NASA Education Express Message — Nov. 3, 2016

Check out the latest NASA opportunities for the education community.

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


New This Week!


Free NASA Educator Professional Development Webinars
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: Nov. 3, 2016, at 4 p.m. EDT

Join NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center for Maryland STEMFest 2016 Events
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Dates: Nov. 4-13, 2016

Celebrate National Distance Learning Week With NASA’s Digital Learning Network
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Dates: Nov. 7-11, 2016

NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Hosts Beginning Engineering, Science and Technology STEM EPD Program
Audience: K-8 and Informal Educators
Kickoff Event Date: Nov. 14, 2016

Free Program — Cubes in SpaceTM
Audience: Students Ages 11-18 and Their Teachers
Registration Deadline: Jan. 6, 2017

National Science Foundation’s 2016-2017 Community College Innovation Challenge
Audience: Community College Students and Faculty
Application Deadline: Feb. 15, 2017

2017-2018 Virginia Space Grant Consortium STEM Bridge Scholarships
Audience: Minority Undergraduate Students (Underclassmen) at Virginia Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: March 13, 2017

What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website?
Audience: K-6 Educators


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

Photo Contest — Win a Trip to Space Camp With Space Racers
Audience: Parents and/or Guardians of One or More Minor Children
Entry Deadline: Nov. 6, 2016, at 11:59 p.m. ET

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Postdoctoral Fellowships in Space Biology to Study the Microbiome of the International Space Station as a Built Environment
Audience: Postdoctoral Students
Required Notice of Intent Deadline: Nov. 7, 2016

Sally Ride EarthKAM @ Space Camp Announces Fall 2016 Mission
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Mission Date: Nov. 8-12, 2016

National Science Foundation’s Advancing Informal STEM Learning Program
Audience: Organizations Interested in Advancing STEM Learning in Informal Environments
Full Proposal Deadline: Nov. 8, 2016

National Science Foundation’s East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes Fellowship Program
Audience: U.S. Graduate Students
Application Deadline: Nov. 10, 2016

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program Accepting Applications for 2017-2018 Fellowship Year
Audience: K-12 STEM Educators
Application Deadline: Nov. 17, 2016, at 8 p.m. EST

2017 RASC-AL Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Students
Entry Deadline: Nov. 17, 2016

NASA CubeSat Launch Opportunity
Audience: Informal Educators, Higher Education Educators and Students
Proposal Deadline: Nov. 22, 2016

Call for Proposals — NASA Research Announcement for Use of the NASA Physical Sciences Informatics System: Appendix C
Audience: Graduate Students
Proposal Deadline: Dec. 15, 2016

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students and Higher Education Institutions


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Teachers Connect: LaRC Centennial Badge Webinar
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-8
Event Date: Nov. 3, 2016, at 4 p.m. EDT
This webinar will focus for the first half-hour on clouds and their role in Earth’s “energy budget” and on implementation ideas using GLOBE for different types of classroom settings as part of Earth Right Now: LaRC 100th digital badge. We also will talk about student badge implementations, extension ideas and extra resources. The second half-hour will be very similar but centered on the engineering design process using the Drag Race to Mars Engineering Design Challenge as part of Journey to Mars: LaRC 100th digital badge. This portion of the webinar will focus on forces and motion and math calculations using paper airplanes and testing different materials as part of Aeronautics: LaRC 100th digital badge. This webinar meets requirements of teacher discussions within the NASA Langley 100th EPDC digital badges. To learn more about the Langley 100th digital badges, login to https://nasatxstate-epdc.net/ and search for LaRC 100th. Register online to participate.
https://www.etouches.com/207888

NASA Technology in Your Classroom: Mission Imagination — Heart to Heart
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-8
Event Date: Nov. 7, 2016, at 5 p.m. EST
Step into the role of NASA flight surgeons with this innovative TI-Nspire™ activity that helps your students understand the science of how life in the microgravity environment of space affects the human heart. Developed by NASA and Texas Instruments for middle grades’ life science and high school biology, “Heart to Heart” looks back to the earliest days of America’s space program; at NASA’s ongoing Human Research Program aboard the International Space Station; and forward to a manned Mars mission. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/199054

NASA Technology in Your Classroom: NASA’s Eyes
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: Nov. 8, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EST
This webinar introduces NASA’s Eyes, a three-part, web-based resource that allows students and educators to study Earth from space, the solar system and extrasolar planets. The webinar addresses Next Generation Science Standards. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/199137

