NASA Education Express Message — March 16, 2017

Check out the latest NASA opportunities for the education community.

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: March 16, 2017, at 8 p.m. EDT

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management — 2017 Minority Serving Institutions Partnership Program Internships
Audience: Full-time Undergraduate and Graduate Students at Accredited Minority-Serving Institutions
Application Deadline: March 20, 2017

2017 Columbia Crew Memorial Undergraduate Scholarships
Audience: Undergraduate Students at Texas Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: April 28, 2017

2017 Texas Space Grant Consortium STEM Educator Scholarships
Audience: Educators Enrolled in Programs for a Master’s Degree in a STEM Field at Member Institutions of the Texas Space Grant Consortium
Application Deadline: April 28, 2017

2017-2018 Texas Space Grant Consortium Graduate Fellowships
Audience: Graduate Students at Member Institutions of the Texas Space Grant Consortium
Application Deadline: April 28, 2017

2017 DREAM2Explore Workshop for Educators
Audience: In-service and Pre-service Science Educators of Grades 6-9
Workshop Dates: June 26-30, 2017

Space Center Houston Presents ‘Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission’ Exhibit
Audience: All Educators and Students
Exhibit Dates: Oct. 14, 2017 – March 18, 2018

Search for Gravitational Waves With ‘Gravity Spy’ Citizen Science Project
Audience: All Educators and Students
Project Timeframe: Ongoing

2017-2018 NASA Software Catalog Now Available
Audience: 9-12 and Higher Education Educators and Students


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Celebrate Women’s History Month With a Series of Webcast Events From NASA’s Digital Learning Network
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: March 16, 2017, 1 p.m. EST

Host a Real-Time Conversation With Astronauts Aboard the International Space Station
Audience: All Educators
Optional Informational Session: March 16, 2017, at 4 p.m. EST
Proposal Deadline: Apr. 15, 2017

Library of Congress 2017 Summer Institutes — Teaching With Primary Sources
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: March 17, 2017
Institute Dates: Multiple Dates in June and July 2017

Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘Making STEM Magic’ Program
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: March 18, 2017, at 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. EST

2016-2017 NASA College and University Aeronautics Design Challenges: Supersonic Business Jet and Low Noise Subsonic Transport
Audience: Only Students at U.S. Colleges and Universities
Required Notice of Intent Due: March 20, 2017
Proposal Deadline: June 1, 2017

Bring the Story of “Hidden Figures” to the Classroom With the “Who Is Katherine Johnson?” Profiles and Modern Figures Toolkit
Audience: K-12 Educators

National Science Foundation’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities — Undergraduate Program
Audience: Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Broadening Participation Research Centers — Preliminary Proposal Deadline: March 21, 2017

Education Webcast Series — STEM @ NASA Goddard: Women’s History Month
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: March 22, 2017, at 1 p.m. EST

‘RockOn! 2017’ University Rocket Science Workshop
Audience: Higher Education Faculty and Students
Early Bird Registration Deadline: March 23, 2017
Registration Deadline: May 1, 2017
Workshop Dates: June 17-22, 2017

Call for Papers: 2017 International Space Station Research and Development Conference
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Abstract Submission Deadline: March 24, 2017

NASA/Applied Physics Laboratory Summer Internship 2017
Audience: Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Application Deadline: March 26, 2017

Celebrate Women’s History Month: Download New NASA Women of Color Lithograph
Audience: All Educators and Students

Celebrate Solar Week — Spring 2017
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-9, Informal Educators
Event Dates: March 27-31, 2017

NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate — Early Career Faculty Opportunity
Audience: Early Career Faculty Members at Accredited U.S. Universities
Proposal Deadline: March 31, 2017

Exploration of the Moon and Asteroids by Secondary Students (ExMASS) High School Research Program
Audience: Educators of Grades 9-12
Application Deadline: March 31, 2017
Program Dates: September 2017 – April 2018

NASA and the American Historical Society Seek Applicants for Fellowships in Aerospace History
Audience: Recent Recipients of the Ph.D. in History or a Closely Related Field, and Students Pursuing Doctoral Degrees in Those Fields
Application Deadline: April 1, 2017

Earn STEM Digital Badges to Celebrate the Centennial of NASA’s Langley Research Center
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-9, Informal Educators
Deadline: April 30, 2017

Grant Competition — USAID Development Innovation Ventures
Audience: Higher Education Faculty and Students
Application Deadline: Proposals Accepted Year-round

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

NASA’s Centennial Challenges: Vascular Tissue Challenge
Audience: All Interested U.S. Citizens, Including Higher Education Educators and Students
Deadline: No Later Than Sept. 30, 2019


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Astrobiology and Looking for Life
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: March 16, 2017, at 8 p.m. EDT
In this webinar, we will discuss how NASA has turned the search for alien life from science fiction to a quickly growing research field. Topics in Earth and space science linked to biology will help us understand the most current theories for how life came to be here on Earth and where we could find it next. Classroom activities for numerous grades will put this exploration into the hands of the next generation of scientists. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/234109

Teachers Connect: NASA’s Langley Research Center Centennial Badge
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School, and Informal Educators of Grades 6-8
Event Date: March 21, 2017, at 4 p.m. EDT
The first half of the webinar will focus on clouds and their role in Earth’s energy budget and on implementation ideas using GLOBE for different classroom settings as part of the “Earth Right Now: LaRC 100th” digital badge. Participants will talk about student badge implementations, extension ideas and extra resources. The second half-hour will center on the engineering design process using the “Drag Race to Mars Engineering Design Challenge” as part of the “Journey to Mars: LaRC 100th” digital badge. This portion of the webinar will focus on forces and motion and on math calculations using paper airplanes and testing different materials as part of the “Aeronautics: LaRC 100th” digital badge.

This webinar meets requirements of teacher discussions within the NASA Langley 100th Educator Professional Development Collaborative digital badges. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/224590. To learn more about the Langley 100th digital badges, log in to https://nasatxstate-epdc.net/ and search for LaRC 100th.

Earth Right Now — Weather to Fly By
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: March 21, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Participants will learn about basic meteorological concepts including the general characteristics of the atmosphere and how weather conditions and weather phenomena occur. There will be hands-on, standards-aligned mathematics, science and engineering activities about density, mass, fluid dynamics and weather so participants can take new ideas back to their classrooms. Real-world connections with NASA and the airplanes that do weather research will be discussed as the webinar highlights a partnership between NASA Armstrong and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA, with the Sensing Hazards with Operational Unmanned Technology, or SHOUT, mission. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/229951

Earth Right Now: From Earth to the Moon
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-12
Event Date: March 23, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT
Earth is influenced by our moon. Humankind has always observed and asked questions about the moon. NASA has studied our moon for almost 60 years and has sent humans there. Explore that technological accomplishment and the Earth/moon relationship by integrating NASA missions, online resources and STEM classroom lessons. Experience some real “classroom lunacy.” Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/229609

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management — 2017 Minority Serving Institutions Partnership Program Internships

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management is accepting applications for Minority Serving Institutions Partnership Program Internships for 2017. MSIPP internships promote the education and development of the next generation workforce in critical science, engineering, technology and mathematics fields for full-time students currently enrolled at accredited minority-serving institutions.

Internships will run for approximately 10 weeks during the summer at one of the Department of Energy’s national laboratories. Interns will complete research projects aligned with ongoing DOE efforts. Students also will be involved in enrichment activities provided by the host laboratory. These activities may include laboratory and site tours, professional development seminars, workshops, lectures, and even social or off-site activities.

Participants will be compensated by either a stipend or salary, commensurate with cost of living at the location of the host laboratory.

To be eligible, applicants must be U.S. citizens currently enrolled full-time as an undergraduate or graduate student at an accredited minority-serving institution. Applicants must be working toward a STEM degree and have a minimum grade point average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.

Applications are due March 20, 2017.

Additional information about the program, including internship locations and access to the online application, may be found at http://www.orise.orau.gov/MSIPP/.

Please direct inquiries about this opportunity to Vivian Cato at vivian.cato@srnl.doe.gov.


2017 Columbia Crew Memorial Undergraduate Scholarships
The Texas Space Grant Consortium and the Aviation and Space Foundation of Texas, in partnership with NASA, are offering undergraduate scholarships of $1,500 in memory of the Space Shuttle Columbia astronauts. These seven men and women made the ultimate sacrifice to expand the exploration of space and our knowledge of the world that we live in.

These scholarships are intended to recognize high-quality students and encourage their consideration of graduate studies in science, technology, engineering and mathematics that would ultimately lead to careers in STEM-related fields. The scholarships stress excellence in academics, participation in STEM education and research projects, and the exhibition of leadership qualities.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens and registered for at least a half-time course load at a Texas Space Grant Consortium institution. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 28, 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/grants/scholars_announcement.html. Please email any questions about this opportunity to scholarships@tsgc.utexas.edu.


2017 Texas Space Grant Consortium STEM Educator Scholarships

The Texas Space Grant Consortium’s Educator STEM Scholarship Program provides $1,500 scholarships to eligible teachers enrolled in master’s programs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens who hold a bachelor’s degree and are enrolled in a master’s program at a Texas Space Grant Consortium institution. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 28, 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/edu_stem/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to scholarships@tsgc.utexas.edu.


2017-2018 Texas Space Grant Consortium Graduate Fellowships

Texas Space Grant Consortium Fellowships encourage graduate study in the fields of space science and engineering. Interdisciplinary and integrated work experience are emphasized.

Each $5,000 award supplements half-time graduate support (or fellowship) provided by a consortium institution. The fellowship award is good for one year. Each fellowship may be renewed for a maximum of three years, provided the recipient has spent no more than two of those years as a master’s candidate.

Applicants must be registered for full-time study in a graduate program at one or more of the Texas Space Grant Consortium institutions and must be promised financial support at that institution. Applicants must also be U.S. citizens. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 28, 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/grants/fellows_announcement.html. Please email any questions about this opportunity to fellowships@tsgc.utexas.edu.


2017 DREAM2Explore Workshop for Educators

The “Dynamic Response of the Environments at Asteroids, the Moon, and moons of Mars,” or DREAM2, team at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center is hosting a free workshop for educators of students in grades 6-9. Participants will learn how our understanding of Earth’s moon, asteroids and the moons of Mars is growing with new information from planetary missions and the work of the DREAM2 team.

Workshop participants will reinforce their understanding of lunar and planetary science concepts; gain tools to help address common student misconceptions about the moon; and interact with NASA scientists who study the dynamic environments surrounding moons, asteroids and other rocky objects. Participants will work with real scientific data, and they will learn how to bring the data and information to their students using hands-on activities aligned with Next Generation Science Standards for grades 6-9.

The workshop will take place June 26-30, 2017, at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Workshop participants will be certified to borrow meteorite samples from NASA and will receive Certificates of Participation and Letters of Completion that indicate 30 hours of instruction.

For more information and to register to attend, visit http://ssed.gsfc.nasa.gov/dream/DREAM/DREAM2Explore.html.

Questions about this workshop should be directed to Nikki Whelley at nicole.l.whelley@nasa.gov.


Space Center Houston Presents ‘Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission’ Exhibit

Space Center Houston is the first of four stops for a brand-new exhibit featuring the Apollo 11 command module. This exhibit will be the first time the Apollo 11 command module has left the Smithsonian since a 1971 national tour. Space Center Houston will be the only location where visitors can see the space capsules for both the first and last lunar landings. The center is the home of the Apollo 17 command module, the last mission to land on the moon.

The awe-inspiring “Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission” exhibit will be on display Oct. 14, 2017 – March 18, 2018. The unveiling of the new exhibit is part of Space Center Houston’s 25th anniversary celebration.

In a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, guests will see more than 20 one-of-a-kind Apollo 11 mission artifacts, some of which flew on the historic Apollo 11 mission. They include the hatch, the F-1 injector plate, a lunar sample return container, astronaut Buzz Aldrin’s extravehicular visor and gloves, astronaut Michael Collins’ Omega Speedmaster Chronograph, a star chart, a survival kit, and more.

For more information about the “Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission” exhibit, visit https://spacecenter.org/destination-moon/.

Please direct questions about this exhibit to schinfo@spacecenter.org.

The “Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission” exhibition, a partnership of the National Air and Space Museum and the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, commemorates the 50th anniversary in 2019 of the extraordinary achievement of man’s first step on the moon.


Search for Gravitational Waves With ‘Gravity Spy’ Citizen Science Project

In 1916, Einstein predicted the existence of ripples in spacetime known as gravitational waves. A century later, on Sept. 14, 2015, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory, or LIGO, made the first direct detection of this elusive phenomenon. This discovery is the first of many that will give researchers a whole new way to explore the universe. However, LIGO needs your help!

Being the most sensitive and most complicated gravitational experiment ever created, LIGO is susceptible to many instrumental and environmental noise sources called “glitches.” These glitches are difficult to model using computers, can mimic true astrophysical signals, and generally make LIGO less sensitive to gravitational waves.

Classifying glitches using computers has proven to be an exceedingly difficult task. That’s where the Gravity Spy Zooniverse Citizen Science Project comes in! Human intuition has proven time and time again to be a useful tool in pattern recognition problems such as this. One of the innovations of this project is that citizen scientists and computer algorithms will work in a symbiotic relationship, helping one another to optimally classify and characterize glitches. By selecting the right classification for a given glitch, you will help computers learn to do this classification themselves on much larger datasets. That capability will help scientists determine and eliminate the sources of noise.

For more information and to learn how to participate, visit the “Gravity Spy” website at https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/zooniverse/gravity-spy.

To learn more about the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory and its mission to detect gravitational waves, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2016/nsf-s-ligo-has-detected-gravitational-waves.

Download the “Direct Observation of Gravitational Waves” Educator Guide for activities and background information designed for grades 5-12. https://dcc.ligo.org/LIGO-P1600015/public.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Tyson Littenberg at tyson.b.littenberg@nasa.gov.

“Gravity Spy” is a collaboration between the following entities:
–Northwestern University, led by Scott Coughlin and Michael Zevin with PI Vicky Kalogera and co-PI Aggelos Katsaggelos. Northwestern’s team is composed of a LIGO group in the CIERA astrophysics research center and a machine learning group in the Image and Video Processing Laboratory.
–The Adler Planetarium Zooniverse Team, led by co-PI Laura Trouille.
–Syracuse University, led by co-PI’s Kevin Crowston and Carsten Østerlund.
–California State University at Fullerton, led by co-PI Josh Smith.
–The LIGO Scientific Collaboration, of which NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center and Goddard Space Flight Center are member institutions.

The project is funded by the National Science Foundation.


2017-2018 NASA Software Catalog Now Available

NASA has released its 2017-2018 software catalog, which offers an extensive portfolio of software products for a wide variety of technical applications, all free of charge to the public without any royalty or copyright fees.

Available in both hard copy and online, this third edition of the publication has contributions from all the agency’s centers on data processing/storage, business systems, operations, propulsion and aeronautics. It includes many of the tools NASA uses to explore space and broaden our understanding of the universe. A number of software packages are being presented for release for the first time. Each catalog entry is accompanied with a plain language description of what it does.

Some of the software available include codes for more advanced drones and quieter aircraft. While access restrictions apply to some codes, NASA has automated and updated its software release process over the last two years to ensure that it is as quick, easy and straightforward as possible.

The software catalog is a product of NASA’s Technology Transfer program, managed for the agency by NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate. The program ensures technologies developed for missions in exploration and discovery are broadly available to the public, maximizing the benefit to the nation.

For more information, visit https://software.nasa.gov/.


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Celebrate Women’s History Month With a Series of Webcast Events From NASA’s Digital Learning Network

NASA’s Digital Learning Network will be celebrating Women’s History Month all throughout the month of March by featuring some of the amazing women that work at NASA. Each 45-minute program will feature a different female lead at the agency and how they started their career with NASA.

March 16, 2017, at 1 p.m. EDT — Nettie Halcomb — Fluid Mechanics Engineer from NASA’s Ames Research Center
March 23, 2017, at 2 p.m. EDT — Erica Alston — Atmospheric Scientist from NASA’s Langley Research Center
March 28, 2017, at 2 p.m. EDT — Kaitlin Liles — Thermal Engineer from NASA’s Langley Research Center

The events will be livestreamed for all schools to watch. For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln/virtual-visit.

Four schools will be selected to interact with speakers during each event. To apply for this special opportunity, visit https://goo.gl/forms/FD6Toxowp1Ngkptp2. Schools may register for only one event. Registration ends Feb. 28, 2017, at 5 p.m. EST.

To learn about other Digital Learning Network events, visit http://www.nasa.gov/dln.


Host a Real-Time Conversation With Astronauts Aboard the International Space Station

ARISS-US is accepting proposals from U.S. schools, museums, science centers and community youth organizations (working individually or together) to host an Amateur Radio on the International Space Station, or ARISS, radio contact with an orbiting space station crew member between Jan. 1 and June 30, 2018. Proposals are due April 15, 2017.

ARISS is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed education plan. Students can learn about satellite communications, wireless technology, science research conducted on the space station, working conditions in space, radio science, and any related STEM subject. Students learn to use amateur radio to talk directly to an astronaut to ask their STEM-related questions. ARISS will help educational organizations locate amateur radio groups who can assist with equipment for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for students. Exact dates for the 10-minute radio contact are determined by crew scheduling and space station orbits.

Informational Sessions
To help organizations learn about ARISS radio contacts and the proposal process, ARISS offers one-hour online information sessions and welcomes all questions. Attending an online session is not required but strongly encouraged.

An informational session will be offered March 16, 2017, at 4 p.m. EDT.

Advance registration is necessary. Email ARISS (ariss@arrl.org) to sign up for an information session.

For proposal information and more details such as expectations, proposal guidelines and proposal forms, visit http://www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.

Please email questions about this opportunity to ariss@arrl.org.

ARISS-US is offered through a partnership between NASA, the American Radio Relay League, and the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation. ARISS was created and is managed by an international working group.


Library of Congress 2017 Summer Institutes — Teaching With Primary Sources

The Library of Congress is now accepting applications for its weeklong summer programs for K-12 educators. Held at the Library of Congress in the District of Columbia, this professional development opportunity provides educators with tools and resources to effectively integrate primary sources into K-12 classroom teaching. Each session focuses on pedagogy, with an emphasis on supporting student engagement, critical thinking and construction of knowledge.

The Library of Congress is offering five programs this summer: Three of the programs are open to teachers and librarians across all content areas; one focuses on primary sources in science, technology and engineering; and the fifth program focuses on World War I. During each five-day institute, participants work with Library of Congress education specialists and subject-matter experts to learn effective practices for using primary sources in the classroom, while exploring some of the millions of digitized historical artifacts and documents available on the library’s website.

General Institutes: Open to K-12 teachers and school librarians across the content areas
— June 19-23, 2017
— June 26-30, 2017
— July 10-14, 2017

Science, Technology and Engineering Institute: Recommended for K-12 educators who teach science, technology or engineering, or collaborate with those who do
— July 17-21, 2017

World War I Institute: Recommended for K-12 educators who teach some aspect of WWI as part of their curriculum, or collaborate with those who do
— July 31-Aug. 4, 2017

Tuition and materials are free. Participants are responsible for transportation to and from Washington, D.C., and any required overnight accommodations.

Applications are due March 17, 2017, and require a letter of recommendation.

For more information and to submit an application, visit http://www.loc.gov/teachers/professionaldevelopment/teacherinstitute/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to teachinglcsummer@loc.gov.


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘Making STEM Magic’ Program

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is presenting a series of free education events called “Making STEM Magic.” This new program introduces young visitors to engineering in a fun and creative way. Participants learn by doing. Each challenge involves designing, building and testing a prototype. Each month, a new theme will be introduced with a new problem to solve.

Events are scheduled each Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. ET at the National Air and Space Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia. The events are free and open to the public.

Suit Up!: Working in Space
Each Saturday in March 2017
Space: It is the final frontier, and the most dangerous. Do you want to be an astronaut? Learn how to suit up and protect yourself from the dangers of space.

In the Heat of the Moment: Space Capsules
Each Saturday in April 2017
Imagine an astronaut hurtling toward Earth in a space capsule at tremendous speeds. In this challenge, participants will design a heat shield to keep the astronaut cool from the heat of re-entry.

Blast Off!: Propulsion
Each Saturday in May 2017
It really is rocket science. Try your hand at designing a rocket and staying on target.

Red Rover: Mission to Mars
Each Saturday in June 2017
Did you know that rovers are robotic ambassadors? Learn more about NASA’s mobile labs and construct your own rolling rover.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s “Making STEM Magic” program, visit https://airandspace.si.edu/visit/events/stem-magic.

Please direct questions about this series of events to the Visitor Service line at 703-572-4118.


2016-2017 NASA College and University Aeronautics Design Challenges: Supersonic Business Jet and Low Noise Subsonic Transport

NASA’s Aeronautics Mission Directorate is seeking entries for the 2016-2017 NASA College and University Aeronautics Design Challenge. Students are invited to submit technical papers outlining their solutions for one of two aeronautics design challenges.

The Supersonic Business Jet Challenge seeks ideas for a commercial supersonic business jet that might fly in 2025 and that meets NASA’s goals for noise, emissions, speed, range, payload and fuel efficiency. The Low Noise Subsonic Transport Challenge seeks designs for a large commercial airliner that would enter service between 2025 and 2035 and would address NASA’s goals for reductions in noise, emissions and fuel use.

The contest is only open to teams of full-time students enrolled in higher education institutions of the United States or its territories. This particular design challenge is for colleges and universities only. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

Interested teams must submit a notice of intent no later than March 20, 2017. Final entries are due June 1, 2017.

For more information and a complete list of rules, visit https://aero.larc.nasa.gov/university-contest/.

Questions about the challenge should be directed to Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.


Bring the Story of “Hidden Figures” to the Classroom With the “Who Is Katherine Johnson?” Profiles and Modern Figures Toolkit

In the 1960s, the U.S. was on an ambitious journey to the moon, and Katherine Johnson and her fellow human computers helped get NASA there. Bring the excitement of their story to your classroom with new resources from NASA Education.

Learn more about Katherine Johnson with the “Who Is Katherine Johnson?” profiles written just for students. Versions written for K-4 and 5-8 students are available.

“Who Is Katherine Johnson?” — K-4 Students Version
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/k-4/stories/nasa-knows/who-is-katherine-johnson-k4

“Who Is Katherine Johnson?” — 5-8 Students Version
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/5-8/features/nasa-knows/who-is-katherine-johnson-5-8

Also available online, the Modern Figures Toolkit is a collection of resources and educational activities for students in grades K-12. Each educational activity and resource includes a brief description, as well as information about how the activities and lessons align to education standards. Resources highlighted include videos, historical references and STEM materials.

Bring Katherine Johnson’s inspiring story to your classroom by downloading the Modern Figures Toolkit at www.nasa.gov/modernfigures-education-toolkit.


National Science Foundation’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities — Undergraduate Program

The National Science Foundation is seeking proposals for the Historically Black Colleges and Universities — Undergraduate Program. HBCU-UP is committed to enhancing the quality of undergraduate STEM education and research at Historically Black Colleges and Universities as a means to broaden participation in the nation’s STEM workforce. HBCU-UP realizes this purpose by providing awards to develop, implement, and study innovative models and approaches for making dramatic improvements in the preparation and success of HBCU undergraduate students so that they may participate successfully in graduate programs and/or careers in STEM disciplines.

HBCU-UP provides support for a variety of opportunities. These include:

Broadening Participation Research Centers: These centers represent the collective intelligence of HBCU STEM higher education and serve as the national hubs for the rigorous study and broad dissemination of the critical pedagogies and culturally sensitive interventions that contribute to the success of HBCUs in educating African-American STEM undergraduates. Centers are expected to conduct research on STEM education and broadening participation in STEM; perform outreach to HBCUs to build capacity for conducting this type of research; and work to transfer and disseminate promising participation-broadening research to enhance STEM education and research outcomes for African-American undergraduates across the country. The preliminary proposal deadline for this opportunity is March 21, 2017. Full proposals are due Nov. 22, 2017.

For more information on the overall Historically Black Colleges and Universities — Undergraduate Program, visit http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5481.

Please direct questions about these opportunities to Claudia Rankins at crankins@nsf.gov and Andrea Johnson at andjohns@nsf.gov.


Education Webcast Series — STEM @ NASA Goddard: Women’s History Month

Join NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in March for “STEM @ NASA Goddard: Women’s History Month.” On Wednesdays at 1 p.m. ET (March 22 and 29), the Goddard Office of Education will celebrate Women’s History Month by highlighting women in STEM. Women from GSFC in Greenbelt, Maryland, and Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia will share how they practice science, technology, engineering and mathematics through their research, missions, careers, etc.

The 30-minute programs will be streamed live on UStream, and participants will be able to interact with the guest speakers by submitting questions through email and Twitter.

To view the programs on Ustream, visit http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-gsfc.

For more information or to express interest in participating, please contact Erin McKinley at erin.e.mckinley@nasa.gov.


‘RockOn! 2017’ University Rocket Science Workshop

University and community college faculty and students are invited to a weeklong workshop to learn how to build and launch a scientific experiment into space. NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia is hosting the “RockOn! 2017” workshop June 17-22, 2017, in partnership with the Colorado and Virginia Space Grant Consortia. Workshop participants must be U.S. citizens. The registration deadline for the workshop is May 1, 2017.

The hands-on workshop teaches participants to build experiments that fly on sounding rockets. During the week, participants will work in teams of three to construct and integrate a sounding rocket payload from a kit. On the fifth day of the workshop, the experiments will fly on a sounding rocket expected to reach an altitude of more than 70 miles.

Each experiment will provide valuable scientific data, analyzed as part of the student-led science and engineering research. The program encourages faculty and students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics to develop skills critical to NASA’s future engineering, scientific and technical missions.

Register before March 23, 2017, and save $100 on workshop registration.

For more information about “RockOn!” and to register online, visit http://spacegrant.colorado.edu/national-programs/rockon-2017-home.

Since 2008, more than 448 people have participated in the “RockOn!” workshops and successfully built and launched 146 payloads to space. Images and information from past years’ workshops can be found at the “RockOn!” website.

Questions about the workshop or the registration process should be directed to Chris Koehler by email at koehler@colorado.edu or by telephone at 303-492-4750.


Call for Papers: 2017 International Space Station Research and Development Conference

The sixth annual International Space Station Research and Development Conference will be held July 17-20, 2017, in Washington, D.C.

NASA, the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space, and the American Astronomical Society are seeking abstracts under the categories of Biology and Medicine; Human Health in Space; Commercialization and Nongovernment Utilization; Physical Sciences and Materials Development; Plant Science; Earth Science and Remote Sensing; Technology Development and Demonstration; Finances, and STEM Education (science, technology, engineering and mathematics). Topics should relate to science, exploration and technology activities (past, present, planned or under development) on the International Space Station.

Both the conference and abstract submittal are open to entrepreneurial, commercial, academic and government agency attendees, both from and outside the United States. Eligible attendees include professionals, young professionals, students and interested parties. The working language for the conference is English. The conference will include plenaries for topics of general interest and technical sessions for focused discussions.

Because of the large number of expected submissions, presenters are encouraged to submit abstracts early. The deadline is March 24, 2017.

For more information about the conference and how to submit an abstract for consideration, visit http://www.issconference.org/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to ISSTechChair@atdl-inc.com.


NASA/Applied Physics Laboratory Summer Internship 2017

The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, or APL, is offering summer projects for students interested in working on NASA missions or space-related research opportunities.

Students participating in the 2017 NASA/APL Internship Program will work at the APL facility in Laurel, Maryland. Students will receive a stipend for the 10-week program, and housing will be provided.

Eligible students include undergraduate rising sophomores through Ph.D. students as of fall 2017. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and have a minimum GPA of 3.0.

Applications are due March 26, 2017.

For more information about the internship and to apply online, visit http://jhuapl.edu/nasaintern/.

Questions about the NASA/APL Internships Program should be emailed to aplnasaintern-web@jhuapl.edu.


Celebrate Women’s History Month: Download New NASA Women of Color Lithograph

Through their accomplishments and dedication to their jobs, women at NASA embody the essence of Women’s History Month. They serve as role models to young women in their pursuit of careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

The new “Women of Color: Pioneers and Innovators” lithograph features administrators, astronauts, pilots and mathematicians who have been or are currently pioneers and innovators in the fields of aeronautics and astronautics. To download this lithograph, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/Women_of_Color_Lithograph.html.

Are you looking for more insight into the innovative work being done by women across NASA? Visit the NASA Women of STEM website to read career profiles, watch videos and more! Check it out at http://www.nasa.gov/education/womenstem.


Celebrate Solar Week — Spring 2017

Solar Week provides a weeklong series of web-based educational classroom activities and games with a focus on the sun-Earth connection. This spring’s Solar Week activities will take place March 27-31, 2017, and will highlight safe solar viewing and the total solar eclipse happening on Aug. 21, 2017.

Solar Week is ideal for young teens or groups wanting to know more about the solar system, the stars or astronomy in general. Students can learn about solar careers, sunspots, solar energy and solar storms through a series of activities, games and lessons. Many activities are suitable for fun in the computer lab as well. Participants can interact on the online bulletin board with leading scientists at the forefront of sun-Earth research.

To learn more and to register to participate, visit http://www.solarweek.org.

Questions about Solar Week may be emailed to solarweek@solarweek.org.


NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate — Early Career Faculty Opportunity

NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate seeks proposals from accredited U.S. universities on behalf of faculty members early in their careers to conduct space technology research of high priority to NASA. NASA is seeking proposals that plan to pursue innovative, early-stage space technology research in the topic areas specifically enumerated in the solicitation.

Only accredited U.S. universities are eligible to submit proposals on behalf of their outstanding new faculty members who intend to develop academic careers related to space technology. The proposed research must be led by a single, eligible principal investigator. The PI must be an untenured assistant professor on the tenure track at the sponsoring U.S. university at the time of award. The PI must be a U.S. citizen or have lawful status of permanent residency. The PI must be the primary researcher on the effort; co-investigators are not permitted. Collaborators (other than NASA civil servants/JPL) are permitted. See the solicitation for complete requirements regarding eligibility and for definitions and restrictions regarding collaborators.

Proposals are due on or before March 31, 2017.

For complete details and proposal procedures, visit http://go.nasa.gov/2l86ywA.

Questions concerning this opportunity may be directed to hq-ecf-call@mail.nasa.gov.


Exploration of the Moon and Asteroids by Secondary Students (ExMASS) High School Research Program

NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, and the Center for Lunar Science and Exploration at the Lunar and Planetary Institute are looking for 10 teams of motivated high school students and their teachers to participate in a national standards-based lunar/asteroid research program for the 2017-2018 academic year.

Supervised by their teacher and aided by a scientist advisor, participants undertake student-led open-inquiry research projects that engage them in the process of science and support the goals of the NASA Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute. At the end of the year, four teams compete for a chance to present their research at the Exploration Science Forum held at NASA’s Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, California, in July 2018.

Participation in the ExMASS program is free. Interested teachers must submit an application. Applications are due March 31, 2017.

For more information and to apply for the ExMASS program, visit http://www.lpi.usra.edu/exploration/education/hsResearch/.

Please direct questions about the ExMASS program to Andy Shaner at shaner@lpi.usra.edu.


NASA and the American Historical Society Seek Applicants for Fellowships in Aerospace History

The Fellowships in Aerospace History are offered annually by NASA to support significant scholarly research projects in aerospace history. These fellowships grant the opportunity to engage in significant and sustained advanced research in all aspects of the history of aerospace from the earliest human interest in flight to the present, including cultural and intellectual history, economic history, history of law and public policy, and the history of science, engineering, and management.

NASA provides funds to the American Historical Association, the History of Science Society, and the Society for the History of Technology to allow each association to award a fellowship. These include the Fellowship in Aerospace History, the Fellowship in the History of Space Technology and the Fellowship in the History of Space Science.

The fellowship term is for a period of at least six months, but not more than nine months, and should commence no later than Nov. 15, 2017. The fellow will be expected to devote the term entirely to the proposed research project. Each fellowship carries a stipend of $21,250, which includes travel expenses.

Applicants must possess a PhD in history or in a closely related field, or be enrolled as a student (having completed all coursework) in a doctoral degree-granting program.

Application materials are due April 1, 2017. Applications will be entered into consideration for all three fellowships.

For more information and complete application process details, visit https://apply.interfolio.com/40406.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to awards@historians.org.


Earn STEM Digital Badges to Celebrate the Centennial of NASA’s Langley Research Center

To celebrate NASA’s Langley Research Center’s Centennial, three STEM digital badges are now available for educators and students in grades 5-9. Discover the role of cloud types in the Earth’s Energy Budget; how drag is used to land the Mars2020 Rover on Mars; and the importance of composite materials for airplanes.

Educators may earn up to 15 hours of professional development. Student badges include up to six hours of content aligned to the educator badge.

The first 1,000 educators to complete all three badges by April 30, 2017, will receive a NASA insignia iron-on patch.

For more information and to begin earning badges, visit https://nasatxstate-epdc.net/. After logging in to the site, click on the Explore icon and type “NASA Langley” in the search area to find and select the NASA Langley Centennial Mission.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Marilé Colón Robles at marile.colonrobles@nasa.gov.


Grant Competition — USAID Development Innovation Ventures

The U.S. Agency for International Development seeks proposals for Development Innovation Ventures grants. Development Innovation Ventures supports breakthrough solutions to the world’s most intractable development challenges by finding and testing bold ideas that could change millions of lives at a fraction of the usual cost.

DIV welcomes applications from U.S. and non-U.S. organizations, individuals, and nonprofit and for-profit entities, provided their work is in a country where USAID operates.

Examples of innovations that USAID/DIV is likely to support include:
— Behavior-change approaches drawing on insights from psychology and behavioral economics.
— Solutions that advance equality between females and males and that empower women and girls to participate fully in and benefit from the development of their societies.
— New methods to reduce absenteeism among frontline health and education workers.
— Testing proof of concept for a solar lighting system distributed by local entrepreneurs at a price/service point that induces wide adoption.

Proposals are accepted year-round.

For more information about this opportunity, visit https://www.usaid.gov/div.

Please email questions about this opportunity to div@usaid.gov.


Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design, or STEAMD; or activities culturally relevant to or focused on populations underrepresented in STEM careers, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or nonreimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA announcement.


NASA’s Centennial Challenges: Vascular Tissue Challenge

NASA, in partnership with the nonprofit Methuselah Foundation’s New Organ Alliance, is seeking ways to advance the field of bioengineering through a new prize competition. The Vascular Tissue Challenge offers a $500,000 prize to be divided among the first three teams that successfully create thick, metabolically functional, human vascularized organ tissue in a controlled laboratory environment.

Competitors must produce vascularized tissue that is more than .39 inches (1 centimeter) in thickness and maintains more than 85 percent survival of the required cells throughout a 30-day trial period. To win an award, teams must demonstrate three successful trials with at least a 75 percent success rate. In addition to the laboratory trials, teams must submit a proposal that details how they would further advance some aspect of their research through a microgravity experiment that could be conducted in the U.S. National Laboratory on the International Space Station.

The first registered team(s) to meet the required guidelines and complete their trials by Sept. 30, 2019, will win the awards.

The Vascular Tissue Challenge prize purse is provided by NASA’s Centennial Challenges Program, part of NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate. Centennial Challenges, managed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, is NASA’s citizen-inventor prize program. It invites the nation to help advance the technologies that will enable us to go to Mars and beyond, as well as improve life on Earth. The New Organ Alliance is administering the competition on behalf of NASA. The alliance is a nonprofit organization focused on regenerative medicine research and development to benefit human disease research and tissue engineering.

For information about the Methuselah Foundation’s New Organ Alliance, official challenge documents, rules and schedule of events, visit https://neworgan.org/vtc-prize.php.

For more information about the Vascular Tissue Challenge, visit http://www.nasa.gov/vtchallenge.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Eduation: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

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