NASA Education Express Message — May 25, 2017

Check out the latest NASA opportunities for the education community.

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: May 25, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT

2017 Girls in STEM Event at NASA’s Glenn Research Center
Audience: Summer Camps and Out-of-School-Time Groups for Girls in Grades 6-8
Registration Deadline: June 2, 2017
Event Date: July 14, 2017

New Amendments, FAQs and Notice Posted — NASA Research Announcement: Competitive Program for Science Museums, Planetariums and NASA Visitor Centers (CP4SMPVC)
Audience: Formal and Informal Education Institutions
Proposal Deadline: June 19, 2017


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘Making STEM Magic’ Program
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: May 27, 2017, at 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. EDT

NASA Solar Eclipse Workshops at Marshall Space Flight Center
Audience: K-12 Educators
Next Workshop Date: June 1, 2017, 9-11 a.m. CDT

NASA History Program Office Internships — Fall 2017
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: June 1, 2017

2017 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education
Next Lecture Date: June 1, 2017, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)

2017 Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
DEADLINE EXTENDED — Abstract Submission Due: June 2, 2017
Workshop Dates: Aug. 21-25, 2017

Lloyd V. Berkner Space Policy Internships
Audience: Undergraduate and Graduate Students at U.S. Universities and Colleges
Application Deadline: June 2, 2017

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 12 to the International Space Station
Audience: School Districts Serving Grades 5-12, Informal Education Institutions, Colleges and Universities
Inquiry Deadline: June 15, 2017
Start Date: September 5, 2017

‘CineSpace’ Short Film Competition
Audience: All Educators and Students
Entry Submission Period: June 1 – July 31, 2017

Get Ready for the 2017 Solar Eclipse With NASA Resources
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Aug. 21, 2017

WGBH Education — The Solar Eclipse of 2017: Teacher Toolkit
Audience: K-12 Educators
Eclipse Date: Aug. 21, 2017

Earn STEM Digital Badges to Celebrate the Centennial of NASA’s Langley Research Center
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-9, Informal Educators
Deadline: Oct. 21, 2017

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

Search for Gravitational Waves With ‘Gravity Spy’ Citizen Science Project
Audience: All Educators and Students
Project Timeframe: Ongoing

NASA Seeks Creative Arts Inspired by Cassini’s Mission to Saturn
Audience: All Educators and Students Ages 13 and Older


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

 


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

International Space Station — Off the Earth, For the Earth: Space Food and Nutrition
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-8
Event Date: May 25, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT
Eat your way through math and science. This webinar will cover NASA STEM lessons that investigate space food and nutrition for astronauts. Participants will find out about NASA resources to research the caloric content and nutritional value of space foods, learn about nutritional needs of astronauts, and construct sample space food menus. Explore a menu of inquiry activities and other resources to satisfy your STEM appetite. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/235775

Mars — Here We Come! Guest: Dr. Pascal Lee, Author
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: May 30, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Dr. Pascal Lee is a planetary scientist at the SETI Institute. He is also chairman of the Mars Institute and director of the NASA Haughton-Mars Project at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. His research is on the history of water on Mars and planning the future human exploration of Mars. Dr. Lee has led over 30 expeditions to the Arctic and Antarctica to study Mars by comparison with the Earth. He also studies asteroids and the two moons of Mars. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/250710

NASA Digital Badge for Educators: A Way to Personalize Your Learning
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: May 31, 2017, at 4 p.m. EDT
Digital badges, or microcredentials, are online representation of online learning experiences. They offer educators an opportunity to personalize their professional development. NASA EPDC Digital Badging System offers various opportunities for educators to learn about NASA topics and classroom activities while earning hours of professional development. This webinar will offer a walkthrough of the Digital Badging System and will look through some current opportunities for all educators. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/242639

Journey to Mars: There and Back Again
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-12
Event Date: June 1, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT
Humans will one day travel to and explore Mars in person. How will we get there? What will we do when we get there? How will we get back? Explore the technology that will enable humans to travel to Mars. The webinar will showcase NASA’s Journey to Mars missions, online resources and STEM classroom lessons. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/241394

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


2017 Girls in STEM Event at NASA’s Glenn Research Center

NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, is hosting a “Girls in STEM” event for girls in grades 6 to 8 who participate in summer camps or other out-of-school-time summer groups and organizations! The event will take place on July 14, 2017, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. EDT.

This activity-filled event includes a career showcase, a panel of female scientists and engineers, an engineering design challenge, and facility tours to encourage future leaders to pursue careers in STEM.

Online registration for the event is open through Friday, June 2, 2017. Attending students and chaperones must be U.S. citizens. Each group must have 10 to 25 students.

For full event details and to register online, visit https://events.grc.nasa.gov/girlsinstem/Default.aspx.

Questions about this event should be directed to Stephanie Brown-Houston at sdbrown-houston@nasa.gov.


New Amendments, FAQs and Notice Posted — NASA Research Announcement: Competitive Program for Science Museums, Planetariums and NASA Visitor Centers (CP4SMPVC)

The NASA Office of Education has posted new information for its 2017 NASA Research Announcement: Competitive Program for Science Museums, Planetariums and NASA Visitor Centers (CP4SMPVC), Announcement Number NNH17ZHA002N. Proposals for this solicitation are due June 19, 2017.

To view the Amendments, FAQs and Notice, visit NSPIRES at https://go.nasa.gov/2oC4eCU.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NRA.


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘Making STEM Magic’ Program

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is presenting a series of free education events called “Making STEM Magic.” This new program introduces young visitors to engineering in a fun and creative way. Participants learn by doing. Each challenge involves designing, building and testing a prototype. Each month, a new theme will be introduced with a new problem to solve.

Events are scheduled each Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. ET at the National Air and Space Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia. The events are free and open to the public.

Blast Off!: Propulsion
Each Saturday in May 2017
It really is rocket science. Try your hand at designing a rocket and staying on target.

Red Rover: Mission to Mars
Each Saturday in June 2017
Did you know that rovers are robotic ambassadors? Learn more about NASA’s mobile labs and construct your own rolling rover.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s “Making STEM Magic” program, visit https://airandspace.si.edu/visit/events/stem-magic.

Please direct questions about this series of events to the Visitor Service line at 703-572-4118.


NASA Solar Eclipse Workshops at Marshall Space Flight Center

On Aug. 21, 2017, the United States will experience a solar eclipse. This celestial event will provide a golden opportunity to engage and educate diverse audiences, and NASA has the resources to help. Join the Educator Resource Center at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, for the final workshop in a series of grade-level specific educator workshops to learn about safety tips, hands-on activities, resources and more!

June 1, 2017, 9-11 a.m. CDT: Educators of Grades K-12

For full event details and registration information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/solar_eclipse_workshop2017.pdf.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Maria Chambers at maria.a.chambers@nasa.gov.


NASA History Program Office Internships — Fall 2017

The NASA History Program Office is seeking undergraduate and graduate students for summer 2017 internships. The History Program Office maintains archival materials to answer research questions from NASA personnel, journalists, scholars, students at all levels and others from around the world. The division also edits and publishes several books and monographs each year. It maintains a large number of websites on NASA history.

Students of all majors are welcome to apply. While detailed prior knowledge of the aeronautics and space fields is not necessary, a keen interest and some basic familiarity with these topics are needed. Strong research, writing and editing skills are essential. Experience with social media is a plus.

Intern projects are flexible. Typical projects include handling a variety of information requests, writing posts for the NASA history Twitter and Facebook pages, editing historical manuscripts, doing research and writing biographical sketches, and identifying and captioning photos.

Applications for fall 2017 internships are due June 1, 2017. Applications for spring 2018 internship applications are due June 1, 2017 and applications for summer 2018 internships are due Feb. 1, 2018.

For more information, visit http://history.nasa.gov/interncall.htm.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please contact Bill Barry at bill.barry@nasa.gov.


2017 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online

The Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, named after the founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and presented by JPL’s Office of Communication and Education, shares the excitement of the space program’s missions, instruments and other technologies.

Lectures take place twice per month, on consecutive Thursdays and Fridays. Thursday lectures take place in JPL’s Theodore von Kármán Auditorium, and Friday lectures take place at Pasadena City College’s Vosloh Forum. Both start at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT). Admission and parking are free for all lectures. No reservations are required, but seating is limited. The Thursday evening lectures are streamed live for viewing online. Archives of past lectures are also available online.

Next Lecture in the Series:

The Golden Age of Exploration
Event Date:
June 1 and June 2, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2017&month=6
Missions managed by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory have visited every planet in our solar system. Mars has been explored by rovers; samples from a comet’s tail and the solar wind have been returned to Earth; planets have been discovered around neighboring stars; and new insights into our planet’s environment have been acquired. Join Charles Elachi, recently retired director of JPL, for a discussion about this golden age of exploration.

For more information about the Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, including a complete list of upcoming lectures, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.php.

Questions about this series should be directed to http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php.


ABSTRACT DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2017 Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop

The annual Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop will be held Aug. 21-25, 2017, at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

The Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop encourages knowledge sharing, professional development, and networking throughout the thermal and fluids engineering community within NASA, academia and the aerospace community at large. STEM faculty and university students are encouraged to attend, submit a poster or paper on their thermal/fluids work, take free training, or do a combination thereof.

Registration to attend the workshop is free. Participants interested in presenting at the conference, via manuscript or technical poster, must submit an abstract by June 2, 2017.

For more information about the workshop and how to submit an abstract for consideration, visit https://tfaws.nasa.gov/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Ramona Cummings at ramona.o.cummings@nasa.gov.


Lloyd V. Berkner Space Policy Internships

The Space Studies Board is seeking applicants for the Lloyd V. Berkner Space Policy Internships for autumn 2017. The goal of the program is to provide promising undergraduate and graduate students with the opportunity to work in the area of civil space research policy in the nation’s capital.

Established in 1958, the Space Studies Board is the principal advisory group providing independent scientific and programmatic advice to NASA and other government agencies on all aspects of civil space research and associated ground-based activities. Interns typically undertake one or more short-term research projects designed to assist with or to enhance ongoing study projects.

Applicants must be registered students (undergraduate or graduate) at a U.S. university or college who have completed their junior year. Applicants should have long-term career goals in space science research, applications or policy.

Applications are due June 2, 2017.

For more information and a full list of eligibility requirements, visit http://sites.nationalacademies.org/SSB/SSB_052239.

Please direct questions about this internship to Dr. David H. Smith at dhsmith@nas.edu.


DEADLINE EXTENDED: Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 12 to the International Space Station

The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education and the Arthur C. Clarke Institute for Space Education announce a science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, opportunity for school districts across the U.S. and space station partner nations. The newest flight opportunity, Mission 12 to the International Space Station, gives students across a community the ability to design and propose real experiments to fly in low Earth orbit on the space station. This opportunity is part of the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program, or SSEP.

Each participating community will receive a microgravity research mini-laboratory capable of supporting a single microgravity experiment and all launch services to fly the minilab to the space station in spring/summer 2018 and return it to Earth. An experiment design competition in each community — engaging typically 300+ students — allows student teams to design and propose real experiments vying for their community′s reserved mini-lab.

Content resources for teachers and students support foundational instruction on science in microgravity and experimental design. Additional SSEP programming uses the experiment design competition to engage the community in embracing a learning-community model for STEM education.

This competition is open to students in grades 5-12 and college. Informal education groups and organizations also are encouraged to participate. Interested communities must inquire about the program no later than June 15, 2017. The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education is available to help interested communities in the U.S. secure the needed funding.

To learn more about this opportunity, visit the “SSEP Mission 12 to International Space Station” National Announcement of Opportunity at http://ssep.ncesse.org/2017/03/new-flight-opportunity-for-school-districts-announcing-student-spaceflight-experiments-program-ssep-mission-12-to-the-international-space-station-starting-september-2017/.

SSEP is enabled through a strategic partnership with DreamUp PBC and NanoRacks LLC working with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the use of the International Space Station as a national laboratory. The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (http://www.iss-casis.org/) is a national partner of SSEP. To view a list of all SSEP national partners, visit http://ssep.ncesse.org/national-partners/.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please email SSEP National Program Director Jeff Goldstein at jeffgoldstein@ncesse.org.


‘CineSpace’ Short Film Competition

NASA and the Houston Cinema Arts Society once again will offer filmmakers around the world a chance to share their works inspired by — and using — actual NASA imagery through “CineSpace,” a short-film competition.

Films featuring imagery captured by NASA and video collected throughout the agency’s 50-year history will be judged on creativity, innovation and attention to detail. Works submitted to “CineSpace” will compete for cash prizes and the opportunity to be shown to audiences both on and off Earth. In addition to being screened at the “CineSpace” awards ceremony during the Houston Cinema Arts Festival, winners and finalists may be screened at other film festivals across the country, as well as on NASA TV and even on the International Space Station.

“CineSpace” is open to all filmmakers, both professional and aspiring. The competition will accept submissions of all genres, including narrative, documentary, comedy, drama, animation, experimental and others, of up to 10 minutes running time. Entries must use at least 10 percent publicly available NASA imagery.

The submission period opens June 1, 2017, and closes July 31, 2017. Finalists and winners will be announced at a “CineSpace” event during the Houston Cinema Arts Festival in November. Entries will be competing for $26,000 in prizes with cash awards going to the top three submissions as well as the two films that best demonstrate the themes “Benefits of Space to Humanity” and “Future Space Exploration.”

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/cinespace-short-film-competition-returns-for-2017.

Please direct questions about this competition to cinespace@cinemartsociety.org.


Get Ready for the 2017 Solar Eclipse With NASA Resources

On Aug. 21, 2017, the United States will experience a solar eclipse! This celestial event will provide a golden opportunity to engage and educate diverse audiences, and NASA has the resources to help.

Along a path 60 to 70 miles wide stretching from Oregon to South Carolina, observers will be able to see a total solar eclipse. Others across North America will see a partial eclipse. The event will happen around lunch time across the country. For an interactive map with timing information along the path of the eclipse, visit http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEgoogle/SEgoogle2001/SE2017Aug21Tgoogle.html.

Visit the following websites to find additional information and resources, including:
— Tips for safely viewing the solar eclipse.
— Recorded interviews with NASA scientists, mission specialists and eclipse path communities.
— Topical online eclipse videos, featuring a variety of STEM and cultural topics.
— Social media community development and networking.
— Mobile educational eclipse applications.
— Public challenges and engagement activities.
— 2-D and 3-D printing exercises for K-16 students.
— Citizen science campaigns in partnership with NASA mission observations.
— Adjunct activities and educational resources.
— Live streaming of observations and programming.

Total Eclipse 2017 — Through the Eyes of NASA
http://eclipse2017.nasa.gov

Eclipses and Transits
http://www.nasa.gov/eclipse

Watch “The Solar Eclipse 2017 PREVIEW Show” with NASA EDGE.
https://youtu.be/UPPGxqqZug0


WGBH Education — The Solar Eclipse of 2017: Teacher Toolkit

Are you a K-12 teacher looking for ideas and information on what to do with your students, your school, or your community about the upcoming solar eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017? Boston-based PBS station WGBH, supported by a NASA cooperative agreement, has gathered information from trusted content partners into a “Solar Eclipse of 2017: Teacher Toolkit.”

Check out the toolkit to find maps, activities and more. Learn how to align your eclipse activities to national education standards. Watch an archived recording of a professional development webinar about the eclipse. And you can even find resources available in Spanish!

For all of this and more, visit http://bit.ly/EclipseToolkit.

Please direct questions about this toolkit to Rachel Connolly at rachel_connolly@wgbh.org.


Earn STEM Digital Badges to Celebrate the Centennial of NASA’s Langley Research Center

To celebrate NASA’s Langley Research Center’s Centennial, three STEM digital badges are now available for educators and students in grades 5-9. Discover the role of cloud types in the Earth’s Energy Budget; how drag is used to land the Mars2020 Rover on Mars; and the importance of composite materials for airplanes.

