NASA EXPRESS: Your STEM Connection for March 21, 2019

Check out the latest NASA opportunities for the education community.

  Christa McAuliffe’s Lost Lessons: Liquids in Microgravity
Audience:
Grades 5-8 Educators 

NASA’s Office of STEM Engagement, in partnership with the Challenger Center, is excited to share the third in our series of lessons honoring Christa McAuliffe. In this video, astronaut Ricky Arnold guides students and educators through an exploration of the behavior of liquids in microgravity. Teachers can use the accompanying lesson plan to further scientific learning in their classrooms. We look forward to sharing more lessons in this series as they are available.

Missile Defense Agency’s 2019 STEM Education Development Workshop
Audience: Educators of Grades K-8
Registration Deadline: March 31
Workshop Dates: July 7-12
Contact: STEMOutreach@mda.mil 

The U.S. Department of Defense Missile Defense Agency is hosting a weeklong workshop in Huntsville, Alabama. Participants will explore STEM concepts in real-world contexts and develop STEM-related instructional activities aligned with state standards and rooted in research-based pedagogical strategies. The workshop’s agenda includes presentations and tools for hands-on learning by Missile Defense Agency STEM professionals to relate STEM concepts to missile-defense applications as well as teacher classroom instruction.

 
  2019 Fellowship in Aerospace History
Audience: Recent Recipients of a Doctorate in History or a Closely Related Field, and Doctoral Candidates in Those Fields
Application Deadline: April 1
Contact: awards@historians.org 

The American Historical Association, supported by NASA, seeks applications for a six- to nine-month fellowship in aerospace history. The fellowship is open to applicants with a doctorate in history or a closely related field, or to those who are enrolled in and have completed all course work for a program granting doctoral degrees in those fields. The fellowship carries a stipend of $21,250, which includes travel expenses.

2019 NASA Fellowship in the History of Space Technology
Audience: Recent Recipients of a Doctorate in History of Technology or a Closely Related Field, and Doctoral Candidates in Those Fields
Application Deadline: April 1
Contact: awards@historians.org 

The Society for the History of Technology, supported by NASA, seeks applications for a six- to nine-month fellowship in the history of space technology. The fellowship is open to applicants with a doctorate in history of technology or in a closely related field, or to those who are enrolled in and have completed all course work for a program granting doctoral degrees in those fields. The fellowship carries a stipend of $21,250, which includes travel expenses.

 
  2019 History of Science Society Fellowship in the History of Space Science
Audience: Recent Recipients of a Doctorate in History of Science or a Closely Related Field, and Doctoral Candidates in Those Fields
Application Deadline: April 1
Contact: awards@historians.org 

The History of Science Society, supported by NASA, seeks applications for a nine-month fellowship. Applicants must hold a doctorate in history of science or in a closely related field, or they must be enrolled as a student in a doctoral degree program and have completed all requirements for the degree (except the dissertation) in history of science or a related field. The fellowship carries a stipend of $21,250, which includes travel expenses.

Explore Earth: Sally Ride EarthKAM
Audience: Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: April 2 at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Contact: barbie.buckner@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. Find out how your students can learn about Earth from the unique perspective of space. During Sally Ride EarthKAM missions, students worldwide request images of specific locations on Earth. This image collection and accompanying activities are extraordinary resources to engage students in Earth and space science, geography, social studies, mathematics, communications and art. Online registration is required.

 
  Explore Earth: Weather in Your Classroom
Audience: Educators of Grades 3-8
Event Date: April 4 at 6 p.m. EDT
Contact: stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. Explore our understanding and forecasting methods of weather and how weather and climate differ. NASA missions, STEM classroom resources, lessons and design challenges will guide us through a storm of classroom activities. Join us, rain or shine. The activities shared in this webinar address Next Generation Science Standards 3-ESS3-1 and MS-ESS2-5,6. Online registration is required.

Sally Ride EarthKAM Mission
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Mission Dates: April 9-12
Contact: https://www.earthkam.org/contact 

Sally Ride EarthKAM is a free STEM educational program managed by the U.S. Space & Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama. EarthKAM allows your students to take images of Earth from space using a camera aboard the International Space Station. Use EarthKAM as a teaching tool to study subjects ranging from geography to art to meteorology. Visit the website for details and to register to participate.

 
App Development Challenge
Audience:
Educators and Students in Middle and High School
Registration Deadline: April 10
Contact: JSC-M2MSTEM@mail.nasa.gov 

NASA’s App Development Challenge kicked off on March 13. The challenge gives middle and high school students the opportunity to develop an app that can visualize three minutes of simulated data in support of NASA’s Ascent Abort-2 flight test. This flight test is a critical step to demonstrate the Orion spacecraft’s safety as NASA leads the next steps of human exploration into deep space. Team submissions will be considered for an all-expenses-paid trip to a NASA field center. Round 1 participation concludes with video submissions on May 1.

2020 eXploration Systems and Habitation Academic Innovation Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Faculty and Students
Proposal Deadline: April 26
Contact: xhab@spacegrant.org 

The X-Hab Academic Innovation Challenge encourages university-level students to develop innovative design solutions for deep-space human exploration systems. Those selected to participate in the challenge will receive $15,000 to $50,000 to design and produce studies or functional products that will increase knowledge and foster risk reduction for space exploration capabilities. Awardees will follow a tailored systems-engineering process with projects being completed in the May 2020 timeframe.

 
  DEADLINE EXTENDED: Call for Abstracts: 70th International Astronautical Congress
Audience: Full-time U.S. Graduate Students Attending U.S. Universities Who Have Submitted Abstracts to the IAF Website
Submission Deadline: May 6
Contact: abstract@nasaprs.com 

NASA seeks abstracts from students interested in presenting at the 70th International Astronautical Congress being held Oct. 21-25, in Washington, D.C. NASA’s participation in this event is an ongoing effort to continue to bridge NASA with the astronautical and space international community. 

Students who have submitted abstracts to the International Astronautical Federation website (http://www.iafastro.org) are requested to submit their abstracts to the NASA website (https://iac.nasaprs.com) by Mon., May 6 (11:59 p.m. EDT). Only abstracts selected by the IAF will be considered for selection by NASA. 

Participants must submit proof of U.S. citizenship and current enrollment in U.S. university or college no later than May 9 to abstract@nasaprs.com.

Explore Space Tech: Rockets 101—Forces and Motion
Audience: Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: March 21 at 6 p.m. EDT
Contact: stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. Blast off into learning by exploring the mathematics and science of rockets with NASA missions and STEM classroom resources. Launch your students’ interest and excitement about forces and motion with inquiry-based rocket activities and design challenges that include designing, building and launching simple rockets. Online registration is required.

NASA Mars Science: MAVEN Outreach Webinar—The Magnetic Tail of Mars
Audience:
Formal and Informal Educators, Parents and Teens
Event Date: March 27 at 5 p.m. EDT
Contact: epomail@lasp.colorado.edu 

Mars has a unique magnetic tail compared to other planets in our solar system. The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission has demonstrated how the Martian magnetotail becomes twisted by its interaction with the solar wind. Join Dr. Gina DiBraccio from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland to hear what makes the Martian magnetic environment so different from other planets, and how processes in its magnetotail may contribute to atmospheric escape to space.

Explore Space Tech: Exploring the Red Planet
Audience: Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: March 27 at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Contact: s_g182@txstate.edu 

Join the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. Learn about NASA’s quest to discover life outside our planet by exploring past, present and future NASA-led missions to the Red Planet. Participants will be introduced to classroom resources designed to bring space exploration to life. Online registration is required.

