NASA Education Express Message — June 15, 2017

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Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: June 15, 2017, at 4 p.m. EDT

NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center ‘NASA in the Park’ Event
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: June 17, 2017, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. CDT

Notice and New FAQs Posted — NASA Research Announcement: Competitive Program for Science Museums, Planetariums and NASA Visitor Centers (CP4SMPVC)
Audience: Formal and Informal Education Institutions
Proposal Deadline: June 19, 2017

Press Conference: 2017 Eclipse Across America Through the Eyes of NASA
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: June 21, 2017, at 1 p.m. EDT

NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate — Research Grant Opportunity for Early Stage Innovations
Audience: Accredited U.S. Universities
Proposal Deadline: June 30, 2017

NASA Education Workshop at Glenn Research Center — Modeling the Solar Eclipse
Audience: K-12 Educators
Workshop Date: July 25, 2017, 8:30 a.m. EDT

National Science Foundation’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities — Undergraduate Program
Audience: Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Research Initiation Awards — Notice of Intent Deadline: July 25, 2017
Various Projects — Notice of Intent Deadline: Sept. 5, 2017

Translational Research Institute Postdoctoral Fellowship
Audience: Researchers Who Have Received a Ph.D. in the Last Seven Years and Have Fewer Than Five Years of Postdoctoral Training
Proposal Deadline: July 31, 2017


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 12 to the International Space Station
Audience: School Districts Serving Grades 5-12, Informal Education Institutions, Colleges and Universities
Inquiry Deadline: June 15, 2017
Start Date: September 5, 2017

Mars Survival Kit: Lessons and Activities to Guide Your Exploration of Mars!
Audience: K-12 Educators

Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope Summer Institute 2017
Audience: K-12 Educators
Registration Deadline: June 16, 2017

Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘Making STEM Magic’ Program
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: June 17, 2017, at 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. EDT

New Forever Stamp to Commemorate Solar Eclipse 2017
Audience: All Educators and Students
Release Date: June 20, 2017

Exploring Space Lecture From Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum — The Grand Tour: Exploring Planets Outside the Solar System
Audience: Students in Grade 9-Higher Education and All Educators
Event Date: June 22, 2017, at 8 p.m. EDT

Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum — STEM Institute for Educators
Audience: Middle School Science Educators
Event Date: June 29, 2017

‘CineSpace’ Short Film Competition
Audience: All Educators and Students
Entry Submission Period: June 1 – July 31, 2017

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

Get Ready for the 2017 Solar Eclipse With NASA Resources
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Aug. 21, 2017

‘Predict the Corona’ Art Project
Audience: All Educators and Students
Eclipse Date: Aug. 21, 2017

New From WGBH Education — The Solar Eclipse of 2017: Teacher Toolkit
Audience: K-12 Educators
Eclipse Date: Aug. 21, 2017

Bring the Story of “Hidden Figures” to the Classroom With the “Who Is Katherine Johnson?” Profiles and Modern Figures Toolkit
Audience: K-12 Educators

Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students and Higher Education Institutions


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

 


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Viewing Your Content Through a NASA Context
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-16
Event Date: June 15, 2017, at 4 p.m. EDT
Explore ways to bring real-world NASA science into your classroom. Participants will be introduced to NASA activities that touch on satellites and ultraviolet (UV) light from the sun. Learn how these activities have classroom applications that cover topics such as scatter plots, the upcoming solar eclipse, weather and clouds, atmospheres and solar system exploration, material composition, and radiation safety. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/244606

Journey to Mars: Is There Water on Mars?
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-12
Event Date: June 19, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Explore the possibility of finding water by probing below the surface of Mars. This webinar will include activities where students will record and graph temperature data to learn about the search for water on Mars using two different models. The activities will match both the Next Generation Science Standards and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics’ Principles and Standards for School Mathematics. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/254724

Journey to Mars: Space Food
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: June 20, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Learn about NASA’s plans for sending astronauts on a journey to Mars and the impact food has on planning the long-duration mission. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/254217

Exploring Exoplanets: Using Math to Understand Our Solar System
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 7-12
Event Date: June 21, 2017, at 8 p.m. EDT
In this webinar, find out how scientists use mathematics to learn about distant planets. Using Kepler’s laws, algebra and geometry, scientists can gather a plethora of information on planet size, speed and movement in the search for planets similar to Earth! The activity in this webinar covers math standards pertaining to radicals, linear and exponential models, and Next Generation Science Standards. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/254552

