation will be submitted to the Symposium Coordinators. They will make acceptance recommendations to the International Programme Committee, which will make the final decision. Please note that any relevance to the Congress main theme will be considered as an advantage.

The following information must be included in the submission: paper title, name of contact author, name of co-author(s), organization(s), full postal address, phone, email of the author and co-author(s). The abstract should specify purpose, methodology, results and conclusions. The abstract should indicate that substantive technical and/or programmatic content is included, as well as clearly indicate that the material is new and original and explain why and how.

Please check the IAF website (www.iafastro.org) regularly to get the latest updates on the Technical Programme.

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White House Office of Science and Technology Policy’s Summer 2016 Policy Internship Program

The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, or OSTP, is seeking students for summer 2016 internships. The OSTP advises the President on the effects of science and technology on domestic and international affairs. The office serves as a source of scientific and technological analyses and judgment for the president with respect to major policies, plans and programs of the federal government.

Policy internships are open to interested students from all majors and programs, including law school programs. Applicants must be U.S. citizens who are enrolled, at least half-time, in an accredited college or university during the period of volunteer service. Students in undergraduate, graduate and professional programs in all fields are encouraged to apply.

While these positions are without compensation, the assignments provide educational enrichment, practical work experience and networking opportunities with other individuals in the science and technology policy arena.

Applications for summer 2016 internships are due Feb. 26, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ostp/about/student.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please contact Rebecca Grimm at rgrimm@ostp.eop.gov.

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Library of Congress 2016 Summer Institutes — Teaching With Primary Sources

The Library of Congress is now accepting applications for its weeklong summer programs for K-12 educators. Held at the Library of Congress in the District of Columbia, this professional development opportunity provides educators with tools and resources to effectively integrate primary sources into K-12 classroom teaching, with an emphasis on student engagement, critical thinking and construction of knowledge.

The Library of Congress is offering five programs this summer: Four of the programs are open to teachers and librarians across all content areas and one focuses on primary sources in science, technology and engineering. During each five-day institute, participants work with Library of Congress education specialists and subject-matter experts to learn effective practices for using primary sources in the classroom, while exploring some of the millions of digitized historical artifacts and documents available on the library’s website.

General Institutes: Open to K-12 teachers and school librarians across the content areas.
— June 27-July 1, 2016
— July 11-15, 2016
— July 18-22, 2016
— July 25-29, 2016

Science, Technology and Engineering Institute: Recommended for K-12 educators who teach science, technology or engineering, or collaborate with those who do.
— June 20-24, 2016

Tuition and materials are free. Participants will be responsible for transportation to and from Washington, D.C., and any required overnight accommodations.

Applications are due Feb. 29, 2016, and require a letter of recommendation.

For more information and to submit an application, visit http://www.loc.gov/teachers/professionaldevelopment/teacherinstitute/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to teachinglcsummer@loc.gov.

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Mars Survival Kit: Lessons and Activities to Guide Your Exploration of Mars!

NASA is embarking on a journey to Mars! Are your students ready to join in the adventure? Spark excitement in your classroom with the Mars Survival Kit.

The Mars Survival Kit is a collection of educational activities for students in grades K-12. Each educational activity includes a brief description, as well as information about how the activities and lessons align to the Next Generation Science Standards.

Start your classroom’s journey to Mars at http://go.nasa.gov/1NnZ0Rg.

To learn more about NASA’s Journey to Mars, visit https://www.nasa.gov/topics/journeytomars/index.html.

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2016 NASA Space Settlement Design Contest

Design a space settlement! Space settlements are permanent communities in orbit, as opposed to a place to work for a few months and go home. Designing a space settlement involves physics, mathematics, space science, environmental science and many other disciplines.

The NASA Space Settlement Design Contest is for K-12 students throughout in the world. Individuals or teams may enter. Grade levels are judged separately, except for the grand prize. A certificate will be sent to each participant.

Submissions must be received by March 1, 2016.

For more information about the NASA Space Settlement Design Contest, visit http://settlement.arc.nasa.gov/Contest/.

Please email questions about the contest to Al Globus at aglobus@mail.arc.nasa.gov.

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NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Seek Students for Climate Research Initiative

The NASA GISS Climate Change Research Initiative is a summer internship opportunity for high school and undergraduate students to work directly with NASA scientists in a NASA research project associated with the science related to climate change.

During the summer session, high school interns will work for 40 hours per week for a six-week period and undergraduate students work full time for eight weeks to complete a research project. Interns will create a scientific research paper and presentation and present their scientific poster at a STEM symposium.

All applicants must be U.S. citizens who are at least 16 years old and reside within a 50-mile radius of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies located in New York City.

Applications are due March 1, 2016.

For more information, visit http://smdepo.org/post/8474.

Please direct inquiries about the NASA GISS Climate Change Research Initiative to Matthew Pearce at matthew.d.pearce@nasa.gov.

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Now Accepting Applications for NASA Summer Internships

Now is your chance to apply for exciting hands-on summer internship opportunities available at all NASA centers. High school, undergraduate and graduate students are needed to help NASA scientists and engineers with ongoing scientific and engineering research, technology development and spaceflight operations activities. Internship opportunities also exist in nontechnical areas such as communications, budget, procurement, education and human resources. NASA internships are stipend-paid and offer students mentor-directed, degree-related, real-time tasks. If you think you have what it takes to be part of NASA’s Journey to Mars, please visit https://intern.nasa.gov today to apply or to learn more about the numerous opportunities available to you.

The deadline for summer applications is March 1, 2016.

Please submit inquiries about the NASA Internships, Fellowships, and Scholarships One Stop Shopping Initiative, or NIFS OSSI, via https://intern.nasa.gov/oic/.

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NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellowships

The NASA Postdoctoral Program provides early-career and more senior scientists the opportunity to share in NASA’s mission. NPP Fellows work on one- to three-year assignments with NASA scientists and engineers at NASA centers and institutes to advance NASA’s missions in Earth science, heliophysics, planetary science, astrophysics, space bioscience, aeronautics, engineering, human exploration and space operations, astrobiology, and science management.

U.S. citizens, lawful permanent residents and foreign nationals eligible for J-1 status as a research scholar may apply. Applicants must have completed a doctorate or equivalent degree before beginning the fellowship, but they may apply while completing degree requirements. Applicants who earned the Ph.D. more than five years before the deadline date are categorized as senior fellows; all applicants, no matter their category, must apply and become eligible for an NPP award via the same process.

Interested applicants may apply by one of three annual application deadlines: March 1, July 1 and November 1.

For more information and application procedures, go to https://npp.usra.edu/.

Please direct questions about this fellowship opportunity to npphelp@usra.edu.

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2016 MAVEN Elementary Teachers’ Summit

The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution mission began orbiting Mars on Sept. 21, 2014. MAVEN is exploring the planet′s upper atmosphere, ionosphere and interactions with the solar wind. The mission is providing invaluable insight into the history of Mars′ atmosphere, climate, liquid water and planetary habitability.

Join the MAVEN education team for a four-day workshop in Boulder, Colorado. This professional development for elementary educators is a great opportunity to explore hands-on activities and blended science/literacy lessons.

The workshop will take place June 14-17, 2016. Participants will receive free dorm housing, a $150 stipend, continental breakfast and lunch, and a certificate of completion. Travel expenses are not covered.

Applications are due March 18, 2016. Space is limited, so interested educators are encouraged to apply early.

For more information about the workshop and to apply online, visit http://lasp.colorado.edu/home/maven/education-outreach/for-educators/summit/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to epomail@lasp.colorado.edu.

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NASA/Applied Physics Laboratory Summer Internship 2016

The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, or APL, is offering summer projects for students interested in working on NASA missions or space-related research opportunities.

Students participating in the 2016 NASA/APL Internship Program will work at the APL facility in Laurel, Maryland. Students will receive a stipend for the 10-week program, and housing will be provided.

Eligible students include undergraduate rising sophomores through Ph.D. students as of fall 2016. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and have a minimum GPA of 3.0.

Applications are due March 25, 2016.

For more information about the internship and to apply online, visit https://portals.jhuapl.edu/aplnasaintern/Home.aspx.

Questions about the NASA/APL Internships Program should be emailed to aplnasaintern-web@jhuapl.edu.

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2016 LiftOff Summer Institute

Registration is now open for the 2016 LiftOff Summer Institute, sponsored by NASA’s Texas Space Grant Consortium. This weeklong professional development training for teachers will be held June 26-July 1, 2016, at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. This competitive aerospace workshop emphasizes science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, learning experiences through speakers, hands-on activities and field investigations.

The theme for this year’s institute is “Exploration: Past, Present and Future.” The event will focus on how NASA is learning from past exploration and current space station research and how it will apply its discoveries to future missions to deep space.

Attendees must be U.S. citizens currently employed as classroom teachers of grades 4-12 with at least one year teaching experience prior to the institute. Texas Space Grant pays all expenses for any Texas teacher selected. Other Space Grant Consortia fund teachers from their states.

Applications are due April 15, 2016.

For more information and to access the online application, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/liftoff/.

If you have questions about the 2016 LiftOff Summer Institute, please email your inquiries to Margaret Baguio at baguio@tsgc.utexas.edu.

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Call for Papers: NASA in the ‘Long’ Civil Rights Movement Symposium

The History Office at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center and the Department of History at the University of Alabama Huntsville invite academics, graduate students and independent scholars to submit proposals for papers to be presented at a two-day symposium, March 16-17, 2017. The symposium will take place at the University of Alabama Huntsville and will address the role/relationship of NASA to the “Long” Civil Rights Movement, particularly in, but not limited to, the Deep South (Huntsville, Florida, Houston, Mississippi and New Orleans).

The conceptual framework for the symposium is provided by Jacquelyn Dowd Hall’s 2005 essay in the Journal of American History, “The Long Civil Rights Movement and the Political Uses of the Past,” which called upon historians to produce new “modes of writing and speaking that emphasize individual agency … while also dramatizing the hidden history of politics and institutions.” Along these lines, the conference welcomes papers addressing the Civil Rights experience across NASA that not only explore the experience of African Americans, but also of women, immigrants and other politically/legally marginalized groups. The intention is to publish a subset of the papers as an anthology.

Those interested in presenting a paper at the symposium should send an abstract of no more than 400 words and a short biography or curriculum vita, including affiliation, to Brian Odom at brian.c.odom@nasa.gov or Dr. Stephen Waring at warings@uah.edu by July 31, 2016.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/centers/marshall/history/call-for-papers-nasa-in-the-long-civil-rights-movement-symposium-university-of-alabama.html.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Brian Odom at brian.c.odom@nasa.gov.

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Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The Announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design (STEAMD); or activities culturally relevant to or focused on unrepresented in STEM careers populations, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or non-reimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA Announcement.

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Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions and museums to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

There will be a nominal shipping fee that must be paid online with a credit card.  To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.

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Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at https://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

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