Explore Space Tech: Space Communication—Speaking in Phases
Audience: Educators of Grades K-10
Event Date: March 28 at 5 p.m. EDT
Contact: susan.m.kohler@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. Participants will explore STEM lessons about space communications. Discover NASA resources related to wave science, phase modulation, binary code, rhythms, signals and noise. Participants also will explore NASA SCaN (Space Communications and Navigation) program resources for educators. Online registration is required.

Exploring Space Lecture From Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum—Apollo Legacy
Audience: Students in Grades 9-Higher Education and All Educators
Event Date: March 28 at 8 p.m. EDT
Contact: NASMVisitorServices@si.edu 

Farouk El-Baz was a guiding force in the Apollo lunar landing site selection process. With his comprehensive knowledge of the lunar surface, he advised on site selection and trained astronauts for orbital science observations. Join El-Baz as he describes his experiences as an eyewitness to the management, planning and implementation of the Apollo program. The lecture takes place at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in the District of Columbia. Attendance is free, but tickets are required. The lecture will be webcast live.

Apollo Next Giant Leap Student Challenge
Audience: Students in Grades 5-12
Registration Deadline: March 31
Contact: apollo50@uw.edu 

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing and to prepare for the next giant leap, NASA’s Northwest Earth and Space Sciences Pipeline invites students to enter the Apollo Next Giant Leap Student Challenge. Each team will build a replica of the lunar module and use a remote-controlled drone to land it on an 8-by-10-foot map of the Moon’s surface. Students will modify and program a LEGO Mindstorms EV3 robot to then explore the lunar surface and bring back a rock sample. Visit the site for full challenge details.

Earth to Sky Academy
Audience: Informal Educators
Application Deadline: March 31
Academy Dates: Oct. 21-25
Contact: https://www.earthtosky.org/about-us/contact-us.html 

The free Earth to Sky (ETS) Academy is for interpreters/informal educators interested in creating and/or strengthening regional communities of practice for improving climate science communication. Graduates will be equipped to develop and run an ETS-style climate course, and be supported in building and sustaining their regional community of practice. Applicants must apply and attend as a team of three to five members from various agencies/organizations. At least one member must have attended an ETS course or mini-course. Visit the website to learn more.

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Mechanical Maker Challenge—Mechanical Eye
Audience: U.S. Residents Ages 18 and Older
Submission Deadline: March 31
Contact: mechanicalmaker@jpl.nasa.gov 

With its sulfuric acid clouds, temperatures over 450°C and surface pressure 92 times that of Earth, Venus is one of the most hostile planetary environments in the solar system. Most electrical components do not survive long in these conditions, but NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory hopes to build an automaton (or clockwork mechanical robot) rover to explore Venus. This challenge seeks innovative ideas for a mechanical camera system that could operate under the harsh conditions found on Venus. The first place winner will have the opportunity to travel to NASA JPL (award up to $1,000 towards travel costs), meet with spacecraft engineers to discuss their design and take an engineer-led tour.

Summer Institute—LiftOff 2019: Legacy of Apollo
Audience: Educators of Grades 5-12
Application Deadline: April 1, 2019
Institute Dates: June 23-28, 2019
Contact: baguio@tsgc.utexas.edu 

The 2019 LiftOff Summer Institute is a weeklong training event sponsored by NASA’s Texas Space Grant Consortium and held at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. This year’s theme is “Legacy of Apollo.” The event will celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Apollo Moon landing. Applicants must be U.S. citizens currently employed as classroom teachers of grades 5-12, with at least one year teaching experience prior to the institute.

Summer Institute—LiftOff Alumni 2019: The Next Giant Leap
Audience: Previous LiftOff Institute Attendees
Application Deadline: April 1, 2019
Institute Dates: July 27-31, 2019
Contact: baguio@tsgc.utexas.edu 

LiftOff Institute alumni are invited to a multiday workshop highlighting what’s happening in the world of space exploration. “The Next Giant Leap” workshop will take place in South Palm Beach, Florida. Attendees will take part in activities related to robotics, 3D printing and sharing cross-curricular ideas with fellow LiftOff educators. Participants will visit NASA’s Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral to meet with scientists and engineers.

U.S. Department of Education’s 2019 Education Innovation and Research Competitions
Audience: Educational Agencies, Consortiums and Nonprofit Organizations
Application Deadline: April 2 at 4:30 p.m. EDT
Contact: eir@ed.gov 

The U.S. Department of Education’s Education Innovation and Research (EIR) program seeks applicants for funding grants to create or take to scale entrepreneurial, evidence-based, field-initiated innovations to improve the achievement and attainment of high-need K-12 students. $125 million is available for award, and 25 percent of these funds will be reserved for applicants serving predominantly rural students. In addition, EIR aims to award at least $60 million for STEM education projects.

  Artists Inspire Astronauts Contest
Audience:
U.S. Citizens Ages 18 and Older
Entry Deadline: April 30
Contact: team@challenge.gov 

The astronaut crew quarters at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida are being prepped for the upcoming commercial crew launches, and your artwork could be on display! NASA is looking for inspiring artwork to hang in the hallways where future crews will stay before launch. The area is one of the last places astronauts will spend time before heading for the launch pad. Artwork on display may be visible during NASA video coverage of crew departure.

2019 Space Port Area Conference for Educators
Audience: K-12 Formal and Informal Educators
Event Date: July 24-26, 2019
Contact: goforspace@gmail.com 

Registration is open for the 2019 Space Port Area Conference for Educators (SPACE) taking place at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida. This conference is for K-12 formal and informal educators who are U.S. citizens teaching in the United States. Experience stimulating presentations from astronauts and NASA science and engineering experts; tour Kennedy and surrounding facilities. Get ready-to-go lesson plans and creative ideas to infuse your classroom with STEM and multifaceted, space-related content.

 
Humans in Space: Youth Art Competition
Audience:
Artists Worldwide, Ages 10-18
Entry Deadline: April 30
Contact: contests@sciartex.org 

Fifty years after humans first set foot on the Moon, we’re calling on artists in the generation who will take the next giant steps into space. Artwork entries may be musical, literary, visual or video that expresses ideas and inspiration for a new generation living, working and doing science on the Moon. Prizes will be awarded to the top entries. Winning entries will be displayed through a worldwide tour, beginning with a kickoff event in the Vortex Dome in Los Angeles, California.

‘CineSpace’ Short Film Competition
Audience: All Educators and Students
Submission Deadline: July 15, 2019
Contact: cinespace@cinemartsociety.org 

NASA and the Houston Cinema Arts Society invite professional and aspiring filmmakers to share their works using actual NASA imagery. The “CineSpace” competition will accept all genres, including narrative, documentary, comedy, drama, animation and others, up to 10 minutes long. Entries must use at least 10 percent publicly available NASA imagery. Entries will be judged on creativity, innovation and attention to detail. Cash prizes will be awarded to the top three submissions, as well as two special category films: 1) the best documentary film and 2) the film that best exhibits human presence in space.

  Citizen Science Project: Earth Rotation Detector
Audience: Educators and Students
Contact: sten.f.odenwald@nasa.gov 

Use your smartphone to explore how Earth’s rotation affects surface gravity at different latitudes. The Earth Rotation Detector project lets you measure the acceleration of gravity at your location and share your data with NASA. Because Earth is rotating, at the equator centrifugal forces will make the local acceleration of gravity a bit weaker than at higher latitudes near the poles. Visit the site for a step-by-step guide on how to participate.

Want to subscribe to get this message delivered to your inbox each Thursday? Sign up for the NASA EXPRESS newsletter at www.nasa.gov/education/express.

Are you looking for NASA STEM materials to support your curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. https://science.nasa.gov/learners/wavelength

Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website! Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

 
 
 
 

 


Visit NASA STEM Engagement on the Web:
NASA’s Office of STEM Engagement: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

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