Making Waves With NASA: Optics Resources
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-12
Event Date: Nov. 9, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EST
This webinar gives an overview of NASA resources for teaching about waves, lenses and mirrors. The resources covered in the webinar address the Next Generation Science Standard PS4. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/199138

NASA Technology in Your Classroom: Solar Eclipse 2017
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: Nov. 10, 2016, at 4 p.m. EST
Participants in this webinar will discuss Solar Eclipse 2017 “Spotlights” for the classroom using NASA’s unique resources. Educators will discover NASA websites, digital badging and applications to implement with students before next year’s 2017 stellar event! Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/196478

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


Join NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center for Maryland STEMFest 2016 Events

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center will celebrate Maryland STEMFest 2016 in a very special way: by highlighting next year’s total solar eclipse! On Aug. 21, 2017, all 48 contiguous states will have the opportunity to view a solar eclipse — an event that has not been seen across the lower 48 states in 38 years! The event will provide scientists the chance to collect valuable research on the sun, its corona and other features. Goddard’s programs for Maryland STEMFest 2016 will highlight the STEM behind solar eclipses, so please join us this year as we celebrate this monumental occasion!

New Interactive Classroom Experience From NASA’s Digital Learning Network — Our Magnificent Sun: Solar Eclipse 2017 Edition
Scheduling Options Available Nov. 4-13, 2016
https://www.nasa.gov/dln/lessons#Our Magnificent Sun
With the solar eclipse of 2017 approaching, Our Magnificent Sun for younger grades will help students answer their questions about the sun in a highly interactive session. During this web-based, interactive classroom program, students illustrate features of the sun by participating in a story time. Our Magnificent Sun for upper grades uses a teachable moment to introduce space weather and answer questions students might have about a solar eclipse.

Join NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center at Greenbelt Observatory Public Star Party
Nov. 5, 2016, 6-9 p.m. EDT
The Astronomical Society of Greenbelt and the Goddard Astronomy Club are hosting a special Maryland STEM Festival star party at the City of Greenbelt Observatory, weather permitting. This event will start an hour earlier than regular ASG star parties in order to give children and young adults a chance to see the various telescopes being set up. Attendees will have the opportunity to observe the moon, planets, and deep sky objects such as galaxies, nebulae and star clusters. For information, contact Goddard’s Astronomy Club (joseph.novotka-1@nasa.gov) or Deanna Trask (deanna.m.trask@nasa.gov).

From the Digital Learning Network at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center: STEM Shorts
Nov. 7, 2016, at 10 a.m. EST
— Science: The Science of the Sun
Nov. 8, 2016, at 10 a.m. EST
— Technology: Studying Earth and Our Solar System
Nov. 9, 2016, at 10 a.m. EST
— Engineering: Designing a Satellite
Nov. 10, 2016, at 10 a.m. EST
— Math: How Does Math Relate to the Solar Eclipse?
http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-gsfc
Explore solar eclipses with NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center through the new STEM Shorts digital program! Each presentation will be a brief 15-minute informational lesson followed by a live question and answer session from the audience. Questions can be submitted via twitter @GSFCEducation using #STEMShorts or by email to gsfceducation@gmail.com. Please contact Lindsey Jones at lindsey.jones-1@nasa.gov for more information or general inquiries about the program.

Join STEM@NASA Goddard in Celebrating STEM During Maryland STEM Fest 2016
Nov. 7-10, 2016, 1-1:30 p.m. EST
Celebrate Maryland STEM Fest 2016 with STEM@NASA Goddard! During these daily events, participants can interact live with scientists and engineers as they discuss how they practice STEM in their careers. Each day will highlight a letter in STEM: Science Monday, Technology Tuesday, Engineering Wednesday, and Math Thursday. The programs will stream live on NASA Goddard’s Ustream channel, and participants may submit questions by email and Twitter. For more information, please contact Erin McKinley at erin.e.mckinley@nasa.gov.

Professional Development Opportunity: NASA Goddard’s Solar Eclipse Spotlight Digital Badge for Educators
Ongoing Throughout the School Year With Special Incentive for Completion Before Nov. 13, 2016
Digital badging is an online professional development process for certifying learning. The NASA STEM EPDC Digital Badging System allows you to select from a wide variety of STEM topics, engage in exciting learning opportunities, demonstrate your mastery of the topic, and receive a badge of accomplishment for your work that you can share with others. The latest NASA Goddard Solar Eclipse Spotlight 2017 badge is a great way to prepare for the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse! Educators who complete this digital badge by Nov. 13, 2016, will have the opportunity for priority scheduling to take part in a Solar Eclipse 2017 module from NASA’s Distance Learning Network.

