NASA EXPRESS: Your STEM Connection for March 12, 2020

Check out the latest NASA opportunities for the education community.

NASA’s Next Mars Rover Has a New Name: Perseverance

Alexander Mather, a 13-year-old student from Virginia, submitted the 
winning name. Find out why he chose Perseverance as the name of 
NASA’s next robotic scientist to visit the Red Planet.

  Make Slime With Space Place!
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 3-6
Contact: info@spaceplace.nasa.gov 

Since the universe began about 13.8 billion years ago, it’s been stretching out and expanding. Educators, teach your students about our stretching universe with this hands-on activity from NASA Space Place!

New Resources From the Commercial Crew Program: “The Astro-Not-Yets Explore Sound”
Audience: Educators of Grades K-4 

Join Mr. Armstrong and his class of astro-not-yets as they explore vibrations caused by sound in this new short storybook

After feeling the windows shake in their classroom as a result of a Commercial Crew launch, Mr. Armstrong challenges his students to create their own sound vibrations. Follow along as they use teamwork to complete this design challenge, and learn more about the Commercial Crew Program along the way. 

Next, challenge your students to their own design challenge with the accompanying activity “Sound on a String,” where they will be able to determine the best variables for transmitting sound on a string-cup phone. 

Inspire your astro-not-yets with these and more great resources found at: nasa.gov/stem/ccp.

 
  Explore Solar System and Beyond: Mars Bound
Audience:
Educators of Grades 3-12
Event Date:
March 23 at 5 p.m. EDT
Contact:
susan.m.kohler@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Engagement & Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. Learn about the “Mars Bound! Mission to the Red Planet Activity” and how to guide student teams in creating Mars missions. Students will develop a science question that requires a technical design solution involving the prioritization of communication systems, computer systems and scientific instrument packages. Students decide which trade-offs to make in order to remain within the limits of mass, power and budget constraints. These same considerations are made by teams at NASA developing missions to Mars. Online registration is required.

Moon to Mars: Overview, Propulsion With SLS and Digital Educator Badge
Audience:
Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date:
March 24 at 6 p.m. EDT
Contact:
d.sangam@txstate.edu 

Join the NASA STEM Engagement & Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. NASA is expanding human exploration by visiting the Moon and then Mars. The Artemis program will land the first woman and the next man on the surface of the Moon. To enable educators to share the excitement of Artemis with students, NASA has developed educator guides on Propulsion with the Space Launch System, Crew Transportation with Orion and Habitation with Gateway. This webinar will explore Propulsion with SLS and provide a quick walkthrough of a digital Educator Badge (microcredential) that provides an in-depth exploration of all the guides. Online registration is required.

 
  Explore Solar System and Beyond: Eyes in the Sky With Space-based Telescopes
Audience:
Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date:
March 25 at 6 p.m. EDT
Contact:
steve.culivan@txstate.edu 

Join the NASA STEM Engagement & Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. NASA space telescopes are our eyes on the universe, expanding our view and understanding of the solar system and the universe beyond. Participants will learn about the Hubble Space Telescope, the James Webb Space Telescope and the electromagnetic spectrum. NASA STEM lessons, online resources and teaching strategies will be integrated in this out-of-this-world webinar. Online registration is required.

Explore Solar System and Beyond: College STEM Students Utilize Mobile Apps and Digital Badges to Familiarize and Prepare Themselves for Opportunities with NASA
Audience:
University/College STEM Students
Event Date:
March 26 at Noon EDT
Contact:
k.henry.collins@txstate.edu        
vemitra.m.white@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Engagement & Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar for college STEM students. Come explore with NASA and discover the latest images, videos, mission information, news, feature stories, tweets, NASA TV and featured content with the NASA app. Experience Earth and our solar system, the universe and the spacecraft exploring them with immersive apps for Mac, PC and mobile devices. This webinar is designed to showcase student engagement opportunities for college students interested in a possible career with NASA. Using mobile technology and online learning, students will explore ways to position themselves so that they may qualify for NASA opportunities. Underrepresented college students in STEM are encouraged to attend! Online registration is required.

 
  Explore Solar System and Beyond: Modeling the Solar System With STEAM
Audience:
Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date:
March 26 at 6 p.m. EDT
Contact:
steve.culivan@txstate.edu 

Join the NASA STEM Engagement & Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. Explore our solar system and beyond with NASA missions. Also, investigate NASA STEAM lessons that include classification, graphing and models to better understand and visualize our Sun, planets, asteroids and other celestial objects of our solar system in this out-of-this-world webinar. Online registration is required.

2020 NASA Fellowships in Aerospace History
Audience: Recent Recipients of a Doctorate in History or a Closely Related Field, and Doctoral Candidates in Those Fields
Application Deadline: April 1
Contact: awards@historians.org 

Offered annually, the Fellowships in Aerospace History support significant scholarly research projects in aerospace history. These fellowships grant the opportunity to engage in significant and sustained advanced research in all aspects of the history of aerospace from the earliest human interest in flight to the present, including cultural and intellectual history, economic history, history of law and public policy, and the history of science, engineering and management. 

The six- to nine-month fellowships are open to applicants with a doctorate in history or a closely related field, or to those who are enrolled in and have completed all coursework for a program granting doctoral degrees in those fields. Each fellowship carries a stipend of $21,250, which includes travel expenses.

 
  2020 CineSpace Short Film Competition
Audience: All Educators and Students
Submission Deadline: July 15
Contact: info@tongal.com 

NASA and the Houston Cinema Arts Society invite professional and aspiring filmmakers to share their works using actual NASA imagery. The CineSpace competition will accept all genres, including narrative, documentary, comedy, drama, animation and others, up to 10 minutes long. Entries must use at least 10 percent publicly available NASA imagery. Entries will be judged on creativity, innovation and attention to detail. Cash prizes will be awarded to the top three submissions, as well as two special category films: 1) the best documentary film and 2) the film that best celebrates 20 years of human presence on the International Space Station.

Hydrogen Infrastructure Technologies Opportunity With U.S. Department of Energy
Audience: Graduate Students, Recent Graduates
Contact: DOE-RPP@orise.orau.gov 

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy is seeking applicants for an appointment with its Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Office. Participants will learn and engage in important aspects of the office’s mission. 

Applications will be accepted on a rolling basis. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or Lawful Permanent Resident (LPR) and preferably have at least a Master’s degree or 3-5 years equivalent experience. Experience in hydrogen and fuel cell technologies is preferred. Stipends and travel allowance are provided.

 
  Explore Solar System and Beyond: Investigating Strange New Worlds
Audience:
Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date:
March 12 at 6 p.m. EDT
Contact:
steve.culivan@txstate.edu 

Join the NASA STEM Engagement & Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. Learn to use real NASA data to explore how telescopes—especially the Kepler and Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) space telescopes—search for planets orbiting stars beyond our Sun. The NASA STEM activities presented investigate how to use telescope data and Kepler’s Third Law to interpret data and to construct graphs to determine if a planet beyond our solar system is Earth-like. Online registration is required.

Celebrate Pi Day With NASA Resources
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 6-12
Event Date: March 14 

It’s almost 3.14, also known as March 14 and more affectionately known as Pi Day! Get ready to celebrate and test your mathematical skills with a set of illustrated planetary puzzlers from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California. 

This year’s challenge will be posted online on Fri., March 6! Are you up for the challenge?

 
  Moon to Mars: We Are Going—Mission, Resources and Digital Badges Overview Presented in Spanish
Audience:
Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date:
March 16 at 6 p.m. EDT
Contact:
m_u52@txstate.edu 

Join the NASA STEM Engagement & Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar presented in Spanish. NASA is expanding human exploration by visiting the Moon and then Mars. The new lunar exploration program that will land the first woman and the next man on the surface of the Moon is called the Artemis program. To provide training opportunities for educators on Artemis program resources, NASA has developed a digital educator badge (microcredential) that provides an in-depth exploration of NASA’s new Moon to Mars curriculum modules. Online registration is required.

Explore Solar System and Beyond: NASA’s Hunt for Signs of Life on Other Planets
Audience:
Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date:
March 18 at 5 p.m. EDT
Contact:
anne.e.weiss@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Engagement & Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. Since Viking’s 1976 landing on Mars, NASA scientists have studied various planetary bodies for evidence of the ingredients necessary for life: liquid water, essential chemical elements and suitable energy sources. In this webinar, we’ll review what has been learned and how NASA’s Mars 2020 rover, Dragonfly mission to Titan, and OSIRIS-REx landing on the asteroid Bennu will contribute to the age-old question: Are we alone? Online registration is required.

 
  Exploring Space Lecture From Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum—‘Infrared Exploration With Spitzer’
Audience: Students in Grades 9-Higher Education and All Educators
Event Date: March 18 at 8 p.m. EDT
Contact: NASMVisitorServices@si.edu 

After a highly successful 16-year mission, the Spitzer Space Telescope has been retired. Join project scientist Michael Werner for a discussion of Spitzer’s technical innovations and the scientific advances they enabled. See examples of remarkable images captured by Spitzer, and find out how it is setting the stage for future NASA observatories. The lecture takes place at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in the District of Columbia. Attendance is free, but tickets are required. The lecture will be webcast live.

Automated Reconfigurable Mission Adaptive Digital Assembly Systems Project
Audience:
Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date:
March 19 at 6 p.m. EDT
Contact:
sara.l.torres@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Engagement & Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. NASA’s Ames Research Center, in Silicon Valley, California, is responding to the needs of future deep space exploration. The Automated Reconfigurable Mission Adaptive Digital Assembly Systems (ARMADAS) project will develop and demonstrate the autonomous assembly of digital materials and structures. Learn how automated technologies present potential for long-duration and deep-space infrastructure needs. Online registration is required.

 
  Library of Congress 2020 Summer Institutes—Teaching With Primary Sources
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: March 23
Institute Dates: Multiple Dates in June-July
Contact: teachinglcsummer@loc.gov 

The Library of Congress is accepting applications for its summer institutes for K-12 educators. Educators and school librarians of all grade levels and subject areas are encouraged to apply. During each five-day institute, participants work with Library of Congress education specialists and subject-matter experts to learn how to use primary sources in the classroom effectively while exploring digitized historical artifacts and documents on the library’s website. Tuition and materials are free.

Celebrate Solar Week—Spring 2020
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-9, Informal Educators
Event Date: March 23-27
Contact: solarweek@solarweek.org 

Solar Week provides a series of educational web activities focusing on the Sun-Earth connection. Students ages 11-14 can learn about solar careers, sunspots, solar energy and solar storms. Explore the website to find cool facts, scavenger hunts, games and an online interactive discussion board where your class or group can submit a question to leading solar scientists. During the week, students will be able to take part in a 30-minute live youth-oriented webinar for even more interaction with a chosen scientist. 

Spring 2020 will feature a look at the exciting high-resolution close-ups of the Sun from the Inouye Telescope. And with NASA’s Parker Solar Probe exploring the Sun like no mission before, it creates exciting times for Sun-related science!

 
  Explorers Wanted—Apply To Be an Astronaut
Application Period: March 2-31
Contact: stephanie.schierholz@nasa.gov 

Do you have what it takes to be an astronaut? As preparations continue for sending the first woman and next man to the Moon, NASA is looking for the next class of Artemis Generation astronauts. 

Visit the How To Be an Astronaut page to find requirements, frequently asked questions and advice from current astronauts on how to apply.

Student Spaceflight Experiments Program—Mission 15 to the International Space Station
Audience: School Districts Serving Grades 5-12, Informal Education Institutions, Colleges and Universities
Inquiry Deadline: March 27
Start Date: Sept. 1
Contact: jeffgoldstein@ncesse.org 

The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education and the Arthur C. Clarke Institute for Space Education announce Mission 15 to the International Space Station, a community engagement initiative in STEM. In each participating community, one proposed student experiment is selected to fly in low-Earth orbit on the space station. For pre-college grades 5-12, each community is expected to engage at least 300 students in real microgravity experiment design and proposal writing. For an undergraduate community, it is expected that at least 30 students will be engaged. Interested communities must inquire about the program no later than March 27.

 
  Contact Opportunity: Amateur Radio on the International Space Station
Audience: All Educators
Proposal Deadline: March 31
Contact: ariss.us.education@gmail.com 

On Feb. 1, ARISS-US will begin accepting proposals from U.S. schools, museums and community youth organizations (working individually or together) to host an amateur radio contact with an astronaut aboard the International Space Station between Jan. 1 and June 30, 2021. To maximize the events, ARISS-US is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed STEAM education plan. Radio contacts are approximately 10 minutes. Visit the site for proposal guidelines and forms.

Save the Date: 2020 Space Port Area Conference for Educators
Audience: K-12 Formal and Informal Educators
Event Date: July 8-10, 2020
Contact: goforspace@gmail.com 

Are you interested in attending the third annual SPACE Conference hosted by the Astronauts Memorial Foundation? Mark your calendar and make plans to head to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida for this conference for K-12 formal and informal educators who are U.S. citizens teaching in the United States. Experience stimulating presentations from astronauts and NASA science and engineering experts; tour Kennedy and surrounding facilities. Get lesson plans and creative ideas to infuse your classroom with STEM and multifaceted, space-related content.

 
  Student Payload Opportunity with Citizen Science (SPOCS)
Audience: College Students
Proposal Deadline: March 27
Contact: JSC-STEMonStation@mail.nasa.gov 

The International Space Station remains the sole space-based proving ground for reaching the Moon in 2024 through NASA’s Artemis program. To celebrate 20 years of continuous human presence on the International Space Station, NASA STEM on Station will fund five payloads to the space station, including return, through the Student Payload Opportunity with Citizen Science (SPOCS). This opportunity is co-designed and executed through NanoRacks, who will provide payload integration support and training. 

Teams of students will propose experiments related to bacteria resistance or sustainability research, topics that are critical not only to the space station but also to future exploration. Selected teams are expected to involve K-12 students as citizen scientists in a substantial part of their experiment and conduct educational outreach activities.

Be a Citizen Scientist—Trees Challenge 2020: Make Every Tree Count
Audience: All Educators and Students
Challenge Dates: April 1-30
Contact: marile.colonrobles@nasa.gov 

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of Earth Day and the 25th anniversary of the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) Program, GLOBE Observer is hosting a monthlong citizen science challenge in April 2020. Citizen scientists worldwide are invited to measure the height of as many different trees as possible throughout the month using the Trees tool in the GLOBE Observer app. The individuals, schools and registered teams that measure the most trees will be recognized as top observers in the challenge.

 
  Mechanical Maker Challenge—Exploring Hell: Avoiding Obstacles on a Clockwork Rover
Audience:
U.S. Residents Ages 18 and Older
Submission Deadline: May 29
Contact:  mechanicalmaker@jpl.nasa.gov 

With its sulfuric acid clouds, temperatures over 842 degrees Fahrenheit (450 degrees Celsius) and surface pressure 92 times that of Earth, Venus is one of the most hostile planetary environments in the solar system. Most electrical components do not survive long in these conditions, but NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, hopes to build an automaton (or clockwork mechanical robot) rover to explore Venus. This challenge seeks innovative ideas for a mechanical obstacle-detection sensor that could operate under the harsh conditions of Venus. A prize purse totaling $30,000 will be distributed to the top 3 finalists.

Want to subscribe to get this message delivered to your inbox each Thursday? Sign up for the NASA EXPRESS newsletter at www.nasa.gov/stem/express.

Are you looking for NASA STEM materials to support your curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at https://www.nasa.gov/education/materials/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. https://science.nasa.gov/learners/wavelength

Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website! Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

 
 
 
 

 


Visit NASA STEM Engagement on the Web:
NASA’s Office of STEM Engagement: https://stem.nasa.gov
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/stem/foreducators
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/stem/forstudents
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

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