NASA EXPRESS: Your STEM Connection for March 14, 2019

Check out the latest NASA opportunities for the education community.

Happy Pi Day! Celebrate With NASA Pi Day Resources
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 6-12 

It’s 3.14, also known as March 14 and more affectionately known as Pi Day! NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory is celebrating with a set of illustrated planetary puzzlers that will test your mathematical skills. This year’s challenge tasks mathematics gurus with solving problems related to weathering a Martian dust storm, squeezing rain from a cloud, sizing up a shrinking spot on Jupiter and blasting ice samples with lasers. Are you up for the challenge? Test your skills, and then check your math when the answers are posted on March 15.

NASA Mars Science: MAVEN Outreach Webinar—The Magnetic Tail of Mars
Audience:
Formal and Informal Educators, Parents and Teens
Event Date: March 27 at 5 p.m. EDT
Contact: epomail@lasp.colorado.edu 

Mars has a unique magnetic tail compared to other planets in our solar system. The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission has demonstrated how the Martian magnetotail becomes twisted by its interaction with the solar wind. Join Dr. Gina DiBraccio from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland to hear what makes the Martian magnetic environment so different from other planets, and how processes in its magnetotail may contribute to atmospheric escape to space.

Explore Space Tech: Exploring the Red Planet
Audience: Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: March 27 at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Contact: s_g182@txstate.edu 

Join the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. Learn about NASA’s quest to discover life outside our planet by exploring past, present and future NASA-led missions to the Red Planet. Participants will be introduced to classroom resources designed to bring space exploration to life. Online registration is required.

Explore Space Tech: Space Communication—Speaking in Phases
Audience: Educators of Grades K-10
Event Date: March 28 at 5 p.m. EDT
Contact: susan.m.kohler@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. Participants will explore STEM lessons about space communications. Discover NASA resources related to wave science, phase modulation, binary code, rhythms, signals and noise. Participants also will explore NASA ScAN (Space Communications and Navigation) program resources for educators. Online registration is required.

Exploring Space Lecture From Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum—Apollo Legacy
Audience: Students in Grades 9-Higher Education and All Educators
Event Date: March 28 at 8 p.m. EDT
Contact: NASMVisitorServices@si.edu 

Farouk El-Baz was a guiding force in the Apollo lunar landing site selection process. With his comprehensive knowledge of the lunar surface, he advised on site selection and trained astronauts for orbital science observations. Join El-Baz as he describes his experiences as an eyewitness to the management, planning and implementation of the Apollo program. The lecture takes place at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in the District of Columbia. Attendance is free, but tickets are required. The lecture will be webcast live.

App Development Challenge
Audience:
Educators and Students in Middle and High School
Registration Deadline: April 10
Contact: JSC-M2MSTEM@mail.nasa.gov 

NASA’s App Development Challenge kicked off on March 13. The challenge gives middle and high school students the opportunity to develop an app that can visualize three minutes of simulated data in support of NASA’s Ascent Abort-2 flight test. This flight test is a critical step to demonstrate the Orion spacecraft’s safety as NASA leads the next steps of human exploration into deep space. Team submissions will be considered for an all-expenses-paid trip to a NASA field center. Round 1 participation concludes with video submissions on May 1.

Exploring Space Lecture From Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum—The New Moon
Audience: Students in Grades 9-Higher Education and All Educators
Event Date: April 24 at 8 p.m. EDT
Contact: NASMVisitorServices@si.edu 

Although lunar exploration went on an extended post-Apollo hiatus, in the last decade, numerous spacecraft have sent revolutionary new views of the Moon’s ancient history and how its surface continues to change today. Join Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory planetary scientist Brett Denevi for an update on lunar science. The lecture takes place at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in the District of Columbia. Attendance is free, but tickets are required. The lecture will be webcast live.

Exploring Space Lecture From Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum—Apollo Landing Sites Revisited
Audience: Students in Grades 9-Higher Education and All Educators
Event Date: May 22 at 8 p.m. EDT
Contact: NASMVisitorServices@si.edu 

Fifty years ago, the Apollo missions revolutionized our understanding of our solar system. The surface explorations on the Moon evolved from a small area around the Apollo 11 landing site to the broader traverses of later missions. Join NASA research space scientist Noah Petro as he shares perspectives on the Apollo landing sites and sheds new light on future explorations. The lecture takes place at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in the District of Columbia. Attendance is free, but tickets are required. The lecture will be webcast live.