To sign up, visit https://nasatxstate-epdc.net/ and use the login buttons to begin exploring this digital badge as well as other exciting professional development opportunities available to you through the NASA STEM EPDC Digital Badging System. Please contact Kelly Kohli at kelly.kohli@nasa.gov for questions or additional information.

Join NASA’s Goddard Space Center and GLOBE for “Maryland-wide Eyes on the Skies”
Nov. 9, 2016, 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. EST

http://observer.globe.gov/about/citizen-science
Join NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland and NASA’s GLOBE program on Nov. 9, 2016, for a statewide day of citizen science! GLOBE Observer invites you to make environmental observations that complement NASA satellite observations to help scientists studying Earth and the global environment. Version 1.1 includes GLOBE Clouds, which allows you to photograph clouds and record sky observations and compare them with NASA satellite images. GLOBE is now the major source of cloud observations by humans, which provide more information than automated systems. Recommended observation hours are between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. EST.

University of Maryland Eastern Shore 2nd Annual Maryland STEM Festival
Nov. 9, 2016, 6-7:30 p.m. EST
The University of Maryland Eastern Shore is hosting the 2nd Annual Maryland STEM Festival. STEM activities will include underwater robotics, amphibious vehicles, 3-D printing, space exploration and more. K-12 students are invited to embark on this virtual experience to NASA Goddard’s Digital Learning Network and will be able to discuss what it is like to live and work in space, how space exploration affects lives here on Earth, and challenges that astronauts living in space must overcome. Please contact Jocelyn Koller at jckoller@umd.edu for additional information.

NASA Technology in Your Classroom: Solar Eclipse 2017
Nov. 10, 2016, at 4 p.m. EST
https://www.etouches.com/196478
Participants in this webinar will discuss Solar Eclipse 2017 “Spotlights” for the classroom using NASA’s unique resources. Educators will discover NASA websites, digital badging and applications to implement with students before the 2017 solar eclipse! Register online to participate.

STEM@NASA Goddard: Library Edition — NASA Heliophysics
Nov. 10, 2016, 5-6 p.m. EST
NASA heliophysics experts will be broadcast live to county libraries across Maryland. Don’t miss this opportunity to learn about the incredible work NASA does and the upcoming 2017 Total Solar Eclipse! Contact your local library http://directory.sailor.lib.md.us/pub_use/county_map.cfm for more information on how to participate. Participants will be able to pose questions to NASA expert via email and Twitter. For more information on how to interact with our experts, please contact Jordan Snyder at jordan.a.snyder@nasa.gov.


Celebrate National Distance Learning Week With NASA’s Digital Learning Network

Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network in celebrating National Distance Learning Week, Nov. 7-11, 2016. The DLN invites you to take part in one or more of the special programs listed below and visit their website for classroom lessons and special events throughout the year.

From the DLN at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center: STEM Shorts
Nov. 7, 2016, at 10 a.m. EST
— Science: The Science of the Sun
Nov. 8, 2016, at 10 a.m. EST
— Technology: Studying Earth and Our Solar System
Nov. 9, 2016, at 10 a.m. EST
— Engineering: Designing a Satellite
Nov. 10, 2016, at 10 a.m. EST
— Math: How Does Math Relate to the Solar Eclipse?
http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-gsfc
Explore solar eclipses with NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center through the new STEM Shorts digital program! Each presentation will be a brief 15-minute informational lesson followed by a live question and answer session from the audience. Questions can be submitted via twitter @GSFCEducation using #STEMShorts or by email to gsfceducation@gmail.com. Please contact Lindsey Jones at lindsey.jones-1@nasa.gov for more information or general inquiries about the program.

From the DLN at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center: Working for the National Park Service: Live From Little River Canyon National Preserve Presented by: Niki Wayner, Little River Canyon National Preserve
Nov. 7, 2016, at 2 p.m.  EST

Have you ever imagined yourself working for the National Park Service? Are you interested in a career in science? Meet some of the people who help protect the plants, animals, sounds and oceans in the National Park Service. The National Park Service preserves the natural and cultural resources and values of the National Park System for the enjoyment, education and inspiration of this and future generations. In this videoconference, you will learn about some of the fascinating careers available.
Note: This video conference is only for schools in the state of Alabama. For more information, contact Scott Anderson at scott.c.anderson@nasa.gov.

From the DLN at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center: NASA STARS en Español With Alex Bengoa From NASA’s Ground Systems Development and Operations Program
Nov. 10, 2016, at Noon EST
http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-dlinfo
NASA STARS en Español promotes awareness of NASA’s diverse career opportunities for minority populations and highlights Hispanic professionals as role models in STEM careers. This monthly webcast is live-streamed in Spanish. DLN invites you to participate with your STEM classes, Spanish classes, Spanish clubs, etc. Bring your classroom into the conversation because Students Talking About Real STEM are the STARS of tomorrow. Learn about November’s guest speaker at https://www.txstate-epdc.net/epdc-post/alex-j-bengoa/. Questions can be submitted during the event via Twitter using #NASASTARS or by email to astrosdenasa@gmail.com. For more information about the program, visit https://www.txstate-epdc.net/nasa-stars/.

NASA’s Digital Learning Network celebrates distance learning every day through a wide variety of programs that include:
DLN Interactive Classroom — DLN specialists connect with one or more schools to deliver an interactive classroom lesson. Descriptions of the lessons can be found at: https://www.nasa.gov/dln/lessons.
DLN Live — DLN specialists or subject matter experts present a special topic related to current events that may involve interviews, demonstrations and live questions from the audience.
DLN Virtual Visits — The DLN specialists connects a subject matter expert with a specific classroom where topics about careers and NASA experiences are discussed.
DLN Virtual Field Trip — A DLN specialist gives a virtual tour of points of interest such as a laboratory or launch on a NASA center.

For more information and other DLN events, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln.


NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Hosts Beginning Engineering, Science and Technology STEM EPD Program

The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center’s Office of Education at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York City invites K-8 STEM and informal educators to attend a series of professional development sessions to learn about the Beginning Engineering, Science and Technology Program!

Become part of a STEM educator cohort to help improve STEM education experiences for your students and community. Participants will explore hands-on, NASA-themed engineering design challenges, attend presentations from NASA subject matter experts, and develop BEST STEM lesson to fit individual classroom needs. Participants will also receive supplementary NASA educational resources and the opportunity to join an ongoing STEM community of practice.

NASA’s BEST activity guides bring the principles of engineering alive to younger audiences. The content in the guides can be used to supplement curricula during the school day or as activities for after-school clubs. Educators may use the materials as a set or as individual activities.

This professional development opportunity kicks off with a webinar on Nov. 14, 2016. Seven additional in-person training sessions will take place at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York City. Participants must attend all sessions to receive certificate of completion.

For more information, including a full list of session dates and registration details, visit http://smdepo.org/post/9102.

Please direct inquiries about this opportunity to Matthew Pearce at matthew.d.pearce@nasa.gov.


Free Program — Cubes in SpaceTM

Cubes in Space™ provides students ages 11-18 an opportunity to design and compete to launch an experiment into space at no cost! Cubes in Space™ is offered by idoodledu, inc., in partnership with NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center’s Wallops Flight Facility, the Colorado Space Grant Consortium and NASA’s Langley Research Center.

This global education program based on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics) enables students to learn about space exploration using innovative problem-solving and inquiry-based learning methods. Participants have access to resources that help prepare them to design and develop an experiment to be integrated into a small cube.

This year, experiments will be launched into space via sounding rocket from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island, Virginia, in late June 2017 or from a high-altitude balloon launched from NASA’s Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility in Fort Sumner, New Mexico, in August 2017.

The deadline for program registration is Jan. 6, 2017. For more information, visit http://www.cubesinspace.com. Questions about this program may be directed to info@cubesinspace.com.

About idoodedu inc.

idoodledu inc., a charitable nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization, is a wholly owned subsidiary of idoodlelearning inc., and was created in 2015 as a legal vehicle to bring public/private partnerships and publicly funded programs to all learners and educators. idoodlelearning inc. is an education company based in Ottawa, Canada; London, England; and Virginia Beach, Virginia, USA.


National Science Foundation’s 2016-2017 Community College Innovation Challenge

The National Science Foundation’s Community College Innovation Challenge is underway and seeking teams to propose innovative STEM-based solutions for real-world problems. Teams must include three to five community college students, a faculty mentor, and a community or industry partner.

Challenge entries consist of two components: a written portion and a 90-second video. Each team’s entry must address one of the three themes outlined by the National Science Foundation. This year’s themes are Maker to Manufacturer, Energy and Environment, and Security Technologies.

Finalists will be invited to attend an Innovation Boot Camp, a professional development workshop on innovation and entrepreneurship.

The entry submission deadline is Feb. 15, 2017.

For additional information about the challenge, visit https://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/communitycollege/index.jsp.

Questions about this challenge should be directed to InnovationChallenge@nsf.gov.


2017-2018 Virginia Space Grant Consortium STEM Bridge Scholarships

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium is offering renewable scholarships to undergraduate students studying science, technology, engineering or mathematics. The STEM Bridge Scholarships are $1,000.

The scholarships are available to students who are U.S. citizens from any federally recognized minority group and are enrolled full time at one of the five VSGC member universities: The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia, and Virginia Tech. Applicants must have completed at least one year of a STEM undergraduate program and be classified as a sophomore during the 2017-2018 academic year.

The STEM Bridge Program connects students to future opportunities by mentoring and guiding them to future VSGC scholarships and NASA-related paid internships. The program encourages students to explore how their majors can apply to NASA’s mission.

This is a competitive program, and awards are based on student academic merit and the quality of interest essay, as well as letters of recommendation from current college faculty who can attest to the student’s interest in STEM areas.

The deadline for submitting applications is March 13, 2017.

For more information, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/Bridge/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to Tysha Sanford at tsanford@odu.edu.


What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website?

Space Place is a NASA website for elementary students, their teachers and their parents. Check it out at www.spaceplace.nasa.gov.

Don’t forget to subscribe to our monthly e-newsletter, the NASA Space Place Gazette! http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/subscribe

New Resources

Planet Masks
— Our solar system has eight unique and special planets. This fun, simple activity for kids allows them to explore and learn about what makes each planet different!
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/planet-masks

How Much Water Is on Earth? — Earth has a lot of water. But exactly how much? Check out our new educational video and poster for kids.
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/water

What Is La Niña? — This is a weather pattern that begins in the Pacific Ocean. Learn all about La Niña and how it differs from El Niño in our new article for kids.
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/la-nina

Earth’s Atmosphere — Earth has a wonderful atmosphere. It keeps us warm and gives us oxygen to breathe. But did you know that our atmosphere has six layers? Each one is unique. Teach kids about Earth’s different atmospheric layers in this series of articles.
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/atmosphere

Make Pumpkin Stencils — Celebrate the fall season by making space pumpkins! This activity is simple, fun and educational. Your kids will love it!
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/pumpkins

Special Days to Celebrate
Find out about noteworthy days in NASA and space history that you can observe in your classroom.

Nov. 8 — X-rays were discovered on this day in 1895.

Explore X-rays with our Cosmic Colors viewer.
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/cosmic-colors

Nov. 17 — Leonid meteor shower at maximum
Learn about meteor showers and find tips on how to get the best view.
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/meteor-shower

Nov. 20 — Happy birthday to astronomer Edwin Hubble (1889)!
The Hubble Space Telescope was named after him. Learn all about the amazing telescope!
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/hubble-wfpc

Dec. 3 — Pioneer 10 flew past Jupiter on this day in 1973.
Jupiter is the largest planet in our solar system. It has big storms like the Great Red Spot, which has been going on for hundreds of years.
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/all-about-jupiter

Dec. 11 — The first aurora borealis sighting was recorded on this day in 1719.
Make a pastel aurora to learn more about these beautiful light displays.
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/pastel-aurora

Dec. 21 — Today is the first day of winter!
Why do we have seasons here on Earth?
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/seasons

Share
Do you want some help spreading the word about NASA’s Space Place? We have a page with ready-to-use website descriptions, logos and links to all our social media. Check out http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/share.

Subscribe to Our Monthly E-newsletter!
Interested in keeping up with the latest and greatest news from NASA Space Place? Subscribe to the NASA Space Place Gazette. The NASA Space Place Gazette is for educators, parents and space enthusiasts of all ages. It includes special bulletins for noteworthy days and NASA events, such as a lunar eclipse, planet flyby or rover landing. It’s easy to subscribe — just click here.
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/subscribe

Send Feedback
Please let us know your ideas about ways to use The Space Place in your teaching. Send them to info@spaceplace.nasa.gov.


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


Photo Contest — Win a Trip to Space Camp With Space Racers

Space Racers® Season 2 is launching on Nov. 5! This animated TV series follows a group of adventurous spaceship cadets and exposes young children to key aspects of the science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, curricula. Space Racers is collaborating in a partnership with the U.S. Space & Rocket Center’s Space Camp, to which NASA serves as technical and educational consultant pursuant to a cooperative agreement.

To celebrate the new season, parents and guardians are invited to submit a photo of their future astronaut for a chance to win a prize! Daily giveaways include memberships to science museums across the country. And a grand prize winner will receive an all-expenses paid family trip to Space Camp!

The deadline to enter is Nov. 6, 2016, at 11:59 p.m. ET.

For complete rules and submission guidelines, visit http://contest.spaceracers.org/.

For more information on Space Racers, go to www.SpaceRacers.org.

Please submit questions about this opportunity to info@spaceracers.org.


DEADLINE EXTENDED: Postdoctoral Fellowships in Space Biology to Study the Microbiome of the International Space Station as a Built Environment

NASA is seeking proposals from potential postdoctoral fellows to conduct studies to characterize microbial populations isolated from the International Space Station. Selected studies will provide insight into how microbes and microbial populations adapt to spaceflight. Proposed experiments will use microbial isolates collected from the space station that have been archived at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston.

Proposals will be accepted from graduate students in their final year of their Ph.D. or equivalent degree program; from postdoctoral fellows (Ph.D., M.D., D.D.S., D.V.M., or equivalent doctoral degree from an accredited domestic or foreign institution); or from applicants who received a doctoral degree within the past two years but have not yet had postdoctoral training. Applicants must have no more than four years of postdoctoral research experience at the time of the initial or the subsequent resubmission or revision application. The program is open to U.S. citizens, permanent residents, or persons with pre-existing visas obtained through their sponsoring institutions that permit postdoctoral training for the project’s duration. Sponsoring institutions must be U.S. academic, government or commercial institutions that will provide appropriate mentors.

Interested applicants must submit a required notice of intent no later than Nov. 7, 2016.

For more information, visit http://go.nasa.gov/2eup7bg .

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Dr. David Tomko at dtomko@nasa.gov.


Sally Ride EarthKAM @ Space Camp Announces Fall 2016 Mission

Registration is open for the fall 2016 mission for the Sally Ride EarthKAM @ Space Camp program taking place Nov. 8-12, 2016. During the mission, students worldwide may submit requests to have a camera aboard the International Space Station capture an image of a specific location on Earth. Related resources, including images and activities, are available for use in the classroom. The optional online activities are targeted at middle school students but are adaptable for other grade levels. All students and educators are welcome, including participants in after-school programs.

For more information and to register for the upcoming mission, visit https://www.earthkam.org/.

Please submit questions about the Sally Ride EarthKAM @ Space Camp program via https://www.earthkam.org/contact.


National Science Foundation’s Advancing Informal STEM Learning Program

The National Science Foundation is accepting proposals for the Advancing Informal STEM Learning, or AISL, program. This program seeks to advance new approaches to evidence-based understanding of the design and development of STEM learning opportunities for the public in informal environments; to provide multiple pathways for broadening access to and engagement in STEM learning experiences; and to advance innovative research on and assessment of STEM learning in informal environments.

Proposals are due Nov. 8, 2016.

For additional information about the program, including anticipated awards, visit http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2015/nsf15593/nsf15593.htm.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to DRLAISL@NSF.gov.


National Science Foundation’s East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes Fellowship Program

The National Science Foundation is accepting applications for its East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes, or EAPSI, Fellowship Program. This program provides U.S. graduate students in science, engineering and education with an opportunity to spend eight weeks during the summer conducting research at one of seven host locations in East Asia and the Pacific. Host locations are Australia, China, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, Singapore and Taiwan. The program is a collaboration between NSF and counterpart agencies in each host location.

EAPSI is open to graduate students who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents and are enrolled in a research-oriented master’s or doctoral program in science or engineering. Applicants must propose a research project in a science, technology, engineering or mathematics field supported by NSF. Applicants identify and contact host researchers on their own prior to submitting their EAPSI proposals. Lists of prospective host institutions are available at the opportunity website.

NSF provides EAPSI Fellows with a $5,000 stipend and roundtrip airplane ticket to the host location. The program’s foreign counterparts provide in-country living expenses and accommodations. (Arrangements vary by host location.)

The application submission deadline for summer 2017 is Nov. 10, 2016.

For additional information about the program, including location-specific handbooks, a How to Apply guide, and helpful tips for applicants, visit www.nsf.gov/eapsi.

Questions about this fellowship opportunity should be directed to eapsi@nsf.gov.


Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites U.S. educational institutions to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets, and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

Nonprofit museums, libraries and planetariums (sponsored through their respective State Agency Surplus Property, or SASP, organization) are also eligible to make requests. Visit the link below for special instructions to request items. To find the contact information for the SASP representative for your area, visit http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/100851.

A nominal shipping fee must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.


Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program Accepting Applications for 2017-2018 Fellowship Year

The Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program provides a unique opportunity for accomplished K-12 educators in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics to serve in the national education arena. Fellows spend 11 months working in a federal agency or U.S. congressional office to bring their extensive classroom knowledge and experience to efforts related to STEM education programs and policy.

To be eligible, applicants must be U.S. citizens who are currently employed full time in a U.S. public or private elementary or secondary school or school district. Applicants must have been teaching full time in a public or private elementary or secondary school for at least five of the last seven years in a STEM discipline.

Current sponsoring agencies included NASA, the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation. The DOE sponsors up to four placements in U.S. congressional offices.

The Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program is managed by the DOE Office of Science through its Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists, in collaboration with the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education and partnering federal agencies.

Program applications are due Nov. 17, 2016, at 8 p.m. EST and must be submitted through an online application system.

Additional information about the program, including eligibility requirements, program benefits, application requirements and access to the online application system, may be found at http://science.energy.gov/wdts/einstein/.

Please direct inquiries about the Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program to sc.einstein@science.doe.gov.


2017 RASC-AL Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge

NASA and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2017 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts-Academic Linkage, or RASC-AL, Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge. This new special edition challenge for 2017 is taking place in celebration of the 100th anniversary of NASA’s Langley Research Center! This design competition is aimed at university-level engineering students and is one of several NASA RASC-AL competitions.

The Mars Ice Challenge requires participants to build a prototype ice drilling system. Teams will compete to extract the most water from simulated Martian subsurface ice at NASA Langley in a three-day competition during summer 2017. During this competition, each participating team will receive a simulated subsurface ice test station composed of solid blocks of ice. The blocks will be in an ice container with a layer of overburden (dirt, rocks, etc.) on top. After drilling through the overburden into the ice, teams must devise innovative solutions to deliver clean water from the ice to an external storage tank (filtering out sediments).

Up to four members of the team (plus the faculty advisor) may travel to NASA Langley for the onsite testing. The drilling and water extraction systems must operate autonomously or via teleoperation, and they are subject to mass, volume and power constraints.

After completion of the test and validation portion of the project, teams will present their drilling concepts to a design review panel composed of NASA judges. Presentations will be based on the team’s technical paper that details the drill concept’s path-to-flight (how the design can be applied to actual drilling on Mars).

Teams must submit a project plan for their proposed system by Nov. 17, 2016.

A Steering Committee of NASA experts will evaluate the project plans and select up to eight teams to compete against each other at NASA’s Langley Research Center in summer 2017. Each of the selected teams will receive a $10,000 stipend to develop their drilling and water extraction system.

The RASCAL Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge is open to full-time undergraduate or graduate students majoring in engineering, science or related disciplines at an accredited university in the United States. University design teams must include (a) one faculty or industry advisor with a university affiliation and (b) two or more undergraduate or graduate students. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

For more information about this competition, visit http://rascal.nianet.org/mars-ice-challenge.

If you have questions about this competition, please contact the RASC-AL team at rascal@nianet.org.


NASA CubeSat Launch Opportunity

NASA has opened the next round of its CubeSat Launch Initiative in an effort to engage the growing community of space enthusiasts who can contribute to NASA’s space exploration goals.

The CubeSat Launch Initiative gives students, teachers and faculty a chance to get hands-on flight hardware development experience in the process of designing, building and operating small research satellites. It also provides a low-cost pathway to space for research in the areas of science, exploration, technology development, education or operations consistent with NASA’s Strategic Plan.

Applicants must submit their proposals electronically by 4:30 p.m. EST, Nov. 22, 2016. NASA will choose the payloads by Feb. 17, 2017, but initial selection does not guarantee a launch opportunity. Certain selected experiments are slated to be flown as auxiliary payloads on agency rocket launches or to be deployed from the International Space Station beginning in 2017 and running through 2020. NASA does not fund the development of the small satellites, and this opportunity is open only to U.S. nonprofit organizations and U.S. accredited educational organizations.

One goal of the CubeSat Launch Initiative is to extend the successes of space exploration to all 50 states by launching a small satellite from at least one participant in each state in the next five years. During this round, NASA is particularly focused on gaining participation in the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and 18 states not previously selected for the CubeSat Launch Initiative. These states are Arkansas, Delaware, Georgia, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, South Dakota, Washington and Wyoming.

CubeSats are in a class of research spacecraft called nanosatellites. The base CubeSat dimensions are about 4 inches by 4 inches by 4 inches (10 centimeters by 10 centimeters by 11 centimeters), which equals one “cube,” or 1U. CubeSats supported by this launch effort include volumes of 1U, 2U, 3U and 6U. CubeSats of 1U, 2U and 3U size typically have a mass of about three pounds (1.33 kilograms) per 1U Cube. A 6U CubeSat typically has a mass of about 26.5 pounds (12 kilograms). The CubeSat’s final mass depends on which deployment method is selected.

To date, NASA has selected 119 CubeSat missions from 66 unique organizations. Of those missions, 46 have been launched into space with 29 more CubeSats scheduled to go in the next 12 months.

For additional information about NASA’s CubeSat Launch Initiative program, visit http://go.nasa.gov/CubeSat_initiative.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Jason Crusan at Jason.Crusan@nasa.gov.


Call for Proposals — NASA Research Announcement for Use of the NASA Physical Sciences Informatics System: Appendix C

NASA is seeking ground-based research proposals from graduate students and established researchers to use NASA’s Physical Sciences Informatics system to develop new analyses and scientific insights. The PSI system is a resource for researchers to data mine information generated from completed physical sciences experiments performed on the International Space Station or from related ground-based studies.

This solicitation appendix focuses on the following five research areas: combustion science, complex fluids, fluid physics, fundamental physics and materials science.

For graduate students (students working toward an advanced degree), this NASA Research Announcement is soliciting proposals that advance fundamental research in one of the physical sciences disciplines identified above and also assist in the awarding of an advanced degree to the graduate student. This call is open to students who meet the following eligibility requirements:

— The student is pursuing an advanced degree directly related to a physical sciences discipline. Only technical degrees are permitted (not degrees in policy or management).
— The student is a U.S. citizen, a permanent resident alien of the U.S., or on a student visa at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission.
— The student is enrolled in a master’s or doctoral degree program at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission. Or, if the student is an undergraduate starting graduate studies, he or she has been accepted to a master’s or doctoral degree program at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission and will start during the next academic year.
— The student has an academic graduate advisor who will submit the application for the graduate student. The student must perform the proposed research under the guidance of the assigned graduate advisor.

The agency expects to make approximately 10 awards in spring 2016. Research and development efforts will take place over two years. The typical award will be $75,000-$100,000 per year, for up to two years.

The deadline for submitting proposals is Dec. 15, 2016.

For information, visit http://psi.nasa.gov/.

Please direct questions about this NASA Research Announcement to Dr. Francis Chiaramonte at francis.p.chiaramonte@nasa.gov.


Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design, or STEAMD; or activities culturally relevant to or focused on populations underrepresented in STEM careers, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or nonreimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA announcement.


Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Are you an undergraduate or graduate student seeking opportunities in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)? The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science — in collaboration with the participating agencies in the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on STEM Education (CoSTEM) and the Science.gov Alliance — has launched a search portal for both students and universities to discover federally sponsored STEM education training and funding opportunities.

Student users can search the site for opportunities they can apply to directly, such as research internships and fellowships. Likewise, universities can search the site for federal funding opportunities to establish innovative training programs for undergraduates or graduate students.

Users can search the site through faceted searching capabilities for characteristics such as program type, STEM discipline, institution location, federal sponsor, and eligibility. Or they can search through the open text option.

For programs and opportunities for undergraduates, visit http://stemundergrads.science.gov/.

For graduate programs and opportunities, visit http://stemgradstudents.science.gov/.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at https://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the new ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Eduation: https://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

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