Journey to Mars: Looking for Life
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-10
Event Date: June 22, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
In this webinar, learn about how scientists conduct research to identify characteristics of living and nonliving organisms. Scientist must establish criteria to work with in their research. Explore the following NASA classroom activities related to this topic: Imaginary Martians, Mars Critters, Strange New Planet, and Areology: the Study of Mars. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/257704

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center ‘NASA in the Park’ Event

Join NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, for the “NASA in the Park” event! This “open house” will take place at Big Spring Park East in downtown Huntsville on Saturday, June 17, 2017, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. CDT.

Throughout the day, Marshall researchers, scientists and other team members will present short talks about their work. Bands featuring Marshall musicians will perform, and visitors can have their picture taken in a spacesuit. The Marshall Exchange shop will have science-related kids’ games for sale, as well as caps, T-shirts, tote bags, space shuttle mission coins and other NASA-logo merchandise. Many educational activities will be available for children and adults alike.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/centers/marshall/news/news/releases/2017/17-042.html.

If you have questions about the “NASA in the Park” event, please email your inquiries to Angela Storey at angela.d.storey@nasa.gov.


Notice and New FAQs Posted — NASA Research Announcement: Competitive Program for Science Museums, Planetariums and NASA Visitor Centers (CP4SMPVC)

As of June 9, the NASA Office of Education has posted new information for its 2017 NASA Research Announcement: Competitive Program for Science Museums, Planetariums and NASA Visitor Centers (CP4SMPVC), Announcement Number NNH17ZHA002N. Proposals for this solicitation are due June 19, 2017.

To view the Notice and new FAQs, visit NSPIRES at https://go.nasa.gov/2oC4eCU.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NRA.


Press Conference: 2017 Eclipse Across America Through the Eyes of NASA

Join NASA, other federal agencies and science organizations for a two-hour nationally televised event, live from the Newseum in Washington, D.C.! The event will take place on June 21, 2017, at 1 p.m. EDT. Tune in to watch on NASA TV or see a livestream of the event on NASA.gov.

For the first time in 99 years, a total solar eclipse will cross the entire United States on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. Over the course of 100 minutes, 14 states across the United States will experience over two minutes of darkness in the middle of the day. Additionally, a partial eclipse will be viewable across the continent.

Tune in to the event for solar eclipse tips, such as:
— How to experience the August 2017 eclipse through the eyes of NASA
— Views from different areas of the country and how to prepare
— Safe practices for viewing an eclipse
— What causes an eclipse and why you should care
— How to participate in events around the country
— The unique research opportunities to study our Earth, moon and the sun

For more information, visit https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/save-date-june-21-2017.

Are you looking for more information about the upcoming eclipse? Visit the 2017 Solar Eclipse website at https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/.

Please direct questions about the press conference event to https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/contact-us.


NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate — Research Grant Opportunity for Early Stage Innovations

NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate seeks proposals from accredited U.S. universities for innovative, early-stage space technology research of high priority to NASA’s mission directorates.

This solicitation challenges universities to examine the theoretical feasibility of new ideas and approaches that are critical to making science, space travel, and exploration more effective, affordable, and sustainable. It is intended to foster interactions between NASA and the awarded university teams. Therefore, collaboration and interaction with NASA researchers should be expected while conducting space technology research under these awards.

Proposals are due on or before June 30, 2017.

For complete details and proposal procedures, visit http://tinyurl.com/NASA-17ESI.

Questions concerning this opportunity may be directed to hq-esi-call@mail.nasa.gov.


NASA Education Workshop at Glenn Research Center — Modeling the Solar Eclipse

On Aug. 21, 2017, the United States will experience a solar eclipse. This event will provide an excellent opportunity to engage and educate diverse audiences, and NASA has the resources to help.

Join the Office of Education at NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, for a STEM educator workshop on July 25, 2017. Participants will be introduced to problem-based-inquiry learning activities related to the solar eclipse. Learn how to bring STEM challenges and the adventure of space exploration to students in the classroom.

For full event details and registration information, visit https://www.eiseverywhere.com/ehome/index.php?eventid=237940&.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Stephanie Brown-Houston at sdbrown-houston@nasa.gov.