Exploring Space Lecture From Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum—The Future of Lunar Exploration
Audience: Students in Grades 9-Higher Education and All Educators
Event Date: June 19 at 8 p.m. EDT
Contact: NASMVisitorServices@si.edu 

NASA’s future plans include going to the Moon to stay, and then traveling on to Mars. The Moon provides the opportunity to accomplish transformational science in understanding the origin and evolution of the solar system. Join NASA Chief Scientist Jim Green as he describes how the Moon provides a natural, yet challenging, environment for our next-generation robotic and human explorers. The lecture takes place at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in the District of Columbia. Attendance is free, but tickets are required. The lecture will be webcast live.

‘CineSpace’ Short Film Competition
Audience: All Educators and Students
Submission Deadline: July 15, 2019
Contact: cinespace@cinemartsociety.org 

NASA and the Houston Cinema Arts Society invite professional and aspiring filmmakers to share their works using actual NASA imagery. The “CineSpace” competition will accept all genres, including narrative, documentary, comedy, drama, animation and others, up to 10 minutes long. Entries must use at least 10 percent publicly available NASA imagery. Entries will be judged on creativity, innovation and attention to detail. Cash prizes will be awarded to the top three submissions, as well as two special category films: 1) the best documentary film and 2) the film that best exhibits human presence in space.

Explore Space Tech: Engineering Design 101
Audience: Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: March 14 at 6 p.m. EDT
Contact: stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. Explore the engineering design process and its application to real-world problem-solving. Also explore NASA design challenges and other NASA STEM classroom resources. Engineering design is a common core idea across each grade level in the Next Generation Science Standards and an important concept in understanding the world around us. Online registration is required.

Free Lecture—The Golden Age of Exoplanet Exploration
Audience: Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education
Event Date: March 14-15 at 10 p.m. EDT (7 p.m. PDT)
Contact: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php 

Since the discovery of the first exoplanet orbiting a sun-like star in 1995, several thousand more have been discovered. Learn how the new NASA planet-hunting spacecraft called the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) and the Spitzer Space telescope are providing valuable insights into what these worlds might be like. Join scientists Jessie Christiansen and Karl Stapelfeldt for a look at exoplanet science and what future discoveries may be around the corner. Attend the lectures in person, or view Thursday’s lecture via live webcast.

Celebrate Solar Week—Spring 2019
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-9, Informal Educators
Event Date: March 18-22, 2019
Contact: solarweek@solarweek.org 

Solar Week provides a series of web-based educational activities focusing on the Sun-Earth connection. Students ages 11-14 can learn about solar careers, sunspots, solar energy and solar storms. Explore the website to find cool facts, scavenger hunts and games, and an online interactive discussion board where your class or group can submit a question to leading solar scientists. With NASA’s Parker Solar Probe exploring the Sun like no mission before, it creates exciting times for Sun-related science!

Explore Space Tech: Thermal Protection
Audience: Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: March 19 at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Contact: barbie.buckner@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. Learn about the NASA Beginning Engineering Science and Technology (BEST) curriculum and ways to use the engineering design process to design, create and test a prototype of a spacecraft that is able to withstand a battery of tests simulating the harsh conditions in space. The activities explored in this webinar align with the Next Generation Science Standards. Online registration is required.

Explore Space Tech: Remote Sensing
Audience: Educators of Grades 5-12
Event Date: March 20 at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Contact: deepika.sangam@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. Explore one of the widest-spread technologies used by NASA—remote sensing. Review NASA’s educational resources on remote sensing and dive deep into a few activities that explore remote sensing of Earth’s landcover to illustrate the connection between remote-sensing technology and computer imagery. Online registration is required.

Explore Space Tech: Rockets 101—Forces and Motion
Audience: Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: March 21 at 6 p.m. EDT
Contact: stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. Blast off into learning by exploring the mathematics and science of rockets with NASA missions and STEM classroom resources. Launch your students’ interest and excitement about forces and motion with inquiry-based rocket activities and design challenges that include designing, building and launching simple rockets. Online registration is required.

Earth to Sky Academy
Audience: Informal Educators
Application Deadline: March 31
Academy Dates: Oct. 21-25
Contact: https://www.earthtosky.org/about-us/contact-us.html 

The free Earth to Sky (ETS) Academy is for interpreters/informal educators interested in creating and/or strengthening regional communities of practice for improving climate science communication. Graduates will be equipped to develop and run an ETS-style climate course, and be supported in building and sustaining their regional community of practice. Applicants must apply and attend as a team of three to five members from various agencies/organizations. At least one member must have attended an ETS course or mini-course. Visit the website to learn more.

U.S. Department of Education’s 2019 Education Innovation and Research Competitions
Audience: Educational Agencies, Consortiums and Nonprofit Organizations
Application Deadline: April 2 at 4:30 p.m. EDT
Contact: eir@ed.gov 

The U.S. Department of Education’s Education Innovation and Research (EIR) program seeks applicants for funding grants to create or take to scale entrepreneurial, evidence-based, field-initiated innovations to improve the achievement and attainment of high-need K-12 students. $125 million is available for award, and 25 percent of these funds will be reserved for applicants serving predominantly rural students. In addition, EIR aims to award at least $60 million for STEM education projects.

  2019 Space Port Area Conference for Educators
Audience: K-12 Formal and Informal Educators
Event Date: July 24-26, 2019
Contact: goforspace@gmail.com 

Registration is open for the 2019 Space Port Area Conference for Educators (SPACE) taking place at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida. This conference is for K-12 formal and informal educators who are U.S. citizens teaching in the United States. Experience stimulating presentations from astronauts and NASA science and engineering experts; tour Kennedy and surrounding facilities. Get ready-to-go lesson plans and creative ideas to infuse your classroom with STEM and multifaceted, space-related content.

Apollo Next Giant Leap Student Challenge
Audience: Students in Grades 5-12
Registration Deadline: March 31
Contact: apollo50@uw.edu 

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing and to prepare for the next giant leap, NASA’s Northwest Earth and Space Sciences Pipeline invites students to enter the Apollo Next Giant Leap Student Challenge. Each team will build a replica of the lunar module and use a remote-controlled drone to land it on an 8-by-10-foot map of the Moon’s surface. Students will modify and program a LEGO Mindstorms EV3 robot to then explore the lunar surface and bring back a rock sample. Visit the site for full challenge details.

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Mechanical Maker Challenge—Mechanical Eye
Audience: U.S. Residents Ages 18 and Older
Submission Deadline: March 31
Contact: mechanicalmaker@jpl.nasa.gov 

With its sulfuric acid clouds, temperatures over 450°C and surface pressure 92 times that of Earth, Venus is one of the most hostile planetary environments in the solar system. Most electrical components do not survive long in these conditions, but NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory hopes to build an automaton (or clockwork mechanical robot) rover to explore Venus. This challenge seeks innovative ideas for a mechanical camera system that could operate under the harsh conditions found on Venus. The first place winner will have the opportunity to travel to NASA JPL (award up to $1,000 towards travel costs), meet with spacecraft engineers to discuss their design and take an engineer-led tour.

Humans in Space: Youth Art Competition
Audience:
Artists Worldwide, Ages 10-18
Entry Deadline: April 30
Contact: contests@sciartex.org 

Fifty years after humans first set foot on the Moon, we’re calling on artists in the generation who will take the next giant steps into space. Artwork entries may be musical, literary, visual or video that expresses ideas and inspiration for a new generation living, working and doing science on the Moon. Prizes will be awarded to the top entries. Winning entries will be displayed through a worldwide tour, beginning with a kickoff event in the Vortex Dome in Los Angeles, California.

Want to subscribe to get this message delivered to your inbox each Thursday? Sign up for the NASA EXPRESS newsletter at www.nasa.gov/education/express.

Are you looking for NASA STEM materials to support your curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. https://science.nasa.gov/learners/wavelength

Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website! Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

 
 
 
 

 


Visit NASA STEM Engagement on the Web:
NASA’s Office of STEM Engagement: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *