NASA Education Express Message — Feb. 16, 2017

Check out the latest NASA opportunities for the education community.

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: Feb. 16, 2017, at 6 p.m. EST

Informational Webinar for Students Interested in Applying for NASA Internship Opportunities
Audience: Higher Education Students
Webinar Date: Feb. 21, 2017, at 3 p.m. EST

2017 Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships
Audience: Undergraduate Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 22, 2017

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Events — ‘Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day’ Webcasts
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-12
Event Date: Feb. 23, 2017, 9 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. EST

International Space Station Research Design Challenge: Capillary Effects on Liquids Exploratory Research Experiments
Audience: Grade 8-12 Educators and Students
Entry Deadlines: March 1, 2017

2017 NASA Space Settlement Design Contest
Audience: Students in Grades 7-12
Entry Deadline: March 1, 2017

Launch Opportunity: RockSat-XN Program
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Notice of Intent to Fly Deadline: March 15, 2017

‘RockOn! 2017’ University Rocket Science Workshop
Audience: Higher Education Faculty and Students
Early Bird Registration Deadline: March 23, 2017
Registration Deadline: May 1, 2017
Workshop Dates: June 17-22, 2017

NASA/Applied Physics Laboratory Summer Internship 2017
Audience: Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Application Deadline: March 26, 2017

Celebrate Solar Week — Spring 2017
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-9, Informal Educators
Event Dates: March 27-31, 2017

NASA and the American Historical Society Seek Applicants for Fellowships in Aerospace History
Audience: Recent Recipients of the Ph.D. in History or a Closely Related Field, and Students Pursuing Doctoral Degrees in Those Fields
Application Deadline: April 1, 2017

Create Art Inspired by NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope
Audience: All Educators and Students

New Issue of NASA’s Earth Observatory Publication ‘EO Kids’ — Urban Heat Islands
Audience: K-12 Educators and Students


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

Bring the Story of “Hidden Figures” to the Classroom With the “Who Is Katherine Johnson?” Profiles and Modern Figures Toolkit
Audience: K-12 Educators

Goddard Virtual Visits: Celebrating African-American History Month at Goddard Space Flight Center
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Dates: Every Wednesday, Thursday and Friday in February

2017 NASA Glenn Faculty Fellowship Program
Audience: Higher Education Educators
Application Deadline: Feb. 16, 2017 at 11:59 p.m. EST

2017 Dissertation Fellowships in Disability Policy Research
Audience: Doctoral Students in Social Sciences and Related Disciplines
Application Deadline: Feb. 17, 2017, at 11:59 p.m. EST

2017 NASA Marshall Faculty Fellowship Program
Audience: Higher Education Educators
Application Deadline: Feb. 22, 2017

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Live Video Chat: NASA STARS en Español
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Feb. 23, 2017, 12-12:30 p.m. EST

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — NASA STARS en Español
Audiencia: Todos Los Educadores y Estudiantes
Fecha del Evento: 23 de febrero de 2017, Mediodía-12:30 p.m. EST

2016-2017 Cassini Scientist for a Day Essay Contest
Audience: 5-12 Students
Entry Deadline: Feb. 24, 2017

Call for Proposals — 2017 NASA Education Aeronautics Scholarship and Advanced STEM Training and Research (AS&ASTAR) Fellowship
Audience: First-year Master’s or Doctoral Students
Proposal Deadline: Feb. 24, 2017

NASA’s Centennial Challenges: Cube Quest Challenge
Audience: All Interested U.S. Citizens, Including Higher Education Educators and Students
Next Submission Deadline: Feb. 24, 2017

Educator Workshop: Ring Wing Glider
Audience: Pre-service Educators and Educators of Grades 3-8
Event Date: Feb. 25, 2017, 10 a.m. – Noon PST

Call for Abstracts: 68th International Astronautical Congress
Audience: Full-time U.S. Graduate Students Attending U.S. Universities
Submission Deadline: Feb. 27, 2017

Solar Eclipse Competition for Educators: Get Mooned!
Audience: In-service Educators in Texas
Submission Deadline: Feb. 28, 2017

Find Summer 2017 NASA Internship Opportunities With New Interactive Map
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: March 1, 2017

History and Archives Summer 2017 Internship at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center
Audience: Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Application Deadline: March 1, 2017

National Science Foundation’s Mathematical Sciences Graduate Internship Program
Audience: Mathematical Sciences Doctoral Students
Application Deadline: March 1, 2017

Space Launch System Video Series — “No Small Steps”
Audience: All Educators and Students

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students and Higher Education Institutions


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

 


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Technology Enables Exploration: Eyes In the Sky
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-10
Event Date: Feb. 16, 2017, at 6 p.m. EST
Explore our “eyes in the sky” with NASA space telescopes that are expanding our understanding of the solar system and the universe beyond. The Hubble Space Telescope and the James Webb Space Telescope will be the focus. NASA STEM curriculum, online resources and the Next Generation Science Standards will be integrated in this “out-of-this-world” webinar. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/225671

Teachers Connect: NASA’s Langley Research Center Centennial Badge
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School, and Informal Educators of Grades 6-8
Event Date: Feb. 21, 2017, at 4 p.m. EST
The first half of this webinar will focus on clouds and their role in Earth’s energy budget and on implementation ideas using GLOBE for different classroom settings as part of the “Earth Right Now: LaRC 100th” digital badge. Participants also will talk about student badge implementations, extension ideas and extra resources. The second half-hour will center on the engineering design process using the “Drag Race to Mars Engineering Design Challenge” as part of the “Journey to Mars: LaRC 100th” digital badge. This portion of the webinar will focus on forces and motion and math calculations using paper airplanes and testing different materials as part of the “Aeronautics: LaRC 100th” digital badge.