National Science Foundation’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities — Undergraduate Program

The National Science Foundation is seeking proposals for the Historically Black Colleges and Universities — Undergraduate Program. HBCU-UP is committed to enhancing the quality of undergraduate STEM education and research at Historically Black Colleges and Universities as a means to broaden participation in the nation’s STEM workforce. HBCU-UP realizes this purpose by providing awards to develop, implement, and study innovative models and approaches for making dramatic improvements in the preparation and success of HBCU undergraduate students so that they may participate successfully in graduate programs and/or careers in STEM disciplines.

HBCU-UP provides support for a variety of opportunities. These include the following:

Research Initiation Awards: These awards provide support for STEM faculty at HBCUs to pursue new research at the home institution, an NSF-funded research center, a research-intensive institution or a national laboratory. Eligible faculty members must not have received any federal funding during the last three years. The deadline to submit a required notice of intent for a Research Initiation Award is July 25, 2017. Full proposals are due Oct. 3, 2017.

Targeted Infusion Projects, Broadening Participation Research Projects, Implementation Projects, and Achieving Competitive Excellence Implementation Projects: These projects aim to support efforts that increase STEM participation at HBCUs. See the website for individual project descriptions. The deadline to submit a required notice of intent for these projects is Sept. 5, 2017. Full proposals are due Nov. 28, 2017.

For more information on the overall Historically Black Colleges and Universities — Undergraduate Program, visit http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5481.

Please direct questions about these opportunities to Claudia Rankins at crankins@nsf.gov and Andrea Johnson at andjohns@nsf.gov.


Translational Research Institute Postdoctoral Fellowship

The Translational Research Institute leads a national effort in applying cutting edge terrestrial research to spaceflight human-risk-mitigation strategies for long-duration exploration missions. TRI was founded in 2016 and works in partnership with NASA’s Human Research Program through a cooperative agreement and cooperative agreement management plan.

Applications for postdoctoral fellowships offered through the Translational Research Institute are now being accepted. Fellowships will be competitively awarded in any laboratory in the U.S. conducting biomedical/biotechnological research aligned with TRI’s mission and goals. The fellowship is open to any researcher who is legally residing and/or working in the United States, i.e., U.S. citizens, permanent residents, or persons with pre-existing visas obtained through their sponsoring institutions that permit postdoctoral training for the project’s duration. To be eligible for this program, applicants may not have more than five years (cumulative) previous postdoctoral training as of the deadline for this proposal submission.

Proposals are due July 31, 2017.

For complete fellowship details and application procedures, visit http://go.nasa.gov/2rJD9iy.

Questions concerning this opportunity may be directed to Dorit B. Donoviel at donoviel@bcm.edu.


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 12 to the International Space Station

The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education and the Arthur C. Clarke Institute for Space Education announce a science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, opportunity for school districts across the U.S. and space station partner nations. The newest flight opportunity, Mission 12 to the International Space Station, gives students across a community the ability to design and propose real experiments to fly in low Earth orbit on the space station. This opportunity is part of the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program, or SSEP.

Each participating community will receive a microgravity research mini-laboratory capable of supporting a single microgravity experiment and all launch services to fly the minilab to the space station in spring/summer 2018 and return it to Earth. An experiment design competition in each community — engaging typically 300+ students — allows student teams to design and propose real experiments vying for their community′s reserved mini-lab.

Content resources for teachers and students support foundational instruction on science in microgravity and experimental design. Additional SSEP programming uses the experiment design competition to engage the community in embracing a learning-community model for STEM education.

This competition is open to students in grades 5-12 and college. Informal education groups and organizations also are encouraged to participate. Interested communities must inquire about the program no later than June 15, 2017. The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education is available to help interested communities in the U.S. secure the needed funding.

To learn more about this opportunity, visit the “SSEP Mission 12 to International Space Station” National Announcement of Opportunity at http://ssep.ncesse.org/2017/03/new-flight-opportunity-for-school-districts-announcing-student-spaceflight-experiments-program-ssep-mission-12-to-the-international-space-station-starting-september-2017/.

SSEP is enabled through a strategic partnership with DreamUp PBC and NanoRacks LLC working with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the use of the International Space Station as a national laboratory. The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (http://www.iss-casis.org/) is a national partner of SSEP. To view a list of all SSEP national partners, visit http://ssep.ncesse.org/national-partners/.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please email SSEP National Program Director Jeff Goldstein at jeffgoldstein@ncesse.org.


Mars Survival Kit: Lessons and Activities to Guide Your Exploration of Mars!

NASA is embarking on a journey to Mars! Are your students ready to join in the adventure? Spark excitement in your classroom with the Mars Survival Kit.

The Mars Survival Kit is a collection of educational activities for students in grades K-12. Each educational activity includes a brief description, as well as information about how the activities and lessons align to the Next Generation Science Standards.

Start your classroom’s journey to Mars at http://go.nasa.gov/1NnZ0Rg.

To learn more about NASA’s Journey to Mars, visit http://www.nasa.gov/topics/journeytomars/index.html.


Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope Summer Institute 2017

The Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope program allows educators and their students to operate a 34-meter (112-foot) radio telescope from the classroom. Partnered with scientists and other observatories from around the world, participants conduct real research and exploration.

Join the GAVRT team for a two-day training institute for educators. Attendees will learn about radio astronomy, current science campaigns available through the GAVRT program, and how the telescopes used by the program operate. Members of the Juno mission team will attend to share highlights from their mission that is studying Jupiter. And attendees will take part in question and answer sessions with professional radio astronomers.

Two institute sessions will be offered:
–June 26-27, 2017 — Howard B. Owens Science Center in Lanham, Maryland.
–June 28-29, 2017 — National Air and Space Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia.

Registration for both sessions closes on June 16, 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.lewiscenter.org/documents/Global%20Programs/east_coast_institute.pdf.

Questions about this workshop should be directed to mc@lcer.org.


Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘Making STEM Magic’ Program

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is presenting a series of free education events called “Making STEM Magic.” This new program introduces young visitors to engineering in a fun and creative way. Participants learn by doing. Each challenge involves designing, building and testing a prototype. Each month, a new theme will be introduced with a new problem to solve.

Events are scheduled each Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. ET at the National Air and Space Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia. The events are free and open to the public.

Red Rover: Mission to Mars
Each Saturday in June 2017
Did you know that rovers are robotic ambassadors? Learn more about NASA’s mobile labs and construct your own rolling rover.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s “Making STEM Magic” program, visit https://airandspace.si.edu/visit/events/stem-magic.

Please direct questions about this series of events to the Visitor Service line at 703-572-4118.


New Forever Stamp to Commemorate Solar Eclipse 2017

To commemorate the Aug. 21 total solar eclipse, the U.S. Postal Service will release a first-of-its-kind stamp that changes when touched. The Total Eclipse of the Sun Forever stamp is the first U.S. stamp application of thermochromic ink. Using the body heat of a person’s thumb or fingers, the eclipse image will transform to reveal an underlying image of the moon. The stamp reverts back to the eclipse image once it cools.

Tens of millions of people in the United States hope to view this rare event, which has not been seen on the U.S. mainland since 1979. The eclipse will travel a narrow path across the entire country for the first time since 1918. The path will run west to east from Oregon to South Carolina and will include portions of 14 states.

The Total Eclipse of the Sun Forever stamps can be pre-ordered now at usps.com/shop for delivery after the June 20 issuance. Please share the news and your eclipse experiences using the hashtag #EclipseStamps.

For more information, visit http://about.usps.com/news/national-releases/2017/pr17_020.htm.

Please direct questions about the Total Solar Eclipse Forever stamp to Mark Saunders at mark.r.saunders@usps.gov.


Exploring Space Lecture From Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum — The Grand Tour: Exploring Planets Outside the Solar System

The past decade has marked a period of great progress in the quest to understand planets outside our solar system. Join Heather Knutson, assistant professor of planetary science at the California Institute of Technology, as she describes ongoing efforts to understand the composition, temperatures, and weather patterns of these distant planets by using both ground- and space-based telescopes.

The lecture will be held June 22, 2017, at 8 p.m. EDT, at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in the District of Columbia. Attendance is free, but tickets are required. Come early to meet the lecturer. The lecture will be webcast live for free viewing.

For more information, visit https://airandspace.si.edu/events/grand-tour.

Questions about this event should be directed to the Visitor Service line at 202-633-2214.


Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum — STEM Institute for Educators

The Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum is hosting a STEM Institute for middle school science teachers on June 29, 2017. Participants will learn new ways to engage students in astronomy topics, both in the classroom and at the museum.

This year’s workshop will discuss the total solar eclipse happening on Aug. 21, 2017. This eclipse is the first in nearly 100 years that will be visible from the entire continental United States, and the event presents a valuable learning opportunity for educators and students. Participants in this workshop will be prepared to help their students safely observe the eclipse and understand why it is happening.

The STEM Institute is a free workshop, but registration is required and space is limited. For more information, visit https://airandspace.si.edu/events/stem-institute-educators-0.

Questions about this event should be directed to NASMteachers@si.edu.


‘CineSpace’ Short Film Competition

NASA and the Houston Cinema Arts Society once again will offer filmmakers around the world a chance to share their works inspired by — and using — actual NASA imagery through “CineSpace,” a short-film competition.

Films featuring imagery captured by NASA and video collected throughout the agency’s 50-year history will be judged on creativity, innovation and attention to detail. Works submitted to “CineSpace” will compete for cash prizes and the opportunity to be shown to audiences both on and off Earth. In addition to being screened at the “CineSpace” awards ceremony during the Houston Cinema Arts Festival, winners and finalists may be screened at other film festivals across the country, as well as on NASA TV and even on the International Space Station.

“CineSpace” is open to all filmmakers, both professional and aspiring. The competition will accept submissions of all genres, including narrative, documentary, comedy, drama, animation, experimental and others, of up to 10 minutes running time. Entries must use at least 10 percent publicly available NASA imagery.

The submission period opens June 1, 2017, and closes July 31, 2017. Finalists and winners will be announced at a “CineSpace” event during the Houston Cinema Arts Festival in November. Entries will be competing for $26,000 in prizes with cash awards going to the top three submissions as well as the two films that best demonstrate the themes “Benefits of Space to Humanity” and “Future Space Exploration.”

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/cinespace-short-film-competition-returns-for-2017.

Please direct questions about this competition to cinespace@cinemartsociety.org.


Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites U.S. educational institutions to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets, and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

Nonprofit museums, libraries and planetariums (sponsored through their respective State Agency Surplus Property, or SASP, organization) are also eligible to make requests. Visit the link below for special instructions to request items. To find the contact information for the SASP representative for your area, visit http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/100851.

A nominal shipping fee must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.


Get Ready for the 2017 Solar Eclipse With NASA Resources

On Aug. 21, 2017, the United States will experience a solar eclipse! This celestial event will provide a golden opportunity to engage and educate diverse audiences, and NASA has the resources to help.

Along a path 60 to 70 miles wide stretching from Oregon to South Carolina, observers will be able to see a total solar eclipse. Others across North America will see a partial eclipse. The event will happen around lunch time across the country. For an interactive map with timing information along the path of the eclipse, visit http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEgoogle/SEgoogle2001/SE2017Aug21Tgoogle.html.

Visit the following websites to find additional information and resources, including:
— Tips for safely viewing the solar eclipse.
— Recorded interviews with NASA scientists, mission specialists and eclipse path communities.
— Topical online eclipse videos, featuring a variety of STEM and cultural topics.
— Social media community development and networking.
— Mobile educational eclipse applications.
— Public challenges and engagement activities.
— 2-D and 3-D printing exercises for K-16 students.
— Citizen science campaigns in partnership with NASA mission observations.
— Adjunct activities and educational resources.
— Live streaming of observations and programming.

Total Eclipse 2017 — Through the Eyes of NASA
http://eclipse2017.nasa.gov

Eclipses and Transits
http://www.nasa.gov/eclipse


‘Predict the Corona’ Art Project

Before the advent of photography, astronomers tried to sketch the fleeting shape of our sun’s outer atmosphere called the corona. This ghostly halo of light had been seen for centuries by naked-eye observers at the height of most total solar eclipses, but little was known about its shape and extent or how these changed with time.

On Aug. 21, 2017, the United States will experience a total solar eclipse once again. Along a path 60 to 70 miles wide stretching from Oregon to South Carolina, observers will be able to see a total solar eclipse. Others across North America will see a partial eclipse. To prepare for the big event, NASA wants you to predict what the corona will look like!

Share your drawings with NASA via the NASA Solar Eclipse Flickr page (https://www.flickr.com/groups/nasa-eclipse2017/) or via Instagram using #Eclipse2017Corona.

For more information about the project and to see what past coronas have looked like, visit https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/predict-corona-art-project.

Please submit questions about this opportunity to https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/contact-us.


WGBH Education — The Solar Eclipse of 2017: Teacher Toolkit

Are you a K-12 teacher looking for ideas and information on what to do with your students, your school, or your community about the upcoming solar eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017? Boston-based PBS station WGBH, supported by a NASA cooperative agreement, has gathered information from trusted content partners into a “Solar Eclipse of 2017: Teacher Toolkit.”

Check out the toolkit to find maps, activities and more. Learn how to align your eclipse activities to national education standards. Watch an archived recording of a professional development webinar about the eclipse. And you can even find resources available in Spanish!

For all of this and more, visit http://bit.ly/EclipseToolkit.

Please direct questions about this toolkit to Rachel Connolly at rachel_connolly@wgbh.org.


Bring the Story of “Hidden Figures” to the Classroom With the “Who Is Katherine Johnson?” Profiles and Modern Figures Toolkit

In the 1960s, the U.S. was on an ambitious journey to the moon, and Katherine Johnson and her fellow human computers helped get NASA there. Bring the excitement of their story to your classroom with new resources from NASA Education.

Learn more about Katherine Johnson with the “Who Is Katherine Johnson?” profiles written just for students. Versions written for K-4 and 5-8 students are available.

“Who Is Katherine Johnson?” — K-4 Students Version
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/k-4/stories/nasa-knows/who-is-katherine-johnson-k4

“Who Is Katherine Johnson?” — 5-8 Students Version
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/5-8/features/nasa-knows/who-is-katherine-johnson-5-8

Also available online, the Modern Figures Toolkit is a collection of resources and educational activities for students in grades K-12. Each educational activity and resource includes a brief description, as well as information about how the activities and lessons align to education standards. Resources highlighted include videos, historical references and STEM materials.

Bring Katherine Johnson’s inspiring story to your classroom by downloading the Modern Figures Toolkit at www.nasa.gov/modernfigures-education-toolkit.


Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Are you an undergraduate or graduate student seeking opportunities in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)? The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science — in collaboration with the participating agencies in the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on STEM Education (CoSTEM) and the Science.gov Alliance — has launched a search portal for both students and universities to discover federally sponsored STEM education training and funding opportunities.

Student users can search the site for opportunities they can apply to directly, such as research internships and fellowships. Likewise, universities can search the site for federal funding opportunities to establish innovative training programs for undergraduates or graduate students.

Users can search the site through faceted searching capabilities for characteristics such as program type, STEM discipline, institution location, federal sponsor, and eligibility. Or they can search through the open text option.

For programs and opportunities for undergraduates, visit http://stemundergrads.science.gov/.

For graduate programs and opportunities, visit http://stemgradstudents.science.gov/.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Eduation: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

2 thoughts on “NASA Education Express Message — June 15, 2017

  1. marty

    hello i’m a french teacher
    my class is very interested in the space since Thomas Pesquet goes to iss
    One of my student i ask me about naming stars.
    Sorry if my question is stupid but I do not know to whom to send me. We suggest on the Internet offering as a gift to name stars. Is this truth or is it a swindle to name its name to a star?
    best regards

    Reply
    1. Mindi Capp Post author

      Marty,

      Thank you for your message to NASA regarding the idea of naming a star after Thomas Pesquet. Some commercial enterprises purport to offer such services for a fee. However, such “names” have no formal or official validity whatsoever.

      The following information is taken from the International Astronomical Union’s website. They are the organization that in charge of assigning names to celestial objects. https://www.iau.org/public/themes/buying_star_names/

      Buying Stars and Star Names
      The IAU frequently receives requests from individuals who want to buy stars or name stars after other persons. Some commercial enterprises purport to offer such services for a fee. However, such “names” have no formal or official validity whatsoever. Similar rules on “buying” names apply to star clusters and galaxies as well. For bodies in the Solar System , special procedures for assigning official names apply (see the IAU theme “Naming Astronomical Objects”), but in no case are commercial transactions involved.

      Some bright stars have proper names, with mostly Arabic, Greek, or Latin etymologies (e.g. Vega), but otherwise the vast majority of stars have alphanumeric designations — consisting of an acronym plus either an index number or celestial position (e.g. HR 7001, 2MASS J18365633+3847012). The IAU supports a Working Group on Star Names (WGSN) under Division C which is cataloguing the names of stars from the world’s cultures, and maintaining a catalogue of approved unique proper names (e.g. Sirius, Proxima Centauri, etc.). After ongoing investigation of cultural star names from around the world, the WGSN may adopt “new” official IAU star names from this list for those stars currently lacking official IAU names. This will help preserve astronomical heritage while providing new unique names for the international astronomical community. Names for exoplanets and their host stars may be also approved by the IAU Executive Committee Working Group on the Public Naming of Planets and Planetary Satellites, as was done in 2015 via the NameExoWorlds contest.

      As an international scientific organization, the IAU dissociates itself entirely from the commercial practice of “selling” fictitious star names, surface feature names, or real estate on other planets or moons in the Solar System. Accordingly, the IAU maintains no list of the (several competing) enterprises in these businesses in individual countries of the world. Readers wanting to contact such enterprises despite the explanations given below should search commercial directories in their country of origin.

      In the past, certain such enterprises have suggested to customers that the IAU is somehow associated with, recognizes, approves, or even actively collaborates in their business. The IAU wishes to make it totally clear that any such claim is patently false and unfounded. The IAU would appreciate being informed, with appropriate documentation, of all cases of illegal abuse of its name, and will pursue all documented cases by all available means.

      Thus, like true love and many other of the best things in human life, the beauty of the night sky is not for sale, but is free for all to enjoy. True, the ‘gift’ of a star may open someone’s eyes to the beauty of the night sky. This is indeed a worthy goal, but it does not justify deceiving people into believing that real star names can be bought like any other commodity.

      Nevertheless, the IAU continues to receive requests for naming stars regardless. You may contact iauinfos@iap.fr if you have more questions.

      We suggest that you explore the following areas to access NASA Education materials and hope that you will consider using other NASA Education resources in your classroom.

      The majority of NASA materials are in the public domain. The following webpage provides guidelines for the use of NASA images, video, PDFs and other NASA materials. http://www.nasa.gov/audience/formedia/features/MP_Photo_Guidelines.html .

      NASA’s Search Educational Resources Tool – http://www.nasa.gov/education/materials/ can help find lesson plans, posters, educator guides and other materials to supplement the science, technology, engineering and mathematics curriculum. You can search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keywords. Find NASA science resources for your classroom at NASA Wavelength. Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

      Younger children may be interested in exploring the following websites to learn more about the universe:
      NASA Kids’ Club – http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forkids/kidsclub/flash/
      NASA Spaceplace – https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/

      The A-Z List of NASA Educational Publications – http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/A-Z_Pubs.html and A-Z List of NASA Websites for Educators – http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/Alpha_index.html provide quick links to NASA resources. The index allows users to locate top level sites for NASA related topics, education pages for NASA missions, print materials, and other hard-to-find pages.

      You may be interested in signing up for the NASA Education EXPRESS listserv. The EXPRESS contains announcements highlighting NASA products, activities, workshops, events, and opportunities that bring NASA educational resources into the classroom. Messages are sent on Thursday of each week.http://www.nasa.gov/education/express If you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science, you can sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” message. Science WOW! provides information about NASA science education opportunities. https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/

      We also suggest that you visit the NASA Current Opportunities pages for Educators and for Students. These areas feature announcements about NASA activities, events, and opportunities available to educators and students. New items are posted on Friday of each week. http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html and http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html .

      We encourage you to visit http://www.nasa.gov for the latest NASA news and information. NASA invites you to consider using one or more of the following easy and convenient communications tools for receiving NASA Updates on the exciting work NASA is doing.
      · Receive Updates by RSS (Really Simple Syndication) – NASA RSS Feeds are available at http://www.nasa.gov/rss/index.html
      · Follow NASA Twitter at http://twitter.com/NASA
      · Follow NASA Education Twitter at https://twitter.com/nasaedu

      We hope that you enjoy exploring the sites that are listed above and find the information that you are looking for. We appreciate your interest in NASA.

      Sincerely,
      NASA Education

      Reply

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