Educators may earn up to 15 hours of professional development. Student badges include up to six hours of content aligned to the educator badge.

The first 1,000 educators to complete all three badges by Oct. 21, 2017, will receive a NASA insignia iron-on patch.

For more information and to begin earning badges, visit https://nasatxstate-epdc.net/. After logging in to the site, click on the Explore icon and type “NASA Langley” in the search area to find and select the NASA Langley Centennial Mission.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Marilé Colón Robles at marile.colonrobles@nasa.gov.


Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design, or STEAMD; or activities culturally relevant to or focused on populations underrepresented in STEM careers, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or nonreimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA announcement.


Search for Gravitational Waves With ‘Gravity Spy’ Citizen Science Project

In 1916, Einstein predicted the existence of ripples in spacetime known as gravitational waves. A century later, on Sept. 14, 2015, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory, or LIGO, made the first direct detection of this elusive phenomenon. This discovery is the first of many that will give researchers a whole new way to explore the universe. However, LIGO needs your help!

Being the most sensitive and most complicated gravitational experiment ever created, LIGO is susceptible to many instrumental and environmental noise sources called “glitches.” These glitches are difficult to model using computers, can mimic true astrophysical signals, and generally make LIGO less sensitive to gravitational waves.

Classifying glitches using computers has proven to be an exceedingly difficult task. That’s where the Gravity Spy Zooniverse Citizen Science Project comes in! Human intuition has proven time and time again to be a useful tool in pattern recognition problems such as this. One of the innovations of this project is that citizen scientists and computer algorithms will work in a symbiotic relationship, helping one another to optimally classify and characterize glitches. By selecting the right classification for a given glitch, you will help computers learn to do this classification themselves on much larger datasets. That capability will help scientists determine and eliminate the sources of noise.

For more information and to learn how to participate, visit the “Gravity Spy” website at https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/zooniverse/gravity-spy.

To learn more about the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory and its mission to detect gravitational waves, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2016/nsf-s-ligo-has-detected-gravitational-waves.

Download the “Direct Observation of Gravitational Waves” Educator Guide for activities and background information designed for grades 5-12. https://dcc.ligo.org/LIGO-P1600015/public.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Tyson Littenberg at tyson.b.littenberg@nasa.gov.

“Gravity Spy” is a collaboration between the following entities:
–Northwestern University, led by Scott Coughlin and Michael Zevin with PI Vicky Kalogera and co-PI Aggelos Katsaggelos. Northwestern’s team is composed of a LIGO group in the CIERA astrophysics research center and a machine learning group in the Image and Video Processing Laboratory.
–The Adler Planetarium Zooniverse Team, led by co-PI Laura Trouille.
–Syracuse University, led by co-PI’s Kevin Crowston and Carsten Østerlund.
–California State University at Fullerton, led by co-PI Josh Smith.
–The LIGO Scientific Collaboration, of which NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center and Goddard Space Flight Center are member institutions.

The project is funded by the National Science Foundation.


NASA Seeks Creative Arts Inspired by Cassini’s Mission to Saturn

During nearly two decades in space, Cassini has inspired people on Earth. Cassini has sent home thousands of images of icy moons and resplendent rings. It helped discover erupting water geysers on Enceladus and seas of methane on Titan. It showed us a view of Earth as a blue dot.

Now the mission is moving toward its “Grand Finale,” and in September 2017 it will finally draw to a dramatic end. NASA’s Cassini team would like to know this: How has Cassini inspired you?

Visit the Cassini Inspires website to explore images and more from the mission. Then use inspiration to get creative. Write a poem. Paint a picture. Choreograph a dance. Tell a story. The possibilities are endless!

Share your creation with the NASA Cassini team on the social media platform of your choice, such as Instagram, YouTube, Facebook, Twitter or others. Tag it #CassiniInspires. Or send it directly to cassinimission@jpl.nasa.gov.

To learn more, visit https://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/cassiniinspires/.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Eduation: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *