NASA EXPRESS: Your STEM Connection for Jan. 30, 2020

Check out the latest NASA opportunities for the education community.

Got a Question for Us? #AskNASA
Check out the video series that features agency experts answering frequently asked questions and debunk myths.
  Celebrate Black History Month With NASA
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Feb. 6, 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. EST
Contact: Bethanne.Hull@nasa.gov 

Join NASA’s Kennedy Space Center on Feb. 6 for two special programs celebrating Black History month. The first event, at 10 a.m. EST, features panelists discussing three key NASA programs. The second event, at 2 p.m. EST, features STEM panelists discussing their careers at NASA. 

Watch the events live at https://go.nasa.gov/DEEP. We invite you to participate in the live Q&A via Twitter using #NASAdeep or via the chat window next to the video player.

GLOBE Mission Mosquito Webinar: What To Do With Mosquito Data
Audience: All Formal and Informal Educators
Webinar Date: Feb. 6 at 5 p.m. EST
Contact: cassie_soeffing@strategies.org 

Teachers worldwide are integrating the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) Program’s Mission Mosquito tool into their ongoing curricula and afterschool activities. Join the GLOBE Mission Mosquito team for a free webinar to hear from Dr. Becky Boger as she takes participants on a journey using map tools and data portals to create a context for the data being collected. Register online.

 
  Heritage Family Day at the Smithsonian—African American Pioneers in Aviation and Space
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Feb. 8 (10 a.m.-3 p.m. EST)
Contact: NASMVisitorServices@si.edu 

Celebrate the significant contributions African Americans have made, and continue to make, to flight and space exploration during Family Day at the National Air and Space Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia. Visitors can participate in hands-on activities that will challenge families to be pioneers in space and aviation, hear inspiring stories of African Americans who have overcome challenges and refused to be hidden figures, and enjoy guest speakers as they share their personal tales of triumph.

Explore Space Technology: BEST Satellite and the Engineering Design Process
Audience:
Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date:
Feb. 10 at 6 p.m. EST
Contact:
barbie.buckner@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Engagement & Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. Learn about the International Space Station and other NASA satellites. Explore the Beginning Engineering Science and Technology (BEST) curriculum and how to use the engineering design process to create and launch a satellite. The activities featured in this webinar align with the Next Generation Science Standards. Online registration is required.

 
  Moon to Mars: Mission, Resources and Digital Badges Overview
Audience:
Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date:
Feb. 11 at 6 p.m. EST
Contact:
d.sangam@txstate.edu 

Join the NASA STEM Engagement & Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. As NASA expands human exploration by visiting the Moon and then Mars, deep space exploration will require innovations in transportation that include the Space Launch System, Orion and Ground Launch Systems. This webinar begins with an overview of NASA’s plans for human exploration beyond low-Earth orbit and continues with an overview of associated NASA education lessons, videos, fact sheets, printables and training opportunities. Participants will also get an overview of newly released digital badges for educators and students. Online registration is required.

Where Is NASA Going? And How Do Universities Fit Into That Journey?
Audience:
College-Level Educators, Researchers and Student Organization Advisors
Event Date:
Feb. 11 at 6 p.m. EST
Contact:
k.henry.collins@txstate.edu and vemitra.m.white@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Engagement & Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. NASA STEM research and education specialists will provide an overview of NASA’s current missions, activities and resources including research/grant opportunities, competitions, collaborations and much more. University researchers and educators will learn strategies to strengthen their research infrastructure, and ways to integrate NASA EPDC’s digital badging system into their STEM curricula. Online registration is required.

 
  Exploring Space Lecture From Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum—‘The Sun in a New Light’
Audience: Students in Grades 9-Higher Education and All Educators
Event Date: Feb. 11 at 8 p.m. EST
Contact: NASMVisitorServices@si.edu 

The Sun rises and sets at predictable times and provides our planet with light and warmth. But the Sun is so much more! Join physicist Mark Cheung for an exploration of how the latest fleet of science missions are revealing the mysteries of the Sun. See the Sun in all its true colors, and discover how learning about our own star will help us find habitable planets around other stars. The lecture takes place at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in the District of Columbia. Attendance is free, but tickets are required. The lecture will be webcast live.

NASA Commercial Crew Program: Mission and STEM Resources Overview
Audience:
Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date:
Feb. 12 at 6 p.m. EST
Contact:
steve.culivan@txstate.edu 

Join the NASA STEM Engagement & Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. NASA’s Commercial Crew Program is the next phase in space transportation, enabling industry to provide safe, reliable and cost-effective access to and from the International Space Station and low-Earth orbit. Learn about the companies, the vehicles, the crew and the STEM classroom resources related to the Commercial Crew Program. Online registration is required.

 
  Teaching Eclipses: Using Digital Models to Explore Phenomena
Audience: U.S.-based Formal Educators
Event Date: Feb 12 at 6:30 p.m. EST
Contact: jlswann@asu.edu 

Infiniscope presents, “Kingdom in Peril,” a three-part learning experience that explores phenomena such as the arrangement of the Sun-Earth-Moon system, shadow size and orbital inclination to present a complete exploration of lunar and solar eclipses for grades 5-8. This unique learning experience uses NASA technology, cloaked in a rich and engaging narrative, to understand key concepts of solar and lunar eclipses. Join us to learn how to implement these digital learning experiences in your classroom for maximum engagement and student growth.

Explore Space Technology: Robotics on a Budget
Audience:
Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date:
Feb. 13 at 6 p.m. EST
Contact:
steve.culivan@txstate.edu 

Robots are a part of our everyday lives. How are robots used in our lives? How are they used at NASA? Join the NASA STEM Engagement & Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar to explore answers to these questions and more. Also, learn how to use robotics and engineering design inexpensively in your classroom by integrating NASA STEAM robotic missions, lessons and online resources. Online registration is required.

 
  Student Payload Opportunity with Citizen Science (SPOCS)
Audience: College Students
Letter of Intent Deadline: Feb. 21
Proposal Deadline: March 27
Contact: JSC-STEMonStation@mail.nasa.gov 

The International Space Station remains the sole space-based proving ground for reaching the Moon in 2024 through NASA’s Artemis program. To celebrate 20 years of continuous human presence on the International Space Station, NASA STEM on Station will fund five payloads to the space station, including return, through the Student Payload Opportunity with Citizen Science (SPOCS). This opportunity is co-designed and executed through NanoRacks, who will provide payload integration support and training. 

Teams of students will propose experiments related to bacteria resistance or sustainability research, topics that are critical not only to the space station but also to future exploration. Selected teams are expected to involve K-12 students as citizen scientists in a substantial part of their experiment and conduct educational outreach activities.

Heritage Family Day at the Smithsonian—Women in Aviation and Space
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: March 14 (10 a.m.-3 p.m. EDT)
Contact: NASMVisitorServices@si.edu 

Women will have an immense impact on the future of space, aviation and other STEM fields. Celebrate Women’s History Month with a day of hands-on activities for families at the “Women in Aviation and Space” Family Day taking place at the National Air and Space Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia. Explore accomplishments by women of the past, and learn what can and will be achieved by women in the future.

 
  Exploring Space Lecture From Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum—‘Infrared Exploration With Spitzer’
Audience: Students in Grades 9-Higher Education and All Educators
Event Date: March 18 at 8 p.m. EDT
Contact: NASMVisitorServices@si.edu 

After a highly successful 16-year mission, the Spitzer Space Telescope has been retired. Join project scientist Michael Werner for a discussion of Spitzer’s technical innovations and the scientific advances they enabled. See examples of remarkable images captured by Spitzer, and find out how it is setting the stage for future NASA observatories. The lecture takes place at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in the District of Columbia. Attendance is free, but tickets are required. The lecture will be webcast live.

Exploring Space Lecture From Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum—‘When Did the Universe Begin?’
Audience: Students in Grades 9-Higher Education and All Educators
Event Date: April 24 at 8 p.m. EDT
Contact: NASMVisitorServices@si.edu 

A century ago the “Great Debate” was held among astronomers to discuss if galaxies exist. Today, a new debate has arisen: How old is the universe? Join professor Wendy Freedman as she shares her research aimed at measuring the current expansion rate of the universe and what it can tell us about the age of the universe. The lecture takes place at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in the District of Columbia. Attendance is free, but tickets are required. The lecture will be webcast live.

 
  Exploring Space Lecture From Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum—‘Capturing an Image of a Black Hole’
Audience: Students in Grades 9-Higher Education and All Educators
Event Date: May 14 at 8 p.m. EDT
Contact: NASMVisitorServices@si.edu 

Black holes are cosmic objects so small and dense that nothing, not even light, can escape their gravitational pull. Until recently, no one had ever seen what a black hole actually looked like. Join Shepard Doeleman as he shares how the Event Horizon Telescope was able to capture the first image of a black hole and discusses the resulting images. The lecture takes place at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in the District of Columbia. Attendance is free, but tickets are required. The lecture will be webcast live.

New Applied Research STEM Curriculum Unit Available—‘Wetlands’
Audience: High School Educators
Contact: matthew.d.pearce@nasa.gov 

“Wetlands” is a comprehensive unit plan created in the NASA Climate Change Research Initiative program that introduces students in grades 9-12 to the ecosystem and economic services that wetlands provide. The unit provides hands-on and laboratory investigations that evaluate human impacts on saltmarsh ecosystems while integrating field work activities using GLOBE, My NASA Data and many other NASA educational resources, content and platforms.

 
  Explore Life in Extreme Environments: Life in the Cold and Dark
Audience:
Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date:
Jan. 30 at 5 p.m. EST
Contact:
susan.m.kohler@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Engagement & Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. Explore “NASA Resources for Teaching Natural Selection and Adaptation.” From microorganisms to penguins, organisms are uniquely designed for some of the harshest Earth and space environments. Join us as we take a closer look at these extreme environments and the life among them. Online registration is required.

Request for Proposals—NASA Centennial Challenges: Lunar Nutrition Challenge
Audience: Non-profit Organizations
Deadline: Jan. 31
Contact: HQ-STMD-CentennialChallenges@mail.nasa.gov 

The NASA Centennial Challenges program, part of the prizes and challenges portfolio within NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate, is seeking to identify potential partner organizations for a challenge on lunar nutrition. Future planetary habitats on the Moon and Mars will require a high degree of self-sufficiency; and long-duration human space exploration will require a sustainable food source. To help solve this problem, NASA is exploring the possibility of opening a NASA Centennial Challenge for the public to help NASA create a system capable of providing astronauts with healthy, nutrient-filled food. Visit the Request for Proposals link above for specific information regarding responsibilities and requirements.

 
  2020-21 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Undergraduate STEM Research Scholarship
Audience: Undergraduate Sophomores and Juniors at Virginia Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions Listed Below
Application Deadline: Jan. 31, 2020
Contact: jkuberek@odu.edu 

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium is offering undergraduate research scholarships of up to $8,500 to encourage students to conduct research in STEM fields. Participants must take part in active faculty-mentored research that aligns with NASA’s mission. Applicants must be enrolled full time at The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia or Virginia Tech. Scholarships are awarded for the following academic year.

2020-21 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Graduate Research STEM Fellowship
Audience: Graduate Students at Virginia Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions Listed Below
Application Deadline: Jan. 31, 2020
Contact: jkuberek@odu.edu 

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium’s Graduate Research STEM Fellowship Program provides fellowships of $6,000 in add-on support to graduate students to supplement and enhance basic research in STEM fields. Research should support NASA’s mission. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and enrolled full time at The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia or Virginia Tech. Fellowships are awarded for the 2020-21 academic year and are renewable for one year.

 
Department of Education logo Presidential Cybersecurity Education Award
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: Jan. 31
Contact: CyberAwards@ed.gov 

Beginning in the spring of 2020, the Presidential Cybersecurity Education Award will be presented annually to two educators, one elementary and one secondary, who instill in their students the skills, knowledge and passion for cybersecurity and related subjects. Recipients will receive a certificate signed by the president of the United States, the secretary of education and the director of the National Science Foundation. Winners will also receive a trip to Washington, D.C., and professional development opportunities. Educators from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, all U.S. territories, Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) schools and tribal areas are eligible to apply or be nominated. Anyone (e.g. principals, superintendents, parents, etc.) may nominate an educator for this honor; self-nominations are permitted as well.

Small Steps to Giant Leaps: X-Plane Glider Challenge
Audience:
Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date:
Feb. 4 at 6 p.m. EST
Contact:
barbie.buckner@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Engagement & Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. Learn about the newly released X-Plane Glider Challenge where students use the engineering design process to create an X-plane glider. Participants will review the history of X-planes and NASA aeronautical research and discuss the future of NASA aeronautics innovation including NASA’s newest X-plane, the X-59 Quiet Supersonic Transport (QueSST), and the latest research on quiet supersonic flight. Online registration is required.

 
  MUREP Innovation and Tech Transfer Idea Competition
Audience: Multidisciplinary Student Teams Enrolled at Minority Serving Institutions
Concept Paper Deadline: Feb. 4, 2020
Contact: HQ-MITTIC@mail.nasa.gov 

The Minority University Research and Education Project (MUREP) Innovation and Tech Transfer Idea Competition (MITTIC) is a spinoff challenge established to develop new ideas for commercialization of NASA technology. Teams choose one NASA technology from the provided list and submit concept papers using MITTIC challenge guidelines. Up to 10 teams will be selected to participate using an online collaboration tool, and will receive funding to travel to NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, for an immersion experience in April 2020. One team will be selected to receive funding to present its idea at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley, California, in June 2020.

Call for Proposals: Future Investigators in NASA Earth and Space Science and Technology
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Proposal Deadline: Feb. 4
Contact: HQ-FINESST@mail.nasa.gov 

NASA’s Science Mission Directorate is seeking proposals from accredited U.S. universities for research grants to begin in the 2020-21 academic year. Each proposal must identify a student seeking a master’s or doctorate degree in Earth and space sciences as the participating future investigator. Project proposers may request up to a three-year period of performance. Visit the website for details and proposal requirements.

 NASA insignia
  Solar System Exploration Public Engagement Institute
Audience: Informal Educators
Event Date: Feb. 4-5
Contact: shupla@lpi.usra.edu 

Informal educators, museum staff, scout leaders and others who conduct programs for children or the public are invited to attend the Solar System Exploration Public Engagement Institute at the Lunar and Planetary Institute and NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. This free two-day institute will feature presentations by planetary scientists, and will introduce participants to a variety of hands-on activities and resources for engaging public audiences. Participants will be expected to conduct and report on at least two programs that use resources, information or activities from the Solar System Exploration Public Engagement Institute.

Call for ProposalsNASA Fellowship Activity 2020
Audience:
First-year Master’s or Doctoral Students
Pre-proposal Teleconference: Feb. 5
Proposal Deadline: Feb. 21
Contact: vandhana.lal@nasa.gov 

The 2020 NASA Fellowship Activity is seeking graduate research proposals that are independently conceived and pose significant contributions to a NASA Research Opportunity listed in the solicitation. The fellowship is designed to support NASA’s Office of STEM Engagement’s mission objectives and offers academic institutions the ability to enhance graduate-level learning and development.

 
  Explore Science Literacy and STEAM Activities With ‘Earth Observatory Kids
Audience:
Educators of Grades 2-8
Event Date:
Feb. 6 at 5 p.m. EST
Contact:
susan.m.kohler@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Engagement & Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. Participants will explore “Earth Observatory Kids,” NASA’s free publication for students in grades 2-8. During this webinar we will look at science literacy articles and activities, as well as student interactive technology with topics to include: atmosphere, heat, humans, land, life, natural events, remote sensing, snow, ice and water. Online registration is required.

Free Lecture—‘Beyond the Pale Blue Dot: Seeing Distant Planets’
Audience: All Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education
Event Date: Feb. 6-7 at 7 p.m. PST
Contact: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php 

On the 30th anniversary of the “Pale Blue Dot” image captured by NASA’s Voyager mission, join astronomers Rich Terrile and Rob Zellem at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, for a look at the impact of that image and other distant views of Earth. Learn about the quest to photograph an exoplanet orbiting another star as its own pale blue dot. Attend the lectures in person, or view Thursday’s lecture via a live webcast.

 
  Where Is NASA Going? And How Do Universities Fit Into That Journey?
Audience:
College-Level Educators, Researchers and Student Organization Advisors
Event Date:
Feb. 7 at 11 a.m. EST
Contact:
k.henry.collins@txstate.edu and vemitra.m.white@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Engagement & Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. NASA STEM research and education specialists will provide an overview of NASA’s current missions, activities and resources including research/grant opportunities, competitions, collaborations and much more. University researchers and educators will learn strategies to strengthen their research infrastructure, and ways to integrate NASA’s digital badging system into their STEM curricula. Online registration is required.

GLOBE Webinar: Visualizing Data From the Urban Heat Island Effect—Surface Temperature Field Campaign
Audience: All Formal and Informal Educators
Webinar Date: Feb. 11 at 8 p.m. EST
Contact: Kevin.Czajkowski@utoledo.edu 

The Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) Program invites you to a free series of webinars about the Urban Heat Island Effect—Surface Temperature Field Campaign. This campaign focuses on the impact urbanization has on Earth’s surface temperature and how surface temperature changes the dynamics of Earth’s atmosphere. Join Dr. Kevin Czajkowski to learn what is making your neighborhood so hot and how to visualize the data you collect. Register online.

 
  NOAA Environmental Literacy Grants
Audience: Informal Education Institutions; K-12 Schools and School Systems; Higher Education Institutions; Community-based Organizations; State, Local and Tribal Governments
Application Deadline: Feb 11 (Priority 2)
Contact: oed.grants@noaa.gov 

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Office of Education has issued a competitive funding opportunity for education projects that will strengthen the public’s and K-12 students’ knowledge of ways to make their communities more resilient to extreme weather events and other environmental hazards. Successful projects will relate to NOAA’s mission and build environmental literacy necessary for community resilience to the weather and other environmental hazards associated with a community’s location.

NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellowships
Audience: Graduate Students and Ph.D. Scientists
Application Deadlines: March 1, July 1 and Nov. 1
Contact: npphelp@usra.edu 

The NASA Postdoctoral Program offers early career and senior scientists one- to three-year work assignments with NASA scientists and engineers. Opportunities relate to missions in Earth science, heliophysics, planetary science, astrophysics, space bioscience, aeronautics, engineering, human exploration and space operations, astrobiology and science management. Applicants must have completed a doctorate or an equivalent degree before beginning the fellowship, but they may apply while completing degree requirements.

 
  Summer Institute—LiftOff 2020: Moon to Mars
Audience: Educators of Grades 5-12
Application Deadline: March 2, 2020
Institute Dates: June 21-26, 2020
Contact: baguio@tsgc.utexas.edu 

The 2020 LiftOff Summer Institute is a weeklong training event sponsored by NASA’s Texas Space Grant Consortium, and held at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. This year’s theme is “Moon to Mars.” Attendees will explore NASA’s plans to establish a permanent human presence on the Moon, using what we learn there as a stepping stone to exploring Mars. Participants will attend presentations by NASA scientists and engineers, tour NASA facilities and receive hands-on, inquiry-based classroom activities aligned to education standards. Applicants must be U.S. citizens currently employed as classroom teachers of grades 5-12, with at least one year of teaching experience prior to the institute.

Save the Date: 2020 Space Port Area Conference for Educators
Audience: K-12 Formal and Informal Educators
Event Date: July 8-10, 2020
Contact: goforspace@gmail.com 

Are you interested in attending the third annual SPACE Conference hosted by the Astronauts Memorial Foundation? Mark your calendar and make plans to head to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida for this conference for K-12 formal and informal educators who are U.S. citizens teaching in the United States. Experience stimulating presentations from astronauts and NASA science and engineering experts; tour Kennedy and surrounding facilities. Get lesson plans and creative ideas to infuse your classroom with STEM and multifaceted, space-related content.

 
  Student Flight Opportunity—Cubes in Space
Audience: Students Ages 11-18 and Educator Mentors
Registration Deadline: Feb. 7
Contact: info@cubesinspace.com 

NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility and Langley Research Center, along with the Colorado Space Grant Consortium and idoodledu Inc. are offering a free STEAM education program for students ages 11-18. Cubes in Space lets students design and compete to launch an experiment into space. Selected student-designed payload cubes will be launched via a sounding rocket from Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia in late June 2020, or from a high-altitude scientific balloon from NASA’s Scientific Balloon Flight Facility in New Mexico in late August 2020.

2019-20 Scientist for a Day Essay Contest
Audience: Students in Grades 5-12
Entry Deadline: Feb. 20
Contact: scientistforaday@jpl.nasa.gov 

The Scientist for a Day contest challenges students to become NASA scientists studying moons of Uranus, Neptune and Pluto. Participants examine three moons and choose the one they think NASA should return to that would yield the best scientific results. This year’s topics are Uranus’ moon, Mimas, Neptune’s moon, Triton, and Pluto’s moon, Charon. After researching the three options, students write an essay under 500 words explaining their choice.

 
  2020 NASA STEM Enhancement in Earth and Space Science Internship
Audience: Current High School Sophomores and Juniors
Application Deadline: Feb. 22
Contact: baguio@csr.utexas.edu 

NASA, the Texas Space Grant Consortium and The University of Texas at Austin Center for Space Research have joined forces to encourage high school students’ interest in STEM careers. The STEM Enhancement in Earth Science project allows students to work remotely prior to their onsite internships in Austin, Texas, July 18-Aug. 1, 2020, or to participate in a virtual project. Participants conduct authentic research while working with scientists and engineers in their chosen areas of work. Housing, transportation and meals will be provided.

Want to subscribe to get this message delivered to your inbox each Thursday? Sign up for the NASA EXPRESS newsletter at www.nasa.gov/stem/express.

Are you looking for NASA STEM materials to support your curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at https://www.nasa.gov/education/materials/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. https://science.nasa.gov/learners/wavelength

Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website! Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

 
 
 
 

 


Visit NASA STEM Engagement on the Web:
NASA’s Office of STEM Engagement: https://stem.nasa.gov
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/stem/foreducators
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/stem/forstudents
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

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