NASA EXPRESS: Your STEM Connection for Dec. 6, 2018

Check out the latest NASA opportunities for the education community.

 NASA insignia NASA Contest: Design the Gateway Program Graphic
Audience:
Graphic Designers
Entry Deadline: Dec. 10
Contact: erin.c.mahoney@nasa.gov 

NASA is working with U.S. and international partners to lead the development of the first permanent human spaceship, known as the Gateway, in orbit around the Moon. The Gateway will be a part-time home and office for astronauts farther in space than humans have ever been before. NASA is seeking designs for a graphic to represent the Gateway. The creator(s) with the winning design will receive a cash prize. Visit the website for background information about the mission and challenge details.

Free Program—Cubes in SpaceTM
Audience: Students Ages 11-18 and Educator Mentors
Registration Deadline: Feb. 8, 2019
Contact: info@cubesinspace.com 

NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility and Langley Research Center, along with the Colorado Space Grant Consortium and idoodledu inc. are offering a free STEAM education program for students ages 11-18. Cubes in Space lets students design and compete to launch an experiment into space. Selected student-designed payload cubes will be launched via a sounding rocket from Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia in late June 2019 or from a high-altitude scientific balloon from NASA’s Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility in New Mexico in late August 2019.

 
  Explore Moon to Mars: Orion Crew Capsule—Engineering Design
Audience: Educators of Grades 3-12
Event Date: Dec. 6 at 6:30 p.m. EST
Contact: john.f.weis@nasa.gov 

As NASA expands human exploration by visiting the Moon and then Mars, deep space exploration will require innovations in transportation that include the Space Launch System, Orion and Ground Launch Systems. Join the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar to explore education resources related to the Orion spacecraft—from activity sheets to engineering challenges. The activities shared in this webinar address the Next Generation Science Standards ETS1. Online registration is required.

Human Spaceflight: Touchdown With Engineering Design Challenges
Audience: Educators of Grades 4-10
Event Date: Dec. 10 at 5 p.m. EST
Contact: susan.m.kohler@nasa.gov 

Human spaceflight will enable astronauts to continue orbiting Earth, return to the Moon and then journey to Mars bringing together science, technology and human innovation. Safety is paramount in the return of spaceflight crews, and parachute testing is providing valuable data to help industry partners and NASA return our astronauts safely. Join the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar to explore engineering design challenges for landing spacecraft safely. Online registration is required.

 
  Explore Flight: Flying With Bernoulli
Audience: Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: Dec. 11 at 6:30 p.m. EST
Contact: barbie.buckner@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar to explore an overview of Bernoulli’s Principle. Participants will learn how the principle relates to flight while using NASA’s “Museum in the Box” curriculum. Participants will also learn about current research going on at NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center. Online registration is required.

Human Spaceflight: Living in Microgravity
Audience: Educators of Grades 5-12
Event Date: Dec. 13 at 6 p.m. EST
Contact: stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov 

Human spaceflight will enable astronauts to continue orbiting Earth, return to the Moon and then journey on to Mars bringing together science, technology and human innovation. Join the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar to explore microgravity. Learn how microgravity is used for research in space and how it affects astronauts. Also, investigate ways it can be used for learning in your classroom. Online registration is required.

 
  2019 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge
Audience: 9-12 and Higher Education Educators and Students
International Team Registration Deadline: Dec. 13U.S. Team Registration Deadline: Jan. 17, 2019
Contact: MSFC-RoverChallenge2019@mail.nasa.gov 

Registration is now open for the 2019 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge. The competition will be held April 12-13, 2019, in Huntsville, Alabama, at the U.S. Space & Rocket Center. Teams of high school and college students are challenged to design and build a human-powered vehicle to traverse the simulated surface of another world. The course includes 14 obstacles and five tasks, and teams must meet NASA specifications. Each school may enter up to two teams. For international entries, no more than four teams from each country can be accepted.

Call for Proposals—NASA Research Announcement for Use of the NASA Physical Sciences Informatics System: Appendix E
Audience: Graduate Students
Proposal Deadline: Dec. 14
Contact: francis.p.chiaramonte@nasa.gov 

NASA invites graduate students and established researchers to submit proposals for ground-based research proposals—both experimental and numerical studies—that use experimental data residing in NASA’s Physical Sciences Informatics system. This solicitation appendix focuses on five research areas: combustion science, complex fluids, fluid physics, fundamental physics and materials science. Proposals from graduate students must be submitted by their advisors. The typical award will be $75,000 to $100,000 per year for up to two years.

 
  2019 High-Altitude Student Platform Opportunity
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: Dec. 14
Contact: laspace@lsu.edu 

The Louisiana Space Consortium, or LaSPACE, is accepting applications from students at U.S. colleges and universities who want to send experiments to the edge of space. The annual project, supported by the NASA Balloon Program Office and LaSPACE, provides near-space access for 12 student experiments to be carried by a NASA high-altitude research balloon. The flights typically last 15 to 20 hours and reach an altitude of 23 miles. Experiments may include compact satellites or prototypes.

Department of Energy’s Scholars Program 2019
Audience: Undergraduate and Graduate Students; Postgraduates
Application Deadline: Dec. 17 at 5 p.m. EST
Contact: doescholars@orau.org 

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Scholars Program introduces college students and recent college graduates to the Department of Energy’s mission and operations. Participants apply their education, talent and skills in a variety of scientific research settings. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and be an undergraduate, graduate or recent postgraduate of an accredited institute of higher education. Internships typically last 10 weeks during the summer, and stipends are provided.

 
  Explore Real World Math With NASA STEM Resources
Audience: Educators of Grades 9-12
Event Date: Dec. 17 at 5 p.m. EST
Contact: susan.m.kohler@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar to explore NASA Wavelength resources for high school math. Engage your students with press releases, images and graphic displays. NASA has a complete collection of books and other space math products in PDF format, which are available to download. The documents are full color, and contain additional explanatory materials about the content. Online registration is required.

2019 NASA EONS Solicitation New Appendix: MUREP Institutional Research Opportunity
Audience: Minority Universities
Proposal Deadline: Dec. 17
Contact: NASAMIRO@nasaprs.com 

NASA’s Office of Education is accepting new proposals under the Education Opportunities in NASA STEM (EONS) 2019 NASA Research Announcement for the Minority University Research and Education Program (MUREP) Institutional Research Opportunity (MIRO) appendix. Through MIRO awards, NASA aims to promote STEM literacy and to enhance and sustain the capability of minority-serving institutions to perform NASA-related research and education.

 
  Explore Moon to Mars: Gateway—Power for Exploration
Audience: Educators of Grades 4-9
Event Date: Dec. 18 at 6:30 p.m. EST
Contact: john.f.weis@nasa.gov 

As NASA expands human exploration by visiting the Moon and then Mars, deep space exploration will require innovations in transportation that include the Space Launch System, Orion and Ground Launch Systems. Join the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar that will introduce activities and resources related to the Gateway Orbital Platform with an emphasis on power generation in space. The activities shared in this webinar address the Next Generation Science Standards PS3. Online registration is required.

Department of Homeland Security’s Summer Research Team Program for Minority Serving Institutions
Audience: Faculty Members at Minority Serving Institutions
Application Deadline: Dec. 21
Contact: DHSed@orau.org 

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Summer Research Team Program for Minority Serving Institutions provides faculty and student research teams the opportunity to do research at the university-based DHS Centers of Excellence. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and at an eligible MSI at the time of application. Selected faculty will be invited to submit a team application including a research project proposal developed in collaboration with a DHS Center researcher and applications from one or two qualified students.

 
  Bring Engineering to the Classroom With NASA Glenn’s Engineering Design Challenges
Audience: Educators of Grades 5-12
Contact: GRC-Ed-Opportunities@mail.nasa.gov 

Engineering design challenges are an exciting way to give students the opportunity to work on real-world challenges in a collaborative, team-based environment. Glenn Engineering Design Challenges connect students, in both classroom and out-of-school settings, with the distinct challenges faced by NASA scientists and engineers as they design the next generation of aeronautic and space vehicles, habitats and technology. Current challenges include Powered and Pumped Up, Let It Glide and Gaining Traction on Mars.

eCYBERMISSION Competition
Audience: Students in Grades 6-9
Registration Deadline: Dec. 19
Contact: missioncontrol@eCYBERMISSION.com 

Registration is open for the eCYBERMISSION competition, sponsored by the U.S. Army Educational Outreach Program. Free to students, this web-based competition challenges teams to identify a problem in their communities to use scientific inquiry or the engineering design process to investigate or propose a solution to that problem. Teams compete for state, regional and national awards of up to $9,000 in U.S. savings bonds. eCYBERMISSION provides a wealth of online resources for student teams and for Team Advisors to assist with project completion.

 
  Recycling in Space: Waste Handling in a Microgravity Environment Challenge
Audience: Individuals Ages 18 and Older
Submission Deadline: Jan. 16, 2019
Contact: phd@ninesigma.com 

On Earth, recycling technologies can utilize gravity to move waste when converting it to new materials or constituent molecules. In a microgravity environment, however, technology is the only way to transfer the waste for processing. The aim of this challenge is to identify receptacle and feeder mechanisms suitable for a microgravity environment that can deliver mission waste for decomposition. NASA plans to award $10,000 to the first-place winner and two $2,500 second prizes. Successful entrants may have the opportunity for future collaboration with NASA.

2018-2019 Scientist for a Day Essay Contest
Audience: Students in Grades 5-12
Entry Deadline: Feb. 8, 2019
Contact: scientistforaday@jpl.nasa.gov 

The Scientist for a Day contest challenges students to become NASA scientists studying moons of Jupiter and Saturn. Participants examine three moons and choose the one they think NASA should return to that would yield the best scientific results. This year’s topics are Saturn’s moon Enceladus, Saturn’s moon Titan and Jupiter’s moon Europa. After researching the three options, students write an essay under 500 words explaining their choice.

 

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Are you looking for NASA STEM materials to support your curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website! Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

 
 
 
 

 


Visit NASA STEM Engagement on the Web:
NASA’s Office of STEM Engagement: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

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