NASA EXPRESS: Your STEM Connection for Jan. 23, 2020

Check out the latest NASA opportunities for the education community.

We are returning to the Moon to stay. Here is how we are going!
While Apollo placed the first steps on the Moon, Artemis opens the door for humanity to sustainably work and live on another world for the first time.
  Free Lecture—‘Spitzer: Final Voyage
Audience: All Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education
Event Date: Jan. 23-24 at 7 p.m. PST
Contact: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php 

The Spitzer Space Telescope has been observing the universe in infrared light for over 16 years. As the mission comes to a close, join current and former members of the Spitzer team at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, for a look at some of the amazing highlights and the lasting legacy of this incredible observatory. Attend the lectures in person, or view Thursday’s lecture via a live webcast.

Contact Opportunity: Amateur Radio on the International Space Station
Audience: All Educators
Informational Webinars: Jan. 23 at 9 p.m. EST and Jan. 27 at 6 p.m. EST
Proposal Deadline: March 31
Contact: ariss.us.education@gmail.com 

On Feb. 1, ARISS-US will begin accepting proposals from U.S. schools, museums and community youth organizations (working individually or together) to host an amateur radio contact with an astronaut aboard the International Space Station between Jan. 1 and June 30, 2021. To maximize the events, ARISS-US is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed STEAM education plan. Radio contacts are approximately 10 minutes. Visit the site for proposal guidelines and forms.

 
  Help Name NASA’s Next Mars Rover
Audience: Public Worldwide
Voting Deadline: Jan. 27
Contact: support@futureengineers.org 

NASA’s Mars 2020 rover needs a name! 

Students around the U.S. sent in over 28,000 essays with name ideas for the rover. The top nine finalists have been selected, and you get to vote on which one NASA should pick. 

Visit the website to see the selected finalists and to cast your vote! 

Read more about the Mars 2020 mission.

Small Steps to Giant Leaps: X-Plane Glider Challenge
Audience:
Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date:
Feb. 4 at 6 p.m. EST
Contact:
barbie.buckner@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Engagement & Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. Learn about the newly released X-Plane Glider Challenge where students use the engineering design process to create an X-plane glider. Participants will review the history of X-planes and NASA aeronautical research and discuss the future of NASA aeronautics innovation including NASA’s newest X-plane, the X-59 Quiet Supersonic Transport (QueSST), and the latest research on quiet supersonic flight. Online registration is required.

 
  Explore Science Literacy and STEAM Activities With ‘Earth Observatory Kids
Audience:
Educators of Grades 2-8
Event Date:
Feb. 6 at 5 p.m. EST
Contact:
susan.m.kohler@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Engagement & Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. Participants will explore “Earth Observatory Kids,” NASA’s free publication for students in grades 2-8. During this webinar we will look at science literacy articles and activities, as well as student interactive technology with topics to include: atmosphere, heat, humans, land, life, natural events, remote sensing, snow, ice and water. Online registration is required.

Where Is NASA Going? And How Do Universities Fit Into That Journey?
Audience:
College-Level Educators, Researchers and Student Organization Advisors
Event Date:
Feb. 7 at 11 a.m. EST
Contact:
k.henry.collins@txstate.edu and vemitra.m.white@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Engagement & Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. NASA STEM research and education specialists will provide an overview of NASA’s current missions, activities and resources including research/grant opportunities, competitions, collaborations and much more. University researchers and educators will learn strategies to strengthen their research infrastructure, and ways to integrate NASA’s digital badging system into their STEM curricula. Online registration is required.

 
  Free Lecture—‘Beyond the Pale Blue Dot: Seeing Distant Planets’
Audience: All Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education
Event Date: Feb. 6-7 at 7 p.m. PST
Contact: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php 

On the 30th anniversary of the “Pale Blue Dot” image captured by NASA’s Voyager mission, join astronomers Rich Terrile and Rob Zellem at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, for a look at the impact of that image and other distant views of Earth. Learn about the quest to photograph an exoplanet orbiting another star as its own pale blue dot. Attend the lectures in person, or view Thursday’s lecture via a live webcast.

Free Lecture—‘The Search for Life: Exploring Ocean Worlds’
Audience: All Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education
Event Date: March 5-6 at 7 p.m. PST
Contact: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php 

The search for life is civilization-level science. What happens if or when we find it? Join research scientist Dr. Morgan Cable at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, for a look at the upcoming “Ocean Access” missions. Find out why ocean worlds are important and what the discovery of life could mean to us as a civilization. Attend the lectures in person, or view Thursday’s lecture via a live webcast.

 
  NASA Psyche Mission Innovation Toolkit
Audience: Public
Contact: nasasychemission@gmail.com 

Set to launch in the summer of 2022, NASA’s Psyche mission will be the first to explore a world likely made largely of metal. Scientists hope that studying asteroid Psyche will give insights into how Earth’s core and the cores of the other terrestrial planets came to be. 

The NASA Psyche Mission Innovation Toolkit includes free online courses based on the real-world science, engineering, technology and teamwork behind the Psyche mission. Two courses are available, and more will be developed throughout the life of the mission.

Explore Humans in Space: Hazards of Spaceflight
Audience:
Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date:
Jan. 23 at 6 p.m. EST
Contact:
steve.culivan@txstate.edu 

Join the NASA STEM Engagement & Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. Human spaceflight will enable astronauts to continue orbiting Earth, return to the Moon and then journey on to Mars, bringing together science, technology and human innovation. Explore the hazards astronauts face in the extreme environment of space travel and the NASA-developed solutions to ensure the safety and well-being of the astronauts. NASA STEM classroom lessons and online resources will be integrated. Online registration is required.

 
  NASA WEAR Challenge
Audience: Middle/High School Educators and Students
Registration Deadline: Jan. 24
Contact: JSC-EPD@mail.nasa.gov 

NASA’s Wearable Equipment for Averting Radiation (WEAR) Challenge gives middle and high school students an opportunity to design wearable radiation countermeasures with multipurpose use for deep space exploration. Protecting deep space astronauts from high-energy charged particles and solar particle events during Artemis missions is important to exploration. Team submissions will be considered for an expense-paid trip to a NASA center. To participate in WEAR, lead educators must register to participate in the challenge by Jan. 24, 2020. Find out more at http://go.nasa.gov/nasa_wear

Visit nasa.gov/stem/nextgenstem for more Next Gen STEM educational resources and opportunities.

Exploring Earth System Phenomena With ‘My NASA Data’ Resources
Audience:
Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date:
Jan. 27 at 6 p.m. EST
Contact:
Samuel.garcia@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Engagement & Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. NASA strives to discover and expand knowledge for the benefit of humanity. That vision begins by observing our own planet, tracking changes over time and determining how we can respond to those changes effectively. In this webinar, Elizabeth Joyner, project lead for My NASA Data at NASA’s Langley Research Center’s Science Directorate, will provide webinar participants with an introductory overview of My NASA Data, and discuss how educators can leverage NASA Earth systems data resources and bridge these data to support Next Generation Science Standards phenomena-based teaching and learning. Online registration is required.

 
  Moon to Mars: Mission and Resources Overview
Audience: Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date:
Jan. 28 at 6 p.m. EST
Contact:
d.sangam@txstate.edu 

As NASA expands human exploration by visiting the Moon and then Mars, deep space exploration will require innovations in transportation that include the Space Launch System, Orion and Ground Launch Systems. Join the NASA STEM Engagement & Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar that begins with an overview of NASA’s plans for human exploration beyond low-Earth orbit and continues with an overview of associated NASA education lessons, videos, fact sheets, printables and training opportunities. Resources covered address national standards in science and mathematics. Online registration is required.

Explore Humans in Space: Mass vs. Weight
Audience:
Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date:
Jan. 29 at 6 p.m. EST
Contact:
sara.l.torres@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Engagement & Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. Are you interested in microgravity aboard the International Space Station? Join us as participants will learn about hands-on, standards-aligned activities using mass and weight. This webinar addresses the Next Generation Science Standards ESS1 and ESS2 and Common Core Math Standards. Online registration is required.

 
  2020 NASA Student Airborne Research Program
Audience: Undergraduate Students Currently in Their Junior Year
Application Deadline: Jan. 29
Contact: nasasarp@baeri.org 

The NASA Student Airborne Research Program is an eight-week summer internship for rising senior undergraduate students. The program provides students with hands-on research experience in all aspects of a major scientific campaign on one or more of the NASA Airborne Science Program’s flying science laboratories. Participants will help operate aircraft instruments to sample atmospheric gases and/or to image land and water surfaces in multiple spectral bands. Participants receive a stipend, and travel/living expenses are covered.

Explore Life in Extreme Environments: Life in the Cold and Dark
Audience:
Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date:
Jan. 30 at 5 p.m. EST
Contact:
susan.m.kohler@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Engagement & Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. Explore “NASA Resources for Teaching Natural Selection and Adaptation.” From microorganisms to penguins, organisms are uniquely designed for some of the harshest Earth and space environments. Join us as we take a closer look at these extreme environments and the life among them. Online registration is required.

 
  Request for Proposals—NASA Centennial Challenges: Lunar Nutrition Challenge
Audience: Non-profit Organizations
Deadline: Jan. 31
Contact: HQ-STMD-CentennialChallenges@mail.nasa.gov 

The NASA Centennial Challenges program, part of the prizes and challenges portfolio within NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate, is seeking to identify potential partner organizations for a challenge on lunar nutrition. Future planetary habitats on the Moon and Mars will require a high degree of self-sufficiency; and long-duration human space exploration will require a sustainable food source. To help solve this problem, NASA is exploring the possibility of opening a NASA Centennial Challenge for the public to help NASA create a system capable of providing astronauts with healthy, nutrient-filled food. Visit the Request for Proposals link above for specific information regarding responsibilities and requirements.

2020-21 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Undergraduate STEM Research Scholarship
Audience: Undergraduate Sophomores and Juniors at Virginia Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions Listed Below
Application Deadline: Jan. 31, 2020
Contact: jkuberek@odu.edu 

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium is offering undergraduate research scholarships of up to $8,500 to encourage students to conduct research in STEM fields. Participants must take part in active faculty-mentored research that aligns with NASA’s mission. Applicants must be enrolled full time at The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia or Virginia Tech. Scholarships are awarded for the following academic year.

 
  2020-21 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Graduate Research STEM Fellowship
Audience: Graduate Students at Virginia Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions Listed Below
Application Deadline: Jan. 31, 2020
Contact: jkuberek@odu.edu 

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium’s Graduate Research STEM Fellowship Program provides fellowships of $6,000 in add-on support to graduate students to supplement and enhance basic research in STEM fields. Research should support NASA’s mission. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and enrolled full time at The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia or Virginia Tech. Fellowships are awarded for the 2020-21 academic year and are renewable for one year.

Presidential Cybersecurity Education Award
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: Jan. 31
Contact: CyberAwards@ed.gov 

Beginning in the spring of 2020, the Presidential Cybersecurity Education Award will be presented annually to two educators, one elementary and one secondary, who instill in their students the skills, knowledge and passion for cybersecurity and related subjects. Recipients will receive a certificate signed by the president of the United States, the secretary of education and the director of the National Science Foundation. Winners will also receive a trip to Washington, D.C., and professional development opportunities. Educators from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, all U.S. territories, Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) schools and tribal areas are eligible to apply or be nominated. Anyone (e.g. principals, superintendents, parents, etc.) may nominate an educator for this honor; self-nominations are permitted as well.

Department of Education logo
  MUREP Innovation and Tech Transfer Idea Competition
Audience: Multidisciplinary Student Teams Enrolled at Minority Serving Institutions
Concept Paper Deadline: Feb. 4, 2020
Contact: HQ-MITTIC@mail.nasa.gov 

The Minority University Research and Education Project (MUREP) Innovation and Tech Transfer Idea Competition (MITTIC) is a spinoff challenge established to develop new ideas for commercialization of NASA technology. Teams choose one NASA technology from the provided list and submit concept papers using MITTIC challenge guidelines. Up to 10 teams will be selected to participate using an online collaboration tool, and will receive funding to travel to NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, for an immersion experience in April 2020. One team will be selected to receive funding to present its idea at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley, California, in June 2020.

Call for Proposals: Future Investigators in NASA Earth and Space Science and Technology
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Proposal Deadline: Feb. 4
Contact: HQ-FINESST@mail.nasa.gov 

NASA’s Science Mission Directorate is seeking proposals from accredited U.S. universities for research grants to begin in the 2020-21 academic year. Each proposal must identify a student seeking a master’s or doctorate degree in Earth and space sciences as the participating future investigator. Project proposers may request up to a three-year period of performance. Visit the website for details and proposal requirements.

 NASA insignia
  Solar System Exploration Public Engagement Institute
Audience: Informal Educators
Event Date: Feb. 4-5
Contact: shupla@lpi.usra.edu 

Informal educators, museum staff, scout leaders and others who conduct programs for children or the public are invited to attend the Solar System Exploration Public Engagement Institute at the Lunar and Planetary Institute and NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. This free two-day institute will feature presentations by planetary scientists, and will introduce participants to a variety of hands-on activities and resources for engaging public audiences. Participants will be expected to conduct and report on at least two programs that use resources, information or activities from the Solar System Exploration Public Engagement Institute.

Call for ProposalsNASA Fellowship Activity 2020
Audience:
First-year Master’s or Doctoral Students
Pre-proposal Teleconference: Feb. 5
Proposal Deadline: Feb. 21
Contact: vandhana.lal@nasa.gov 

The 2020 NASA Fellowship Activity is seeking graduate research proposals that are independently conceived and pose significant contributions to a NASA Research Opportunity listed in the solicitation. The fellowship is designed to support NASA’s Office of STEM Engagement’s mission objectives and offers academic institutions the ability to enhance graduate-level learning and development.

