NASA EXPRESS: Your STEM Connection for March 28, 2019

Check out the latest NASA opportunities for the education community.

  STEMonstration: Solar Energy
Audience:
All Educators
Contact: JSC-STEMonStation@mail.nasa.gov 

Did you know astronauts have access to electricity in low-Earth orbit through solar arrays? Solar energy is essential to keeping the International Space Station functional as it serves as a research laboratory and living quarters for astronauts in low-Earth orbit. 

In this new STEMonstrations episode, Expedition 55/56 Flight Engineer Ricky Arnold talks about the process of using solar arrays to generate power as the station orbits Earth at 17,500 miles per hour. Visit https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstrations for more educational videos filmed on the International Space Station, and their accompanying Classroom Connection lesson plans. 

Find more ways to bring resources from the International Space Station into your classroom by checking out NASA’s STEM on Station website.

Go Behind the Scenes With New “NASA Science Live” Show
Audience: Public
Contact: emily.furfaro@nasa.gov 

Join NASA experts as they explore the secrets of the universe—from remote locations on Earth to the depths of outer space—in this new monthly series. Episodes air on NASA Television and can be streamed online via the NASA website, Facebook Watch, YouTube and Ustream. Viewers can join the conversation monthly by submitting questions on social media using the hashtag #askNASA, or by leaving a comment in the chat section on Facebook. For show information and a schedule of upcoming episodes, visit https://www.nasa.gov/nasasciencelive.

 
  Explore Earth: GLOBE Hydrology
Audience: Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: April 8 at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Contact: barbie.buckner@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar about water and the hydrologic cycle. NASA’s researchers, airborne missions and fleet of satellites address some of the critical challenges facing our planet today. Explore ways to take part via citizen science as part of the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) Program, an international science and education program that provides students and the public worldwide with the opportunity to participate in data collection and the scientific process. Online registration is required.

Explore Earth: Understanding the A-Train
Audience: Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: April 9 at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Contact: john.f.weis@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. Participants will get an overview of the Earth-observing satellites, known as the A-Train, and related education resources. Discussion will include modifications of activities and accommodations. The activities discussed in this webinar address the Next Generation Science Standards ESS2 and ESS3. Online registration is required.

 
  App Development Challenge
Audience:
Educators and Students in Middle and High School
Registration Deadline: April 10
Contact: JSC-M2MSTEM@mail.nasa.gov 

NASA’s App Development Challenge kicked off on March 13. The challenge gives middle and high school students the opportunity to develop an app that can visualize three minutes of simulated data in support of NASA’s Ascent Abort-2 flight test. This flight test is a critical step to demonstrate the Orion spacecraft’s safety as NASA leads the next steps of human exploration into deep space. Team submissions will be considered for an all-expenses-paid trip to a NASA field center. Round 1 participation concludes with video submissions on May 1.

NASA Global Climate Change Resources
Audience: Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: April 11 at 5 p.m. EDT
Contact: susan.m.kohler@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar about climate change. Earth-orbiting satellites and other technological advances have enabled scientists to see the big picture, collecting many different types of information about Earth and its climate on a global scale. This body of data, collected over many years, reveals the signals of a changing climate. Participants will explore evidence, causes, effects and solutions. Online registration is required.

 
  The Museum of Flight in Seattle Presents ‘Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission’ Exhibit
Audience: Public
Exhibit Dates: Open April 13 through Sept. 2
Contact: info@museumofflight.org 

The Museum of Flight in Seattle is the only West Coast stop for a new exhibition featuring the Apollo 11 command module Columbia—the only part of the Apollo 11 spacecraft to return intact to Earth. The exhibit features dozens of artifacts, including astronaut Buzz Aldrin’s extravehicular visor and gloves, a star chart and more. The family-friendly exhibit also features an immersive launch pad entrance, iconic audio from mission control and interactives like a lunar lander video game and a virtual 3D tour of Columbia’s interior.

Two-Part Webinar Series—Beyond Blue: Why Ocean Color Really Matters
Audience: Formal and Informal Educators
Webinar Dates: April 30 and May 1
Contact: trena.m.ferrell@nasa.gov 

Have you ever wondered how tiny algae help reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide while fueling the marine food web? Are you interested in ideas that make a faraway topic like ocean color feel more personal? The team working on the Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud, ocean Ecosystem satellite are hosting a pair of free webinars to answer these questions and more. Learn how data from PACE will be crucial for assessing ocean health, air quality and climate. Find out how to access formal and informal education resources, videos and information designed to make ocean color come to life.

 
  Apollo Youth Art Contest
Audience:
Students in Grades Pre-K through 12
Registration Deadline: June 1
Contact: Shirley.J.Lapole@nasa.gov 

On July 20, NASA will mark the 50th anniversary of humans first setting foot on the Moon. In recognition of this historic event, NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility Visitor Center is hosting an art competition to encourage students to use the elements of art to explore the role of the Apollo missions in NASA’s advancements in human space exploration. Entries will be judged in four age group categories. Winners will receive prizes, and all contest participants will receive an official NASA Certificate of Participation.

Explore Space Tech: Space Communication—Speaking in Phases
Audience: Educators of Grades K-10
Event Date: March 28 at 5 p.m. EDT
Contact: susan.m.kohler@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. Participants will explore STEM lessons about space communications. Discover NASA resources related to wave science, phase modulation, binary code, rhythms, signals and noise. Participants also will explore NASA SCaN (Space Communications and Navigation) program resources for educators. Online registration is required.

Exploring Space Lecture From Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum—Apollo Legacy
Audience: Students in Grades 9-Higher Education and All Educators
Event Date: March 28 at 8 p.m. EDT
Contact: NASMVisitorServices@si.edu 

Farouk El-Baz was a guiding force in the Apollo lunar landing site selection process. With his comprehensive knowledge of the lunar surface, he advised on site selection and trained astronauts for orbital science observations. Join El-Baz as he describes his experiences as an eyewitness to the management, planning and implementation of the Apollo program. The lecture takes place at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in the District of Columbia. Attendance is free, but tickets are required. The lecture will be webcast live.

Apollo Next Giant Leap Student Challenge
Audience: Students in Grades 5-12
Registration Deadline: March 31
Contact: apollo50@uw.edu 

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing and to prepare for the next giant leap, NASA’s Northwest Earth and Space Sciences Pipeline invites students to enter the Apollo Next Giant Leap Student Challenge. Each team will build a replica of the lunar module and use a remote-controlled drone to land it on an 8-by-10-foot map of the Moon’s surface. Students will modify and program a LEGO Mindstorms EV3 robot to then explore the lunar surface and bring back a rock sample. Visit the site for full challenge details.

Earth to Sky Academy
Audience: Informal Educators
Application Deadline: March 31
Academy Dates: Oct. 21-25
Contact: https://www.earthtosky.org/about-us/contact-us.html 

The free Earth to Sky (ETS) Academy is for interpreters/informal educators interested in creating and/or strengthening regional communities of practice for improving climate science communication. Graduates will be equipped to develop and run an ETS-style climate course, and be supported in building and sustaining their regional community of practice. Applicants must apply and attend as a team of three to five members from various agencies/organizations. At least one member must have attended an ETS course or mini-course. Visit the website to learn more.

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Mechanical Maker Challenge—Mechanical Eye
Audience: U.S. Residents Ages 18 and Older
Submission Deadline: March 31
Contact: mechanicalmaker@jpl.nasa.gov 

With its sulfuric acid clouds, temperatures over 450°C and surface pressure 92 times that of Earth, Venus is one of the most hostile planetary environments in the solar system. Most electrical components do not survive long in these conditions, but NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory hopes to build an automaton (or clockwork mechanical robot) rover to explore Venus. This challenge seeks innovative ideas for a mechanical camera system that could operate under the harsh conditions found on Venus. The first place winner will have the opportunity to travel to NASA JPL (award up to $1,000 towards travel costs), meet with spacecraft engineers to discuss their design and take an engineer-led tour.

  Missile Defense Agency’s 2019 STEM Education Development Workshop
Audience: Educators of Grades K-8
Registration Deadline: March 31
Workshop Dates: July 7-12
Contact: STEMOutreach@mda.mil 

The U.S. Department of Defense Missile Defense Agency is hosting a weeklong workshop in Huntsville, Alabama. Participants will explore STEM concepts in real-world contexts and develop STEM-related instructional activities aligned with state standards and rooted in research-based pedagogical strategies. The workshop’s agenda includes presentations and tools for hands-on learning by Missile Defense Agency STEM professionals to relate STEM concepts to missile-defense applications as well as teacher classroom instruction.