This webinar meets requirements of teacher discussions within the NASA Langley 100th Educator Professional Development Collaborative digital badges. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/224586 To learn more about the Langley 100th digital badges, log in to https://nasatxstate-epdc.net/ and search for LaRC 100th.

Technology Enables Exploration: Explore With NASA Apps
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: Feb. 22, 2017, at 4 p.m. EST
NASA has over 50 FREE Apps for educational use. Learn how to use and integrate some of the applications functionality in the classroom setting. Virtual reality, 3-D exploration and NASA missions come alive with the use of these apps. Engage students in topics such as Earth science, solar system exploration, robotics and International Space Station research through the usage of technology apps. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/222724

Picking Up STEAM: Using Models and Data to Understand Clouds
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-10
Event Date: Feb. 23, 2017, at 8 p.m. EST
Practice STEAM through the use of inquiry-based science activities from the NASA curriculum guides. The activities and NASA educational websites introduced will provide the educators new curriculum ideas to assist in meeting the Next Generation Science Standards and CORE learning outcomes standards. This STEAM webinar will guide participants through inquiry-based learning activities related to clouds, phase change, light, water cycle, weather and climate. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/218765

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


Informational Webinar for Students Interested in Applying for NASA Internship Opportunities

The One Stop Shopping Initiative for NASA’s Internships, Fellowships and Scholarships, or OSSI NIFS, strives to provide students at all U.S. institutions of higher education access to a portfolio of opportunities offered by NASA mission directorates and centers.

Join the OSSI NIFS team on Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017, at 3 p.m. EST for a live webinar event. Learn all you need to know about NASA internships, including the deadlines for summer and fall Internship applications and how to apply. The team also will share tips on how to market yourself and stand out among hundreds of applicants.

To join the webinar, visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0XcGBWitxWA.

Webinar participants also will be able to submit questions during the event. Email your questions to dlinfochannel@gmail.com.


2017 Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships

Caltech’s Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships, or SURF, program introduces undergraduate students to research under the guidance of seasoned mentors at Caltech or NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, or JPL. Students experience the process of research as a creative intellectual activity and gain a more realistic view of the opportunities and demands of a professional research career.

SURF is modeled on the grant-seeking process. Students collaborate with potential mentors to define and develop a project and to write research proposals. Caltech faculty or JPL staff review the proposals and recommend awards. Students work during a 10-week period in the summer, mid-June to late August. At the conclusion of the project, each student submits a technical paper and gives an oral presentation at SURF Seminar Day.

All application materials must be received no later than Feb. 22, 2017. For more information, visit http://www.sfp.caltech.edu/programs/surf.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to the Caltech Student-Faculty Programs office at sfp@caltech.edu.


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Events — ‘Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day’ Webcasts

Tune in Feb. 23 and #askDLN questions about Engineering.

Celebrate National Engineers Week with NASA. Feb. 23 is Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day! NASA’s Digital Learning Network will host 30-minute events on every hour to highlight women in engineering at NASA. Up to three schools will be selected to participate in each of the LIVE question-and-answer panels with our experts.

The live 30-minute events will be webcast on the NASA DLiNfo Channel on Feb. 23, 2017, at every hour starting at 9 a.m. EST.

9 a.m. EST — Nancy Bray, Director of Spaceport Integration and Services, Kennedy Space Center

10 a.m. EST — Ashlie Flegel, Aerospace Research Engineer, Glenn Research Center

11 a.m. EST — Charlie Blackwell-Thompson, GSDO Launch Director, Kennedy Space Center

12 p.m. EST — (Event in SPANISH) Jessica Parsons, Integration Engineer, Kennedy Space Center

1 p.m. EST — Shideh Naderi, Electrical Engineer, Armstrong Flight Research Center

2 p.m. EST — Jill Marlowe, Director of Research, Langley Research Center

3 p.m. EST — Ali Luna, Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) Program Director, Ames Research Center

4 p.m. EST — Cinda Chullen, Advanced Spacesuit Project Manager, Johnson Space Center

Please direct questions about this event to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com, ATTN: Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day.

For more information about this and other DLN events, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln/special-events.


International Space Station Research Design Challenge: Capillary Effects on Liquids Exploratory Research Experiments

NASA and Portland State University are seeking participants for the International Space Station Research Design Challenge: Capillary Effects on Liquids Exploratory Research Experiments, or CELERE. This design challenge enables students to do microgravity research on capillary action, similar to that conducted on the space station.