 
  Seeking Volunteer Reviewers in Earth and Space Science
Audience:
Subject Matter Experts in Earth and Space Science
Contact: SARA@nasa.gov 

NASA’s Science Mission Directorate seeks subject matter experts to serve as mail-in and/or panel reviewers of proposals to ROSES and other SMD solicitations. Reviewers are needed on a regular basis as opportunities periodically open. Visit the website to find volunteer review forms and to indicate the topics in which you consider yourself to be a subject matter expert. If your skills match the needs for that review, you may be contacted to discuss scheduling.

GLOBE Webinar: Visualizing Data From the Urban Heat Island Effect—Surface Temperature Field Campaign
Audience: All Formal and Informal Educators
Webinar Date: Feb. 11 at 8 p.m. EST
Contact: Kevin.Czajkowski@utoledo.edu 

The Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) Program invites you to a free series of webinars about the Urban Heat Island Effect—Surface Temperature Field Campaign. This campaign focuses on the impact urbanization has on Earth’s surface temperature and how surface temperature changes the dynamics of Earth’s atmosphere. Join Dr. Kevin Czajkowski to learn what is making your neighborhood so hot and how to visualize the data you collect. Register online.

 
  2019-20 Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching
Audience: Grades K-6 Educators
Nomination Deadline: March 1, 2020
Contact: info@paemst.org 

The Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching is the highest recognition that a teacher of K-12 science, technology, engineering, mathematics and/or computer science may receive for outstanding teaching in the U.S. Anyone may nominate exceptional teachers, or teachers may apply directly. The nomination deadline for primary school teachers (grades K-6) is March 1, 2020. Secondary school teachers (grades 7-12) are eligible to apply for the 2020-21 competition.

U.S. Department of Education’s RISE Award
Audience: K-12 School Faculty and Staff
Nomination Deadline: Nov. 1, 2020
Contact: RISE@ed.gov 

The U.S. Department of Education’s Recognizing Inspirational School Employees (RISE) Award honors and promotes classified school employees who provide exemplary service to students. The governor of each state and the chief executive of the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the outlying areas are invited to nominate up to two classified school employees by November 1 annually. The secretary of education will select a single classified school employee from among the nominees to receive the RISE Award by the following spring. The department will recognize the honoree and communicate his or her story in order to inspire excellence and innovative practices among classified school employees and within schools.

 
  2019-20 Scientist for a Day Essay Contest
Audience: Students in Grades 5-12
Entry Deadline: Feb. 20
Contact: scientistforaday@jpl.nasa.gov 

The Scientist for a Day contest challenges students to become NASA scientists studying moons of Uranus, Neptune and Pluto. Participants examine three moons and choose the one they think NASA should return to that would yield the best scientific results. This year’s topics are Uranus’ moon, Mimas, Neptune’s moon, Triton, and Pluto’s moon, Charon. After researching the three options, students write an essay under 500 words explaining their choice.

International Space Station Research Design Challenge: Capillary Effects on Liquids Exploratory Research Experiments
Audience: Students in Grades 8-12
Design Submission Deadlines: March 1
Contact: celere@lists.nasa.gov 

NASA and Portland State University in Oregon are challenging students to design microgravity experiments investigating capillary action, similar to those conducted on the space station. Teams or individuals create an experiment using a computer-aided design (CAD) template and submit a short proposal presenting the experiment. Selected experiments will be tested in the university’s 2.1-second drop tower, and video results will be made available for analysis and reporting.

 
  Join Today and Get a Postcard From Space: Blue Origin’s Club for the Future
Audience: K-12 Students, Educators and Parents
Contact: clubforfuture@blueorigin.com 

Club for the Future is a nonprofit founded by Blue Origin to inspire students to pursue careers in STEM and to help visualize the future of life in space. The organization gathers teachers and K-12 students worldwide to engage in activities giving youth access to space through Blue Origin’s reusable rockets. 

Want to be one of the first humans to receive a postcard from space? Join the club and learn how you can send a postcard on a round-trip visit to space.

Want to subscribe to get this message delivered to your inbox each Thursday? Sign up for the NASA EXPRESS newsletter at www.nasa.gov/stem/express.

Are you looking for NASA STEM materials to support your curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at https://www.nasa.gov/education/materials/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. https://science.nasa.gov/learners/wavelength

Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website! Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

 
 
 
 

 


Visit NASA STEM Engagement on the Web:
NASA’s Office of STEM Engagement: https://stem.nasa.gov
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/stem/foreducators
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/stem/forstudents
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

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