Summer Institute—LiftOff 2019: Legacy of Apollo
Audience: Educators of Grades 5-12
Application Deadline: April 1, 2019
Institute Dates: June 23-28, 2019
Contact: baguio@tsgc.utexas.edu 

The 2019 LiftOff Summer Institute is a weeklong training event sponsored by NASA’s Texas Space Grant Consortium and held at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. This year’s theme is “Legacy of Apollo.” The event will celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Apollo Moon landing. Applicants must be U.S. citizens currently employed as classroom teachers of grades 5-12, with at least one year teaching experience prior to the institute.

Summer Institute—LiftOff Alumni 2019: The Next Giant Leap
Audience: Previous LiftOff Institute Attendees
Application Deadline: April 1, 2019
Institute Dates: July 27-31, 2019
Contact: baguio@tsgc.utexas.edu 

LiftOff Institute alumni are invited to a multiday workshop highlighting what’s happening in the world of space exploration. “The Next Giant Leap” workshop will take place in South Palm Beach, Florida. Attendees will take part in activities related to robotics, 3D printing and sharing cross-curricular ideas with fellow LiftOff educators. Participants will visit NASA’s Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral to meet with scientists and engineers.

2019 Fellowship in Aerospace History
Audience: Recent Recipients of a Doctorate in History or a Closely Related Field, and Doctoral Candidates in Those Fields
Application Deadline: April 1
Contact: awards@historians.org 

The American Historical Association, supported by NASA, seeks applications for a six- to nine-month fellowship in aerospace history. The fellowship is open to applicants with a doctorate in history or a closely related field, or to those who are enrolled in and have completed all course work for a program granting doctoral degrees in those fields. The fellowship carries a stipend of $21,250, which includes travel expenses.

 
  2019 NASA Fellowship in the History of Space Technology
Audience: Recent Recipients of a Doctorate in History of Technology or a Closely Related Field, and Doctoral Candidates in Those Fields
Application Deadline: April 1
Contact: awards@historians.org 

The Society for the History of Technology, supported by NASA, seeks applications for a six- to nine-month fellowship in the history of space technology. The fellowship is open to applicants with a doctorate in history of technology or in a closely related field, or to those who are enrolled in and have completed all course work for a program granting doctoral degrees in those fields. The fellowship carries a stipend of $21,250, which includes travel expenses.

2019 History of Science Society Fellowship in the History of Space Science
Audience: Recent Recipients of a Doctorate in History of Science or a Closely Related Field, and Doctoral Candidates in Those Fields
Application Deadline: April 1
Contact: awards@historians.org 

The History of Science Society, supported by NASA, seeks applications for a nine-month fellowship. Applicants must hold a doctorate in history of science or in a closely related field, or they must be enrolled as a student in a doctoral degree program and have completed all requirements for the degree (except the dissertation) in history of science or a related field. The fellowship carries a stipend of $21,250, which includes travel expenses.

 
U.S. Department of Education’s 2019 Education Innovation and Research Competitions
Audience: Educational Agencies, Consortiums and Nonprofit Organizations
Application Deadline: April 2 at 4:30 p.m. EDT
Contact: eir@ed.gov 

The U.S. Department of Education’s Education Innovation and Research (EIR) program seeks applicants for funding grants to create or take to scale entrepreneurial, evidence-based, field-initiated innovations to improve the achievement and attainment of high-need K-12 students. $125 million is available for award, and 25 percent of these funds will be reserved for applicants serving predominantly rural students. In addition, EIR aims to award at least $60 million for STEM education projects.

Explore Earth: Sally Ride EarthKAM
Audience: Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: April 2 at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Contact: barbie.buckner@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. Find out how your students can learn about Earth from the unique perspective of space. During Sally Ride EarthKAM missions, students worldwide request images of specific locations on Earth. This image collection and accompanying activities are extraordinary resources to engage students in Earth and space science, geography, social studies, mathematics, communications and art. Online registration is required.

 
  Explore Earth: Weather in Your Classroom
Audience: Educators of Grades 3-8
Event Date: April 4 at 6 p.m. EDT
Contact: stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. Explore our understanding and forecasting methods of weather and how weather and climate differ. NASA missions, STEM classroom resources, lessons and design challenges will guide us through a storm of classroom activities. Join us, rain or shine. The activities shared in this webinar address Next Generation Science Standards 3-ESS3-1 and MS-ESS2-5,6. Online registration is required.

Sally Ride EarthKAM Mission
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Mission Dates: April 9-12
Contact: https://www.earthkam.org/contact 

Sally Ride EarthKAM is a free STEM educational program managed by the U.S. Space & Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama. EarthKAM allows your students to take images of Earth from space using a camera aboard the International Space Station. Use EarthKAM as a teaching tool to study subjects ranging from geography to art to meteorology. Visit the website for details and to register to participate.

 
  2020 eXploration Systems and Habitation Academic Innovation Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Faculty and Students
Proposal Deadline: April 26
Contact: xhab@spacegrant.org 

The X-Hab Academic Innovation Challenge encourages university-level students to develop innovative design solutions for deep-space human exploration systems. Those selected to participate in the challenge will receive $15,000 to $50,000 to design and produce studies or functional products that will increase knowledge and foster risk reduction for space exploration capabilities. Awardees will follow a tailored systems-engineering process with projects being completed in the May 2020 timeframe.

Call for Peer Reviewers: U.S. Department of Education’s 2019 Education Innovation and Research Competitions
Audience: Educators, School Leaders, Researchers
Contact: EIRpeerreview@ed.gov 

In support of its 2019 Education Innovation and Research Competitions, the U.S. Department of Education seeks individuals who can participate in review panels to help select grant award winners. Reviewers will provide written analysis and scoring of submitted grant applications, and provide constructive written feedback to applicants. Reviewers with expertise in K-12 computer science education are encouraged to apply. Applicants for this year’s competition may not apply.

Humans in Space: Youth Art Competition
Audience:
Artists Worldwide, Ages 10-18
Entry Deadline: April 30
Contact: contests@sciartex.org 

Fifty years after humans first set foot on the Moon, we’re calling on artists in the generation who will take the next giant steps into space. Artwork entries may be musical, literary, visual or video that expresses ideas and inspiration for a new generation living, working and doing science on the Moon. Prizes will be awarded to the top entries. Winning entries will be displayed through a worldwide tour, beginning with a kickoff event in the Vortex Dome in Los Angeles, California.

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Call for Abstracts: 70th International Astronautical Congress
Audience: Full-time U.S. Graduate Students Attending U.S. Universities Who Have Submitted Abstracts to the IAF Website
Submission Deadline: May 6
Contact: abstract@nasaprs.com 

NASA seeks abstracts from students interested in presenting at the 70th International Astronautical Congress being held Oct. 21-25, in Washington, D.C. NASA’s participation in this event is an ongoing effort to continue to bridge NASA with the astronautical and space international community. 

Students who have submitted abstracts to the International Astronautical Federation website (http://www.iafastro.org) are requested to submit their abstracts to the NASA website (https://iac.nasaprs.com) by Mon., May 6 (11:59 p.m. EDT). Only abstracts selected by the IAF will be considered for selection by NASA. 

Participants must submit proof of U.S. citizenship and current enrollment in U.S. university or college no later than May 9 to abstract@nasaprs.com.

 
  Citizen Science Project: Earth Rotation Detector
Audience: Educators and Students
Contact: sten.f.odenwald@nasa.gov 

Use your smartphone to explore how Earth’s rotation affects surface gravity at different latitudes. The Earth Rotation Detector project lets you measure the acceleration of gravity at your location and share your data with NASA. Because Earth is rotating, at the equator centrifugal forces will make the local acceleration of gravity a bit weaker than at higher latitudes near the poles. Visit the site for a step-by-step guide on how to participate.

Want to subscribe to get this message delivered to your inbox each Thursday? Sign up for the NASA EXPRESS newsletter at www.nasa.gov/stem/express.

Are you looking for NASA STEM materials to support your curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. https://science.nasa.gov/learners/wavelength

Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website! Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

 
 
 
 

 


Visit NASA STEM Engagement on the Web:
NASA’s Office of STEM Engagement: http://www.nasa.gov/stem
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/stem/foreducators
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/stem/forstudents
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

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