Teams or individuals create their own experiment using computer-aided design with a provided template and submit short proposals presenting the experiments. Portland State University then manufactures test cells using the CAD drawings and a computer-controlled laser cutter. Each experiment is conducted in a drop tower. Video of the drop is provided for student analysis and reporting of results.

CELERE is open to individuals and teams in grades 8-12. To facilitate the participation of informal science clubs, scouts, etc., teams may include younger students as long as at least one team member is in grades 8-12. Teams may be of any size and may include an entire class or science club. The program is limited to students from the U.S., including the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Students at Department of Defense Education Activity schools (www.dodea.edu), including those outside the U.S., are also eligible to participate.

The CELERE design challenge is a relatively new program and, as a result, the odds of selection are high. In 2014-2016, 100 percent of the entries were selected for full participation, where the student experiments were built and tested in microgravity. In 2017, selection of at least one qualifying entry is guaranteed from each state and listed territory, at least one DODEA school, and at least one Bureau of Indian Education school (http://bie.edu/). Students are strongly encouraged to apply!

Design proposals are now being accepted. Submissions are due March 1, 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit http://spaceflightsystems.grc.nasa.gov/CELERE/.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please email your inquiries to the CELERE team at celere@lists.nasa.gov.


2017 NASA Space Settlement Design Contest

Design a space settlement! Space settlements are permanent communities in orbit, as opposed to a place to work for a few months and go home. Designing a space settlement involves physics, mathematics, space science, environmental science and many other disciplines.

The NASA Space Settlement Design Contest is for students in grades 7-12 throughout the world. Individuals or teams may enter. Grade levels are judged separately, except for the grand prize. A certificate will be sent to each participant.

Submissions must be received by March 1, 2017.

For more information about the NASA Space Settlement Design Contest, visit https://settlement.arc.nasa.gov/Contest/.

Please email questions about the contest to Al Globus at aglobus@mail.arc.nasa.gov.


Launch Opportunity: RockSat-XN Program

The RockSat-XN program is a new partnership between NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility and Andoya Space Center designed to give students access to space at a new launch site as part of the Grand Challenge Initiative. The internationally organized Grand Challenge Initiative is composed of seven rockets that will launch in December 2018 and January 2019 to conduct research on cusp space physics. One of these rockets is the G-CHASER student rocket, which will be flown as part of a new RockSat program called RockSat-XN (RockSat-X Norway). The G-CHASER rocket will launch in early January 2019 from Andoya Space Center in Norway.

The RockSat-XN program provides hands-on experiences to students and faculty advisors to equip them to support the future technical workforce of the United States and other participating countries. The program also can help students and faculty advisors become principal investigators on future science missions of NASA or other institutions.

Student teams are invited to submit an intent-to-fly form before March 15, 2017.

To learn more about RockSat-XN, visit http://spacegrant.colorado.edu/national-programs/rocksat-xn.

Questions about the RockSat-XN program should be directed to rocksatx@gmail.com.


‘RockOn! 2017’ University Rocket Science Workshop

University and community college faculty and students are invited to a weeklong workshop to learn how to build and launch a scientific experiment into space. NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia is hosting the “RockOn! 2017” workshop June 17-22, 2017, in partnership with the Colorado and Virginia Space Grant Consortia. Workshop participants must be U.S. citizens. The registration deadline for the workshop is May 1, 2017.

The hands-on workshop teaches participants to build experiments that fly on sounding rockets. During the week, participants will work in teams of three to construct and integrate a sounding rocket payload from a kit. On the fifth day of the workshop, the experiments will fly on a sounding rocket expected to reach an altitude of more than 70 miles.

Each experiment will provide valuable scientific data, analyzed as part of the student-led science and engineering research. The program encourages faculty and students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics to develop skills critical to NASA’s future engineering, scientific and technical missions.

Register before March 23, 2017, and save $100 on workshop registration.

For more information about “RockOn!” and to register online, visit http://spacegrant.colorado.edu/national-programs/rockon-2017-home.

Since 2008, more than 448 people have participated in the “RockOn!” workshops and successfully built and launched 146 payloads to space. Images and information from past years’ workshops can be found at the “RockOn!” website.

Questions about the workshop or the registration process should be directed to Chris Koehler by email at koehler@colorado.edu or by telephone at 303-492-4750.


NASA/Applied Physics Laboratory Summer Internship 2017

The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, or APL, is offering summer projects for students interested in working on NASA missions or space-related research opportunities.

Students participating in the 2017 NASA/APL Internship Program will work at the APL facility in Laurel, Maryland. Students will receive a stipend for the 10-week program, and housing will be provided.

Eligible students include undergraduate rising sophomores through Ph.D. students as of fall 2017. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and have a minimum GPA of 3.0.

Applications are due March 26, 2017.

For more information about the internship and to apply online, visit http://jhuapl.edu/nasaintern/.

Questions about the NASA/APL Internships Program should be emailed to aplnasaintern-web@jhuapl.edu.


Celebrate Solar Week — Spring 2017

Solar Week provides a weeklong series of web-based educational classroom activities and games with a focus on the sun-Earth connection. This spring’s Solar Week activities will take place March 27-31, 2017, and will highlight safe solar viewing and the total solar eclipse happening on Aug. 21, 2017.

Solar Week is ideal for young teens or groups wanting to know more about the solar system, the stars or astronomy in general. Students can learn about solar careers, sunspots, solar energy and solar storms through a series of activities, games and lessons. Many activities are suitable for fun in the computer lab as well. Participants can interact on the online bulletin board with leading scientists at the forefront of sun-Earth research.

To learn more and to register to participate, visit http://www.solarweek.org.

Questions about Solar Week may be emailed to solarweek@solarweek.org.


NASA and the American Historical Society Seek Applicants for Fellowships in Aerospace History

The Fellowships in Aerospace History are offered annually by NASA to support significant scholarly research projects in aerospace history. These fellowships grant the opportunity to engage in significant and sustained advanced research in all aspects of the history of aerospace from the earliest human interest in flight to the present, including cultural and intellectual history, economic history, history of law and public policy, and the history of science, engineering, and management.

NASA provides funds to the American Historical Association, the History of Science Society, and the Society for the History of Technology to allow each association to award a fellowship. These include the Fellowship in Aerospace History, the Fellowship in the History of Space Technology and the Fellowship in the History of Space Science.

The fellowship term is for a period of at least six months, but not more than nine months, and should commence no later than Nov. 15, 2017. The fellow will be expected to devote the term entirely to the proposed research project. Each fellowship carries a stipend of $21,250, which includes travel expenses.

Applicants must possess a PhD in history or in a closely related field, or be enrolled as a student (having completed all coursework) in a doctoral degree-granting program.

Application materials are due April 1, 2017. Applications will be entered into consideration for all three fellowships.

For more information and complete application process details, visit https://apply.interfolio.com/40406.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to awards@historians.org.


Create Art Inspired by NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope

In November 2016, a small group of artists visited NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, to see the James Webb Space Telescope in person for inspiration to create art. They have been busy ever since, producing amazing work that will be presented for exhibit during spring 2017 at the Goddard Visitor Center.

Their offerings include painting, poetry, sculpting, textiles, woodworking, music, silk screening, 3-D design, jewelry, posters, tattooing and letterpress printing.

Though only a few artists were able to physically visit the telescope, the team at GSFC was impressed by the number of talented people who were interested in participating and want to offer more artists a chance to participate virtually.

How can you participate? Browse through the collection of James Webb Space Telescope images and videos and see what inspires you. Create art! (Note: this is not limited to art you can hang on a wall.) Then, share it with NASA on social media with #JWSTArt, or email it to jwst@lists.nasa.gov.

There’s no deadline for submissions.

To find inspiration and learn the full details on how to participate, visit https://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/2017/nasa-invites-you-to-create-james-webb-space-telescope-inspired-art.

Email questions about this opportunity to jwst@lists.nasa.gov.


New Issue of NASA’s Earth Observatory Publication ‘EO Kids’ — Urban Heat Islands

NASA is announcing a new issue of EO Kids, a publication from Earth Observatory, highlighting science stories for a younger audience.

This latest issue explores how NASA observes and measures urban heat islands from space.

What makes an urban heat island? Why is New York City a “hot” town? Where are the hottest places on Earth? How can NASA scientists help city planners turn down the heat? Read about this and more in the EO Kids: Urban Heat Island issue.

EO Kids offers hands-on activities, experiments and more. The Maker Corner gives instructions for making a green roof bird-feeder. Figure out how much of a city is paved and developed in this issue’s Data Viz. Research the urban heat island in your own backyard with some DIY Science. What do city lights and urban heat islands have in common? Find out when you are the Data Detective.

Explore this “hot” topic with NASA Earth Observatory’s EO Kids. To download your copy of the EO Kids: Urban Heat Island issue, visit http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/eokids.

To learn more about NASA’s missions to study Earth, visit the Earth Observatory at http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/.


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


Bring the Story of “Hidden Figures” to the Classroom With the “Who Is Katherine Johnson?” Profiles and Modern Figures Toolkit

In the 1960s, the U.S. was on an ambitious journey to the moon, and Katherine Johnson and her fellow human computers helped get NASA there. Bring the excitement of their story to your classroom with new resources from NASA Education.

Learn more about Katherine Johnson with the “Who Is Katherine Johnson?” profiles written just for students. Versions written for K-4 and 5-8 students are available.

“Who Is Katherine Johnson?” — K-4 Students Version
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/k-4/stories/nasa-knows/who-is-katherine-johnson-k4

“Who Is Katherine Johnson?” — 5-8 Students Version
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/5-8/features/nasa-knows/who-is-katherine-johnson-5-8

Also available online, the Modern Figures Toolkit is a collection of resources and educational activities for students in grades K-12. Each educational activity and resource includes a brief description, as well as information about how the activities and lessons align to education standards. Resources highlighted include videos, historical references and STEM materials.

Bring Katherine Johnson’s inspiring story to your classroom by downloading the Modern Figures Toolkit at www.nasa.gov/modernfigures-education-toolkit.


Goddard Virtual Visits: Celebrating African-American History Month at Goddard Space Flight Center

Join Goddard Space Flight Center’s Office of Education from 1-1:30 p.m. EST every Wednesday, Thursday and Friday in February for a digital program dedicated to African-American History Month. This virtual, interactive series will highlight the many talented men and women that work at Goddard. STEM experts from across Goddard will share how they practice science, technology, engineering and mathematics through these short presentations by focusing on their career goals, stories, research and missions. For our programs this year, we also hope to highlight the new film “Hidden Figures” by exploring how the “M” in STEM applies at NASA in a variety of different fields.

Visit https://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/2017/aahm-event-for-education/ for more information and to register for these free, live webcasts. The website will feature up-to-date information on speakers and the focus of each session, plus links for more information for students and educators. These programs are aimed for students in grades 6-12 but are open to the public. Additionally, these webcasts will be archived on NASA Goddard’s UStream channel and would be a great asset to informal learners such as those in after-school programs, groups of Girl and Boy Scouts, libraries, and more!

For additional information, questions, or to learn about accessing archived sessions, please email Lindsey Jones at Lindsey.jones-1@nasa.gov or call 301-286-1978.


2017 NASA Glenn Faculty Fellowship Program

Applications are being accepted for the 2017 NASA Glenn Faculty Fellowship Program. This program provides a summer residency at NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The 10-week fellowship begins on Monday, June 5, 2017, and runs through Friday, Aug. 11, 2017.

To be eligible for the program, applicants must be full-time science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, faculty members who are U.S. citizens. Applicants must be tenured faculty or in tenure-track positions at four-year accredited U.S. colleges and universities, or full-time faculty at two-year U.S. academic institutions. Qualified male and female faculty from Majority and Minority Serving Universities and Colleges, including underserved groups and persons with disabilities, are encouraged to apply.

The program covers limited relocation travel expense for qualified and accepted faculty, as well as stipends for all accepted faculty. Please note that stipend payments or salaries from other federal funding sources, including research grants and contracts, may not be accepted during the 10-week tenure of a Glenn faculty fellowship appointment.

The deadline for applications is 11:59 p.m. EST on Feb. 16, 2017. For more information about this opportunity, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/nasa-glenn-higher-education-students-faculty-postdoc-fellows.

Inquiries about NASA’s Glenn Faculty Fellowship Program should be directed to Dr. M. David Kankam at Mark.D.Kankam@nasa.gov.


2017 Dissertation Fellowships in Disability Policy Research

The Social Security Administration and the Center for Studying Disability Policy at Mathematica Policy Research are seeking applications from doctoral students in the social sciences and related disciplines for a dissertation fellowship in disability policy research. This fellowship provides financial support to outstanding doctoral students who are conducting high-quality research in areas of significance to disability policy.

Dissertation fellows will remain at their home institution and receive a stipend totaling $28,000 to support their dissertation research.

The application submission deadline is Feb. 17, 2017, at 11:59 p.m. EST.

For more information, visit https://www.disabilitypolicyresearch.org/disability-research-consortium/fellowships.

Questions about this fellowship opportunity should be directed to DRCDissertationFellows@mathematica-mpr.com.


2017 NASA Marshall Faculty Fellowship Program

Applications are being accepted for the 2017 NASA Marshall Faculty Fellowship Program. This program provides a summer residency at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The 10-week fellowship begins on Monday, June 5, 2017, and runs through Friday, Aug. 11, 2017.

To be eligible for the program, applicants must hold a full-time teaching or research appointment in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, at an accredited university or college in the United States. Applicants must be U.S. citizens. Women, underrepresented minorities and persons with disabilities are particularly encouraged to apply.

The program covers limited travel expenses for qualified and accepted faculty, as well as stipends for all accepted faculty. Please note that stipend payments or salaries from other federal funding sources, including research grants and contracts, may not be accepted during the 10-week tenure of a Marshall faculty fellowship appointment.

The deadline for applications is Feb. 22, 2017. For more information about this opportunity, visit https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/descriptions/MSFC-Faculty-Fellowship.html.

Inquiries about NASA’s Marshall Faculty Fellowship Program should be directed to Dr. Frank Six at Frank.Six@nasa.gov.


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Live Video Chat: NASA STARS en Español

Do you want to be one of NASA’s STARS? In this series of live Spanish video chats, listen as “Students Talk About Real STEM” with NASA professionals who work in these areas. Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network and Educator Professional Development Collaborative for an inside look at NASA missions, research and careers.

This special 30-minute NASA STARS en Español event is part of a series for “Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day” and will be webcast on the NASA DLiNfo Channel on Feb. 23, 2017, at Noon EST.

Submit questions via Twitter using #NASASTARS or via email to astrosdeNASA@gmail.com. Or sign up at https://www.txstate-epdc.net/nasa-stars/) for your class to connect directly.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln/special-events. Please send questions about this event to astrosdeNASA@gmail.com.


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — NASA STARS en Español

¿Quieres ser uno de los Astros de NASA? En esta serie de video conferencia en español y en vivo, los estudiantes hablarán de lo que es en realidad STEM (ciencias, tecnología, ingeniería y matemáticas) con profesionales de NASA que están trabajando en estas ramas. Acompaña a los programas de conexión digital de NASA (DLN for sus siglas en inglés) y el programa de colaboraciones de desarrolló profesional educativo (EPDC por sus siglas en inglés) hablando de diferentes misiones, investigaciones y carreras en NASA.

El siguiente programa será transmitido por NASA DLiNfo Channel el 23 de febrero de 2017 a la 12 p.m. EST.

Envia tus preguntas por medio de Twitter usando #NASASTARS ó por correo electrónico astrosdeNASA@gmail.com. O inscribe tu escuela y conectate.

Para más información, visite la página https://www.nasa.gov/dln/special-events. Escribanos si usted esta interesado en conectarse directo para participar y cualquier pregunta sobre el programa astrosdeNASA@gmail.com.


2016-2017 Cassini Scientist for a Day Essay Contest

The Cassini Scientist for a Day contest challenges students to become NASA scientists studying Saturn. Participants examine three of the best scientific targets imaged by the Cassini spacecraft in its 12 years at Saturn. After researching the topics, students are to choose the one they think yielded the best scientific results. This year’s targets are Enceladus’ plumes, Titan’s lakes and Saturn’s hexagon. After researching the three options, students write an essay of fewer than 500 words explaining their choice.

The contest is open to all students in the United States in grades 5-12. The essays will be divided into three groups for scoring: grades 5-6, 7-8 and 9-12. All submissions must be students’ original work. Participants may enter as individuals or as part of a team of up to four students.

The deadline for entries is Feb. 24, 2017.

For more information, visit http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/scientist-for-a-day.

If you have questions about this contest, please email scientistforaday@jpl.nasa.gov.


Call for Proposals — 2017 NASA Education Aeronautics Scholarship and Advanced STEM Training and Research (AS&ASTAR) Fellowship

NASA Education is seeking proposals for a NASA Education Aeronautics Scholarship and Advanced STEM Training and Research, or AS&ASTAR, Fellowship opportunity. The NASA Education AS&ASTAR Fellowship provides funding for fellowship candidates to perform graduate research at their respective campuses during the academic year under the guidance of their faculty adviser and a NASA researcher.

To be eligible to submit a proposal, candidates must be U.S. citizens or naturalized citizens who hold a bachelor’s degree in a STEM field earned prior to Aug. 31, 2017. Candidates must be enrolled in a master’s or doctoral degree program no later than Sept. 1, 2017, and intend to pursue a research-based master’s or Ph.D. program in a NASA-relevant field.

Proposals are due Feb. 24, 2017.

For full program details, visit http://go.nasa.gov/2fYxdsn.

Questions concerning this program element may be directed to Elizabeth Cartier at elizabeth.a.cartier@nasa.gov.


NASA’s Centennial Challenges: Cube Quest Challenge

Registration is open for NASA’s Cube Quest Challenge, which advances communication and propulsion technologies for CubeSats. Competitors have a shot at a share of $5 million in prize money and an opportunity to participate in space exploration and technology development. Participants can compete for a chance at flying their very own CubeSat to the moon and beyond as secondary payload on the first integrated flight of NASA’s Orion spacecraft and Space Launch System, or SLS. Or the competitors can launch their satellite using an independent launch provider.

Challenge objectives include designing, building and launching flight-qualified, small satellites capable of advanced operations near and beyond the moon. The challenge and prize purse are divided into three major areas:

— Ground Tournaments: $500,000 in the four qualifying ground tournaments to determine who will have the ability to fly on the first SLS flight

— Deep Space Derby: $1.5-million purse for demonstrating communication and CubeSat durability at a distance greater than almost 2.5 million miles (4,000,000 km), 10 times the distance from Earth to the moon

— Lunar Derby: $3-million purse for demonstrating the ability to place a CubeSat in a stable lunar orbit and demonstrate communication and durability near the moon.

The Cube Quest Challenge seeks to develop and test subsystems necessary to perform deep space exploration using small spacecraft. Advancements in small spacecraft capabilities will provide benefits to future missions and also may enable new mission scenarios, including future investigations of near-Earth asteroids.

All teams may compete in any one of the four ground tournaments, or GT. Submissions for the final tournament, GT-4, are due Feb. 24, 2017. Teams that rate high on mission safety and probability of success will receive incremental awards. Participation in GT-4 is required to earn a secondary payload spot on SLS.

Teams must register at least 30 days prior to the ground tournament in which they plan to participate. Check the Cube Quest Challenge website for updates.

The Lunar Derby focuses primarily on propulsion for small spacecraft and near-Earth communications, while the Deep Space Derby focuses on finding innovative solutions to deep space communications using small spacecraft. Together, these competitions will contribute to opening deep space exploration to nongovernment spacecraft.

For more information on the Cube Quest Challenge, visit http://www.nasa.gov/cubequest.

To learn more about NASA’s challenges and citizen science efforts, visit http://www.nasa.gov/solve.

Please direct any questions about the Cube Quest Challenge to James Cockrell at james.j.cockrell@nasa.gov.


Educator Workshop: Ring Wing Glider

Learn how to use engineering design principles to turn a piece of paper into an experimental wing for a new type of aircraft designed to be more economical and efficient than today’s airliners. Join NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory on Feb. 25, 2017, from 10 a.m. to noon PST for this workshop at the Columbia Memorial Space Center in Downey, California.

The workshop is free for all pre-service and fully credentialed teachers! Participants must bring their teacher or student ID the day of the workshop. Lunch will be provided. Pre-registration is required.

For more information and to register to attend, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/events/2017/2/25/ring-wing-glider/.

Can’t make it to the workshop? Explore the lesson online at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/teach/activity/ring-wing-glider/.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Sandra Valencia at (562) 231-1206.


Call for Abstracts: 68th International Astronautical Congress

NASA announces its intent to participate in the 68th International Astronautical Congress, or IAC, and requests that full-time U.S. graduate students attending U.S. universities respond to this “Call for Abstracts.”

The IAC — which is organized by the International Astronautical Federation, or IAF; the International Academy of Astronautics, or IAA; and the International Institute of Space Law, or IISL — is the largest space-related conference worldwide and selects an average of 1,000 scientific papers every year. The upcoming IAC will be held Sept. 25-29, 2017, in Adelaide, Australia. NASA’s participation in this event is part of an ongoing effort to connect NASA with the astronautical and space international community.

This “Call for Abstracts” is a precursor to a subsequent submission of a final paper, which may be presented at the 68th IAC. Student authors are invited to submit an abstract regarding an original, unpublished paper that has not been submitted in any other forum. A NASA technical review panel will select abstracts from those that have been accepted by the International Astronautical Federation. This opportunity is for graduate students majoring in fields related to the IAF research topics. Students may submit technical (oral) presentations and/or posters. Students may submit abstracts that are co-authored with their Principal Investigators. However, the student must be the “lead author,” and only the student will present at the IAC. Students must be available to travel to the conference to represent NASA and their universities. Students must be U.S. citizens, attending a U.S. university, who plan to enter a career in space science or aeronautics. Pending the availability of funding, graduate students selected by NASA to participate in the IAC will be considered for subsidy funding from NASA.

Many students and professors currently are involved in NASA-related research that could be considered for this submission. Students submitting abstracts are strongly encouraged to seek advice from professors who are conducting NASA research and/or from NASA scientists and engineers. Abstracts must be related to NASA’s ongoing vision for space exploration and fit into one of the following IAC categories:

— Science and Exploration — Systems sustaining missions, including life, microgravity, space exploration, space debris and Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence, or SETI
— Applications and Operations — Ongoing and future operational applications, including earth observation, communication, navigation, human space endeavors and small satellites
— Technology — Common technologies to space systems including astrodynamics, structures, power and propulsion
— Infrastructure — Systems sustaining space missions including space system transportation, future systems and safety
— Space and Society — Interaction of space with society including education, policy and economics, history, and law

The criteria for the selection will be defined according to the following specifications:
— Abstracts should specify purpose, methodology, results, conclusions and areas for discussion.
— Abstracts should indicate that substantive technical and/or programmatic content is included.
— Abstracts should clearly indicate that the material is new and original; they should explain why and how.
— Prospective author(s) should certify that the paper was not presented at a previous meeting.

Abstracts must be written in English, and the length should not exceed 400 words. Tables or drawings are not allowed in the abstract.

NOTE: If you plan to seek assistance from NASA, you must submit to the International Astronautical Federation and to NASA.
— Submit your abstract to the IAF at their website
www.iafastro.org by Feb. 28, 2017 (11:59:00 CET).
— Submit your abstract to NASA at
https://iac.nasaprs.com no later than 11:59 p.m. EST on Monday, Feb. 27, 2017.

IAC Paper Selection
Submitted abstracts will be evaluated by the Session Chairs on the basis of technical quality and relevance to the session topics. Selected abstracts may be chosen for eventual oral or poster presentation. Any such choice is not an indication of quality of the submitted abstract. Their evaluation will be submitted to the Symposium Coordinators. They will make acceptance recommendations to the International Programme Committee, which will make the final decision. Please note that any relevance to the Congress main theme will be considered as an advantage.

The following information must be included in the submission: paper title, name of contact author, name of co-author(s), organization(s), full postal address, phone, email of the author and co-author(s). The abstract should specify purpose, methodology, results and conclusions. The abstract should indicate that substantive technical and/or programmatic content is included, as well as clearly indicate that the material is new and original and explain why and how.

Please check the IAF website (www.iafastro.org) regularly to get the latest updates on the Technical Programme.


Solar Eclipse Competition for Educators: Get Mooned!

The 2017 solar eclipse provides a spectacular opportunity to help students more fully understand the relationships between Earth, the moon and the sun, including their behaviors and characteristics. The Texas Space Grant Consortium’s “Get Mooned!” competition challenges teachers to submit a unit with lesson plans they develop about the upcoming solar eclipse. Semifinalists will be interviewed via Skype about their lessons, their scope and the range of their impact. Ten teachers will be selected to travel to the path of totality to view the solar eclipse.

Submissions will be accepted only from in-service educators currently teaching in the state of Texas. Submissions are due no later than Feb. 28, 2017.

For more information about this competition, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/eclipse/.

Please direct questions about this competition to Pam Knab at knab@csr.utexas.edu.


Find Summer 2017 NASA Internship Opportunities With New Interactive Map

The One Stop Shopping Initiative for NASA’s Internships, Fellowships and Scholarships, or OSSI NIFS, strives to provide students at all U.S. institutions of higher education access to a portfolio of opportunities offered by NASA mission directorates and centers.

OSSI has launched a new way to find NASA opportunities! The new NASA Internships Map is an interactive way to search for internships near you or across the country. The website also allows for searching and viewing opportunities as a list.

The new map can be accessed at https://www.careerarc.com/job-map/nasa?campaign_id=21631.

For full access to the OSSI website, visit https://intern.nasa.gov. The site features the OSSI NIFS online application, an innovative system that allows students to search and apply to up to 15 opportunities in one location. A completed application places the student in the applicant pool for consideration by all NASA mentors.

Applications for summer 2017 opportunities are due March 1, 2017.

Inquiries about OSSI NIFS should be submitted via https://intern.nasa.gov/oic/.


History and Archives Summer 2017 Internship at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center

NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center’s History Program Office is seeking an intern for the summer 2017 term. The intern will assist with collecting and archiving oral histories, processing archival materials and developing historical content for the web, podcasts and social media. The intern also will research historical topics related to Marshall Space Flight Center’s history and will engage with the relevant professional literature as applicable to assigned duties.

Students of all majors may apply. While detailed prior knowledge of the aeronautics and space fields is not necessary, applicants must possess basic understanding of archival arrangement, digitization equipment/software and historical methodologies. Pay is $6,000 for undergraduate students and $7,500 for graduate students.

Applications are due March 1, 2017.

For more information, visit https://intern.nasa.gov/ossi/web/public/guest/searchOpps/index.cfm?solarAction=view&id=16963.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please contact Brian Odom at brian.c.odom@nasa.gov.


National Science Foundation’s Mathematical Sciences Graduate Internship Program

The National Science Foundation is accepting applications for its Mathematical Sciences Graduate Internship Program. MSGI provides an opportunity for mathematical sciences doctoral students to participate in internships at national laboratories, industry and other approved facilities. Participation in an internship will provide first-hand experience of the use of mathematics in a nonacademic setting. The internships are aimed at students who are interested in understanding the application of advanced mathematical and statistical techniques to “real-world” problems, regardless of whether the student plans to pursue an academic or nonacademic career.

MSGI is open to graduate students pursuing a doctoral degree in mathematics, statistics or applied mathematics who are enrolled as full-time graduate students at an accredited U.S. college or university during the 2016-2017 academic year. Applicants must have a cumulative GPA of 3.30 or higher on a 4.0 scale, including fall 2016 grades.

The application submission deadline is March 1, 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.orise.orau.gov/nsf-msgi/default.html.

Questions about this internship opportunity should be directed to nsf-msgi@orise.orau.gov.


Space Launch System Video Series — “No Small Steps”

The challenge of going to Mars is monumental, and it’s going to take a monumental rocket to make it possible. NASA’s Space Launch System will be the most powerful rocket ever built and will help send humans to deep space destinations. SLS is an advanced, heavy-lift launch vehicle that will provide an entirely new capability for science and human exploration beyond Earth’s orbit.

Learn more about the Space Launch System with the “No Small Steps” video series. Hosted by Stephen Granade, the entertaining and informative series gets into the “how” of making a trip to Mars happen — taking rocket science and making it relatable.

Episode 1: “Getting to Mars”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TOYXa9jx-TI

Episode 2: “A Foundation for Mars”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DesBgDPR22Q

Episode 3: “Rocket Fuel”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zJXQQv9UZNg

Episode 4: “Working With Gravity”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4wlcFU1Le4U


Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design, or STEAMD; or activities culturally relevant to or focused on populations underrepresented in STEM careers, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or nonreimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA announcement.


Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Are you an undergraduate or graduate student seeking opportunities in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)? The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science — in collaboration with the participating agencies in the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on STEM Education (CoSTEM) and the Science.gov Alliance — has launched a search portal for both students and universities to discover federally sponsored STEM education training and funding opportunities.

Student users can search the site for opportunities they can apply to directly, such as research internships and fellowships. Likewise, universities can search the site for federal funding opportunities to establish innovative training programs for undergraduates or graduate students.

Users can search the site through faceted searching capabilities for characteristics such as program type, STEM discipline, institution location, federal sponsor, and eligibility. Or they can search through the open text option.

For programs and opportunities for undergraduates, visit http://stemundergrads.science.gov/.

For graduate programs and opportunities, visit http://stemgradstudents.science.gov/.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the new ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Eduation: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

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