NASA Education Express — May 5, 2016

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Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


New This Week!


New IMAX Movie ‘A Beautiful Planet’ Out Now, Plus Educational Resources
Audience: All Educators and Students

New Educational Resources Available From JPL Education
Teachable Moment: May the Force = Mass x Acceleration — Grades 6-12
Teachable Moment: Transit of Mercury — Grades 5-12

Free NASA Educator Professional Development Webinars
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: May 5, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT

Call for Proposals — Citizen Science for Earth Systems Program
Audience: Higher Education and Informal Education Institutions
Notice of Intent Request Date: May 27, 2016
Proposal Deadline: July 21, 2016


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


NASA/NSTA Webinar — Global Precipitation Measurement Mission: Weather
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Date: May 5, 2016, 6:30 p.m. EDT

Call for Proposals: NASA’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate’s University Leadership Initiative
Audience: Accredited, Degree-granting U.S. Colleges and Universities
Notice of Intent Deadline: May 5, 2016
Proposal Deadline: June 7, 2016

Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy
Audience: Designed for Families With Children Ages 10 to 14, but Open to All
Next Event Date: May 7, 2016, 10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. EDT

White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities — 2016 All-Star Students Program
Audience: Higher Education Students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Application Deadline: May 13, 2016

Federal Aviation Administration Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues
Audience: Graduate Students
Application Deadline: May 15, 2016

2016 NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge: Distributed Electric Propulsion
Audience: Students at U.S. Colleges and Universities
Entry Deadline: May 16, 2016

GLOBE El Niño Field Campaign and Webinar Series
Audience: K-12 Educators
Next Webinar Date: May 17, 2016, at 8 p.m. EDT

Free Educator Workshop — Space Technology: Green Propellant Infusion Mission
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Event Dates: May 18, 2016, 4:30-6 p.m. PDT

Smallsat Technology Partnerships Solicitation
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Proposal Deadline: May 25, 2016

Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 11 to the International Space Station
Audience: School Districts Serving Grades 5-12, Informal Education Institutions, Colleges and Universities
Inquiry Deadline: May 27, 2016

2016 National Academy of Engineering – Engineering for You Video Contest 3
Audience: All Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: May 31, 2016

Mars Survival Kit: Lessons and Activities to Guide Your Exploration of Mars!
Audience: K-12 Educators

NASA History Program Office Fall 2016 Internships
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Fall 2016 Application Deadline: June 1, 2016

Call for Proposals: Next Space Technologies for Exploration Partnerships (NextSTEP-2)
Audience: Universities and Nonprofit Organizations
Proposal Deadline: June 15, 2016

Future Engineers ‘Think Outside the Box’ Challenge
Audience: K-12 Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: Aug. 1, 2016

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

Free “NASA’s Journey to Mars” Planetarium/Dome Show
Audience: All Formal and Informal Educators


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.


NEW THIS WEEK!


New IMAX Movie ‘A Beautiful Planet’ Out Now, Plus Educational Resources

Embark on an awe-inspiring trip around our world through the eyes of astronauts on the International Space Station in the newly released IMAX movie, “A Beautiful Planet.” The movie stars Earth as seen from space by astronauts and cosmonauts aboard the orbiting laboratory. Shooting spanned multiple expeditions with NASA astronauts Kjell Lindgren, Terry Virts and Barry “Butch” Wilmore, as well as former NASA astronaut Scott Kelly, volunteering as filmmakers during their time on station.

To learn more about the film and to watch a trailer, visit http://www.nasa.gov/feature/window-to-earth-nasa-partners-with-imax-for-a-beautiful-planet.

Bring the excitement of “A Beautiful Planet” into your classroom! Download the educator’s resource guide and supplemental activities at IMAX.COM/ABP/Education. Inspired by the film, these resources are designed to enhance your students’ understanding of Earth, the importance of the International Space Station, and the work that’s being done to conserve our planet and its resources.


New Educational Resources Available From JPL Education

Are you looking for ways to bring the latest NASA science and mission news into your classroom? Education specialists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California have the resources to help you do just that! The “Teachable Moments” blog brings together news, activities and education tips on the latest happenings at NASA.

Check out the latest offerings from JPL Education.

Teachable Moment: May the Force = mass x acceleration — Grades 6-12
Star Wars Day, May the Fourth, was earlier this week, and the education team at JPL has a Teachable Moment that connects Star Wars, JPL’s Dawn Mission and Newton’s Laws of Motion. This article contains a primer on the physics behind the ion propulsion engines that drive the Dawn spacecraft, as well as a lesson that shows students how to calculate additive velocity on a hypothetical ion-propelled spacecraft. The spreadsheet model addresses both Next Generation Science and Common Core Math Standards for grades 6-12. Check it out at http://bit.ly/jpltms.

Coming Soon! Teachable Moment: Transit of Mercury — Grades 5-12
May 9 marks the first transit of Mercury since 2006. The movement of Mercury across the sun’s disk, as seen from Earth, provides an opportunity for teachers to engage students in authentic, real-world problems that address Common Core Math Standards. On May 6, the education team at JPL will release a Teachable Moment related to the transit of Mercury that will provide background on the importance of planetary transits, mathematics activities appropriate for middle and high school students, and extensions to enhance student learning.

Looking for more? Check out the “Teachable Moments” archives for more resources. http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/news/column/teachable-moments/


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Join Us on the Journey to Mars: Looking for Life
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-9
Event Date: May 5, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT
Is there life beyond our Earth? If so, how can we verify its existence? Using NASA STEM curriculum, participants will explore the possibility of life on Mars using their definition of “life” to determine whether anything is alive in three different simulated Mars soil samples. Participants will experiment, record observations and draw pictures as they collect data from the samples to determine if life may exist in any of them. The activities presented in this webinar address Next Generation Science Standards 4-LS1-1, 5-LS1-1, MS-LS2-1, and HS-LS2-3. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/170333

Join Us on the Journey to Mars: Exploration of Mars Through the Eyes of the Rovers
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 3-8
Event Date: May 9, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Take a journey to Mars as seen through the eyes of the rovers on Mars. Dive into NASA curriculum you can use with your students that has them creating “Planetary Pasta Rovers.” The engineering design process will be used during this session, and the activity is aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/170708

Virtual Missions and Exoplanets (vMAX): Part 1 — Curriculum Overview
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: May 10, 2016, at 4 p.m. EDT
With the Virtual Missions and Exoplanets curriculum, learn how to engage students in the study of exoplanetary systems through hands-on experiences, scenario-based problem solving, and 3-D multi-user virtual world simulations. This webinar provides an overview of exoplanetary system resources that build upon the use of NASA data. These resources are organized for a one-week experience for middle school students but are flexible enough to be used for any formal or informal audience and time period. It is suggested that participants also attend the vMAX Technical (Part 2) webinar for a complete understanding of how to implement these resources. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/167831

Virtual Missions and Exoplanets (vMAX): Part 2 — Technical Overview
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: May 11, 2016, at 4 p.m. EDT
With the Virtual Missions and Exoplanets curriculum, learn how to engage students in the study of exoplanetary systems through hands-on experiences, scenario-based problem solving, and multi-user virtual world simulations in 3-D. This webinar addresses technical requirements to download, install and navigate the virtual world as an avatar in preparation for using the vMAX virtual world with students. It is suggested that participants also attend the vMAX Curriculum (Part 1) webinar for a complete understanding of how to implement these resources. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/167832

Join Us on the Journey to Mars: Destination Mars — Super Models
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-8
Event Date: May 12, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT
Students you teach today may be the first explorers to Mars! How far will they have to travel to explore Mars? Is Mars big or small? This webinar will investigate those questions and explore Earth, the moon and Mars with NASA STEM activities that model the sizes of and distances between those bodies in our neighborhood. The activities presented in this session also address the Next Generation Science Standard MS-ESS1-3. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/170334

For a full schedule of upcoming webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Please direct questions about this series of webinars to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


Call for Proposals — Citizen Science for Earth Systems Program

NASA is seeking proposals for a new program as part of the NASA Research Announcement “Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) 2016.” The Citizen Science for Earth Systems Program’s primary goal is to develop and implement capabilities to use contributions from the general public to advance understanding of Earth as a system. The program will complement NASA’s observation of Earth from space, air, land and water by engaging the public in NASA’s mission. The program will advance the use of citizen science in scientific research about Earth by directly supporting citizen science activities, as well as by developing technology to further citizen science research.

Through this solicitation, two types of proposals are sought — citizen science research and low-cost sensor deployment for the collection of well-calibrated citizen science data.

Notices of Intent are requested by May 27, 2016, and proposals are due July 21, 2016.

For more information, visit http://go.nasa.gov/1SUOO63 .

Questions concerning this program element may be directed to Kevin Murphy at kevin.j.murphy@nasa.gov.


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


NASA/NSTA Webinar — Global Precipitation Measurement Mission: Weather

Join the National Science Teachers Association for a free interactive webinar to learn about weather and NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement, or GPM, mission. The 90-minute session will take place on May 5, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EDT.

Topics presented at this webinar will include types of weather, weather basics, extreme weather, monitoring extreme weather with satellites, and hands-on investigations for students to collect data about weather — including GLOBE protocols. A NASA scientist will discuss the difference between weather and climate and will describe ground validation campaigns.

GPM is an international satellite mission managed by NASA and JAXA (the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) that will provide next-generation observations of rain and snow. The GPM mission will help us learn more about Earth’s water and energy cycles, improve the forecasting of extreme events that cause natural disasters, and extend current capabilities of using satellite precipitation information to directly benefit society.

All participants will receive a certificate of participation and 100 Learning Center activity points for attending and completing the post-program evaluation. An archive and presentation slides will be available at the end of the program.

For more information and to register to attend the webinar event, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/resource/?id=10.2505/9/WSNASA15_May5.

For more information about GPM, visit http://www.nasa.gov/gpm or http://gpm.nasa.gov.

Please email questions about this opportunity to webseminars@nsta.org.


Call for Proposals: NASA’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate’s University Leadership Initiative

NASA’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate is seeking proposals for a new opportunity for universities and their research partners to contribute toward NASA research goals. The University Leadership Initiative allows universities and university-led partnerships to provide strategic leadership that advances ARMD’s research objectives and promotes education of the next generation of engineers.

Proposers will identify technical challenges and research activities that will contribute to the six strategic thrusts provided in the ARMD Strategic Implementation Plan (http://www.aeronautics.nasa.gov/pdf/armd-strategic-implementation-plan.pdf).

For this solicitation, the proposing (lead) organization must be an accredited, degree-granting U.S. college or university. Proposing organizations are invited to include partners as part of their team. Partners may include other U.S. colleges and universities, U.S. companies, nonprofit organizations, and any other public or private U.S. entity. Proposers may not include NASA centers or researchers as team members.

Multiple awards are anticipated with nominal budgets in the $2M range per award per year. Awards will have a maximum duration of five years.

Interested applicants should submit a Notice of Intent no later than May 5, 2016. Step A proposals are due June 7, 2016.

For more information about this solicitation, visit http://go.nasa.gov/1VxTDmc.

Please submit questions about this opportunity to HQ-UnivPartnerships@mail.nasa.gov.


Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy

Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy, at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia, is a free alternate-reality game that will challenge you to become an astronaut-in-training for a future trip to Mars. Choose what role you will play on the mission; engage in fun interactive activities; and explore the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics skills you will need as a next-generation space traveler. Along the way, you’ll learn about some of the museum’s fascinating artifacts.

Instructions and guidance are given via a special webpage accessed on your mobile device. Players should bring their own phones or devices equipped with an internet browser and a camera. Having a digital picture-taking device (smartphone, tablet, camera) is highly recommended but not required.

The game is aimed at upper elementary and middle school visitors and their families. Do you want to bring a group? Reservations are required for groups larger than 15.

The next offering of the Astronaut Academy is on May 7, 2016. Begin your training with Astronaut Orientation in the Claude Moore Education Center Classroom 1 located on the first level across from the restrooms. Astronaut Orientation is offered at regular intervals between 10:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. The last opportunity to start the game is at 2:30 p.m. A self-guided activity, the game should take between 60 and 90 minutes, and staff will help you along the way.

For more information, including a full list of upcoming Astronaut Academy dates, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/techquest/.

Please direct questions about the Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy to the visitor service line at 202-633-2214.


White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities — 2016 All-Star Students Program

The White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities works to promote HBCU excellence, innovation and sustainability. The Initiative will recognize current HBCU students for their dedication to academics, leadership and civic engagement as 2016 HBCU All-Star Students.

The appointment period will last approximately one year. During this time, HBCU All-Stars will serve as ambassadors of the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities by providing outreach opportunities and communications to their fellow students about the value of education and the Initiative as a networking resource. Through social media and personal and professional relationships with community-based organizations, students will share promising and proven practices that support opportunities for all young people to realize their educational and career potential. The program will provide an opportunity to participate in regional and national events as well as webchats with Initiative staff and other professionals from a wide range of disciplines that support a spirit of engagement and personal and professional development.

Nominees must be current undergraduate, graduate or professional students at an HBCU. Students must be enrolled for the 2016-2017 fall semester. Applications must be submitted by 11:59 p.m. EDT on May 13, 2016.

For more information and to download an application, visit http://sites.ed.gov/whhbcu/resources/hbcu-all-star-students/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to hbcuallstars@ed.gov.


Federal Aviation Administration Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues

The Airport Cooperative Research Program is seeking applicants for its Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues. Through this program, the ACRP strives to encourage applied research on airport and related aviation system issues and to foster the next generation of aviation community leaders. The program is intended to stimulate thought, discussion and research by those who may become the future airport managers, operators, designers and policy makers in aviation. The focus of this research program is on applied research to help the public sector continue to improve the quality, reliability, safety and security of the U.S. civil aviation system well into the foreseeable future.

The Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues will award up to 10 highly qualified applicants, selected by an ACRP panel of experts, a stipend of $10,000 each for successful completion of a research paper on a subject chosen by the candidate within the framework of the program’s purpose.

Applicants must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States, or have a current student visa. Each applicant also must be officially enrolled as a full-time student at an accredited North American institution of higher learning for the academic year in a graduate course leading to a master’s or doctoral degree. Proof of both may be required.

Applications are due May 15, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.trb.org/ACRP/ACRPGraduateAwardProgram.aspx.

The ACRP Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues is sponsored by the Federal Aviation Administration. Creating a selection panel, monitoring research progress, organizing a forum for presentation, and publishing the research papers are the responsibility of the ACRP of the Transportation Research Board. The Virginia Space Grant Consortium will manage the Graduate Research Award program under the ACRP’s direction.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to acrp@odu.edu.


2016 NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge: Distributed Electric Propulsion

Distributed Electric Propulsion, or DEP, is an emerging aircraft design concept that has the potential to improve aircraft performance in a number of areas, including efficiency, takeoff and landing performance, emissions, noise abatement, safety, and ride quality. DEP also has the potential to enable new novel control systems. In this year’s NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge, student teams are challenged to design a commuter aircraft that applies DEP technology. The main source of thrust for the students’ concept may come from DEP or a combination of DEP and conventional propulsion devices (turboprops, turbofans, etc.). The challenge for the design team is to determine the most advantageous application of DEP for their aircraft and to justify their selection.

The contest is open to teams of full-time students enrolled in higher education institutions of the United States or its territories. This category includes universities, colleges, trade schools, community colleges, professional schools, etc. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

Final entries are due May 16, 2016.

For more information and a complete list of rules, visit http://aero.larc.nasa.gov/university-contest/.

Questions about the challenge should be directed to Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.


GLOBE El Niño Field Campaign and Webinar Series

El Niño and La Niña are important phenomena that can impact the climate by causing global flooding and droughts as well as changes in seasonal weather. These interactions around the world are called teleconnections. Because of the importance of this issue, a GLOBE ENSO (El Niño Southern Oscillation) Campaign has been formulated to engage students in determining where and how much El Niño affects local places and to put students in contact with their local environment.

To learn more about the campaign and how to participate, visit http://www.globe.gov/web/el-nino/el-nino-campaign.

To help educators prepare for the El Niño Campaign, GLOBE is hosting a series of free education webinars to discuss the mechanics of the campaign, give updates on data collection, and give participants the opportunity to learn science content from experts.

The hourlong webinars will take place on the following dates at 8 p.m. EDT.

May 17, 2016: The 2015-2016 El Niño Event
June 13, 2016: Using El Niño GLOBE Data for Scientific Research
Sept. 19, 2016: El Niño Student Campaign Refresher and Update

For more information, including log-in instructions for the webinars and recordings of previous webinars in the series, visit http://www.globe.gov/web/el-nino/el-nino-campaign/webinars.

Please direct questions about this opportunity and series of webinars to http://www.globe.gov/support/contact.


Free Educator Workshop — Space Technology: Green Propellant Infusion Mission

Are you ready to go green? Join NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center Office of Education for a free educator professional development workshop to investigate “green” alternatives to conventional space technologies. Through hands-on experiments and physical demonstrations, educators will learn how to design, construct and test a simple mock spacecraft and “green” propellant using the Beginning Engineering Science & Technology, or BEST, curriculum and the engineering design process.

BEST is a demonstrated pedagogical framework that teaches students the engineering design process. Activities can supplement instruction during the school day or out of school, and they can be implemented individually or as a themed series. During the workshop, teaching connections will be made to real-world applications including NASA’s Green Propellant Infusion Mission and Armstrong’s GREEN technology research.

The workshop will take place Wednesday, May 18, 2016, 4:30-6 p.m. PDT at NASA’s Armstrong Educator Resource Center at the AERO Institute in Palmdale, California.

For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/erc_workshop_05_18_16.pdf.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Sondra Geddes at sondra.l.geddes@nasa.gov.


Smallsat Technology Partnerships Solicitation

NASA is extending an opportunity to college and university teams to propose small spacecraft technology projects that they can conduct in collaboration with NASA researchers. The Smallsat Technology Partnerships solicitation is being issued by the Small Spacecraft Technology Program as an appendix to the Space Technology Mission Directorate’s NASA Research Announcement for 2016.

NASA expects to competitively select about eight projects from among those proposed by university teams. The teams can form proposal partnerships with researchers from any of NASA’s 10 field centers. Awards for each project will include up to $100,000 to each university team per year. In addition, NASA will fund the time for one NASA employee to work with each selected team. Project funding is for one year with the potential to continue for a second year.

Proposed projects could involve laboratory work to advance a particular spacecraft technology or the development of a new smallsat. NASA will be accepting proposals in four topic areas: 1) enhanced power generation and storage, 2) cross-linking communications systems, 3) relative navigation for multiple small spacecraft, and 4) instruments and sensors for small spacecraft science missions.

Proposals are due May 25, 2016.

Details and instructions for submitting proposals may be found at http://go.nasa.gov/1qc751z.

Questions about this solicitation may be directed to Rachel Khattab at rachel.khattab@nasa.gov.


Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 11 to the International Space Station

The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education and the Arthur C. Clarke Institute for Space Education, in partnership with NanoRacks LLC, announce a science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, opportunity for school districts across the U.S. and space station partner nations. The newest flight opportunity, Mission 11 to the International Space Station, gives students across a community the ability to design and propose real experiments to fly in low-Earth orbit on the space station. This opportunity is part of the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program, or SSEP.

Each participating community will receive a real microgravity research mini-laboratory capable of supporting a single microgravity experiment and all launch services to fly the minilab to the space station in spring 2017 and return it to Earth. An experiment design competition in each community — engaging typically 300+ students — allows student teams to design and propose real experiments vying for their community′s reserved minilab.

Content resources for teachers and students support foundational instruction on science in microgravity and experimental design. Additional SSEP programming uses the experiment design competition to engage the community in embracing a learning-community model for STEM education.

This competition is open to students in grades 5-12 and college. Informal education groups and organizations also are encouraged to participate. Interested communities must inquire about the program no later than May 27, 2016. The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education is available to help interested communities in the U.S. secure the needed funding.

To learn more about this opportunity, visit the SSEP Mission 11 to International Space Station National Announcement of Opportunity at http://ssep.ncesse.org/2016/03/new-flight-opportunity-for-school-districts-announcing-student-spaceflight-experiments-program-ssep-mission-11-to-the-international-space-station-starting-september-2016/.

SSEP is enabled through a strategic partnership with NanoRacks LLC working with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the use of the International Space Station as a national laboratory. The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (http://www.iss-casis.org/) is a national partner on SSEP. To view a list of all SSEP national partners, visit http://ssep.ncesse.org/national-partners/.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please email SSEP National Program Director Jeff Goldstein at jeffgoldstein@ncesse.org.


2016 National Academy of Engineering – Engineering for You Video Contest 3

The National Academy of Engineering, or NAE, is launching the Engineering for You Video Contest 3, or E4U3.

This year, participants are tasked with creating a 1- to 2-minute video focused on mega-engineering. Mega-engineering projects typically address important needs of large populations and/or societies, require teams working across countries and cultures on a solution, and involve at least three disciplines including engineering.

The competition is open to all individuals or teams in the following competition categories:
— Middle school students and younger (grades K-8)
— High school students (grades 9-12)
— Tertiary education students (two-year college through graduate school, full or part time)
— The general public

The main prize is $25,000, and videos will be accepted through May 31, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.nae.edu/e4u3/.

Questions about the E4U3 Video Contest should be directed to E4Uvideocontest@nae.edu.


Mars Survival Kit: Lessons and Activities to Guide Your Exploration of Mars!

NASA is embarking on a journey to Mars! Are your students ready to join in the adventure? Spark excitement in your classroom with the Mars Survival Kit.

The Mars Survival Kit is a collection of educational activities for students in grades K-12. Each educational activity includes a brief description, as well as information about how the activities and lessons align to the Next Generation Science Standards.

Start your classroom’s journey to Mars at http://go.nasa.gov/1NnZ0Rg.

To learn more about NASA’s Journey to Mars, visit http://www.nasa.gov/topics/journeytomars/index.html.


NASA History Program Office Fall 2016 Internships

The NASA History Program Office is seeking undergraduate and graduate students for fall 2016 internships. The History Program Office maintains archival materials to answer research questions from NASA personnel, journalists, scholars, students at all levels and others from around the world. The division also edits and publishes several books and monographs each year. It maintains a large number of websites on NASA history.

Students of all majors are welcome to apply. While detailed prior knowledge of the aeronautics and space fields is not necessary, a keen interest and some basic familiarity with these topics are needed. Strong research, writing and editing skills are essential. Experience with social media is a plus.

Intern projects are flexible. Typical projects include handling a variety of information requests, writing posts for the NASA history Twitter and Facebook pages, editing historical manuscripts, doing research and writing biographical sketches, and identifying and captioning photos.

Applications for fall 2016 internships are due June 1, 2016.

For more information, visit http://history.nasa.gov/interncall.htm.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please contact Bill Barry at bill.barry@nasa.gov.


Call for Proposals: Next Space Technologies for Exploration Partnerships (NextSTEP-2)

NASA is soliciting proposals for the development of prototypes for deep space habitats that will give astronauts a place to call home during long-duration missions supporting the agency’s Journey to Mars.

The solicitation, Next Space Technologies for Exploration Partnerships-2 (NextSTEP-2), is a public-private partnership model that seeks commercial development of deep space exploration capabilities to support more extensive human spaceflight missions in the proving ground of space around the moon, known as cislunar space, and to enable transit to Mars. This partnership model enables NASA to obtain innovative concepts and support private industry commercialization plans for low-Earth orbit.

Eligible applicants from U.S. companies, universities and nonprofit organizations must submit proposals electronically by 5 p.m. EDT, June 15, 2016.

For more information about this solicitation, visit http://www.nasa.gov/nextstep.

Please submit questions about this opportunity to Jason Crusan at HQ-NextSTEP-BAA@mail.nasa.gov.


Future Engineers ‘Think Outside the Box’ Challenge

To celebrate the launch of the first-ever expandable habitat to the International Space Station (Bigelow Aerospace’s BEAM) and the launch of the first-ever commercial 3-D printer in space (Made In Space’s Advanced Manufacturing Facility), NASA and the American Society for Mechanical Engineers Foundation are challenging students to think outside the box with 3-D printing — literally. If you are a K-12 student in the United States, your challenge is to design a useful object that assembles, telescopes, hinges, accordions, grows, or expands to become larger than the printing bounds of the Advanced Manufacturing Facility 3-D printer in space (14cm length by 10cm width by 10cm height). The function of your assembled or expanded item can be anything you think would be useful for an astronaut living on the International Space Station.

The ‘Out of the Box’ Challenge is the fourth in a series of challenges where students in grades K-12 will create and submit a digital 3-D model of an object that they think astronauts might need in space. Future Engineers is a multiyear education initiative that consists of 3-D space challenges and curriculum videos on the site that parents and educators can use to get kids designing today.

Think big. Think outside of the box! And good luck!

Entries must be submitted by Aug. 1, 2016.

For more information about the challenge and to watch the launch video, go to www.futureengineers.org/thinkoutsidethebox.

Please email questions about this competition to info@futureengineers.org.


Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The Announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design (STEAMD); or activities culturally relevant to or focused on unrepresented in STEM careers populations, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or non-reimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA Announcement.


Free “NASA’s Journey to Mars” Planetarium/Dome Show

Are you looking for ways to prepare your students for STEM-related career opportunities in the future? Do you want to spark their interest in pushing the boundaries of technology and innovation? Right now, NASA’s fleet of Mars robotic explorers is paving the way for human exploration of the solar system in the coming decades. Have your students join NASA in preparing for a monumental journey of a lifetime — to Mars!

“NASA’s Journey to Mars” is a short planetarium presentation that can be used in the educational domes of your school district, as well as local planetariums, to inspire interest in STEM. To learn more, including how you can acquire the show for use in your area, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/journey-of-a-lifetime-mars-education-resources/.

Please direct questions about the “NASA’s Journey to Mars” planetarium/dome show to Elsie Weigel at elsie.weigel@nasa.gov.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — April 28, 2016

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Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


New This Week!


Free NASA Educator Professional Development Webinars
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: April 28, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT

Join STEM on Station for #mISSionimaginaTIon — Submission Deadline
Audience: Grades 6-12 — Educators and Students
Deadline: May 2, 2016

Call for Proposals: NASA’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate’s University Leadership Initiative
Audience: Accredited, Degree-granting U.S. Colleges and Universities
Applicant’s Workshop: May 3, 2016, 12:30-3 p.m. EDT
Notice of Intent Deadline: May 5, 2016
Proposal Deadline: June 7, 2016

Call for Proposals: Next Space Technologies for Exploration Partnerships (NextSTEP-2)
Audience: Universities and Nonprofit Organizations
Proposal Deadline: June 15, 2016

What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website
Audience: K-6 Educators


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy
Audience: Designed for Families With Children Ages 10 to 14, but Open to All
Next Event Date: April 30, 2016, 10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. EDT

2017 eXploration Habitat (X-Hab) Academic Innovation Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Faculty and Students
Proposal Deadline: April 29, 2016

2016 Texas Space Grant Consortium Columbia Crew Memorial Undergraduate Scholarships
Audience: Undergraduate Students at Texas Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: April 29, 2016

2016 Texas Space Grant Consortium STEM Educator Scholarships
Audience: Educators Enrolled in STEM-field Programs for a Master’s Degree at Texas Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: April 29, 2016

2016-2017 Texas Space Grant Consortium Graduate Fellowships
Audience: Graduate Students at Texas Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: April 29, 2016

Future Engineers ‘Star Trek’ Replicator Challenge
Audience: Students in the United States Ages 5-19
Entry Deadline: May 1, 2016

Institute of Museum and Library Services Grants: STEM Expert Facilitation of Family Learning in Libraries and Museums
Audience: Libraries, Museums and Higher Education Institutions
Application Deadline: May 1, 2016

‘RockOn! 2016’ University Rocket Science Workshop
Audience: Higher Education Faculty and Students
Registration Deadline: May 2, 2016
Workshop Dates: June 18-23, 2016

Exploration of the Moon and Asteroids by Secondary Students (ExMASS) High School Research Program
Audience: 9-12 Educators
Application Deadline: May 2, 2016
Program Dates: September 2016 – April 2017

GLOBE El Niño Field Campaign and Webinar Series
Audience: K-12 Educators
Next Webinar Date: May 3, 2016, at 8 p.m. EDT

NASA/NSTA Webinar — Global Precipitation Measurement Mission: Weather
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Date: May 5, 2016, 6:30 p.m. EDT

DEADLINE EXTENDED: White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities — 2016 All-Star Students Program
Audience: Higher Education Students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Application Deadline: May 13, 2016

Federal Aviation Administration Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues
Audience: Graduate Students
Application Deadline: May 15, 2016

2016 NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge: Distributed Electric Propulsion
Audience: Students at U.S. Colleges and Universities
Entry Deadline: May 16, 2016

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

Free Educator Workshop — Space Technology: Green Propellant Infusion Mission
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Event Dates: May 18, 2016, 4:30-6 p.m. PDT

Smallsat Technology Partnerships Solicitation
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Proposal Deadline: May 25, 2016

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 11 to the International Space Station
Audience: School Districts Serving Grades 5-12, Informal Education Institutions, Colleges and Universities
Inquiry Deadline: May 27, 2016

2016 National Academy of Engineering – Engineering for You Video Contest 3
Audience: All Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: May 31, 2016

2016 Lunar Workshop for Educators
Audience: In-service and Pre-service Science Educators of Grades 6-9
Workshop Dates: June 27-July 1, 2016

NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellowships
Audience: Graduate Students and Ph.D. Scientists
Next Application Deadline: July 1, 2016

2016 DREAM2Explore Workshop for Educators
Audience: In-service and Pre-service Science Educators of Grades 6-9
Workshop Dates: July 11-15, 2016

Help NASA Study Mars — Planet Four: Terrains
Audience: All Educators and Students
Project Timeframe: Ongoing Through Mid-2016

Future Engineers ‘Think Outside the Box’ Challenge
Audience: K-12 Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: Aug. 1, 2016

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Solar System and Beyond: Kepler Mission Exploring Strange New Worlds
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: April 28, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT
Explore how the Kepler Space Telescope searches for planets orbiting stars beyond our sun. Participants will investigate how to use actual Kepler Telescope data and Kepler’s Third Law to construct graphs and interpret data that determines if a planet, orbiting a star in another solar system, is Earth-like and a candidate to support “life.” Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/159277

Join Us on the Journey to Mars: Roving the Red Planet
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-9
Event Date: May 2, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Participants will get a historical overview of NASA’s rover missions to Mars. Discussion will focus on hands-on activities involving the engineering of rover vehicles. The activities presented in this webinar address the Next Generation Science Standard ETS1. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/166383

Join Us on the Journey to Mars: Understanding Radiation
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: May 3, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Participants will learn about the Journey to Mars and how radiation impacts our planning. Attendees also will learn about current research going on at NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in California. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/161530

Space Launch System ‘Engineering Is Out of This World’
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 2-5
Event Date: May 4, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Participants will be introduced to the “NASA Engineering Is Out of This World” activity resources. Discussion will focus on using the resources to introduce engineering concepts. The activities presented in this webinar address the Next Generation Science Standards ETS1. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/166387

Join Us on the Journey to Mars: Looking for Life
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-9
Event Date: May 5, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT
Is there life beyond our Earth? If so, how can we verify its existence? Using NASA STEM curriculum, participants will explore the possibility of life on Mars using their definition of “life” to determine whether anything is alive in three different simulated Mars soil samples. Participants will experiment, record observations and draw pictures as they collect data from the samples to determine if life may exist in any of them. The activities presented in this webinar address Next Generation Science Standards 4-LS1-1, 5-LS1-1, MS-LS2-1, and HS-LS2-3. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/170333

For a full schedule of upcoming webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Please direct questions about this series of webinars to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


Join STEM on Station for #mISSionimaginaTIon — Submission Deadline

Join #mISSionImaginaTIon and design plans to help astronauts during a deep space mission! The deadline for submissions is Monday, May 2, 2016.

To submit a completed design notebook for #mISSionimaginaTIon, visit www.missionimagination.com.

Learn more about this exciting opportunity and other ways you can bring the space station into your classroom by visiting NASA’s STEM on Station website. While you are there, stop by and learn more about the yearlong mission and how it is still helping us on our #JourneytoMars. Opportunities, resources and more await at this site that focuses on the International Space Station!

To check out the website, visit http://www.nasa.gov/education/STEMonStation.


Call for Proposals: NASA’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate’s University Leadership Initiative

NASA’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate is seeking proposals for a new opportunity for universities and their research partners to contribute toward NASA research goals. The University Leadership Initiative allows universities and university-led partnerships to provide strategic leadership that advances ARMD’s research objectives and promotes education of the next generation of engineers.

Proposers will identify technical challenges and research activities that will contribute to the six strategic thrusts provided in the ARMD Strategic Implementation Plan (http://www.aeronautics.nasa.gov/pdf/armd-strategic-implementation-plan.pdf).

For this solicitation, the proposing (lead) organization must be an accredited, degree-granting U.S. college or university. Proposing organizations are invited to include partners as part of their team. Partners may include other U.S. colleges and universities, U.S. companies, nonprofit organizations, and any other public or private U.S. entity. Proposers may not include NASA centers or researchers as team members.

Multiple awards are anticipated with nominal budgets in the $2M range per award per year. Awards will have a maximum duration of five years.

An Applicant’s Workshop will be held on Tuesday, May 3, 2016, from 12:30-3 p.m. EDT. The workshop will give an opportunity for interested parties to better understand the solicitation’s intent, scope and selection criteria. Information on joining the workshop is available at https://nari.arc.nasa.gov/uli.

Interested applicants should submit a Notice of Intent no later than May 5, 2016. Step A proposals are due June 7, 2016.

For more information about this solicitation, visit http://go.nasa.gov/1VxTDmc.

Please submit questions about this opportunity to HQ-UnivPartnerships@mail.nasa.gov.


Call for Proposals: Next Space Technologies for Exploration Partnerships (NextSTEP-2)

NASA is soliciting proposals for the development of prototypes for deep space habitats that will give astronauts a place to call home during long-duration missions supporting the agency’s Journey to Mars.

The solicitation, Next Space Technologies for Exploration Partnerships-2 (NextSTEP-2), is a public-private partnership model that seeks commercial development of deep space exploration capabilities to support more extensive human spaceflight missions in the proving ground of space around the moon, known as cislunar space, and to enable transit to Mars. This partnership model enables NASA to obtain innovative concepts and support private industry commercialization plans for low-Earth orbit.

Eligible applicants from U.S. companies, universities and nonprofit organizations must submit proposals electronically by 5 p.m. EDT, June 15, 2016.

For more information about this solicitation, visit http://www.nasa.gov/nextstep.

Please submit questions about this opportunity to Jason Crusan at HQ-NextSTEP-BAA@mail.nasa.gov.


What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website

NASA Space Place has a new look! We’ve made our content more accessible — check it out at www.spaceplace.nasa.gov. To keep up with all the latest, follow us on Facebook and Twitter @nasaspaceplace.

What’s New? Sunspot Cookies
Fun Fact: Our sun has sunspots, which are a result of changes in the sun’s magnetic field. Sometimes, these spots can last for a few days — or even a few months! Learn more about sunspots by making your very own sunspot cookies.
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/sunspot-cookies

All About Jupiter
Have you heard of NASA’s Juno mission? Launched on August 5, 2011, this mission will help us better understand the formation and structure of Jupiter. Juno is expected to arrive at the gas giant in just a few months — on July 4, 2016! Learn all about Jupiter here!
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/all-about-jupiter

Subscribe to Our Monthly E-newsletter!
Interested in keeping up with the latest and greatest news from NASA Space Place? Subscribe to the NASA Space Place Gazette! The NASA Space Place Gazette is for educators, parents and space enthusiasts of all ages. It includes special bulletins near noteworthy days and NASA events, such as a lunar eclipse, planet flyby or rover landing. It’s easy to subscribe — just click here!
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/subscribe

Get Ready for Summer!
It’s almost time for summer in the Northern Hemisphere. Before you head straight to the beach, learn all about the sun and how it can affect you!

Where does the sun’s energy come from?
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/sun-heat/

How old is the sun?
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/sun-age

Why does the sun burn us?
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/sunburn

Make sun paper!
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/sun-paper

Hosting Any Summer Programs?
Download our NASA Space Place make-and-do activities! We have PDF versions of all our favorites — from “Make Oreo Moon Phases” to “Build a Bubble-Powered Rocket.” These are perfect for the classroom, after school, and summer camps!
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/make-do-pdf

Special Days to Celebrate
Find out about noteworthy days in NASA and space history that you can observe in your classroom.

May 9 — Today, Mercury will move directly between Earth and the sun.

Learn more about Mercury, the smallest planet in our solar system! http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/all-about-mercury

May 14 — Happy Astronomy Day!
Are you part of an astronomy club? Join our Astronomy Club Partner Program. http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/astronomy-clubs

May 30 — Mariner 9 launched to Mars on this day in 1971.
Did you know that Mars is a cold desert world? Learn more here! http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/all-about-mars

June 3 — The first U.S. spacewalk took place in 1965!
See more astronauts in action! http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/gallery-technology

June 22 — James Christy discovered Pluto’s moon Charon in 1978.
Explore this icy dwarf planet! http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/ice-dwarf

Share
Do you want some help spreading the word about NASA’s Space Place? We have a page with ready-to-use website descriptions, logos and links to all our social media. Check out http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/share.

Send Feedback
Please let us know your ideas about ways to use The Space Place in your teaching. Send them to info@spaceplace.nasa.gov.


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy

Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy, at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia, is a free alternate-reality game that will challenge you to become an astronaut-in-training for a future trip to Mars. Choose what role you will play on the mission; engage in fun interactive activities; and explore the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics skills you will need as a next-generation space traveler. Along the way, you’ll learn about some of the museum’s fascinating artifacts.

Instructions and guidance are given via a special webpage accessed on your mobile device. Players should bring their own phones or devices equipped with an internet browser and a camera. Having a digital picture-taking device (smartphone, tablet, camera) is highly recommended but not required.

The game is aimed at upper elementary and middle school visitors and their families. Do you want to bring a group? Reservations are required for groups larger than 15.

The next offering of the Astronaut Academy is on April 30, 2016. Begin your training with Astronaut Orientation in the Claude Moore Education Center Classroom 1 located on the first level across from the restrooms. Astronaut Orientation is offered at regular intervals between 10:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. The last opportunity to start the game is at 2:30 p.m. A self-guided activity, the game should take between 60 and 90 minutes, and staff will help you along the way.

For more information, including a full list of upcoming Astronaut Academy dates, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/techquest/.

Please direct questions about the Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy to the visitor service line at 202-633-2214.


2017 eXploration Habitat (X-Hab) Academic Innovation Challenge

NASA is seeking university teams to develop innovative design solutions for deep space human exploration systems in the 2017 eXploration Systems and Habitation Academic Innovation Challenge. This year, the X-Hab Challenge scope is being formally extended not only to include habitation topics but other areas of exploration systems as well. Topic areas include in-space recycling/reclamation, quantification of condensed water on the lunar surface, a wastewater to plant nutrient solution, a microgravity plant-watering system and a microgravity food production system.

The winners of the challenge will receive between $10,000 and $30,000 to design and produce functional products of interest to NASA human spaceflight. Proposals are due April 29, 2016, and awardees will follow a tailored systems-engineering process with the completion of the projects in the May 2017 timeframe.

Proposals will be accepted from university faculty who are U.S. citizens and who teach at an accredited university in the U.S. Eligible educators must be teaching a senior or graduate engineering design, industrial design or architecture curriculum that is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.

Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tribal Colleges and other minority-serving educational institutions are particularly encouraged to apply. Proposals from women, members of underrepresented minority groups and persons with disabilities also are highly encouraged.

For more information about the challenge and how to submit a proposal, visit http://spacegrant.org/xhab/.

Please email questions about the X-Hab Challenge to xhab@spacegrant.org.


2016 Texas Space Grant Consortium Columbia Crew Memorial Undergraduate Scholarships

The Texas Space Grant Consortium and the Aviation and Space Foundation of Texas, in partnership with NASA, are offering undergraduate scholarships of $1,500 in memory of the Space Shuttle Columbia astronauts. These seven men and women paid the ultimate sacrifice to expand the exploration of space and our knowledge of the world that we live in.

These scholarships are intended to recognize high-quality students and encourage their consideration of graduate studies in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, ultimately leading to careers in STEM-related fields. The scholarships stress excellence in academics, participation in STEM education and research projects, and the exhibition of leadership qualities.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens and registered for at least a half-time course load at a Texas Space Grant Consortium institution. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 29, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/grants/2016/scholars_announcement.html.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to scholarships@tsgc.utexas.edu.


2016 Texas Space Grant Consortium STEM Educator Scholarships

The Texas Space Grant Consortium has established a new Educator STEM Scholarship Program. These $1,500 scholarships are intended to recognize teachers enrolled in master’s programs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields at a TSGC member institution.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens who hold a bachelor’s degree and are enrolled in a master’s program at a Texas Space Grant Consortium institution. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 29, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/edu_stem/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to scholarships@tsgc.utexas.edu.


2016-2017 Texas Space Grant Consortium Graduate Fellowships

Texas Space Grant Consortium Fellowships encourage graduate study in the fields of space science and engineering. Interdisciplinary and integrated work experience are emphasized.

Each $5,000 award supplements half-time graduate support (or fellowship) provided by a Consortium institution. The fellowship award is good for one year. Each fellowship may be renewed for a maximum of three years, providing the recipient has spent no more than two of those years as a master’s candidate.

Applicants must be registered for full-time study in a graduate program at one or more of the Texas Space Grant Consortium institutions and must be promised financial support at that institution. Applicants must also be U.S. citizens. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 29, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/grants/2016/fellows_announcement.html.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to fellowships@tsgc.utexas.edu.


Future Engineers ‘Star Trek’ Replicator Challenge

Calling all Starfleet cadets! “Star Trek,” the American Society for Mechanical Engineers Foundation and NASA want you to pioneer the future of food in space. Your challenge is to create a digital model of a food-related item for astronauts to 3-D print in the year 2050. We want designs that boldly go where no human has 3-D printed before and that help astronauts eat nutritious meals so they can live long and prosper.

You must specify one of the following locations for your 3-D print: our moon, another planet, another planet’s moon, or a spacecraft beyond low-Earth orbit (explain where it is going and why). You also must specify the intended printing material (feedstock) for your 3-D print. This could be plastic, metal, recycled materials, locally sourced material, or any nonedible, 3-D printing feedstock you think would advance human space exploration.

Eating a meal in space goes beyond the actual food itself — from growing food to devouring it. There are many things to consider, so check out our rules, design guidelines and education resources before to starting your design.

Student winners will receive a range of prizes, including a trip to New York for a tour of the space shuttle Enterprise at the Intrepid Museum with an astronaut, a 3-D printer for the winners’ schools or a “Star Trek” prize pack.

Entries are due May 1, 2016. For more information about the challenge and how to enter, visit www.futureengineers.org/startrek.

Please email questions about this competition to info@futureengineers.org.


Institute of Museum and Library Services Grants: STEM Expert Facilitation of Family Learning in Libraries and Museums

The Institute of Museum and Library Services seeks proposals for design-based research projects focused on inquiry-based STEM programs delivered by scientists, engineers, and related technical practitioners to children ages 6-10 and their families. Proposals should address the role of experts’ oral narratives (e.g., storytelling or personal histories) as part of object-based science inquiry and include information about how findings will be applicable in both museum and library settings.

Entities that are eligible to apply include libraries, agencies, institutions of higher education, museums, and other entities that advance the museum and library fields. Grant amounts up to $1,000,000 are available for a period of performance up to two years.

Applications are due May 1, 2016.

For more information, visit https://www.imls.gov/grants/available/stem-expert-facilitation-family-learning-libraries-and-museums-stemex.

Library representatives with questions about this opportunity should email Sandra Toro at storo@imls.gov. Museum representatives with questions should email Helen Wechsler at hwechsler@imls.gov or Sandra Narva at snarva@imls.gov.


‘RockOn! 2016’ University Rocket Science Workshop

University and community college faculty and students are invited to a weeklong workshop to learn how to build and launch a scientific experiment into space. NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia is hosting the “RockOn! 2016” workshop June 18-23, 2016, in partnership with the Colorado and Virginia Space Grant Consortia. Workshop participants must be U.S. citizens. The registration deadline for the workshop is May 2, 2016.

The hands-on workshop teaches participants to build experiments that fly on sounding rockets. During the week, participants will work in teams of three to construct and integrate a sounding rocket payload from a kit. On the fifth day of the workshop, the experiments will fly on a sounding rocket expected to reach an altitude of more than 70 miles.

Each experiment will provide valuable scientific data, analyzed as part of the student-led science and engineering research. The program engages faculty and students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics skills critical to NASA’s future engineering, scientific and technical missions.

For more information about “RockOn!” and to register online, visit http://spacegrant.colorado.edu/national-programs/rockon-2016-home/.

Since 2008, more than 376 people have participated in the “RockOn!” workshops and successfully built and launched 119 payloads to space. Images and information from past years’ workshops can be found at the “RockOn!” website.

Questions about the workshop or the registration process should be directed to Chris Koehler by email at koehler@colorado.edu or by telephone at 303-492-4750.


Exploration of the Moon and Asteroids by Secondary Students (ExMASS) High School Research Program

NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, and the Center for Lunar Science and Exploration at the Lunar and Planetary Institute are looking for 10 teams of motivated high school students and their teachers to participate in a national standards-based lunar/asteroid research program for the 2016-2017 academic year.

Supervised by their teacher and aided by a scientist advisor, students undertake open-inquiry research projects that engage them in the process of science and support the goals of the NASA Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute. At the end of the year, four teams compete for a chance to present their research at the Exploration Science Forum held at NASA’s Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, California, in July 2017.

Participation in the ExMASS program is free. Interested teachers must submit an application. Applications are due May 2, 2016.

For more information and to apply for the ExMASS program, visit http://www.lpi.usra.edu/exploration/education/hsResearch/.

Please direct questions about the ExMASS program to Andy Shaner at shaner@lpi.usra.edu.


GLOBE El Niño Field Campaign and Webinar Series

El Niño and La Niña are important phenomena that can impact the climate by causing global flooding and droughts as well as changes in seasonal weather. These interactions around the world are called teleconnections. Because of the importance of this issue, a GLOBE ENSO (El Niño Southern Oscillation) Campaign has been formulated to engage students in determining where and how much El Niño affects local places and to put students in contact with their local environment.

To learn more about the campaign and how to participate, visit http://www.globe.gov/web/el-nino/el-nino-campaign.

To help educators prepare for the El Niño Campaign, GLOBE is hosting a series of free education webinars to discuss the mechanics of the campaign, give updates on data collection, and give participants the opportunity to learn science content from experts.

The hourlong webinars will take place on the following dates at 8 p.m. EDT.

May 3, 2016: Biometry and Ground Cover
May 17, 2016: The 2015-2016 El Niño Event
June 13, 2016: Using El Niño GLOBE Data for Scientific Research
Sept. 19, 2016: El Niño Student Campaign Refresher and Update

For more information, including log-in instructions for the webinars and recordings of previous webinars in the series, visit http://www.globe.gov/web/el-nino/el-nino-campaign/webinars.

Please direct questions about this opportunity and series of webinars to http://www.globe.gov/support/contact.


NASA/NSTA Webinar — Global Precipitation Measurement Mission: Weather

Join the National Science Teachers Association for a free interactive webinar to learn about weather and NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement, or GPM, mission. The 90-minute session will take place on May 5, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EDT.

Topics presented at this webinar will include types of weather, weather basics, extreme weather, monitoring extreme weather with satellites, and hands-on investigations for students to collect data about weather — including GLOBE protocols. A NASA scientist will discuss the difference between weather and climate and will describe ground validation campaigns.

GPM is an international satellite mission managed by NASA and JAXA (the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) that will provide next-generation observations of rain and snow. The GPM mission will help us learn more about Earth’s water and energy cycles, improve the forecasting of extreme events that cause natural disasters, and extend current capabilities of using satellite precipitation information to directly benefit society.

All participants will receive a certificate of participation and 100 Learning Center activity points for attending and completing the post-program evaluation. An archive and presentation slides will be available at the end of the program.

For more information and to register to attend the webinar event, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/resource/?id=10.2505/9/WSNASA15_May5.

For more information about GPM, visit http://www.nasa.gov/gpm or http://gpm.nasa.gov.

Please email questions about this opportunity to webseminars@nsta.org.


DEADLINE EXTENDED: White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities — 2016 All-Star Students Program

The White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities works to promote HBCU excellence, innovation and sustainability. The Initiative will recognize current HBCU students for their dedication to academics, leadership and civic engagement as 2016 HBCU All-Star Students.

The appointment period will last approximately one year. During this time, HBCU All-Stars will serve as ambassadors of the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities by providing outreach opportunities and communications to their fellow students about the value of education and the Initiative as a networking resource. Through social media and personal and professional relationships with community-based organizations, students will share promising and proven practices that support opportunities for all young people to realize their educational and career potential. The program will provide an opportunity to participate in regional and national events as well as webchats with Initiative staff and other professionals from a wide range of disciplines that support a spirit of engagement and personal and professional development.

Nominees must be current undergraduate, graduate or professional students at an HBCU. Students must be enrolled for the 2016-2017 fall semester. Applications must be submitted by 11:59 p.m. EDT on May 13, 2016.

For more information and to download an application, visit http://sites.ed.gov/whhbcu/resources/hbcu-all-star-students/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to hbcuallstars@ed.gov.


Federal Aviation Administration Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues

The Airport Cooperative Research Program is seeking applicants for its Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues. Through this program, the ACRP strives to encourage applied research on airport and related aviation system issues and to foster the next generation of aviation community leaders. The program is intended to stimulate thought, discussion and research by those who may become the future airport managers, operators, designers and policy makers in aviation. The focus of this research program is on applied research to help the public sector continue to improve the quality, reliability, safety and security of the U.S. civil aviation system well into the foreseeable future.

The Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues will award up to 10 highly qualified applicants, selected by an ACRP panel of experts, a stipend of $10,000 each for successful completion of a research paper on a subject chosen by the candidate within the framework of the program’s purpose.

Applicants must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States, or have a current student visa. Each applicant also must be officially enrolled as a full-time student at an accredited North American institution of higher learning for the academic year in a graduate course leading to a master’s or doctoral degree. Proof of both may be required.

Applications are due May 15, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.trb.org/ACRP/ACRPGraduateAwardProgram.aspx.

The ACRP Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues is sponsored by the Federal Aviation Administration. Creating a selection panel, monitoring research progress, organizing a forum for presentation, and publishing the research papers are the responsibility of the ACRP of the Transportation Research Board. The Virginia Space Grant Consortium will manage the Graduate Research Award program under the ACRP’s direction.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to acrp@odu.edu.


2016 NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge: Distributed Electric Propulsion

Distributed Electric Propulsion, or DEP, is an emerging aircraft design concept that has the potential to improve aircraft performance in a number of areas, including efficiency, takeoff and landing performance, emissions, noise abatement, safety, and ride quality. DEP also has the potential to enable new novel control systems. In this year’s NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge, student teams are challenged to design a commuter aircraft that applies DEP technology. The main source of thrust for the students’ concept may come from DEP or a combination of DEP and conventional propulsion devices (turboprops, turbofans, etc.). The challenge for the design team is to determine the most advantageous application of DEP for their aircraft and to justify their selection.

The contest is open to teams of full-time students enrolled in higher education institutions of the United States or its territories. This category includes universities, colleges, trade schools, community colleges, professional schools, etc. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

Final entries are due May 16, 2016.

For more information and a complete list of rules, visit http://aero.larc.nasa.gov/university-contest/.

Questions about the challenge should be directed to Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.


Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions and museums to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

There will be a nominal shipping fee that must be paid online with a credit card.  To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.


Free Educator Workshop — Space Technology: Green Propellant Infusion Mission

Are you ready to go green? Join NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center Office of Education for a free educator professional development workshop to investigate “green” alternatives to conventional space technologies. Through hands-on experiments and physical demonstrations, educators will learn how to design, construct and test a simple mock spacecraft and “green” propellant using the Beginning Engineering Science & Technology, or BEST, curriculum and the engineering design process.

BEST is a demonstrated pedagogical framework that teaches students the engineering design process. Activities can supplement instruction during the school day or out of school, and they can be implemented individually or as a themed series. During the workshop, teaching connections will be made to real-world applications including NASA’s Green Propellant Infusion Mission and Armstrong’s GREEN technology research.

The workshop will take place Wednesday, May 18, 2016, 4:30-6 p.m. PDT at NASA’s Armstrong Educator Resource Center at the AERO Institute in Palmdale, California.

For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/erc_workshop_05_18_16.pdf.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Sondra Geddes at sondra.l.geddes@nasa.gov.


Smallsat Technology Partnerships Solicitation

NASA is extending an opportunity to college and university teams to propose small spacecraft technology projects that they can conduct in collaboration with NASA researchers. The Smallsat Technology Partnerships solicitation is being issued by the Small Spacecraft Technology Program as an appendix to the Space Technology Mission Directorate’s NASA Research Announcement for 2016.

NASA expects to competitively select about eight projects from among those proposed by university teams. The teams can form proposal partnerships with researchers from any of NASA’s 10 field centers. Awards for each project will include up to $100,000 to each university team per year. In addition, NASA will fund the time for one NASA employee to work with each selected team. Project funding is for one year with the potential to continue for a second year.

Proposed projects could involve laboratory work to advance a particular spacecraft technology or the development of a new smallsat. NASA will be accepting proposals in four topic areas: 1) enhanced power generation and storage, 2) cross-linking communications systems, 3) relative navigation for multiple small spacecraft, and 4) instruments and sensors for small spacecraft science missions.

Proposals are due May 25, 2016.

Details and instructions for submitting proposals may be found at http://go.nasa.gov/1qc751z.

Questions about this solicitation may be directed to Rachel Khattab at rachel.khattab@nasa.gov.


DEADLINE EXTENDED: Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 11 to the International Space Station

The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education and the Arthur C. Clarke Institute for Space Education, in partnership with NanoRacks LLC, announce a science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, opportunity for school districts across the U.S. and space station partner nations. The newest flight opportunity, Mission 11 to the International Space Station, gives students across a community the ability to design and propose real experiments to fly in low-Earth orbit on the space station. This opportunity is part of the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program, or SSEP.

Each participating community will receive a real microgravity research mini-laboratory capable of supporting a single microgravity experiment and all launch services to fly the minilab to the space station in spring 2017 and return it to Earth. An experiment design competition in each community — engaging typically 300+ students — allows student teams to design and propose real experiments vying for their community′s reserved minilab.

Content resources for teachers and students support foundational instruction on science in microgravity and experimental design. Additional SSEP programming uses the experiment design competition to engage the community in embracing a learning-community model for STEM education.

This competition is open to students in grades 5-12 and college. Informal education groups and organizations also are encouraged to participate. Interested communities must inquire about the program no later than May 27, 2016. The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education is available to help interested communities in the U.S. secure the needed funding.

To learn more about this opportunity, visit the SSEP Mission 11 to International Space Station National Announcement of Opportunity at http://ssep.ncesse.org/2016/03/new-flight-opportunity-for-school-districts-announcing-student-spaceflight-experiments-program-ssep-mission-11-to-the-international-space-station-starting-september-2016/.

SSEP is enabled through a strategic partnership with NanoRacks LLC working with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the use of the International Space Station as a national laboratory. The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (http://www.iss-casis.org/) is a national partner on SSEP. To view a list of all SSEP national partners, visit http://ssep.ncesse.org/national-partners/.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please email SSEP National Program Director Jeff Goldstein at jeffgoldstein@ncesse.org.


2016 National Academy of Engineering – Engineering for You Video Contest 3

The National Academy of Engineering, or NAE, is launching the Engineering for You Video Contest 3, or E4U3.

This year, participants are tasked with creating a 1- to 2-minute video focused on mega-engineering. Mega-engineering projects typically address important needs of large populations and/or societies, require teams working across countries and cultures on a solution, and involve at least three disciplines including engineering.

The competition is open to all individuals or teams in the following competition categories:
— Middle school students and younger (grades K-8)
— High school students (grades 9-12)
— Tertiary education students (two-year college through graduate school, full or part time)
— The general public

The main prize is $25,000, and videos will be accepted through May 31, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.nae.edu/e4u3/.

Questions about the E4U3 Video Contest should be directed to E4Uvideocontest@nae.edu.


2016 Lunar Workshop for Educators

NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, mission is sponsoring a workshop for educators of students in grades 6-9. The workshop will focus on lunar science, exploration, and how our understanding of the moon is growing and changing with the new data from current and recent lunar missions.

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has allowed scientists to measure the coldest known place in the solar system, map the surface of the moon in unprecedented detail and accuracy, find evidence of recent lunar geologic activity, characterize the radiation environment around the moon and its potential effects on future lunar explorers, and much, much more!

Workshop participants will reinforce their understanding of lunar science concepts; gain tools to help address common student misconceptions about the moon; and interact with lunar scientists and engineers. Participants will work with LRO data and learn how to bring the data and information to their students using hands-on activities aligned with Next Generation Science Standards for grades 6-9.

The workshop will take place June 27-July 1, 2016, at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Workshop participants will have the opportunity to tour the LRO Mission Operation Center and the Goddard spacecraft testing facilities.

For more information and to register to attend, visit http://lunar.gsfc.nasa.gov/lwe/index.html.

Questions about this workshop should be directed to Andrea Jones at Andrea.J.Jones@nasa.gov.


NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellowships

The NASA Postdoctoral Program provides early-career and more senior scientists the opportunity to share in NASA’s mission. NPP Fellows work on one- to three-year assignments with NASA scientists and engineers at NASA centers and institutes to advance NASA’s missions in Earth science, heliophysics, planetary science, astrophysics, space bioscience, aeronautics, engineering, human exploration and space operations, astrobiology, and science management.

U.S. citizens, lawful permanent residents and foreign nationals eligible for J-1 status as a research scholar may apply. Applicants must have completed a doctorate or equivalent degree before beginning the fellowship, but they may apply while completing degree requirements. Applicants who earned the Ph.D. more than five years before the deadline date are categorized as senior fellows; all applicants, no matter their category, must apply and become eligible for an NPP award via the same process.

Interested applicants may apply by one of three annual application deadlines: March 1, July 1 and November 1.

For more information and application procedures, go to https://npp.usra.edu/.

Please direct questions about this fellowship opportunity to npphelp@usra.edu.


2016 DREAM2Explore Workshop for Educators

The “Dynamic Response of the Environments at Asteroids, the Moon, and moons of Mars,” or DREAM2, team at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center is hosting a free workshop for educators of students in grades 6-9. Participants will learn how our understanding of Earth’s moon, asteroids and the moons of Mars is growing and changing with new data and models from current and recent planetary missions and the work of the DREAM2 team.

Workshop participants will reinforce their understanding of lunar and planetary science concepts; gain tools to help address common student misconceptions about the moon; and interact with NASA scientists who study the dynamic environments surrounding these rocky objects. Participants will work with real scientific data and learn how to bring the data and information to their students using hands-on activities aligned with Next Generation Science Standards for grades 6-9.

The workshop will take place July 11-15, 2016, at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Workshop participants will become certified to borrow meteorite samples from NASA and will receive Certificates of Participation and Letters of Completion that indicate 30 hours of instruction.

For more information and to register to attend, visit http://ssed.gsfc.nasa.gov/dream/DREAM/DREAM2Explore.html.

Questions about this workshop should be directed to Andrea Jones at Andrea.J.Jones@nasa.gov.


Help NASA Study Mars — Planet Four: Terrains

Help NASA study exotic landscape features near the south pole of Mars! In this citizen science project, you’ll view images from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter’s Context Camera. Your input will help scientists identify possible areas for even more detailed examination with the orbiter’s High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment camera. HiRISE can reveal more detail than any other camera ever put into orbit around Mars.

Some of Mars resembles deserts on Earth, but seasonal freezing and thawing of carbon-dioxide ice (known on Earth as “dry ice”) at the Martian poles creates some unusual landscape features. There’s a lot of territory to cover, so scientists need your help identifying what and where these features are.

For more information and to learn how to participate, visit the “Planet Four: Terrains” website at https://www.zooniverse.org/#/projects/mschwamb/planet-four-terrains.

To learn more about NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and its mission at the Red Planet, visit http://mars.nasa.gov/mro/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Whitney Clavin at whitney.clavin@jpl.nasa.gov.


Future Engineers ‘Think Outside the Box’ Challenge

To celebrate the launch of the first-ever expandable habitat to the International Space Station (Bigelow Aerospace’s BEAM) and the launch of the first-ever commercial 3-D printer in space (Made In Space’s Advanced Manufacturing Facility), NASA and the American Society for Mechanical Engineers Foundation are challenging students to think outside the box with 3-D printing — literally. If you are a K-12 student in the United States, your challenge is to design a useful object that assembles, telescopes, hinges, accordions, grows, or expands to become larger than the printing bounds of the Advanced Manufacturing Facility 3-D printer in space (14cm length by 10cm width by 10cm height). The function of your assembled or expanded item can be anything you think would be useful for an astronaut living on the International Space Station.

The ‘Out of the Box’ Challenge is the fourth in a series of challenges where students in grades K-12 will create and submit a digital 3-D model of an object that they think astronauts might need in space. Future Engineers is a multiyear education initiative that consists of 3-D space challenges and curriculum videos on the site that parents and educators can use to get kids designing today.

Think big. Think outside of the box! And good luck!

Entries must be submitted by Aug. 1, 2016.

For more information about the challenge and to watch the launch video, go to www.futureengineers.org/thinkoutsidethebox.

Please email questions about this competition to info@futureengineers.org.


Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The Announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design (STEAMD); or activities culturally relevant to or focused on unrepresented in STEM careers populations, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or non-reimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA Announcement.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — April 21, 2016

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


New This Week!


Free NASA Educator Professional Development Webinars
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: April 21, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT

Free Webinar — Learn How to Navigate the Federal Application Process and Tips on Writing Your Federal Résumé
Audience: Graduate STEM Students
Event Date: April 27, 2016, 2-4 p.m. EDT

2016 NASA Johnson Space Center Educator Professional Development Institutes
Audience: Grades 6-8 Educators
Application Deadline: May 2, 2016
Institute Dates: Multiple Dates in July 2016

Free Educator Workshop — Space Technology: Green Propellant Infusion Mission
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Event Dates: May 18, 2016, 4:30-6 p.m. PDT

Smallsat Technology Partnerships Solicitation
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Proposal Deadline: May 25, 2016

Future Engineers ‘Think Outside the Box’ Challenge
Audience: K-12 Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: Aug. 1, 2016

Join STEM on Station for #mISSionimaginaTIon — Design Challenge #4
Audience: Grades 6-12 — Educators and Students


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education
Next Lecture Date: April 21, 2016, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)

White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities — 2016 All-Star Students Program
Audience: Higher Education Students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Application Deadline: April 22, 2016

2016 International Space Apps Challenge
Audience: Problem Solvers of All Ages
Event Dates: April 22-24, 2016

Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy
Audience: Designed for Families With Children Ages 10 to 14, but Open to All
Next Event Date: April 23, 2016, 10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. EDT

Free Education Webinar Series From the GOES-R Education Proving Ground
Audience: 6-12 Educators
Next Event Date: April 23, 2016, at 11:30 a.m. EDT

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — CASIS Academy Live: Microbes in Space
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: April 26, 2016, 11 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. EDT

2017 eXploration Habitat (X-Hab) Academic Innovation Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Faculty and Students
Proposal Deadline: April 29, 2016

2016 Texas Space Grant Consortium Columbia Crew Memorial Undergraduate Scholarships
Audience: Undergraduate Students at Texas Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: April 29, 2016

2016 Texas Space Grant Consortium STEM Educator Scholarships
Audience: Educators Enrolled in STEM-field Programs for a Master’s Degree at Texas Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: April 29, 2016

2016-2017 Texas Space Grant Consortium Graduate Fellowships
Audience: Graduate Students at Texas Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: April 29, 2016

Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 11 to the International Space Station
Audience: School Districts Serving Grades 5-12, Informal Education Institutions, Colleges and Universities
Inquiry Deadline: April 29, 2016

Future Engineers ‘Star Trek’ Replicator Challenge
Audience: Students in the United States Ages 5-19
Entry Deadline: May 1, 2016

Institute of Museum and Library Services Grants: STEM Expert Facilitation of Family Learning in Libraries and Museums
Audience: Libraries, Museums and Higher Education Institutions
Application Deadline: May 1, 2016

Exploration of the Moon and Asteroids by Secondary Students (ExMASS) High School Research Program
Audience: 9-12 Educators
Application Deadline: May 2, 2016
Program Dates: September 2016 – April 2017

GLOBE El Niño Field Campaign and Webinar Series
Audience: K-12 Educators
Next Webinar Date: May 3, 2016, at 8 p.m. EDT

NASA/NSTA Webinar — Global Precipitation Measurement Mission: Weather
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Date: May 5, 2016, 6:30 p.m. EDT

Federal Aviation Administration Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues
Audience: Graduate Students
Application Deadline: May 15, 2016

2016 NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge: Distributed Electric Propulsion
Audience: Students at U.S. Colleges and Universities
Entry Deadline: May 16, 2016

2016 National Academy of Engineering – Engineering for You Video Contest 3
Audience: All Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: May 31, 2016

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

2016 Lunar Workshop for Educators
Audience: In-service and Pre-service Science Educators of Grades 6-9
Workshop Dates: June 27-July 1, 2016

2016 DREAM2Explore Workshop for Educators
Audience: In-service and Pre-service Science Educators of Grades 6-9
Workshop Dates: July 11-15, 2016

Call for Papers: NASA in the ‘Long’ Civil Rights Movement Symposium
Audience: Academics, Graduate Students and Independent Scholars
Abstract Submission Deadline: July 31, 2016
Symposium Dates: March 16-17, 2017

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Air and Space — Airplanes and Rockets: NASA Rockets 101
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-8
Event Date: April 21, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT
Launch your students’ interest and excitement in forces and motion. Explore forces, motion and flight with inquiry-based rocket activities and design challenges that include designing, building and launching simple rockets while recording and analyzing data. This webinar will also investigate rockets by integrating NASA missions, STEM curriculum, online education resources and the Next Generation Science Standards into teaching strategies that will guide educators into a learning journey “blast off.” Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/162228

Air and Space — Airplanes and Rockets: Contrails — Clouds and Human Activity
Audience:
Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: April 25, 2016, at 4 p.m. EDT
This webinar will focus on cloud types, in particular contrails, and Earth’s energy balance. This session will highlight the S’COOL and GLOBE programs with emphasis on using computer-based statistical analysis of student observations. Clouds are the largest variable controlling Earth’s atmospheric temperature and climate. Contrails, especially persistent contrails, represent a human-caused increase in high, thin clouds in the Earth’s atmosphere. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/172360

Air and Space — Airplanes and Rockets: Smart Skies FlyBy MathTM
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-9
Event Date: April 26, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Discover the excitement of air traffic control through this webinar. It will focus on mathematics skills in grades 5-9 where students solve distance-rate-time problems related to in air traffic control by using an online graphing tool. A hands-on experiment will demonstrate these math skills. Lesson materials align with the Common Core Math Standards. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/167220

Solar System and Beyond: Kepler Mission Exploring Strange New Worlds
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: April 28, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT
Explore how the Kepler Space Telescope searches for planets orbiting stars beyond our sun. Participants will investigate how to use actual Kepler Telescope data and Kepler’s Third Law to construct graphs and interpret data that determines if a planet, orbiting a star in another solar system, is Earth-like and a candidate to support “life.” Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/159277

For a full schedule of upcoming webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Please direct questions about this series of webinars to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


Free Webinar — Learn How to Navigate the Federal Application Process and Tips on Writing Your Federal Résumé

Join Karlos DelToro of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management for an informative webinar session on Wednesday, April 27, 2016, at 2 p.m. EDT. During the two-hour session, participants will learn more about the federal employment application process, including how to navigate USAJOBS (the federal employment portal) when applying for civil service positions. DelToro will also share tips on preparing a federal résumé.

Interested participants may attend the session in person in Room 1461 at the General Services Administration building at 1800 F St. NW, Washington, D.C.

The event will be streamed online at https://nsf.webex.com/nsf/onstage/g.php?MTID=e5a74da347803326346e4be0f0e64771c. Use the following event information to access the webinar.
Event number: 745 127 849
Event password: 9sHUf8T@


2016 NASA Johnson Space Center Educator Professional Development Institutes

NASA’s Johnson Space Center is seeking middle school educators to attend this year’s Educator Professional Development Institutes. The JSC EPDI feature online interactions and weeklong, face-to-face training that is grade-level specific. All activities align NASA’s current missions and education resources to state and national standards for teaching science, technology, engineering and mathematics in middle school classrooms.

Participants must be U.S. citizens currently employed as classroom teachers of grades 6-8. The institute will include online assignments, hands-on training, tours of NASA facilities, and presentations from NASA scientists and engineers. Participants will receive a $450 stipend and a certificate showing 50 Continuing Professional Education hours.

Institutes will take place in July. Applications are due May 2, 2016.

For more information, visit https://opportunities.nasa.okstate.edu/index.cfm?liftoff=EPDI.Home.

If you have questions about the 2016 JSC EPDI, please email your inquiries to JSC-EPD@mail.nasa.gov.


Free Educator Workshop — Space Technology: Green Propellant Infusion Mission

Are you ready to go green? Join NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center Office of Education for a free educator professional development workshop to investigate “green” alternatives to conventional space technologies. Through hands-on experiments and physical demonstrations, educators will learn how to design, construct and test a simple mock spacecraft and “green” propellant using the Beginning Engineering Science & Technology, or BEST, curriculum and the engineering design process.

BEST is a demonstrated pedagogical framework that teaches students the engineering design process. Activities can supplement instruction during the school day or out of school, and they can be implemented individually or as a themed series. During the workshop, teaching connections will be made to real-world applications including NASA’s Green Propellant Infusion Mission and Armstrong’s GREEN technology research.

The workshop will take place Wednesday, May 18, 2016, 4:30-6 p.m. PDT at NASA’s Armstrong Educator Resource Center at the AERO Institute in Palmdale, California.

For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/erc_workshop_05_18_16.pdf.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Sondra Geddes at sondra.l.geddes@nasa.gov.


Smallsat Technology Partnerships Solicitation

NASA is extending an opportunity to college and university teams to propose small spacecraft technology projects that they can conduct in collaboration with NASA researchers. The Smallsat Technology Partnerships solicitation is being issued by the Small Spacecraft Technology Program as an appendix to the Space Technology Mission Directorate’s NASA Research Announcement for 2016.

NASA expects to competitively select about eight projects from among those proposed by university teams. The teams can form proposal partnerships with researchers from any of NASA’s 10 field centers. Awards for each project will include up to $100,000 to each university team per year. In addition, NASA will fund the time for one NASA employee to work with each selected team. Project funding is for one year with the potential to continue for a second year.

Proposed projects could involve laboratory work to advance a particular spacecraft technology or the development of a new smallsat. NASA will be accepting proposals in four topic areas: 1) enhanced power generation and storage, 2) cross-linking communications systems, 3) relative navigation for multiple small spacecraft, and 4) instruments and sensors for small spacecraft science missions.

Proposals are due May 25, 2016.

Details and instructions for submitting proposals may be found at http://go.nasa.gov/1qc751z.

Questions about this solicitation may be directed to Rachel Khattab at rachel.khattab@nasa.gov.


Future Engineers ‘Think Outside the Box’ Challenge

To celebrate the launch of the first-ever expandable habitat to the International Space Station (Bigelow Aerospace’s BEAM) and the launch of the first-ever commercial 3-D printer in space (Made In Space’s Advanced Manufacturing Facility), NASA and the American Society for Mechanical Engineers Foundation are challenging students to think outside the box with 3-D printing — literally. If you are a K-12 student in the United States, your challenge is to design a useful object that assembles, telescopes, hinges, accordions, grows, or expands to become larger than the printing bounds of the Advanced Manufacturing Facility 3-D printer in space (14cm length by 10cm width by 10cm height). The function of your assembled or expanded item can be anything you think would be useful for an astronaut living on the International Space Station.

The ‘Out of the Box’ Challenge is the fourth in a series of challenges where students in grades K-12 will create and submit a digital 3-D model of an object that they think astronauts might need in space. Future Engineers is a multiyear education initiative that consists of 3-D space challenges and curriculum videos on the site that parents and educators can use to get kids designing today.

Think big. Think outside of the box! And good luck!

Entries must be submitted by Aug. 1, 2016.

For more information about the challenge and to watch the launch video, go to www.futureengineers.org/thinkoutsidethebox.

Please email questions about this competition to info@futureengineers.org.


Join STEM on Station for #mISSionimaginaTIon — Design Challenge #4

Did you know that pollution occurs in space too? Right now, over 100 million pieces of orbital debris are orbiting Earth, and most are 1mm or smaller. NASA and Texas Instruments present the fourth and final #mISSionImaginaTIon design challenge. We need your help to design a spacecraft that can detect and prevent potential collisions with orbital debris during a deep space mission.

To find out more about #mISSionimaginaTIon, visit www.missionimagination.com.

Learn more about this exciting opportunity and other ways you can bring the space station into your classroom by visiting NASA’s STEM on Station website. While you are there, stop by and learn more about the yearlong mission and how it is still helping us on our #JourneytoMars. Opportunities, resources and more await at this site that focuses on the International Space Station!

To check out the website, visit http://www.nasa.gov/education/STEMonStation.


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online

The Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, named after the founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and presented by JPL’s Office of Communication and Education, shares the excitement of the space program’s missions, instruments and other technologies.

Lectures take place twice per month, on consecutive Thursdays and Fridays. The Thursday lectures take place in JPL’s Theodore von Kármán Auditorium, and Friday lectures take place at Pasadena City College’s Vosloh Forum. Both start at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT). Admission and parking are free for all lectures. No reservations are required, but seating is limited. The Thursday evening lectures are streamed live for viewing online. Archives of past lectures are also available online.

Next Lecture in the Series:

CubeSats: Big Goals, Tiny Package
Event Date:
April 21 and April 22, 2016, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2016&month=4
Over the last 15 years, a miniature revolution in space science has been underway: CubeSats! First flown as educational tools the size of soup cans, significant capabilities have now been developed to allow these nanospacecraft to travel to the moon, asteroids and even Mars. Join Dr. Andrew Klesh, Chief Engineer for Interplanetary Small Spacecraft, for a discussion about these small spacecraft and the types of missions they are being used for.

For more information about the Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, including a complete list of upcoming lectures, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.php.

Questions about this series should be directed to http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php.


White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities — 2016 All-Star Students Program

The White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities works to promote HBCU excellence, innovation and sustainability. The Initiative will recognize current HBCU students for their dedication to academics, leadership and civic engagement as 2016 HBCU All-Star Students.

The appointment period will last approximately one year. During this time, HBCU All-Stars will serve as ambassadors of the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities by providing outreach opportunities and communications to their fellow students about the value of education and the Initiative as a networking resource. Through social media and personal and professional relationships with community-based organizations, students will share promising and proven practices that support opportunities for all young people to realize their educational and career potential. The program will provide an opportunity to participate in regional and national events as well as webchats with Initiative staff and other professionals from a wide range of disciplines that support a spirit of engagement and personal and professional development.

Nominees must be current undergraduate, graduate or professional students at an HBCU. Students must be enrolled for the 2016-2017 fall semester. Applications must be submitted by 11:59 p.m. EDT on April 22, 2016.

For more information and to download an application, visit http://sites.ed.gov/whhbcu/resources/hbcu-all-star-students/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to hbcuallstars@ed.gov.


2016 International Space Apps Challenge

NASA and space agencies around the world are preparing for the fifth annual International Space Apps Challenge, which will be held April 22-24, 2016. Participants will develop mobile applications, software, hardware, data visualization and platform solutions that could contribute to space exploration missions and help improve life on Earth.

This year’s challenge kicks off with a boot camp event on April 22 that will be live-streamed globally. The two-day “code-athon” event will follow on April 23-24. It will be hosted locally at over 193 locations spanning 72 countries. More than 200 data sources, including data sets, data services and tools, will be available. This event will bring tech-savvy citizens, scientists, entrepreneurs, educators and students together to help solve challenges relevant to both space exploration and broader subjects that impact life on Earth.

Registration for citizen participation is now open.

To learn more about the International Space Apps Challenge, get the latest updates and register to attend an event, visit https://2016.spaceappschallenge.org/.

If you have questions about the challenge, please visit https://2016.spaceappschallenge.org/contact.


Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy

Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy, at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia, is a free alternate-reality game that will challenge you to become an astronaut-in-training for a future trip to Mars. Choose what role you will play on the mission; engage in fun interactive activities; and explore the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics skills you will need as a next-generation space traveler. Along the way, you’ll learn about some of the museum’s fascinating artifacts.

Instructions and guidance are given via a special webpage accessed on your mobile device. Players should bring their own phones or devices equipped with an internet browser and a camera. Having a digital picture-taking device (smartphone, tablet, camera) is highly recommended but not required.

The game is aimed at upper elementary and middle school visitors and their families. Do you want to bring a group? Reservations are required for groups larger than 15.

The next offering of the Astronaut Academy is on April 23, 2016. Begin your training with Astronaut Orientation in the Claude Moore Education Center Classroom 1 located on the first level across from the restrooms. Astronaut Orientation is offered at regular intervals between 10:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. The last opportunity to start the game is at 2:30 p.m. A self-guided activity, the game should take between 60 and 90 minutes, and staff will help you along the way.

For more information, including a full list of upcoming Astronaut Academy dates, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/techquest/.

Please direct questions about the Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy to the visitor service line at 202-633-2214.


Free Education Webinar Series From the GOES-R Education Proving Ground

The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites — R Series is the next generation of geostationary Earth-observing systems. The GOES-R series satellites will provide continuous imagery and atmospheric measurements of Earth’s Western Hemisphere. The satellites will collect lightning data and monitor space weather to provide critical atmospheric, hydrologic, oceanic, climatic, solar and space data. The first satellite in the GOES-R series is scheduled to launch in October 2016.

To help educators prepare for the new satellite imagery and data that will be available during the GOES-R era, the GOES-R Education Proving Ground is hosting a series of education webcasts leading up to launch.

The webinars will take place on the following Saturday mornings at 11:30 a.m. Eastern Time.

April 23, 2016: Additional GOES-R Resources and Educational Tools
Sept. 17, 2016: Countdown to Launch!

For more information, including log-in instructions for the webinars, visit http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/education/goesr/.

Please direct questions about this series of webinars to Margaret Mooney at Margaret.Mooney@ssec.wisc.edu.


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — CASIS Academy Live: Microbes in Space

Why does life depend on microbes and what do extremophiles tell us about the potential for life beyond Earth? Join DLN and the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space for this CASIS Academy Live event with Dr. Michael Roberts to learn more about microbes in space. During the live video chat, Roberts will answer your questions.

The 45-minute event will be webcast on the NASA DLiNfo Channel on April 26, 2016, at 11 a.m. EDT.

Ask questions via Twitter using #askDLN or via email to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com.

Sign up to connect your class directly and participate in a CASIS Academy Live event. Please direct questions about this event to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com.

For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/dln.


2017 eXploration Habitat (X-Hab) Academic Innovation Challenge

NASA is seeking university teams to develop innovative design solutions for deep space human exploration systems in the 2017 eXploration Systems and Habitation Academic Innovation Challenge. This year, the X-Hab Challenge scope is being formally extended not only to include habitation topics but other areas of exploration systems as well. Topic areas include in-space recycling/reclamation, quantification of condensed water on the lunar surface, a wastewater to plant nutrient solution, a microgravity plant-watering system and a microgravity food production system.

The winners of the challenge will receive between $10,000 and $30,000 to design and produce functional products of interest to NASA human spaceflight. Proposals are due April 29, 2016, and awardees will follow a tailored systems-engineering process with the completion of the projects in the May 2017 timeframe.

Proposals will be accepted from university faculty who are U.S. citizens and who teach at an accredited university in the U.S. Eligible educators must be teaching a senior or graduate engineering design, industrial design or architecture curriculum that is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.

Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tribal Colleges and other minority-serving educational institutions are particularly encouraged to apply. Proposals from women, members of underrepresented minority groups and persons with disabilities also are highly encouraged.

For more information about the challenge and how to submit a proposal, visit http://spacegrant.org/xhab/.

Please email questions about the X-Hab Challenge to xhab@spacegrant.org.


2016 Texas Space Grant Consortium Columbia Crew Memorial Undergraduate Scholarships

The Texas Space Grant Consortium and the Aviation and Space Foundation of Texas, in partnership with NASA, are offering undergraduate scholarships of $1,500 in memory of the Space Shuttle Columbia astronauts. These seven men and women paid the ultimate sacrifice to expand the exploration of space and our knowledge of the world that we live in.

These scholarships are intended to recognize high-quality students and encourage their consideration of graduate studies in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, ultimately leading to careers in STEM-related fields. The scholarships stress excellence in academics, participation in STEM education and research projects, and the exhibition of leadership qualities.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens and registered for at least a half-time course load at a Texas Space Grant Consortium institution. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 29, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/grants/2016/scholars_announcement.html.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to scholarships@tsgc.utexas.edu.


2016 Texas Space Grant Consortium STEM Educator Scholarships

The Texas Space Grant Consortium has established a new Educator STEM Scholarship Program. These $1,500 scholarships are intended to recognize teachers enrolled in master’s programs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields at a TSGC member institution.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens who hold a bachelor’s degree and are enrolled in a master’s program at a Texas Space Grant Consortium institution. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 29, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/edu_stem/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to scholarships@tsgc.utexas.edu.


2016-2017 Texas Space Grant Consortium Graduate Fellowships

Texas Space Grant Consortium Fellowships encourage graduate study in the fields of space science and engineering. Interdisciplinary and integrated work experience are emphasized.

Each $5,000 award supplements half-time graduate support (or fellowship) provided by a Consortium institution. The fellowship award is good for one year. Each fellowship may be renewed for a maximum of three years, providing the recipient has spent no more than two of those years as a master’s candidate.

Applicants must be registered for full-time study in a graduate program at one or more of the Texas Space Grant Consortium institutions and must be promised financial support at that institution. Applicants must also be U.S. citizens. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 29, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/grants/2016/fellows_announcement.html.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to fellowships@tsgc.utexas.edu.


Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 11 to the International Space Station

The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education and the Arthur C. Clarke Institute for Space Education, in partnership with NanoRacks LLC, announce a science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, opportunity for school districts across the U.S. and space station partner nations. The newest flight opportunity, Mission 11 to the International Space Station, gives students across a community the ability to design and propose real experiments to fly in low-Earth orbit on the space station. This opportunity is part of the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program, or SSEP.

Each participating community will receive a real microgravity research mini-laboratory capable of supporting a single microgravity experiment and all launch services to fly the minilab to the space station in spring 2017 and return it to Earth. An experiment design competition in each community — engaging typically 300+ students — allows student teams to design and propose real experiments vying for their community′s reserved minilab.

Content resources for teachers and students support foundational instruction on science in microgravity and experimental design. Additional SSEP programming uses the experiment design competition to engage the community in embracing a learning-community model for STEM education.

This competition is open to students in grades 5-12 and college. Informal education groups and organizations also are encouraged to participate. Interested communities must inquire about the program no later than April 29, 2016. The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education is available to help interested communities in the U.S. secure the needed funding.

To learn more about this opportunity, visit the SSEP Mission 11 to International Space Station National Announcement of Opportunity at http://ssep.ncesse.org/2016/03/new-flight-opportunity-for-school-districts-announcing-student-spaceflight-experiments-program-ssep-mission-11-to-the-international-space-station-starting-september-2016/.

SSEP is enabled through a strategic partnership with NanoRacks LLC working with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the use of the International Space Station as a national laboratory. The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (http://www.iss-casis.org/) is a national partner on SSEP. To view a list of all SSEP national partners, visit http://ssep.ncesse.org/national-partners/.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please email SSEP National Program Director Jeff Goldstein at jeffgoldstein@ncesse.org.


Future Engineers ‘Star Trek’ Replicator Challenge

Calling all Starfleet cadets! “Star Trek,” the American Society for Mechanical Engineers Foundation and NASA want you to pioneer the future of food in space. Your challenge is to create a digital model of a food-related item for astronauts to 3-D print in the year 2050. We want designs that boldly go where no human has 3-D printed before and that help astronauts eat nutritious meals so they can live long and prosper.

You must specify one of the following locations for your 3-D print: our moon, another planet, another planet’s moon, or a spacecraft beyond low-Earth orbit (explain where it is going and why). You also must specify the intended printing material (feedstock) for your 3-D print. This could be plastic, metal, recycled materials, locally sourced material, or any nonedible, 3-D printing feedstock you think would advance human space exploration.

Eating a meal in space goes beyond the actual food itself — from growing food to devouring it. There are many things to consider, so check out our rules, design guidelines and education resources before to starting your design.

Student winners will receive a range of prizes, including a trip to New York for a tour of the space shuttle Enterprise at the Intrepid Museum with an astronaut, a 3-D printer for the winners’ schools or a “Star Trek” prize pack.

Entries are due May 1, 2016. For more information about the challenge and how to enter, visit www.futureengineers.org/startrek.

Please email questions about this competition to info@futureengineers.org.


Institute of Museum and Library Services Grants: STEM Expert Facilitation of Family Learning in Libraries and Museums

The Institute of Museum and Library Services seeks proposals for design-based research projects focused on inquiry-based STEM programs delivered by scientists, engineers, and related technical practitioners to children ages 6-10 and their families. Proposals should address the role of experts’ oral narratives (e.g., storytelling or personal histories) as part of object-based science inquiry and include information about how findings will be applicable in both museum and library settings.

Entities that are eligible to apply include libraries, agencies, institutions of higher education, museums, and other entities that advance the museum and library fields. Grant amounts up to $1,000,000 are available for a period of performance up to two years.

Applications are due May 1, 2016.

For more information, visit https://www.imls.gov/grants/available/stem-expert-facilitation-family-learning-libraries-and-museums-stemex.

Library representatives with questions about this opportunity should email Sandra Toro at storo@imls.gov. Museum representatives with questions should email Helen Wechsler at hwechsler@imls.gov or Sandra Narva at snarva@imls.gov.


Exploration of the Moon and Asteroids by Secondary Students (ExMASS) High School Research Program

NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, and the Center for Lunar Science and Exploration at the Lunar and Planetary Institute are looking for 10 teams of motivated high school students and their teachers to participate in a national standards-based lunar/asteroid research program for the 2016-2017 academic year.

Supervised by their teacher and aided by a scientist advisor, students undertake open-inquiry research projects that engage them in the process of science and support the goals of the NASA Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute. At the end of the year, four teams compete for a chance to present their research at the Exploration Science Forum held at NASA’s Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, California, in July 2017.

Participation in the ExMASS program is free. Interested teachers must submit an application. Applications are due May 2, 2016.

For more information and to apply for the ExMASS program, visit http://www.lpi.usra.edu/exploration/education/hsResearch/.

Please direct questions about the ExMASS program to Andy Shaner at shaner@lpi.usra.edu.


GLOBE El Niño Field Campaign and Webinar Series

El Niño and La Niña are important phenomena that can impact the climate by causing global flooding and droughts as well as changes in seasonal weather. These interactions around the world are called teleconnections. Because of the importance of this issue, a GLOBE ENSO (El Niño Southern Oscillation) Campaign has been formulated to engage students in determining where and how much El Niño affects local places and to put students in contact with their local environment.

To learn more about the campaign and how to participate, visit http://www.globe.gov/web/el-nino/el-nino-campaign.

To help educators prepare for the El Niño Campaign, GLOBE is hosting a series of free education webinars to discuss the mechanics of the campaign, give updates on data collection, and give participants the opportunity to learn science content from experts.

The hourlong webinars will take place on the following dates at 8 p.m. EDT.

May 3, 2016: Biometry and Ground Cover
May 17, 2016: The 2015-2016 El Niño Event
June 13, 2016: Using El Niño GLOBE Data for Scientific Research
Sept. 19, 2016: El Niño Student Campaign Refresher and Update

For more information, including log-in instructions for the webinars and recordings of previous webinars in the series, visit http://www.globe.gov/web/el-nino/el-nino-campaign/webinars.

Please direct questions about this opportunity and series of webinars to http://www.globe.gov/support/contact.


NASA/NSTA Webinar — Global Precipitation Measurement Mission: Weather

Join the National Science Teachers Association for a free interactive webinar to learn about weather and NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement, or GPM, mission. The 90-minute session will take place on May 5, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EDT.

Topics presented at this webinar will include types of weather, weather basics, extreme weather, monitoring extreme weather with satellites, and hands-on investigations for students to collect data about weather — including GLOBE protocols. A NASA scientist will discuss the difference between weather and climate and will describe ground validation campaigns.

GPM is an international satellite mission managed by NASA and JAXA (the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) that will provide next-generation observations of rain and snow. The GPM mission will help us learn more about Earth’s water and energy cycles, improve the forecasting of extreme events that cause natural disasters, and extend current capabilities of using satellite precipitation information to directly benefit society.

All participants will receive a certificate of participation and 100 Learning Center activity points for attending and completing the post-program evaluation. An archive and presentation slides will be available at the end of the program.

For more information and to register to attend the webinar event, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/resource/?id=10.2505/9/WSNASA15_May5.

For more information about GPM, visit http://www.nasa.gov/gpm or http://gpm.nasa.gov.

Please email questions about this opportunity to webseminars@nsta.org.


Federal Aviation Administration Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues

The Airport Cooperative Research Program is seeking applicants for its Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues. Through this program, the ACRP strives to encourage applied research on airport and related aviation system issues and to foster the next generation of aviation community leaders. The program is intended to stimulate thought, discussion and research by those who may become the future airport managers, operators, designers and policy makers in aviation. The focus of this research program is on applied research to help the public sector continue to improve the quality, reliability, safety and security of the U.S. civil aviation system well into the foreseeable future.

The Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues will award up to 10 highly qualified applicants, selected by an ACRP panel of experts, a stipend of $10,000 each for successful completion of a research paper on a subject chosen by the candidate within the framework of the program’s purpose.

Applicants must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States, or have a current student visa. Each applicant also must be officially enrolled as a full-time student at an accredited North American institution of higher learning for the academic year in a graduate course leading to a master’s or doctoral degree. Proof of both may be required.

Applications are due May 15, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.trb.org/ACRP/ACRPGraduateAwardProgram.aspx.

The ACRP Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues is sponsored by the Federal Aviation Administration. Creating a selection panel, monitoring research progress, organizing a forum for presentation, and publishing the research papers are the responsibility of the ACRP of the Transportation Research Board. The Virginia Space Grant Consortium will manage the Graduate Research Award program under the ACRP’s direction.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to acrp@odu.edu.


2016 NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge: Distributed Electric Propulsion

Distributed Electric Propulsion, or DEP, is an emerging aircraft design concept that has the potential to improve aircraft performance in a number of areas, including efficiency, takeoff and landing performance, emissions, noise abatement, safety, and ride quality. DEP also has the potential to enable new novel control systems. In this year’s NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge, student teams are challenged to design a commuter aircraft that applies DEP technology. The main source of thrust for the students’ concept may come from DEP or a combination of DEP and conventional propulsion devices (turboprops, turbofans, etc.). The challenge for the design team is to determine the most advantageous application of DEP for their aircraft and to justify their selection.

The contest is open to teams of full-time students enrolled in higher education institutions of the United States or its territories. This category includes universities, colleges, trade schools, community colleges, professional schools, etc. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

Final entries are due May 16, 2016.

For more information and a complete list of rules, visit http://aero.larc.nasa.gov/university-contest/.

Questions about the challenge should be directed to Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.


2016 National Academy of Engineering – Engineering for You Video Contest 3

The National Academy of Engineering, or NAE, is launching the Engineering for You Video Contest 3, or E4U3.

This year, participants are tasked with creating a 1- to 2-minute video focused on mega-engineering. Mega-engineering projects typically address important needs of large populations and/or societies, require teams working across countries and cultures on a solution, and involve at least three disciplines including engineering.

The competition is open to all individuals or teams in the following competition categories:
— Middle school students and younger (grades K-8)
— High school students (grades 9-12)
— Tertiary education students (two-year college through graduate school, full or part time)
— The general public

The main prize is $25,000, and videos will be accepted through May 31, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.nae.edu/e4u3/.

Questions about the E4U3 Video Contest should be directed to E4Uvideocontest@nae.edu.


Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions and museums to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

There will be a nominal shipping fee that must be paid online with a credit card.  To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.


2016 Lunar Workshop for Educators

NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, mission is sponsoring a workshop for educators of students in grades 6-9. The workshop will focus on lunar science, exploration, and how our understanding of the moon is growing and changing with the new data from current and recent lunar missions.

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has allowed scientists to measure the coldest known place in the solar system, map the surface of the moon in unprecedented detail and accuracy, find evidence of recent lunar geologic activity, characterize the radiation environment around the moon and its potential effects on future lunar explorers, and much, much more!

Workshop participants will reinforce their understanding of lunar science concepts; gain tools to help address common student misconceptions about the moon; and interact with lunar scientists and engineers. Participants will work with LRO data and learn how to bring the data and information to their students using hands-on activities aligned with Next Generation Science Standards for grades 6-9.

The workshop will take place June 27-July 1, 2016, at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Workshop participants will have the opportunity to tour the LRO Mission Operation Center and the Goddard spacecraft testing facilities.

For more information and to register to attend, visit http://lunar.gsfc.nasa.gov/lwe/index.html.

Questions about this workshop should be directed to Andrea Jones at Andrea.J.Jones@nasa.gov.


2016 DREAM2Explore Workshop for Educators

The “Dynamic Response of the Environments at Asteroids, the Moon, and moons of Mars,” or DREAM2, team at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center is hosting a free workshop for educators of students in grades 6-9. Participants will learn how our understanding of Earth’s moon, asteroids and the moons of Mars is growing and changing with new data and models from current and recent planetary missions and the work of the DREAM2 team.

Workshop participants will reinforce their understanding of lunar and planetary science concepts; gain tools to help address common student misconceptions about the moon; and interact with NASA scientists who study the dynamic environments surrounding these rocky objects. Participants will work with real scientific data and learn how to bring the data and information to their students using hands-on activities aligned with Next Generation Science Standards for grades 6-9.

The workshop will take place July 11-15, 2016, at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Workshop participants will become certified to borrow meteorite samples from NASA and will receive Certificates of Participation and Letters of Completion that indicate 30 hours of instruction.

For more information and to register to attend, visit http://ssed.gsfc.nasa.gov/dream/DREAM/DREAM2Explore.html.

Questions about this workshop should be directed to Andrea Jones at Andrea.J.Jones@nasa.gov.


Call for Papers: NASA in the ‘Long’ Civil Rights Movement Symposium

The History Office at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center and the Department of History at the University of Alabama Huntsville invite academics, graduate students and independent scholars to submit proposals for papers to be presented at a two-day symposium, March 16-17, 2017. The symposium will take place at the University of Alabama Huntsville and will address the role/relationship of NASA to the “Long” Civil Rights Movement, particularly in, but not limited to, the Deep South (Huntsville, Florida, Houston, Mississippi and New Orleans).

The conceptual framework for the symposium is provided by Jacquelyn Dowd Hall’s 2005 essay in the Journal of American History, “The Long Civil Rights Movement and the Political Uses of the Past,” which called upon historians to produce new “modes of writing and speaking that emphasize individual agency … while also dramatizing the hidden history of politics and institutions.” Along these lines, the conference welcomes papers addressing the Civil Rights experience across NASA that not only explore the experience of African Americans, but also of women, immigrants and other politically/legally marginalized groups. The intention is to publish a subset of the papers as an anthology.

Those interested in presenting a paper at the symposium should send an abstract of no more than 400 words and a short biography or curriculum vita, including affiliation, to Brian Odom at brian.c.odom@nasa.gov or Dr. Stephen Waring at warings@uah.edu by July 31, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/centers/marshall/history/call-for-papers-nasa-in-the-long-civil-rights-movement-symposium-university-of-alabama.html.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Brian Odom at brian.c.odom@nasa.gov.


Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The Announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design (STEAMD); or activities culturally relevant to or focused on unrepresented in STEM careers populations, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or non-reimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA Announcement.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — April 14, 2016

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.
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New This Week!
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Free NASA Educator Professional Development Webinars
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: April 18, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Live Video Chat: NASA STARS en Español
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: April 20, 2016, 1-2 p.m. EDT

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Video conferencia en vivo: NASA STARS en Español
Audiencia: Todos Los Educadores y Estudiantes
Fecha del Evento: Abril 20, 2016, 1-2 p.m. EDT

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — CASIS Academy Live: Microbes in Space
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: April 26, 2016, 11 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. EDT

Exploration of the Moon and Asteroids by Secondary Students (ExMASS) High School Research Program
Audience: 9-12 Educators
Application Deadline: May 2, 2016
Program Dates: September 2016 – April 2017

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PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…
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NASA TechPort Request for Information
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Feedback Deadline: April 14, 2016

Host a Real-Time Conversation With Crew Members Aboard the International Space Station
Audience: All Educators
Proposal Deadline: April 15, 2016

2016 LiftOff Summer Institute
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: April 15, 2016
Institute Dates: June 26-July 1, 2016

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy
Audience: Designed for Families With Children Ages 10 to 14, but Open to All
Next Event Date: April 16, 2016, 10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. EST

U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s National Summer Teacher Institute on Innovation, STEM, and Intellectual Property
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: April 18, 2016
Event Date: July 17-22, 2016

GLOBE El Niño Field Campaign and Webinar Series
Audience: K-12 Educators
Next Webinar Date: April 20, 2016, at 8 p.m. EDT

2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education
Next Lecture Date: April 21, 2016, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)

White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities — 2016 All-Star Students Program
Audience: Higher Education Students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Application Deadline: April 22, 2016

2016 International Space Apps Challenge
Audience: Problem Solvers of All Ages
Event Dates: April 22-24, 2016

Free Education Webinar Series From the GOES-R Education Proving Ground
Audience: 6-12 Educators
Next Event Date: April 23, 2016, at 11:30 a.m. EDT

Mars Survival Kit: Lessons and Activities to Guide Your Exploration of Mars!
Audience: K-12 Educators

2017 eXploration Habitat (X-Hab) Academic Innovation Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Faculty and Students
Proposal Deadline: April 29, 2016

2016 Texas Space Grant Consortium Columbia Crew Memorial Undergraduate Scholarships
Audience: Undergraduate Students at Texas Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: April 29, 2016

2016 Texas Space Grant Consortium STEM Educator Scholarships
Audience: Educators Enrolled in STEM-field Programs for a Master’s Degree at Texas Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: April 29, 2016

2016-2017 Texas Space Grant Consortium Graduate Fellowships
Audience: Graduate Students at Texas Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: April 29, 2016

Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 11 to the International Space Station
Audience: School Districts Serving Grades 5-12, Informal Education Institutions, Colleges and Universities
Inquiry Deadline: April 29, 2016

Future Engineers ‘Star Trek’ Replicator Challenge
Audience: Students in the United States Ages 5-19
Entry Deadline: May 1, 2016

Institute of Museum and Library Services Grants: STEM Expert Facilitation of Family Learning in Libraries and Museums
Audience: Libraries, Museums and Higher Education Institutions
Application Deadline: May 1, 2016

2016 NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge: Distributed Electric Propulsion
Audience: Students at U.S. Colleges and Universities
Entry Deadline: May 16, 2016

2016 National Academy of Engineering – Engineering for You Video Contest 3
Audience: All Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: May 31, 2016

‘CineSpace’ Short Film Competition
Audience: All Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: July 31, 2016

National Science Foundation’s Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers
Audience: Organizations Interested in Implementing Pre-K-12 STEM Education Programs
Full Proposal Deadline: Aug. 10, 2016

National Science Foundation’s Advancing Informal STEM Learning Program
Audience: Organizations Interested in Advancing STEM Learning in Informal Environments
Full Proposal Deadline: Nov. 8, 2016

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

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Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

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NEW THIS WEEK!
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Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Air and Space — Airplanes and Rockets: NASA BEST — Green Propellant Challenge
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-8
Event Date: April 18, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT
Teaching force and motion has never been so much fun. NASA’s BEST Next Generation Engineering Design Challenge will take propulsion to a new level. Participants will complete the Green Propellant Infusion Mission Challenge by designing and building a simple spacecraft and “green” spacecraft propellant. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/168130

The Hubble Space Telescope — A History
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-8
Event Date: April 19, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Participants will get a historical overview of NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. Discussion will focus on using the telescope as a platform for teaching science concepts. This webinar addresses the Next Generation Science Standards ESS1 and PS4. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/166382

Air and Space — Airplanes and Rockets: NASA Rockets 101
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-8
Event Date: April 21, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT
Launch your students’ interest and excitement in forces and motion. Explore forces, motion and flight with inquiry-based rocket activities and design challenges that include designing, building and launching simple rockets while recording and analyzing data. This webinar will also investigate rockets by integrating NASA missions, STEM curriculum, online education resources and the Next Generation Science Standards into teaching strategies that will guide educators into a learning journey “blast off.” Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/162228

For a full schedule of upcoming webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Please direct questions about this series of webinars to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.

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NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Live Video Chat: NASA STARS en Español

Do you want to be one of NASA’s STARS? In this series of live, Spanish video chats, “Students Talk About Real STEM” (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) with NASA professionals who work in these areas. Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network and Educator Professional Development Collaborative for an inside look at NASA missions, research and careers. Submit questions via Twitter using #NASASTARS or via email to astrosdeNASA@gmail.com.

Sign up to connect your class directly and participate in a live event. Please send questions about this event to astrosdeNASA@gmail.com.

The next hourlong event will be webcast on the NASA DLiNfo Channel on April 20, 2016, at 1 p.m. EDT.

For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/dln.

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NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Video conferencia en vivo: NASA STARS en Español

¿Quieres ser uno de los Astros de NASA? En esta serie de video conferencia en español y en vivo, los estudiantes hablarán de lo que es en realidad STEM (ciencias, tecnología, ingeniería y matemáticas) con profesionales de NASA que están trabajando en estas ramas. Acompaña a los programas de conexión digital de NASA (DLN for sus siglas en inglés) y el programa de colaboraciones de desarrolló profesional educativo (EPDC por sus siglas en inglés) hablando de diferentes misiones, investigaciones, y carreras en NASA. Inscribe tu escuela y conectate ó envia tus preguntas por medio de Twitter usando #NASASTARS ó correo electrónico astrosdeNASA@gmail.com.

Escribanos si usted esta interesado en conectarse directo para participar y cualquier pregunta sobre el programa astrosdeNASA@gmail.com.

El siguiente programa de una hora será transmitido por NASA DLiNfo Channel el 20 de abril de 2016 a la 1 p.m. EDT.

Para más información, visite la página http://www.nasa.gov/dln.

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NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — CASIS Academy Live: Microbes in Space

Why does life depend on microbes and what do extremophiles tell us about the potential for life beyond Earth? Join DLN and the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space for this CASIS Academy Live event with Dr. Michael Roberts to learn more about microbes in space. During the live video chat, Roberts will answer your questions.

The 45-minute event will be webcast on the NASA DLiNfo Channel on April 26, 2016, at 11 a.m. EDT.

Ask questions via Twitter using #askDLN or via email to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com.

Sign up to connect your class directly and participate in a CASIS Academy Live event. Please direct questions about this event to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com.

For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/dln.

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Exploration of the Moon and Asteroids by Secondary Students (ExMASS) High School Research Program

NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, and the Center for Lunar Science and Exploration at the Lunar and Planetary Institute are looking for 10 teams of motivated high school students and their teachers to participate in a national standards-based lunar/asteroid research program for the 2016-2017 academic year.

Supervised by their teacher and aided by a scientist advisor, students undertake open-inquiry research projects that engage them in the process of science and support the goals of the NASA Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute. At the end of the year, four teams compete for a chance to present their research at the Exploration Science Forum held at NASA’s Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, California, in July 2017.

Participation in the ExMASS program is free. Interested teachers must submit an application. Applications are due May 2, 2016.

For more information and to apply for the ExMASS program, visit http://www.lpi.usra.edu/exploration/education/hsResearch/.

Please direct questions about the ExMASS program to Andy Shaner at shaner@lpi.usra.edu.

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PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…
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NASA TechPort Request for Information

NASA is conducting this Request for Information, or RFI, to better understand user needs and identify potential improvements for the NASA Technology Portfolio System (TechPort).

NASA developed TechPort as an agencywide tool to capture detailed information on technology investments that support missions across aeronautics, space exploration and scientific discovery. NASA has used TechPort internally since 2012. Through continuous updates, the system now contains information on more than 840 active projects and more than 7,600 historical records. In February 2015, NASA opened a beta version of TechPort to the public.

To help enhance the TechPort system, NASA is seeking feedback via a short, 18-question survey that takes an estimated 5 to 10 minutes to complete. Feedback may be submitted through April 14, 2016.

To provide feedback, visit https://techport.nasa.gov/rfi.

To visit the NASA TechPort, visit http://techport.nasa.gov/home.

Please direct questions about NASA TechPort and this RFI to hq-techport@mail.nasa.gov.

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Host a Real-Time Conversation With Crew Members Aboard the International Space Station

ARISS-US is now accepting proposals from U.S. schools, museums, science centers and community youth organizations to host an Amateur Radio on the International Space Station, or ARISS, contact between Jan. 1 – June 30, 2017. To maximize these radio contact opportunities, ARISS-US is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed education plan. Proposals are due April 15, 2016.

Using amateur radio, students can ask astronauts questions about life in space and other space-related topics. Students fully engage in the ARISS contact by helping set up an amateur radio ground station at the school and then using that station to talk directly with a crew member on the International Space Station for approximately 10 minutes. ARISS provides experienced mentors and relies on local amateur radio volunteers to help organizations obtain the technology required to host this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for students.

For proposal information and more details such as expectations, proposal guidelines and proposal form, visit http://www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.

ARISS-US is offered through a partnership between NASA; the American Radio Relay League, or ARRL; and the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation, or AMSAT. ARISS was created and is managed by an international working group, including several countries in Europe as well as Japan, Russia, Canada, and the USA.

Questions about this opportunity should be emailed to ariss@arrl.org.

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2016 LiftOff Summer Institute

Registration is now open for the 2016 LiftOff Summer Institute, sponsored by NASA’s Texas Space Grant Consortium. This weeklong professional development training for teachers will be held June 26-July 1, 2016, at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. This competitive aerospace workshop emphasizes science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, learning experiences through speakers, hands-on activities and field investigations.

The theme for this year’s institute is “Exploration: Past, Present and Future.” The event will focus on how NASA is learning from past exploration and current space station research and how it will apply its discoveries to future missions to deep space.

Attendees must be U.S. citizens currently employed as classroom teachers of grades 4-12 with at least one year teaching experience prior to the institute. Texas Space Grant pays all expenses for any Texas teacher selected. Other Space Grant Consortia fund teachers from their states.

Applications are due April 15, 2016.

For more information and to access the online application, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/liftoff/.

If you have questions about the 2016 LiftOff Summer Institute, please email your inquiries to Margaret Baguio at baguio@tsgc.utexas.edu.

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Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions and museums to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

There will be a nominal shipping fee that must be paid online with a credit card.  To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.

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Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy

Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy, at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia, is a free alternate-reality game that will challenge you to become an astronaut-in-training for a future trip to Mars. Choose what role you will play on the mission; engage in fun interactive activities; and explore the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics skills you will need as a next-generation space traveler. Along the way, you’ll learn about some of the museum’s fascinating artifacts.

Instructions and guidance are given via a special webpage accessed on your mobile device. Players should bring their own phones or devices equipped with an internet browser and a camera. Having a digital picture-taking device (smartphone, tablet, camera) is highly recommended but not required.

The game is aimed at upper elementary and middle school visitors and their families. Do you want to bring a group? Reservations are required for groups larger than 15.

The next offering of the Astronaut Academy is on April 16, 2016. Begin your training with Astronaut Orientation in the Claude Moore Education Center Classroom 1 located on the first level across from the restrooms. Astronaut Orientation is offered at regular intervals between 10:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. The last opportunity to start the game is at 2:30 p.m. A self-guided activity, the game should take between 60 and 90 minutes, and staff will help you along the way.

For more information, including a full list of upcoming Astronaut Academy dates, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/techquest/.

Please direct questions about the Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy to the visitor service line at 202-633-2214.

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U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s National Summer Teacher Institute on Innovation, STEM, and Intellectual Property

The United States Patent and Trademark Office, or USPTO, will host its third annual National Summer Teacher Institute on Innovation, STEM, and Intellectual Property on July 17-22, 2016, at Michigan State University in East Lansing.

This multiday, professional development opportunity will train elementary, middle and high school teachers to incorporate concepts of making, inventing, creating and protecting intellectual property into classroom instruction. Participants are expected to implement lessons learned from the institute into their schools and school districts.

The institute is open to teachers nationwide, so apply to be a part of this exciting cohort! In accordance with the Federal Travel Regulations and USPTO travel policy, travel and lodging expenses will be covered for teachers who are traveling more than 50 miles to the venue. Space is limited.

The deadline for applications has been extended to April 18, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.uspto.gov/learning-and-resources/outreach-and-education/national-summer-teacher-institute.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to NSTI_Applications@uspto.gov.

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GLOBE El Niño Field Campaign and Webinar Series

El Niño and La Niña are important phenomena that can impact the climate by causing global flooding and droughts as well as changes in seasonal weather. These interactions around the world are called teleconnections. Because of the importance of this issue, a GLOBE ENSO (El Niño Southern Oscillation) Campaign has been formulated to engage students in determining where and how much El Niño affects local places and to put students in contact with their local environment.

To learn more about the campaign and how to participate, visit http://www.globe.gov/web/el-nino/el-nino-campaign.

To help educators prepare for the El Niño Campaign, GLOBE is hosting a series of free education webinars to discuss the mechanics of the campaign, give updates on data collection, and give participants the opportunity to learn science content from experts.

The hourlong webinars will take place on the following dates at 8 p.m. EDT.

April 20, 2016: SMAP Soil Moisture
May 3, 2016: Biometry and Ground Cover
May 17, 2016: The 2015-2016 El Niño Event
June 13, 2016: Using El Niño GLOBE Data for Scientific Research
Sept. 19, 2016: El Niño Student Campaign Refresher and Update

For more information, including log-in instructions for the webinars and recordings of previous webinars in the series, visit http://www.globe.gov/web/el-nino/el-nino-campaign/webinars.

Please direct questions about this opportunity and series of webinars to http://www.globe.gov/support/contact.

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2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online

The Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, named after the founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and presented by JPL’s Office of Communication and Education, shares the excitement of the space program’s missions, instruments and other technologies.

Lectures take place twice per month, on consecutive Thursdays and Fridays. The Thursday lectures take place in JPL’s Theodore von Kármán Auditorium, and Friday lectures take place at Pasadena City College’s Vosloh Forum. Both start at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT). Admission and parking are free for all lectures. No reservations are required, but seating is limited. The Thursday evening lectures are streamed live for viewing online. Archives of past lectures are also available online.

Next Lecture in the Series:

CubeSats: Big Goals, Tiny Package
Event Date:
April 21 and April 22, 2016, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2016&month=4
Over the last 15 years, a miniature revolution in space science has been underway: CubeSats! First flown as educational tools the size of soup cans, significant capabilities have now been developed to allow these nanospacecraft to travel to the moon, asteroids and even Mars. Join Dr. Andrew Klesh, Chief Engineer for Interplanetary Small Spacecraft, for a discussion about these small spacecraft and the types of missions they are being used for.

For more information about the Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, including a complete list of upcoming lectures, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.php.

Questions about this series should be directed to http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php.

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White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities — 2016 All-Star Students Program

The White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities works to promote HBCU excellence, innovation and sustainability. The Initiative will recognize current HBCU students for their dedication to academics, leadership and civic engagement as 2016 HBCU All-Star Students.

The appointment period will last approximately one year. During this time, HBCU All-Stars will serve as ambassadors of the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities by providing outreach opportunities and communications to their fellow students about the value of education and the Initiative as a networking resource. Through social media and personal and professional relationships with community-based organizations, students will share promising and proven practices that support opportunities for all young people to realize their educational and career potential. The program will provide an opportunity to participate in regional and national events as well as webchats with Initiative staff and other professionals from a wide range of disciplines that support a spirit of engagement and personal and professional development.

Nominees must be current undergraduate, graduate or professional students at an HBCU. Students must be enrolled for the 2016-2017 fall semester. Applications must be submitted by 11:59 p.m. EDT on April 22, 2016.

For more information and to download an application, visit http://sites.ed.gov/whhbcu/resources/hbcu-all-star-students/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to hbcuallstars@ed.gov.

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2016 International Space Apps Challenge

NASA and space agencies around the world are preparing for the fifth annual International Space Apps Challenge, which will be held April 22-24, 2016. Participants will develop mobile applications, software, hardware, data visualization and platform solutions that could contribute to space exploration missions and help improve life on Earth.

This year’s challenge kicks off with a boot camp event on April 22 that will be live-streamed globally. The two-day “code-athon” event will follow on April 23-24. It will be hosted locally at over 193 locations spanning 72 countries. More than 200 data sources, including data sets, data services and tools, will be available. This event will bring tech-savvy citizens, scientists, entrepreneurs, educators and students together to help solve challenges relevant to both space exploration and broader subjects that impact life on Earth.

Registration for citizen participation is now open.

To learn more about the International Space Apps Challenge, get the latest updates and register to attend an event, visit https://2016.spaceappschallenge.org/.

If you have questions about the challenge, please visit https://2016.spaceappschallenge.org/contact.

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Free Education Webinar Series From the GOES-R Education Proving Ground

The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites — R Series is the next generation of geostationary Earth-observing systems. The GOES-R series satellites will provide continuous imagery and atmospheric measurements of Earth’s Western Hemisphere. The satellites will collect lightning data and monitor space weather to provide critical atmospheric, hydrologic, oceanic, climatic, solar and space data. The first satellite in the GOES-R series is scheduled to launch in October 2016.

To help educators prepare for the new satellite imagery and data that will be available during the GOES-R era, the GOES-R Education Proving Ground is hosting a series of education webcasts leading up to launch.

The webinars will take place on the following Saturday mornings at 11:30 a.m. Eastern Time.

April 23, 2016: Additional GOES-R Resources and Educational Tools
Sept. 17, 2016: Countdown to Launch!

For more information, including log-in instructions for the webinars, visit http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/education/goesr/.

Please direct questions about this series of webinars to Margaret Mooney at Margaret.Mooney@ssec.wisc.edu.

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Mars Survival Kit: Lessons and Activities to Guide Your Exploration of Mars!

NASA is embarking on a journey to Mars! Are your students ready to join in the adventure? Spark excitement in your classroom with the Mars Survival Kit.

The Mars Survival Kit is a collection of educational activities for students in grades K-12. Each educational activity includes a brief description, as well as information about how the activities and lessons align to the Next Generation Science Standards.

Start your classroom’s journey to Mars at http://go.nasa.gov/1NnZ0Rg.

To learn more about NASA’s Journey to Mars, visit http://www.nasa.gov/topics/journeytomars/index.html.

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2017 eXploration Habitat (X-Hab) Academic Innovation Challenge

NASA is seeking university teams to develop innovative design solutions for deep space human exploration systems in the 2017 eXploration Systems and Habitation Academic Innovation Challenge. This year, the X-Hab Challenge scope is being formally extended not only to include habitation topics but other areas of exploration systems as well. Topic areas include in-space recycling/reclamation, quantification of condensed water on the lunar surface, a wastewater to plant nutrient solution, a microgravity plant-watering system and a microgravity food production system.

The winners of the challenge will receive between $10,000 and $30,000 to design and produce functional products of interest to NASA human spaceflight. Proposals are due April 29, 2016, and awardees will follow a tailored systems-engineering process with the completion of the projects in the May 2017 timeframe.

Proposals will be accepted from university faculty who are U.S. citizens and who teach at an accredited university in the U.S. Eligible educators must be teaching a senior or graduate engineering design, industrial design or architecture curriculum that is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.

Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tribal Colleges and other minority-serving educational institutions are particularly encouraged to apply. Proposals from women, members of underrepresented minority groups and persons with disabilities also are highly encouraged.

For more information about the challenge and how to submit a proposal, visit http://spacegrant.org/xhab/.

Please email questions about the X-Hab Challenge to xhab@spacegrant.org.

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2016 Texas Space Grant Consortium Columbia Crew Memorial Undergraduate Scholarships

The Texas Space Grant Consortium and the Aviation and Space Foundation of Texas, in partnership with NASA, are offering undergraduate scholarships of $1,500 in memory of the Space Shuttle Columbia astronauts. These seven men and women paid the ultimate sacrifice to expand the exploration of space and our knowledge of the world that we live in.

These scholarships are intended to recognize high-quality students and encourage their consideration of graduate studies in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, ultimately leading to careers in STEM-related fields. The scholarships stress excellence in academics, participation in STEM education and research projects, and the exhibition of leadership qualities.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens and registered for at least a half-time course load at a Texas Space Grant Consortium institution. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 29, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/grants/2016/scholars_announcement.html. Please email any questions about this opportunity to scholarships@tsgc.utexas.edu.

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2016 Texas Space Grant Consortium STEM Educator Scholarships

The Texas Space Grant Consortium has established a new Educator STEM Scholarship Program. These $1,500 scholarships are intended to recognize teachers enrolled in master’s programs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields at a TSGC member institution.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens who hold a bachelor’s degree and are enrolled in a master’s program at a Texas Space Grant Consortium institution. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 29, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/edu_stem/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to scholarships@tsgc.utexas.edu.

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2016-2017 Texas Space Grant Consortium Graduate Fellowships

Texas Space Grant Consortium Fellowships encourage graduate study in the fields of space science and engineering. Interdisciplinary and integrated work experience are emphasized.

Each $5,000 award supplements half-time graduate support (or fellowship) provided by a Consortium institution. The fellowship award is good for one year. Each fellowship may be renewed for a maximum of three years, providing the recipient has spent no more than two of those years as a master’s candidate.

Applicants must be registered for full-time study in a graduate program at one or more of the Texas Space Grant Consortium institutions and must be promised financial support at that institution. Applicants must also be U.S. citizens. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 29, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/grants/2016/fellows_announcement.html. Please email any questions about this opportunity to fellowships@tsgc.utexas.edu.

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Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 11 to the International Space Station

The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education and the Arthur C. Clarke Institute for Space Education, in partnership with NanoRacks LLC, announce a science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, opportunity for school districts across the U.S. and space station partner nations. The newest flight opportunity, Mission 11 to the International Space Station, gives students across a community the ability to design and propose real experiments to fly in low-Earth orbit on the space station. This opportunity is part of the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program, or SSEP.

Each participating community will receive a real microgravity research mini-laboratory capable of supporting a single microgravity experiment and all launch services to fly the minilab to the space station in spring 2017 and return it to Earth. An experiment design competition in each community — engaging typically 300+ students — allows student teams to design and propose real experiments vying for their community′s reserved minilab.

Content resources for teachers and students support foundational instruction on science in microgravity and experimental design. Additional SSEP programming uses the experiment design competition to engage the community in embracing a learning-community model for STEM education.

This competition is open to students in grades 5-12 and college. Informal education groups and organizations also are encouraged to participate. Interested communities must inquire about the program no later than April 29, 2016. The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education is available to help interested communities in the U.S. secure the needed funding.

To learn more about this opportunity, visit the SSEP Mission 11 to International Space Station National Announcement of Opportunity at http://ssep.ncesse.org/2016/03/new-flight-opportunity-for-school-districts-announcing-student-spaceflight-experiments-program-ssep-mission-11-to-the-international-space-station-starting-september-2016/.

SSEP is enabled through a strategic partnership with NanoRacks LLC working with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the use of the International Space Station as a national laboratory. The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (http://www.iss-casis.org/) is a national partner on SSEP. To view a list of all SSEP national partners, visit http://ssep.ncesse.org/national-partners/.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please email SSEP National Program Director Jeff Goldstein at jeffgoldstein@ncesse.org.

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Future Engineers ‘Star Trek’ Replicator Challenge

Calling all Starfleet cadets! “Star Trek,” the American Society for Mechanical Engineers Foundation and NASA want you to pioneer the future of food in space. Your challenge is to create a digital model of a food-related item for astronauts to 3-D print in the year 2050. We want designs that boldly go where no human has 3-D printed before and that help astronauts eat nutritious meals so they can live long and prosper.

You must specify one of the following locations for your 3-D print: our moon, another planet, another planet’s moon, or a spacecraft beyond low-Earth orbit (explain where it is going and why). You also must specify the intended printing material (feedstock) for your 3-D print. This could be plastic, metal, recycled materials, locally sourced material, or any nonedible, 3-D printing feedstock you think would advance human space exploration.

Eating a meal in space goes beyond the actual food itself — from growing food to devouring it. There are many things to consider, so check out our rules, design guidelines and education resources before to starting your design.

Student winners will receive a range of prizes, including a trip to New York for a tour of the space shuttle Enterprise at the Intrepid Museum with an astronaut, a 3-D printer for the winners’ schools or a “Star Trek” prize pack.

Entries are due May 1, 2016. For more information about the challenge and how to enter, visit www.futureengineers.org/startrek.

Please email questions about this competition to info@futureengineers.org.

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Institute of Museum and Library Services Grants: STEM Expert Facilitation of Family Learning in Libraries and Museums

The Institute of Museum and Library Services seeks proposals for design-based research projects focused on inquiry-based STEM programs delivered by scientists, engineers, and related technical practitioners to children ages 6-10 and their families. Proposals should address the role of experts’ oral narratives (e.g., storytelling or personal histories) as part of object-based science inquiry and include information about how findings will be applicable in both museum and library settings.

Entities that are eligible to apply include libraries, agencies, institutions of higher education, museums, and other entities that advance the museum and library fields. Grant amounts up to $1,000,000 are available for a period of performance up to two years.

Applications are due May 1, 2016.

For more information, visit https://www.imls.gov/grants/available/stem-expert-facilitation-family-learning-libraries-and-museums-stemex.

Library representatives with questions about this opportunity should email Sandra Toro at storo@imls.gov. Museum representatives with questions should email Helen Wechsler at hwechsler@imls.gov or Sandra Narva at snarva@imls.gov.

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2016 NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge: Distributed Electric Propulsion

Distributed Electric Propulsion, or DEP, is an emerging aircraft design concept that has the potential to improve aircraft performance in a number of areas, including efficiency, takeoff and landing performance, emissions, noise abatement, safety, and ride quality. DEP also has the potential to enable new novel control systems. In this year’s NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge, student teams are challenged to design a commuter aircraft that applies DEP technology. The main source of thrust for the students’ concept may come from DEP or a combination of DEP and conventional propulsion devices (turboprops, turbofans, etc.). The challenge for the design team is to determine the most advantageous application of DEP for their aircraft and to justify their selection.

The contest is open to teams of full-time students enrolled in higher education institutions of the United States or its territories. This category includes universities, colleges, trade schools, community colleges, professional schools, etc. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

Final entries are due May 16, 2016.

For more information and a complete list of rules, visit http://aero.larc.nasa.gov/university-contest/.

Questions about the challenge should be directed to Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.

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2016 National Academy of Engineering – Engineering for You Video Contest 3

The National Academy of Engineering, or NAE, is launching the Engineering for You Video Contest 3, or E4U3.

This year, participants are tasked with creating a 1- to 2-minute video focused on mega-engineering. Mega-engineering projects typically address important needs of large populations and/or societies, require teams working across countries and cultures on a solution, and involve at least three disciplines including engineering.

The competition is open to all individuals or teams in the following competition categories:
— Middle school students and younger (grades K-8)
— High school students (grades 9-12)
— Tertiary education students (two-year college through graduate school, full or part time)
— The general public

The main prize is $25,000, and videos will be accepted through May 31, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.nae.edu/e4u3/.

Questions about the E4U3 Video Contest should be directed to E4Uvideocontest@nae.edu.

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‘CineSpace’ Short Film Competition

NASA and the Houston Cinema Arts Society once again will offer filmmakers around the world a chance to share their works inspired by — and using — actual NASA imagery through “CineSpace,” a short-film competition.

Films featuring NASA-captured imagery and video collected throughout the agency’s 50-year history will be judged on creativity, innovation and attention to detail. Works submitted to “CineSpace” will compete for cash prizes and the opportunity to be shown to audiences both on and off Earth. In addition to being screened at the “CineSpace” awards ceremony during the Houston Cinema Arts Festival, winners and finalists may be screened at other film festivals across the country, as well as on NASA TV and even on the International Space Station.

“CineSpace” is open to all filmmakers, both professional and aspiring. The competition will accept submissions of all genres, including narrative, documentary, comedy, drama, animation, experimental and others, of up to 10 minutes running time. Entries must use at least 10 percent publically available NASA imagery.

The submission period opens June 1, 2016, and closes July 31, 2016. Finalists and winners will be announced at a “CineSpace” event during the Houston Cinema Arts Festival in November. Entries will be competing for $26,000 in prizes with cash awards going to the top three submissions as well as the two films that best demonstrate the themes “Benefits of Space to Humanity” and “Future Space Exploration.”

For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press-release/cinespace-short-film-competition-returns-for-2016.

Please direct questions about this competition to cinespace@cinemartsociety.org.

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National Science Foundation’s Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers

The National Science Foundation is accepting proposals for the Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers, or ITEST, program. This program supports the development, implementation and selective spread of innovative strategies for engaging students in experiences that do the following:

— Increase student awareness of STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) and ICT (information and communications technology) careers
— Motivate students to pursue the education necessary to participate in those careers
— And/or provide students with technology-rich experiences that develop their knowledge of related content and skills (including critical thinking skills) needed for entering the STEM workforce.

ITEST projects must involve students but may also include teachers. The ITEST program is especially focused on broadening participation of students from traditionally underrepresented groups in STEM fields and related education and workforce domains. ITEST strongly encourages projects that actively engage business and industry partners. The resulting relationships better ensure that the students’ experiences foster the knowledge and skill sets needed for emerging STEM-related occupations.

Proposals are due Aug. 10, 2016.

For additional information about the program, including anticipated awards, visit http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2015/nsf15599/nsf15599.htm.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to DRLITEST@NSF.gov.

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National Science Foundation’s Advancing Informal STEM Learning Program

The National Science Foundation is accepting proposals for the Advancing Informal STEM Learning, or AISL, program. This program seeks to advance new approaches to evidence-based understanding of the design and development of STEM learning opportunities for the public in informal environments; to provide multiple pathways for broadening access to and engagement in STEM learning experiences; and to advance innovative research on and assessment of STEM learning in informal environments.

Proposals are due Nov. 8, 2016.

For additional information about the program, including anticipated awards, visit http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2015/nsf15593/nsf15593.htm.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to DRLAISL@NSF.gov.

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Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The Announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design (STEAMD); or activities culturally relevant to or focused on unrepresented in STEM careers populations, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or non-reimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA Announcement.

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Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — April 7, 2016

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.
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New This Week!
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Free NASA Educator Professional Development Webinars
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: April 7, 2016, at 4 p.m. EDT

2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education
Next Lecture Date: April 21, 2016, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)

Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 11 to the International Space Station
Audience: School Districts Serving Grades 5-12, Informal Education Institutions, Colleges and Universities
Inquiry Deadline: April 29, 2016

Download the New ‘Easy Ways to Get NASA Education Materials’ Flier
Audience: All Educators

Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students and Higher Education Institutions

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PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…
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Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy
Audience: Designed for Families With Children Ages 10 to 14, but Open to All
Next Event Date: April 8, 2016, 10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. EST

Scholarships Available for 2016 U.S. Space & Rocket Center® STEMcon Professional Development Sessions
Audience: STEM Educators of Grades 4-8 in Alabama, Arkansas, Iowa, Missouri and Tennessee
Application Deadline: April 8, 2016

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Environmental Education Grants
Audience: State and Local Education Agencies, Colleges and Universities, Non-profit Organizations, Tribal Education Agencies, and Non-Commercial Educational Broadcasting Companies.
Application Deadline: April 8, 2016

Family Day Events at Smithsonian’s Air and Space Museum
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: April 9, 2016

Teacher Advisors Needed: NASA / WGBH’s ‘Bringing the Universe to America’s Classrooms’ Initiative
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: April 11, 2016

Sally Ride EarthKAM @ Space Camp Announces Spring 2016 Mission
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Mission Date: April 12-16, 2016

NASA/NSTA Webinar — Global Precipitation Measurement Mission: Watersheds
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Date: April 13, 2016, 6:30 p.m. EDT

NASA TechPort Request for Information
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Feedback Deadline: April 14, 2016

Host a Real-Time Conversation With Crew Members Aboard the International Space Station
Audience: All Educators
Proposal Deadline: April 15, 2016

2016 LiftOff Summer Institute
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: April 15, 2016
Institute Dates: June 26-July 1, 2016

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s National Summer Teacher Institute on Innovation, STEM, and Intellectual Property
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: April 18, 2016
Event Date: July 17-22, 2016

White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities — 2016 All-Star Students Program
Audience: Higher Education Students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Application Deadline: April 22, 2016

2016 International Space Apps Challenge
Audience: Problem Solvers of All Ages
Event Dates: April 22-24, 2016

2017 eXploration Habitat (X-Hab) Academic Innovation Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Faculty and Students
Proposal Deadline: April 29, 2016

2016 Texas Space Grant Consortium Columbia Crew Memorial Undergraduate Scholarships
Audience: Undergraduate Students at Texas Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: April 29, 2016

2016 Texas Space Grant Consortium STEM Educator Scholarships
Audience: Educators Enrolled in STEM-field Programs for a Master’s Degree at Texas Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: April 29, 2016

2016-2017 Texas Space Grant Consortium Graduate Fellowships
Audience: Graduate Students at Texas Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: April 29, 2016

Future Engineers ‘Star Trek’ Replicator Challenge
Audience: Students in the United States Ages 5-19
Entry Deadline: May 1, 2016

Institute of Museum and Library Services Grants: STEM Expert Facilitation of Family Learning in Libraries and Museums
Audience: Libraries, Museums and Higher Education Institutions
Application Deadline: May 1, 2016

NASA History Program Office Fall 2016 Internships
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Fall 2016 Application Deadline: June 1, 2016

2016 Lunar Workshop for Educators
Audience: In-service and Pre-service Science Educators of Grades 6-9
Workshop Dates: June 27-July 1, 2016

2016 DREAM2Explore Workshop for Educators
Audience: In-service and Pre-service Science Educators of Grades 6-9
Workshop Dates: July 11-15, 2016

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

Free “NASA’s Journey to Mars” Planetarium/Dome Show
Audience: All Formal and Informal Educators

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Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

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NEW THIS WEEK!
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Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Virtual Missions and Exoplanets (vMAX): Part 2 — Technical Overview
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: April 7, 2016, at 4 p.m. EDT
With the Virtual Missions and Exoplanets curriculum, learn how to engage students in the study of exoplanetary systems through hands-on experiences, scenario-based problem solving, and multi-user virtual world simulations in 3-D. This webinar addresses technical requirements to download, install and navigate the virtual world as an avatar in preparation for using the vMAX virtual world with students. It is suggested that participants also attend the vMAX Curriculum (Part 1) webinar for a complete understanding of how to implement these resources. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/167830

Our Magnificent Sun Weathering the Seasons
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-5
Event Date: April 11, 2016, at 4 p.m. EDT
Discover highly interactive activities in which students learn about different features of the sun and its importance as our very own star. This session also will focus on seasons and ways to use a kinesthetic approach to teach why Earth has seasons. Attendees will learn how to participate in NASA’s Exploration Design Challenge where students learn about radiation and its effects on human space travel. The activities discussed in this session address Next Generation Science Standards ESS1, ESS2 and ETS1. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/172356

Air and Space — Airplanes and Rockets: Flying With Bernoulli
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades Pre-K-12
Event Date: April 12, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Participants will get an overview of Bernoulli’s Principle and how it relates to flight. NASA’s “Museum in the Box” curriculum will be used in the webinar. Participants will learn about current research going on at NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in California. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/161526

Air and Space — Airplanes and Rockets: Smart Skies LineUp With Math
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-9
Event Date: April 13, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Learn about the Smart Skies “LineUp With Math” program that enables students to explore and apply decision-making and proportional reasoning skills to resolve distance-rate-time problems in realistic air traffic control situations. A Web-based, interactive Air Traffic Control simulator that represents an air traffic controller’s screen will be used for solving problems. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/166662

For a full schedule of upcoming webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Please direct questions about this series of webinars to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.

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2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online

The Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, named after the founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and presented by JPL’s Office of Communication and Education, shares the excitement of the space program’s missions, instruments and other technologies.

Lectures take place twice per month, on consecutive Thursdays and Fridays. The Thursday lectures take place in JPL’s Theodore von Kármán Auditorium, and Friday lectures take place at Pasadena City College’s Vosloh Forum. Both start at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT). Admission and parking are free for all lectures. No reservations are required, but seating is limited. The Thursday evening lectures are streamed live for viewing online. Archives of past lectures are also available online.

Next Lecture in the Series:

CubeSats: Big Goals, Tiny Package
Event Date:
April 21 and April 22, 2016, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2016&month=4
Over the last 15 years, a miniature revolution in space science has been underway: CubeSats! First flown as educational tools the size of soup cans, significant capabilities have now been developed to allow these nanospacecraft to travel to the moon, asteroids and even Mars. Join Dr. Andrew Klesh, Chief Engineer for Interplanetary Small Spacecraft, for a discussion about these small spacecraft and the types of missions they are being used for.

For more information about the Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, including a complete list of upcoming lectures, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.php.

Questions about this series should be directed to http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php.

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Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 11 to the International Space Station

The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education and the Arthur C. Clarke Institute for Space Education, in partnership with NanoRacks LLC, announce a science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, opportunity for school districts across the U.S. and space station partner nations. The newest flight opportunity, Mission 11 to the International Space Station, gives students across a community the ability to design and propose real experiments to fly in low-Earth orbit on the space station. This opportunity is part of the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program, or SSEP.

Each participating community will receive a real microgravity research mini-laboratory capable of supporting a single microgravity experiment and all launch services to fly the minilab to the space station in spring 2017 and return it to Earth. An experiment design competition in each community — engaging typically 300+ students — allows student teams to design and propose real experiments vying for their community′s reserved minilab.

Content resources for teachers and students support foundational instruction on science in microgravity and experimental design. Additional SSEP programming uses the experiment design competition to engage the community in embracing a learning-community model for STEM education.

This competition is open to students in grades 5-12 and college. Informal education groups and organizations also are encouraged to participate. Interested communities must inquire about the program no later than April 29, 2016. The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education is available to help interested communities in the U.S. secure the needed funding.

To learn more about this opportunity, visit the SSEP Mission 11 to International Space Station National Announcement of Opportunity at http://ssep.ncesse.org/2016/03/new-flight-opportunity-for-school-districts-announcing-student-spaceflight-experiments-program-ssep-mission-11-to-the-international-space-station-starting-september-2016/.

SSEP is enabled through a strategic partnership with NanoRacks LLC working with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the use of the International Space Station as a national laboratory. The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (http://www.iss-casis.org/) is a national partner on SSEP. To view a list of all SSEP national partners, visit http://ssep.ncesse.org/national-partners/.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please email SSEP National Program Director Jeff Goldstein at jeffgoldstein@ncesse.org.

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Download the New ‘Easy Ways to Get NASA Education Materials’ Flier

Are you looking for NASA resources to incorporate into your curriculum? NASA Education recently published an updated and enhanced version of the ‘Easy Ways to Get NASA Education Materials’ flier.

NASA Education’s mission is to advance high-quality STEM education using NASA’s unique capabilities. To do this, NASA’s Office of Education collaborates with NASA experts to connect both learners and educators to exciting NASA missions through dynamic STEM content. These efforts result in innovative and informative educational materials that inspire an interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. This flier describes how teachers can access the materials.

Download your copy today at http://www.nasa.gov/education/easyways/.

Looking for more? NASA’s Educational Resource Search Tool can help you find lesson plans, posters, educator guides and other materials to boost your science, technology, engineering and mathematics curriculum. Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keywords.

To check out the search tool and begin your hunt for educational resources, visit http://www.nasa.gov/education/materials/.

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Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Are you looking for federally sponsored STEM education training and funding opportunities? The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science, along with the participating agencies in the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education, and in collaboration with Science.gov, have launched a pair of Web-based portals for undergraduate and graduate students.

Student users can search the portal for a range of opportunities that they can apply for directly, such as research internships and fellowships. Likewise, academic institutions can search for federal funding opportunities to establish innovative training programs for undergraduates or graduate students.

For programs and opportunities for undergraduates, visit http://stemundergrads.science.gov/.

For graduate programs and opportunities, visit http://stemgradstudents.science.gov/.

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PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…
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Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy

Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy, at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia, is a free alternate-reality game that will challenge you to become an astronaut-in-training for a future trip to Mars. Choose what role you will play on the mission; engage in fun interactive activities; and explore the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics skills you will need as a next-generation space traveler. Along the way, you’ll learn about some of the museum’s fascinating artifacts.

Instructions and guidance are given via a special webpage accessed on your mobile device. Players should bring their own phones or devices equipped with an internet browser and a camera. Having a digital picture-taking device (smartphone, tablet, camera) is highly recommended but not required.

The game is aimed at upper elementary and middle school visitors and their families. Do you want to bring a group? Reservations are required for groups larger than 15.

The next offering of the Astronaut Academy is on April 8, 2016. Begin your training with Astronaut Orientation in the Claude Moore Education Center Classroom 1 located on the first level across from the restrooms. Astronaut Orientation is offered at regular intervals between 10:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. The last opportunity to start the game is at 2:30 p.m. A self-guided activity, the game should take between 60 and 90 minutes, and staff will help you along the way.

For more information, including a full list of upcoming Astronaut Academy dates, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/techquest/.

Please direct questions about the Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy to the visitor service line at 202-633-2214.

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Scholarships Available for 2016 U.S. Space & Rocket Center® STEMcon Professional Development Sessions

The U.S. Space & Rocket Center® is offering scholarships to educators to attend a four-day professional development session featuring NASA-focused STEM content and resources. Applicants must live in the five-state region served by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The states included are Alabama, Arkansas, Iowa, Missouri and Tennessee.

STEMcon provides 32 hours of intensive classroom, laboratory and training time. During the program, educators participate in astronaut-style training and simulations, along with activities designed to promote lifelong learning. All lessons and activities correlate to Next Generation Science Standards and other national standards and are ready to use in various educational settings.

Funding for this program is provided by a grant from the NASA Competitive Program for Science Museums and Planetariums. The scholarship includes tuition, meals, lodging, lesson materials and a stipend to help offset travel expenses.

STEMcon sessions will take place June 2-5, 2016, (arrival June 1; departure June 5), and July 8-11, 2015, (arrival July 7; departure July 11).

STEMcon applications are due April 8, 2016.

For more information and to access the online application, visit http://rocketcenter.com/educators/STEMCon.

Please direct questions about the 2016 STEMcon opportunity to education@spacecamp.com.

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Environmental Education Grants

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency seeks proposals for grants to support environmental education projects that promote environmental awareness and stewardship and help people develop the skills to take responsible actions to protect the environment. This grant program provides financial support for projects that design, demonstrate and/or disseminate environmental education practices, methods or techniques.

Entities that are eligible to apply include local education agencies, state education or environmental agencies, colleges and universities, nonprofit organizations, noncommercial educational broadcasting entities, and tribal education agencies (including schools and community colleges controlled by an Indian tribe, band or nation). Applicant organizations must be located in the United States or its territories, and the majority of the educational activities must take place in the U.S.; in the U.S. and Canada or Mexico; or in the territories of the U.S.

Applications are due April 8, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.epa.gov/education/environmental-education-ee-grants.

Please direct questions about this grant opportunity to eegrants@epa.gov.

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Family Day Event at Smithsonian’s Air and Space Museum

The Smithsonian’s Family Day event series celebrates the diverse ethnic and cultural communities that have contributed to aviation and space exploration. Events will commemorate historic and current contributions through presentations and activities for the entire family. The events are free and open to the public.

Explore the Universe
April 9, 2016, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. EST
National Air and Space Museum in Washington, District of Columbia

People around the world have always looked to the sky, but they don’t always see the same things. Bring your family to experience how different people study the sky and to hear their stories. Learn about telescopes and, if weather permits, do some daytime observations.
http://airandspace.si.edu/events/heritage-days/explore-universe/

Please direct questions about this event to the Visitor Service line at 202-633-2214.

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Teacher Advisors Needed: NASA / WGBH’s ‘Bringing the Universe to America’s Classrooms’ Initiative

Public Broadcasting Station WGBH/Boston, supported by a NASA cooperative agreement, is developing new instructional models and digital media tools for STEM classrooms. WGBH is looking for 50 K-12 educators to act as advisors in the development of the new resources.

Teacher Advisors will work with media producers and education researchers to design new ways to engage students around topics in Earth, space and physical sciences. The main activity will center on the evaluation and testing of instructional modules that incorporate cutting-edge scientific data digital media tools (e.g., data visualizations, interactives, virtual field trips, etc.) and address educational standards.

Applicants must be full-time K-12 educators (U.S. or U.S. territories) currently teaching topics in Earth, physical and/or space science. Eligible candidates must have a passion for using digital technology and media and a desire to gain instructional design experience.

Applications are due April 11, 2016.

For more information and to access the online application, visit http://www.wgbhteacheradvisors.org/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to carolyn_jacobs@wgbh.org.

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Sally Ride EarthKAM @ Space Camp Announces Spring 2016 Mission

Registration is open for the Spring 2016 mission for the Sally Ride EarthKAM @ Space Camp program taking place April 12-16, 2016. During the mission, students worldwide may submit requests to have a camera aboard the International Space Station capture an image of a specific location on Earth. Related resources, including images and activities, are available for use in the classroom. The optional online activities are targeted at middle school students but are adaptable for other grade levels. All students and educators are welcome, including participants in afterschool programs.

For more information and to register for the upcoming mission, visit https://www.earthkam.org/.

To learn more, watch this short video from Space Station Live. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SVrW3uOkLjU

Please submit questions about the Sally Ride EarthKAM @ Space Camp program via https://www.earthkam.org/contact.

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NASA/NSTA Webinar — Global Precipitation Measurement Mission: Watersheds

Join the National Science Teachers Association for a free interactive webinar to learn about watersheds and NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement, or GPM, mission. The 90-minute session will take place on April 13, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EDT.

What is a watershed? Why are watersheds important? What are signs of a healthy watershed? Why are some watersheds or water reservoirs losing their water? Topics presented at this webinar will include watershed basics and hands-on investigations students can conduct to monitor their local watershed areas. NASA scientists will give background science information about watersheds and how NASA helps monitor watershed regions.

GPM is an international satellite mission managed by NASA and JAXA (the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) that will provide next-generation observations of rain and snow. The GPM mission will help us learn more about Earth’s water and energy cycles, improve the forecasting of extreme events that cause natural disasters, and extend current capabilities of using satellite precipitation information to directly benefit society.

All participants will receive a certificate of participation and 100 Learning Center activity points for attending and completing the post-program evaluation. An archive and presentation slides will be available at the end of the program.

For more information and to register to attend the webinar event, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/resource/?id=10.2505/9/WSNASA15_Apr13.

For more information about GPM, visit http://www.nasa.gov/gpm or http://gpm.nasa.gov.

Please email questions about this opportunity to webseminars@nsta.org.

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NASA TechPort Request for Information

NASA is conducting this Request for Information, or RFI, to better understand user needs and identify potential improvements for the NASA Technology Portfolio System (TechPort).

NASA developed TechPort as an agencywide tool to capture detailed information on technology investments that support missions across aeronautics, space exploration and scientific discovery. NASA has used TechPort internally since 2012. Through continuous updates, the system now contains information on more than 840 active projects and more than 7,600 historical records. In February 2015, NASA opened a beta version of TechPort to the public.

To help enhance the TechPort system, NASA is seeking feedback via a short, 18-question survey that takes an estimated 5 to 10 minutes to complete. Feedback may be submitted through April 14, 2016.

To provide feedback, visit https://techport.nasa.gov/rfi.

To visit the NASA TechPort, visit http://techport.nasa.gov/home.

Please direct questions about NASA TechPort and this RFI to hq-techport@mail.nasa.gov.

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Host a Real-Time Conversation With Crew Members Aboard the International Space Station

ARISS-US is now accepting proposals from U.S. schools, museums, science centers and community youth organizations to host an Amateur Radio on the International Space Station, or ARISS, contact between Jan. 1 – June 30, 2017. To maximize these radio contact opportunities, ARISS-US is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed education plan. Proposals are due April 15, 2016.

Using amateur radio, students can ask astronauts questions about life in space and other space-related topics. Students fully engage in the ARISS contact by helping set up an amateur radio ground station at the school and then using that station to talk directly with a crew member on the International Space Station for approximately 10 minutes. ARISS provides experienced mentors and relies on local amateur radio volunteers to help organizations obtain the technology required to host this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for students.

For proposal information and more details such as expectations, proposal guidelines and proposal form, visit http://www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.

ARISS-US is offered through a partnership between NASA; the American Radio Relay League, or ARRL; and the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation, or AMSAT. ARISS was created and is managed by an international working group, including several countries in Europe as well as Japan, Russia, Canada, and the USA.

Questions about this opportunity should be emailed to ariss@arrl.org.

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2016 LiftOff Summer Institute

Registration is now open for the 2016 LiftOff Summer Institute, sponsored by NASA’s Texas Space Grant Consortium. This weeklong professional development training for teachers will be held June 26-July 1, 2016, at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. This competitive aerospace workshop emphasizes science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, learning experiences through speakers, hands-on activities and field investigations.

The theme for this year’s institute is “Exploration: Past, Present and Future.” The event will focus on how NASA is learning from past exploration and current space station research and how it will apply its discoveries to future missions to deep space.

Attendees must be U.S. citizens currently employed as classroom teachers of grades 4-12 with at least one year teaching experience prior to the institute. Texas Space Grant pays all expenses for any Texas teacher selected. Other Space Grant Consortia fund teachers from their states.

Applications are due April 15, 2016.

For more information and to access the online application, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/liftoff/.

If you have questions about the 2016 LiftOff Summer Institute, please email your inquiries to Margaret Baguio at baguio@tsgc.utexas.edu.

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Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions and museums to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

There will be a nominal shipping fee that must be paid online with a credit card.  To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.

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U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s National Summer Teacher Institute on Innovation, STEM, and Intellectual Property

The United States Patent and Trademark Office, or USPTO, will host its third annual National Summer Teacher Institute on Innovation, STEM, and Intellectual Property on July 17-22, 2016, at Michigan State University in East Lansing.

This multiday, professional development opportunity will train elementary, middle and high school teachers to incorporate concepts of making, inventing, creating and protecting intellectual property into classroom instruction. Participants are expected to implement lessons learned from the institute into their schools and school districts.

The institute is open to teachers nationwide, so apply to be a part of this exciting cohort! In accordance with the Federal Travel Regulations and USPTO travel policy, travel and lodging expenses will be covered for teachers who are traveling more than 50 miles to the venue. Space is limited.

The deadline for applications has been extended to April 18, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.uspto.gov/learning-and-resources/outreach-and-education/national-summer-teacher-institute.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to NSTI_Applications@uspto.gov.

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White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities — 2016 All-Star Students Program

The White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities works to promote HBCU excellence, innovation and sustainability. The Initiative will recognize current HBCU students for their dedication to academics, leadership and civic engagement as 2016 HBCU All-Star Students.

The appointment period will last approximately one year. During this time, HBCU All-Stars will serve as ambassadors of the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities by providing outreach opportunities and communications to their fellow students about the value of education and the Initiative as a networking resource. Through social media and personal and professional relationships with community-based organizations, students will share promising and proven practices that support opportunities for all young people to realize their educational and career potential. The program will provide an opportunity to participate in regional and national events as well as webchats with Initiative staff and other professionals from a wide range of disciplines that support a spirit of engagement and personal and professional development.

Nominees must be current undergraduate, graduate or professional students at an HBCU. Students must be enrolled for the 2016-2017 fall semester. Applications must be submitted by 11:59 p.m. EDT on April 22, 2016.

For more information and to download an application, visit http://sites.ed.gov/whhbcu/resources/hbcu-all-star-students/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to hbcuallstars@ed.gov.

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2016 International Space Apps Challenge

NASA and space agencies around the world are preparing for the fifth annual International Space Apps Challenge, which will be held April 22-24, 2016. Participants will develop mobile applications, software, hardware, data visualization and platform solutions that could contribute to space exploration missions and help improve life on Earth.

This year’s challenge kicks off with a boot camp event on April 22 that will be live-streamed globally. The two-day “code-athon” event will follow on April 23-24. It will be hosted locally at over 193 locations spanning 72 countries. More than 200 data sources, including data sets, data services and tools, will be available. This event will bring tech-savvy citizens, scientists, entrepreneurs, educators and students together to help solve challenges relevant to both space exploration and broader subjects that impact life on Earth.

Registration for citizen participation is now open.

To learn more about the International Space Apps Challenge, get the latest updates and register to attend an event, visit https://2016.spaceappschallenge.org/.

If you have questions about the challenge, please visit https://2016.spaceappschallenge.org/contact.

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2017 eXploration Habitat (X-Hab) Academic Innovation Challenge

NASA is seeking university teams to develop innovative design solutions for deep space human exploration systems in the 2017 eXploration Systems and Habitation Academic Innovation Challenge. This year, the X-Hab Challenge scope is being formally extended not only to include habitation topics but other areas of exploration systems as well. Topic areas include in-space recycling/reclamation, quantification of condensed water on the lunar surface, a wastewater to plant nutrient solution, a microgravity plant-watering system and a microgravity food production system.

The winners of the challenge will receive between $10,000 and $30,000 to design and produce functional products of interest to NASA human spaceflight. Proposals are due April 29, 2016, and awardees will follow a tailored systems-engineering process with the completion of the projects in the May 2017 timeframe.

Proposals will be accepted from university faculty who are U.S. citizens and who teach at an accredited university in the U.S. Eligible educators must be teaching a senior or graduate engineering design, industrial design or architecture curriculum that is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.

Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tribal Colleges and other minority-serving educational institutions are particularly encouraged to apply. Proposals from women, members of underrepresented minority groups and persons with disabilities also are highly encouraged.

For more information about the challenge and how to submit a proposal, visit http://spacegrant.org/xhab/.

Please email questions about the X-Hab Challenge to xhab@spacegrant.org.

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2016 Texas Space Grant Consortium Columbia Crew Memorial Undergraduate Scholarships

The Texas Space Grant Consortium and the Aviation and Space Foundation of Texas, in partnership with NASA, are offering undergraduate scholarships of $1,500 in memory of the Space Shuttle Columbia astronauts. These seven men and women paid the ultimate sacrifice to expand the exploration of space and our knowledge of the world that we live in.

These scholarships are intended to recognize high-quality students and encourage their consideration of graduate studies in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, ultimately leading to careers in STEM-related fields. The scholarships stress excellence in academics, participation in STEM education and research projects, and the exhibition of leadership qualities.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens and registered for at least a half-time course load at a Texas Space Grant Consortium institution. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 29, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/grants/2016/scholars_announcement.html.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to scholarships@tsgc.utexas.edu.

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2016 Texas Space Grant Consortium STEM Educator Scholarships

The Texas Space Grant Consortium has established a new Educator STEM Scholarship Program. These $1,500 scholarships are intended to recognize teachers enrolled in master’s programs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields at a TSGC member institution.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens who hold a bachelor’s degree and are enrolled in a master’s program at a Texas Space Grant Consortium institution. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 29, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/edu_stem/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to scholarships@tsgc.utexas.edu.

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2016-2017 Texas Space Grant Consortium Graduate Fellowships

Texas Space Grant Consortium Fellowships encourage graduate study in the fields of space science and engineering. Interdisciplinary and integrated work experience are emphasized.

Each $5,000 award supplements half-time graduate support (or fellowship) provided by a Consortium institution. The fellowship award is good for one year. Each fellowship may be renewed for a maximum of three years, providing the recipient has spent no more than two of those years as a master’s candidate.

Applicants must be registered for full-time study in a graduate program at one or more of the Texas Space Grant Consortium institutions and must be promised financial support at that institution. Applicants must also be U.S. citizens. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 29, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/grants/2016/fellows_announcement.html.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to fellowships@tsgc.utexas.edu.

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Future Engineers ‘Star Trek’ Replicator Challenge

Calling all Starfleet cadets! “Star Trek,” the American Society for Mechanical Engineers Foundation and NASA want you to pioneer the future of food in space. Your challenge is to create a digital model of a food-related item for astronauts to 3-D print in the year 2050. We want designs that boldly go where no human has 3-D printed before and that help astronauts eat nutritious meals so they can live long and prosper.

You must specify one of the following locations for your 3-D print: our moon, another planet, another planet’s moon, or a spacecraft beyond low-Earth orbit (explain where it is going and why). You also must specify the intended printing material (feedstock) for your 3-D print. This could be plastic, metal, recycled materials, locally sourced material, or any nonedible, 3-D printing feedstock you think would advance human space exploration.

Eating a meal in space goes beyond the actual food itself — from growing food to devouring it. There are many things to consider, so check out our rules, design guidelines and education resources before to starting your design.

Student winners will receive a range of prizes, including a trip to New York for a tour of the space shuttle Enterprise at the Intrepid Museum with an astronaut, a 3-D printer for the winners’ schools or a “Star Trek” prize pack.

Entries are due May 1, 2016. For more information about the challenge and how to enter, visit www.futureengineers.org/startrek.

Please email questions about this competition to info@futureengineers.org.

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Institute of Museum and Library Services Grants: STEM Expert Facilitation of Family Learning in Libraries and Museums

The Institute of Museum and Library Services seeks proposals for design-based research projects focused on inquiry-based STEM programs delivered by scientists, engineers, and related technical practitioners to children ages 6-10 and their families. Proposals should address the role of experts’ oral narratives (e.g., storytelling or personal histories) as part of object-based science inquiry and include information about how findings will be applicable in both museum and library settings.

Entities that are eligible to apply include libraries, agencies, institutions of higher education, museums, and other entities that advance the museum and library fields. Grant amounts up to $1,000,000 are available for a period of performance up to two years.

Applications are due May 1, 2016.

For more information, visit https://www.imls.gov/grants/available/stem-expert-facilitation-family-learning-libraries-and-museums-stemex.

Library representatives with questions about this opportunity should email Sandra Toro at storo@imls.gov. Museum representatives with questions should email Helen Wechsler at hwechsler@imls.gov or Sandra Narva at snarva@imls.gov.

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NASA History Program Office Fall 2016 Internships

The NASA History Program Office is seeking undergraduate and graduate students for fall 2016 internships. The History Program Office maintains archival materials to answer research questions from NASA personnel, journalists, scholars, students at all levels and others from around the world. The division also edits and publishes several books and monographs each year. It maintains a large number of websites on NASA history.

Students of all majors are welcome to apply. While detailed prior knowledge of the aeronautics and space fields is not necessary, a keen interest and some basic familiarity with these topics are needed. Strong research, writing and editing skills are essential. Experience with social media is a plus.

Intern projects are flexible. Typical projects include handling a variety of information requests, writing posts for the NASA history Twitter and Facebook pages, editing historical manuscripts, doing research and writing biographical sketches, and identifying and captioning photos.

Applications for fall 2016 internships are due June 1, 2016.

For more information, visit http://history.nasa.gov/interncall.htm.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please contact Bill Barry at bill.barry@nasa.gov.

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2016 Lunar Workshop for Educators

NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, mission is sponsoring a workshop for educators of students in grades 6-9. The workshop will focus on lunar science, exploration, and how our understanding of the moon is growing and changing with the new data from current and recent lunar missions.

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has allowed scientists to measure the coldest known place in the solar system, map the surface of the moon in unprecedented detail and accuracy, find evidence of recent lunar geologic activity, characterize the radiation environment around the moon and its potential effects on future lunar explorers, and much, much more!

Workshop participants will reinforce their understanding of lunar science concepts; gain tools to help address common student misconceptions about the moon; and interact with lunar scientists and engineers. Participants will work with LRO data and learn how to bring the data and information to their students using hands-on activities aligned with Next Generation Science Standards for grades 6-9.

The workshop will take place June 27-July 1, 2016, at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Workshop participants will have the opportunity to tour the LRO Mission Operation Center and the Goddard spacecraft testing facilities.

For more information and to register to attend, visit http://lunar.gsfc.nasa.gov/lwe/index.html.

Questions about this workshop should be directed to Andrea Jones at Andrea.J.Jones@nasa.gov.

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2016 DREAM2Explore Workshop for Educators

The “Dynamic Response of the Environments at Asteroids, the Moon, and moons of Mars,” or DREAM2, team at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center is hosting a free workshop for educators of students in grades 6-9. Participants will learn how our understanding of Earth’s moon, asteroids and the moons of Mars is growing and changing with new data and models from current and recent planetary missions and the work of the DREAM2 team.

Workshop participants will reinforce their understanding of lunar and planetary science concepts; gain tools to help address common student misconceptions about the moon; and interact with NASA scientists who study the dynamic environments surrounding these rocky objects. Participants will work with real scientific data and learn how to bring the data and information to their students using hands-on activities aligned with Next Generation Science Standards for grades 6-9.

The workshop will take place July 11-15, 2016, at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Workshop participants will become certified to borrow meteorite samples from NASA and will receive Certificates of Participation and Letters of Completion that indicate 30 hours of instruction.

For more information and to register to attend, visit http://ssed.gsfc.nasa.gov/dream/DREAM/DREAM2Explore.html.

Questions about this workshop should be directed to Andrea Jones at Andrea.J.Jones@nasa.gov.

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Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The Announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design (STEAMD); or activities culturally relevant to or focused on unrepresented in STEM careers populations, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or non-reimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA Announcement.

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Free “NASA’s Journey to Mars” Planetarium/Dome Show

Are you looking for ways to prepare your students for STEM-related career opportunities in the future? Do you want to spark their interest in pushing the boundaries of technology and innovation? Right now, NASA’s fleet of Mars robotic explorers is paving the way for human exploration of the solar system in the coming decades. Have your students join NASA in preparing for a monumental journey of a lifetime — to Mars!

“NASA’s Journey to Mars” is a short planetarium presentation that can be used in the educational domes of your school district, as well as local planetariums, to inspire interest in STEM. To learn more, including how you can acquire the show for use in your area, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/journey-of-a-lifetime-mars-education-resources/.

Please direct questions about the “NASA’s Journey to Mars” planetarium/dome show to Elsie Weigel at elsie.weigel@nasa.gov.

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Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — March 31, 2016

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.
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New This Week!
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Free NASA Educator Professional Development Webinars
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: March 31, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT

Free Educator Workshop: Journey to M*A*R*S* — Being Mobile on Mars
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Event Dates: April 6, 2016, 4:30-6 p.m. PDT

Scholarships Available for 2016 U.S. Space & Rocket Center® STEMcon Professional Development Sessions
Audience: STEM Educators of Grades 4-8 in Alabama, Arkansas, Iowa, Missouri and Tennessee
Application Deadline: April 8, 2016

Teacher Advisors Needed: NASA / WGBH’s ‘Bringing the Universe to America’s Classrooms’ Initiative
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: April 11, 2016

2016 International Space Apps Challenge
Audience: Problem Solvers of All Ages
Event Dates: April 22-24, 2016

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PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…
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STEM@NASA Goddard: Women’s History Month
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: March 31, 2016, at 1 p.m. EST

2016 International Summer School in Astrobiology
Audience: Graduate Students Studying at U.S. Institutions
Application Deadline: March 31, 2016
Summer School Dates: June 20-24, 2016

International Space Station Research Design Challenge: Capillary Effects on Liquids Exploratory Research Experiments
Audience: Grade 8-12 Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: April 1, 2016

2016 Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching
Audience: All Educators and Students
Nomination Deadline: April 1, 2016

Astrobiology Graduate Conference 2016
Audience: Astrobiology Graduate Students
Application Deadline: April 1, 2016
Conference Dates: July 24-27, 2016

2016 Fellowship in Aerospace History
Audience: Recent Recipients of the Ph.D. in History or a Closely Related Field, or Students in Programs Granting Doctoral Degrees in Those Fields
Application Deadline: April 1, 2016

2016 NASA Fellowship in the History of Space Technology
Audience: Recent Recipients of the Ph.D. in History of Technology or a Closely Related Field, and Students Pursuing Doctoral Degrees in Those Fields
Application Deadline: April 1, 2016

Earth Observatory’s Tournament Earth 2016
Audience: All Educators and Students
Competition Dates: Through April 1, 2016

Free Tours of Facilities at NASA’s Glenn Research Center
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: April 2, 2016

Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy
Audience: Designed for Families With Children Ages 10 to 14, but Open to All
Next Event Date: April 2, 2016, 10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. EST

GLOBE El Niño Field Campaign and Webinar Series
Audience: K-12 Educators
Next Webinar Date: April 6, 2016, at 8 p.m. EDT

2016 History of Science Society Fellowship in the History of Space Science
Audience: Recent Recipients of the Ph.D. in History of Science or a Closely Related Field, or Students in Programs Granting Doctoral Degrees in Those Fields
Application Deadline: April 6, 2016

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Environmental Education Grants
Audience: State and Local Education Agencies, Colleges and Universities, Non-profit Organizations, Tribal Education Agencies, and Non-Commercial Educational Broadcasting Companies.
Application Deadline: April 8, 2016

Family Day Events at Smithsonian’s Air and Space Museum
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: April 9, 2016

Early Career Fellowships for Planetary Science Researchers
Audience: Higher Education Students
Proposal Deadline: Various Dates Depending on Specific Program

Sally Ride EarthKAM @ Space Camp Announces Spring 2016 Mission
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Mission Date: April 12-16, 2016

NASA/NSTA Webinar — Global Precipitation Measurement Mission: Watersheds
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Date: April 13, 2016, 6:30 p.m. EDT

NASA TechPort Request for Information
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Feedback Deadline: April 14, 2016

Host a Real-Time Conversation With Crew Members Aboard the International Space Station
Audience: All Educators
Proposal Deadline: April 15, 2016

2016 LiftOff Summer Institute
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: April 15, 2016
Institute Dates: June 26-July 1, 2016

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

Future Engineers ‘Star Trek’ Replicator Challenge
Audience: Students in the United States Ages 5-19
Entry Deadline: May 1, 2016

Federal Aviation Administration Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues
Audience: Graduate Students
Application Deadline: May 15, 2016

NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellowships
Audience: Graduate Students and Ph.D. Scientists
Next Application Deadline: July 1, 2016

Help NASA Study Mars — Planet Four: Terrains
Audience: All Educators and Students
Project Timeframe: Ongoing Through Mid-2016

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

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Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

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NEW THIS WEEK!
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Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Virtual Missions and Exoplanets (vMAX): Part 2 – Technical Overview
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: March 31, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT
Learn how to engage students in the study of exoplanetary systems through hands-on experiences, scenario-based problem solving, and 3-D multi-user virtual world simulations with the Virtual Missions and Exoplanets curriculum. This webinar addresses technical requirements to download, install, and navigate the virtual world as an avatar in preparation for using the vMAX virtual world with students. It is suggested that participants also attend the vMAX Curriculum (Part 1) webinar for a complete understanding of how to implement these resources. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/166714

Air and Space — Airplanes and Rockets: Exploring the Extreme
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-8
Event Date: April 4, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Participants will get an overview of NASA’s Exploring the Extreme educator guide. Discussions will focus on hands-on activities to teach about force and motion. The activities presented in this webinar address the Next Generation Science Standard PS2. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/166371

Air and Space — Airplanes and Rockets: Principles of Flight
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades Pre-K – 12
Event Date: April 5, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Participants will learn about the principles of flight and the four forces of flight while using NASA’s Museum in the Box curriculum. Participants also will learn about current research going on at NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in California. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/161525

Virtual Missions and Exoplanets (vMAX): Part 1 — Curriculum Overview
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: April 6, 2016, at 4 p.m. EDT
With the Virtual Missions and Exoplanets curriculum, learn how to engage students in the study of exoplanetary systems through hands-on experiences, scenario-based problem solving, and 3-D multi-user virtual world simulations. This webinar provides an overview of exoplanetary system resources that build upon the use of NASA data. These resources are organized for a one-week experience for middle school students but are flexible enough to be used for any formal or informal audience and time period. It is suggested that participants also attend the vMAX Technical (Part 2) webinar for a complete understanding of how to implement these resources. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/167829

Virtual Missions and Exoplanets (vMAX): Part 2 — Technical Overview
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: April 7, 2016, at 4 p.m. EDT
With the Virtual Missions and Exoplanets curriculum, learn how to engage students in the study of exoplanetary systems through hands-on experiences, scenario-based problem solving, and multi-user virtual world simulations in 3-D. This webinar addresses technical requirements to download, install and navigate the virtual world as an avatar in preparation for using the vMAX virtual world with students. It is suggested that participants also attend the vMAX Curriculum (Part 1) webinar for a complete understanding of how to implement these resources. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/167830

For a full schedule of upcoming webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Please direct questions about this series of webinars to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.

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Free Educator Workshop: Journey to M*A*R*S* — Being Mobile on Mars

Are you ready to go on a Journey to Mars? Join NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center Office of Education for a free educator professional development workshop on Being Mobile on Mars. Through hands-on experiments and physical demonstrations, educators will learn how to design and construct a rover for Mars using the Beginning Engineering Science & Technology, or BEST, curriculum and the engineering design process.

Participants will engage in hands-on, standards-aligned mathematics, science and engineering activities as they construct a rover, predict its performance and chance of mission success, and test drive it. Learn about real-world connections with NASA research and our Journey to Mars.

The workshop will take place Wednesday, April 6, 2016, 4:30-6 p.m. PDT at NASA’s Armstrong Educator Resource Center at the AERO Institute in Palmdale, California.

For more information, visit http://aeroinstitute.org/educator_workshops/Mars_Rover_Workshop_Flyer.pdf.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Sondra Geddes at sondra.l.geddes@nasa.gov.

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Scholarships Available for 2016 U.S. Space & Rocket Center® STEMcon Professional Development Sessions

The U.S. Space & Rocket Center® is offering scholarships to educators to attend a four-day professional development session featuring NASA-focused STEM content and resources. Applicants must live in the five-state region served by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The states included are Alabama, Arkansas, Iowa, Missouri and Tennessee.

STEMcon provides 32 hours of intensive classroom, laboratory and training time. During the program, educators participate in astronaut-style training and simulations, along with activities designed to promote lifelong learning. All lessons and activities correlate to Next Generation Science Standards and other national standards and are ready to use in various educational settings.

Funding for this program is provided by a grant from the NASA Competitive Program for Science Museums and Planetariums. The scholarship includes tuition, meals, lodging, lesson materials and a stipend to help offset travel expenses.

STEMcon sessions will take place June 2-5, 2016, (arrival June 1; departure June 5), and July 8-11, 2015, (arrival July 7; departure July 11).

STEMcon applications are due April 8, 2016.

For more information and to access the online application, visit http://rocketcenter.com/educators/STEMCon.

Please direct questions about the 2016 STEMcon opportunity to education@spacecamp.com.

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Teacher Advisors Needed: NASA / WGBH’s ‘Bringing the Universe to America’s Classrooms’ Initiative

Public Broadcasting Station WGBH/Boston, supported by a NASA cooperative agreement, is developing new instructional models and digital media tools for STEM classrooms. WGBH is looking for 50 K-12 educators to act as advisors in the development of the new resources.

Teacher Advisors will work with media producers and education researchers to design new ways to engage students around topics in Earth, space and physical sciences. The main activity will center on the evaluation and testing of instructional modules that incorporate cutting-edge scientific data digital media tools (e.g., data visualizations, interactives, virtual field trips, etc.) and address educational standards.

Applicants must be full-time K-12 educators (U.S. or U.S. territories) currently teaching topics in Earth, physical and/or space science. Eligible candidates must have a passion for using digital technology and media and a desire to gain instructional design experience.

Applications are due April 11, 2016.

For more information and to access the online application, visit http://www.wgbhteacheradvisors.org/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to carolyn_jacobs@wgbh.org.

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2016 International Space Apps Challenge

NASA and space agencies around the world are preparing for the fifth annual International Space Apps Challenge, which will be held April 22-24, 2016. Participants will develop mobile applications, software, hardware, data visualization and platform solutions that could contribute to space exploration missions and help improve life on Earth.

This year’s challenge kicks off with a boot camp event on April 22 that will be live-streamed globally. The two-day “code-athon” event will follow on April 23-24. It will be hosted locally at over 193 locations spanning 72 countries. More than 200 data sources, including data sets, data services and tools, will be available. This event will bring tech-savvy citizens, scientists, entrepreneurs, educators and students together to help solve challenges relevant to both space exploration and broader subjects that impact life on Earth.

Registration for citizen participation is now open.

To learn more about the International Space Apps Challenge, get the latest updates and register to attend an event, visit https://2016.spaceappschallenge.org/.

If you have questions about the challenge, please visit https://2016.spaceappschallenge.org/contact.

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PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…
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STEM@NASA Goddard: Women’s History Month

Join NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center for the final “STEM@NASA Goddard: Women’s History Month” event! On Thursday, March 31, 2016, at 1 p.m. EDT, the Goddard Office of Education will celebrate Women’s History Month by highlighting women in STEM. Women from across Goddard will share how they practice science, technology, engineering and mathematics — through their research, missions, career and the like — with participating schools and other groups.

The 30-minute program will be streamed live on UStream, and participants will be able to interact with the guest speakers by submitting questions through email and Twitter.

To view the programs on Ustream, visit http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-gsfc.

For more information or to express interest in participating, please contact Erin McKinley at erin.e.mckinley@nasa.gov.

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2016 International Summer School in Astrobiology

The 2016 International Summer School in Astrobiology will be held at the summer campus of the Universidad Internacional Menéndez Pelayo, Palacio de la Magdalena, in Santander, Spain, on June 20-24, 2016.

This year’s theme will be “Earth Analog Environments and the Search for Life Beyond the Earth.” The school will provide an interdisciplinary examination of the chemical, physical and geological properties of potential extraterrestrial habitats and an in-depth description and analysis of sites on Earth with similar characteristics. In particular, lectures and activities will consider icy satellites, rocky planets in the solar system, extreme Earth environments, and terrestrial exoplanets.

The NASA Astrobiology Institute is offering scholarships that cover travel costs, school fees, accommodations and meals. To be eligible to apply for these scholarships, applicants must be graduate students studying at U.S. institutions.

Applications are due March 31, 2016.

For more information, visit http://nai.nasa.gov/uimp/2016-international-summer-school-astrobiology/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Edward Goolish at edward.goolish@nasa.gov.

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International Space Station Research Design Challenge: Capillary Effects on Liquids Exploratory Research Experiments

NASA and Portland State University are seeking participants for the International Space Station Research Design Challenge: Capillary Effects on Liquids Exploratory Research Experiments, or CELERE. This design challenge enables students to participate in microgravity research on capillary action, similar to that conducted on the space station.

Teams or individuals create their own experiment using computer-aided design with a provided template and submit short proposals presenting the experiments. Portland State University then manufactures test cells using the CAD drawings and a computer-controlled laser cutter. Each experiment is conducted in a drop tower. Video of the drop is provided for student analysis and reporting of results.

CELERE is open to individuals and teams in grades 8-12. To facilitate the participation of informal science clubs, Scouts, etc., teams may include younger students as long as at least one team member is in grades 8-12. Teams may be of any size and may include an entire class or science club. The program is limited to students from the U.S., including the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Students at Department of Defense Education Activity schools (www.dodea.edu), including those outside the U.S., are also eligible to participate.

The CELERE design challenge is a relatively new program and, as a result, the odds of selection are quite high. In 2014 and 2015, 100 percent of the entries were selected for full participation, where the student experiments were built and tested in microgravity. In 2016, selection of at least one qualifying entry is guaranteed from each state and listed territory, at least one DODEA school, and at least one Bureau of Indian Education school (http://bie.edu/). Students are strongly encouraged to apply!

Design proposals are now being accepted. Submissions are due April 1, 2016.

For more information about this opportunity, visit http://spaceflightsystems.grc.nasa.gov/CELERE/.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please email your inquiries to the CELERE team at celere@lists.nasa.gov.

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2016 Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching

The National Science Foundation currently is accepting nominations and applications for the Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching program. PAEMST is the highest recognition that a teacher of K-12 mathematics or science (including computer science) may receive for outstanding teaching in the United States. Since 1983, more than 4,400 teachers have been recognized for their contributions to mathematics and science education. Awardees serve as models for their colleagues, inspiration to their communities, and leaders in the improvement of mathematics and science education. Up to 108 awardees may be recognized each year.

Presidential awardees receive a certificate signed by the President of the United States; a trip for two to Washington, D.C., to attend a series of recognition events and professional development opportunities; and a $10,000 award from the National Science Foundation. The National Science Foundation administers PAEMST on the behalf of The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.

The PAEMST program is open to outstanding mathematics and science teachers in the 50 states and the four U.S. jurisdictions (Washington, D.C.; Puerto Rico; Department of Defense education activity schools; and the U.S. territories as a group). Anyone — principals, teachers, parents, students or members of the public — may nominate a teacher by completing the nomination form available on the PAEMST website. Teachers also may apply directly. Teachers from groups underrepresented in STEM teaching and learning are encouraged to apply.

Nominations for elementary school teachers (grades K-6) are due April 1, 2016. Secondary school teachers (grades 7-12) are eligible to apply in 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.paemst.org/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to info@paemst.org.

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Astrobiology Graduate Conference 2016

The next Astrobiology Graduate Conference, AbGradCon 2016, will be held at the University of Colorado in Boulder on July 24-27, 2016. This conference is run by graduate students for other graduate students and early career scientists with the purpose of having conference attendees share their astrobiology-related research, collaborate with their peers, and make new professional connections in a low-pressure setting.

Conference attendees share their research by presenting a 15-minute talk or presenting a poster (though talks are preferred). Topics to be covered include astrochemistry, exoplanet research, planetary science, geobiology, computer science, origins of life research, and aerospace engineering. The conference culminates with a field trip to a site relevant to astrobiology. This year’s conference attendees will visit Dinosaur Ridge in Morrison, Colorado. A Public Speaking Workshop will be held as an alternative for those who do not want to participate in the field trip.

Attendees also have the option of joining, separate from the conference, the Research Focus Group workshop that will take place July 22-24 in Estes Park, Colorado. The RFG is a proposal-writing workshop targeted at developing better fundable proposals for research.

Food and lodging for conference attendees will be covered by the conference. We also expect to be able to cover most travel costs for attendees.

Applications are due April 1, 2016.

For more information, visit http://astrobiology.nasa.gov/careers-employment/abgradcon-2016/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to abgradcon@gmail.com.

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2016 Fellowship in Aerospace History

The Fellowship in Aerospace History, offered by the American Historical Association and supported by NASA, seeks applications for a predoctoral or postdoctoral fellowship related to the history of aerospace. The selected fellow will have the opportunity to engage in significant and sustained advanced research in all aspects of the history of aerospace from the earliest human interest in flight to the present. These areas will include cultural and intellectual history; economic history; history of law and public policy; and the history of science, engineering and management.

The fellowship carries a stipend of $20,000 for a six- to nine-month fellowship. Funds may not be used to support tuition or fees.

The fellowship is open to applicants who hold a doctoral degree in history or in a closely related field, or applicants who are enrolled in and have completed all course work for a program granting doctoral degrees in those fields.

Applications are due April 1, 2016.

For detailed information on the fellowship and the application process, visit http://www.historians.org/prizes/NASA.htm.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to awards@historians.org.

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2016 NASA Fellowship in the History of Space Technology

The NASA Fellowship in the History of Space Technology, offered by the Society for the History of Technology and supported by the NASA History Program Office, seeks applications for a yearlong predoctoral or postdoctoral fellowship related to the history of space technology. The fellowship may support advanced research related to all aspects of space history, leading to publications on the history of space technology in a broad sense, including cultural and intellectual history, institutional history, economic history, history of law and public policy, and history of engineering and management.

The fellowship carries a stipend of $21,500, paid quarterly. Funds may not be used to support tuition or fees. The NASA fellow also will receive complimentary membership in the Society for the History of Technology for the year of fellowship.

Applicants must possess a doctorate in the history of technology or in a closely related field, or be enrolled as a student in a doctoral degree program and have completed all requirements for the degree (except the dissertation) in history of technology or a related field. Eligibility is limited to U.S. citizens.

Applications are due April 1, 2016.

For detailed information on the fellowship and the application process, visit http://www.historyoftechnology.org/awards/nasa.html.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to shotsec@auburn.edu.

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Earth Observatory’s Tournament Earth 2016

Thirty-two of the best Earth Observatory images will compete in Tournament Earth 4.0, but only one can be the winner! From Feb. 29 through April 1, 2016, visitors to NASA’s Earth Observatory website can vote for their favorite images from 2015, whittling them down each week in a tournament of remote-sensing science. The competition is divided into four categories: data, art, event and photograph.

Voting takes place online, and a printable bracket is available to let you pick your favorites and track your selections as the competition progresses.

To get started, visit http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/TournamentEarth/.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Kevin Ward at kevin.a.ward@nasa.gov.

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Free Tours of Facilities at NASA’s Glenn Research Center

NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, is offering tours that take visitors behind the scenes and inside certain research facilities. Glenn scientists and engineers serve as guides. Tours and open house events will be held each month through October 2016. Tours are free for groups and individuals, but to guarantee admission, reservations are required. Visitor parking is also free.

On the days of the tours, a bus departs from Glenn’s main gate every hour, beginning at 10 a.m. The last tour departs at 1 p.m. Each tour lasts about 45 minutes and is followed by a stop at Glenn’s Gift Shop.

Glenn’s 2016 Tour Schedule

April 2, 2016 — Piloted Control Evaluation Facility and Distributed Engine Control Laboratory: Visit two laboratories that showcase how researchers evaluate propulsion control and aircraft engine control. Tour the Piloted Control Evaluation (Flight Simulator) Facility to see where researchers evaluate the effect of propulsion control on aircraft performance. Visit the Distributed Engine Control Laboratory to learn how NASA evaluates new hardware architectures for aircraft engine control.

May 21-22, 2016 — Open House at NASA’s Glenn Research Center: NASA Glenn is opening its doors to the public for a weekend open house. Visitors will be able to tour many of the center’s world-class facilities and see how the center improves aviation and fosters exploration to benefit everyone on Earth. Visitors also will be able to meet an astronaut and talk with engineers, scientists and technicians who work on space programs. Registration for this event is not required.

June 11-12, 2016 — Open House at NASA’s Plum Brook Station: NASA Glenn is opening the doors of Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, to the public for a weekend open house. Visitors will be able to tour the station’s world-class facilities and step inside the world’s largest vacuum chamber, which has tested parts of rockets, Mars landers and Orion hardware. Visitors also will be able to meet an astronaut and talk with engineers, scientists and technicians. Registration for this event is not required.

July 9, 2016: Radioisotope Power System, Systems Integration Laboratory: See how NASA emulates the electrical characteristics of a spacecraft system in the Radioisotope Power System, Systems Integration Laboratory. RPS is a source of electricity for NASA space missions from the surface of Mars to the realm of the outer planets.

Aug. 6, 2016 — See Things a Different Way: Check out Glenn’s Graphics and Visualization, or GVIS, and the Reconfigurable User-interface and Virtual Reality Exploration, or GRUVE, Laboratories. The GVIS lab uses advanced computer input and output devices paired with a variety of natural user interface devices and 3-D displays. The GRUVE lab is used to analyze data obtained either by computer simulation or from research test facilities.

Sept. 10, 2016 — Vibration Testing: Join us on a tour of Glenn’s Structural Dynamics Laboratory, where things get shaken to verify their survivability. Several experiments that currently are operating on the International Space Station were tested in this lab.

Oct. 1, 2016 — Prepare for Impact: Come explore Glenn’s Ballistic Impact Facility. See the laboratory that helped to identify the cause of the space shuttle Columbia accident and return NASA’s shuttle fleet to flight.

Tours are open to U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents. To guarantee admission, reservations are required. For more information on tours and how to make reservations, visit http://www.nasa.gov/centers/glenn/events/tours.html.

Please direct questions about the tours to Sheila Reese at sheila.d.reese@nasa.gov.

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Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy

Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy, at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia, is a free alternate-reality game that will challenge you to become an astronaut-in-training for a future trip to Mars. Choose what role you will play on the mission; engage in fun interactive activities; and explore the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics skills you will need as a next-generation space traveler. Along the way, you’ll learn about some of the museum’s fascinating artifacts.

Instructions and guidance are given via a special webpage accessed on your mobile device. Players should bring their own phones or devices equipped with an internet browser and a camera. Having a digital picture-taking device (smartphone, tablet, camera) is highly recommended but not required.

The game is aimed at upper elementary and middle school visitors and their families. Do you want to bring a group? Reservations are required for groups larger than 15.

The next offering of the Astronaut Academy is on April 2, 2016. Begin your training with Astronaut Orientation in the Claude Moore Education Center Classroom 1 located on the first level across from the restrooms. Astronaut Orientation is offered at regular intervals between 10:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. The last opportunity to start the game is at 2:30 p.m. A self-guided activity, the game should take between 60 and 90 minutes, and staff will help you along the way.

For more information, including a full list of upcoming Astronaut Academy dates, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/techquest/.

Please direct questions about the Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy to the visitor service line at 202-633-2214.

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GLOBE El Niño Field Campaign and Webinar Series

El Niño and La Niña are important phenomena that can impact the climate by causing global flooding and droughts as well as changes in seasonal weather. These interactions around the world are called teleconnections. Because of the importance of this issue, a GLOBE ENSO (El Niño Southern Oscillation) Campaign has been formulated to engage students in determining where and how much El Niño affects local places and to put students in contact with their local environment.

To learn more about the campaign and how to participate, visit http://www.globe.gov/web/el-nino/el-nino-campaign.

To help educators prepare for the El Niño Campaign, GLOBE is hosting a series of free education webinars to discuss the mechanics of the campaign, give updates on data collection, and give participants the opportunity to learn science content from experts.

The hourlong webinars will take place on the following dates at 8 p.m. EDT.

April 6, 2016: Surface Temperature and Soil Temperature
April 20, 2016: SMAP Soil Moisture
May 3, 2016: Biometry and Ground Cover
May 17, 2016: The 2015-2016 El Niño Event
June 13, 2016: Using El Niño GLOBE Data for Scientific Research
Sept. 19, 2016: El Niño Student Campaign Refresher and Update

For more information, including log-in instructions for the webinars and recordings of previous webinars in the series, visit http://www.globe.gov/web/el-nino/el-nino-campaign/webinars.

Please direct questions about this opportunity and series of webinars to http://www.globe.gov/support/contact.

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2016 History of Science Society Fellowship in the History of Space Science

The Fellowship in the History of Space Science, offered by the History of Science Society and supported by the NASA History Program Office, seeks applications for a nine-month predoctoral or postdoctoral fellowship related to the history of space science. The fellowship may support advanced research related to all aspects of the history of space science, from the earliest human interest in space to the present.

The fellowship carries a stipend of $21,250. Funds may not be used to support tuition or fees.

Applicants must possess a doctorate in history of science or in a closely related field, or be enrolled as a student in a doctoral degree program and have completed all requirements for the degree (except the dissertation) in history of science or a related field. Eligibility is not limited to U.S. citizens or residents.

Applications are due April 6, 2016.

For detailed information on the fellowship and the application process, visit http://hssonline.org/employment/fellowship-in-the-history-of-space-science/2015-16-hss-fellowship-in-the-history-of-space-science/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to info@hssonline.org.

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Environmental Education Grants

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency seeks proposals for grants to support environmental education projects that promote environmental awareness and stewardship and help people develop the skills to take responsible actions to protect the environment. This grant program provides financial support for projects that design, demonstrate and/or disseminate environmental education practices, methods or techniques.

Entities that are eligible to apply include local education agencies, state education or environmental agencies, colleges and universities, nonprofit organizations, noncommercial educational broadcasting entities, and tribal education agencies (including schools and community colleges controlled by an Indian tribe, band or nation). Applicant organizations must be located in the United States or its territories, and the majority of the educational activities must take place in the U.S.; in the U.S. and Canada or Mexico; or in the territories of the U.S.

Applications are due April 8, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.epa.gov/education/environmental-education-ee-grants.

Please direct questions about this grant opportunity to eegrants@epa.gov.

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Family Day Event at Smithsonian’s Air and Space Museum

The Smithsonian’s Family Day event series celebrates the diverse ethnic and cultural communities that have contributed to aviation and space exploration. Events will commemorate historic and current contributions through presentations and activities for the entire family. The events are free and open to the public.

Explore the Universe
April 9, 2016, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. EST
National Air and Space Museum in Washington, District of Columbia

People around the world have always looked to the sky, but they don’t always see the same things. Bring your family to experience how different people study the sky and to hear their stories. Learn about telescopes and, if weather permits, do some daytime observations.
http://airandspace.si.edu/events/heritage-days/explore-universe/

Please direct questions about this event to the Visitor Service line at 202-633-2214.

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Early Career Fellowships for Planetary Science Researchers

The Early Career Fellowship program supports the development of individual research programs of outstanding scientists in the early stages of their careers and stimulates research careers in the areas supported by the Planetary Sciences Division. This program is based on the idea that supporting key individuals is a critical mechanism for impacting science with new concepts, technologies and methods.

This program consists of two components with two different submission procedures: The first is the one-page application to be an “Early Career Fellow,” and the second is the subsequent submission of a seven-page proposal for startup funds once selected as an ECF. To be eligible to apply, applicants must have received their Ph.D. (or equivalent degree such as a DPhil) within seven calendar years of the year of the submission of the research proposal.

For consideration as a Fellow (new applicants), submit a proposal to the participating program element by the deadline specified in Tables 2 and 3 in the ROSES Summary of Solicitation. Proposals from Fellows selected in prior years for start-up funds may be submitted at any time in response to this program element.

For complete fellowship details and application procedures, visit http://go.nasa.gov/1MkySUk.

Questions concerning this opportunity may be directed to Doris Daou at Doris.Daou@nasa.gov.

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Sally Ride EarthKAM @ Space Camp Announces Spring 2016 Mission

Registration is open for the Spring 2016 mission for the Sally Ride EarthKAM @ Space Camp program taking place April 12-16, 2016. During the mission, students worldwide may submit requests to have a camera aboard the International Space Station capture an image of a specific location on Earth. Related resources, including images and activities, are available for use in the classroom. The optional online activities are targeted at middle school students but are adaptable for other grade levels. All students and educators are welcome, including participants in afterschool programs.

For more information and to register for the upcoming mission, visit https://www.earthkam.org/.

Please submit questions about the Sally Ride EarthKAM @ Space Camp program via https://www.earthkam.org/contact.

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NASA/NSTA Webinar — Global Precipitation Measurement Mission: Watersheds

Join the National Science Teachers Association for a free interactive webinar to learn about watersheds and NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement, or GPM, mission. The 90-minute session will take place on April 13, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EDT.

What is a watershed? Why are watersheds important? What are signs of a healthy watershed? Why are some watersheds or water reservoirs losing their water? Topics presented at this webinar will include watershed basics and hands-on investigations students can conduct to monitor their local watershed areas. NASA scientists will give background science information about watersheds and how NASA helps monitor watershed regions.

GPM is an international satellite mission managed by NASA and JAXA (the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) that will provide next-generation observations of rain and snow. The GPM mission will help us learn more about Earth’s water and energy cycles, improve the forecasting of extreme events that cause natural disasters, and extend current capabilities of using satellite precipitation information to directly benefit society.

All participants will receive a certificate of participation and 100 Learning Center activity points for attending and completing the post-program evaluation. An archive and presentation slides will be available at the end of the program.

For more information and to register to attend the webinar event, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/resource/?id=10.2505/9/WSNASA15_Apr13.

For more information about GPM, visit http://www.nasa.gov/gpm or http://gpm.nasa.gov.

Please email questions about this opportunity to webseminars@nsta.org.

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NASA TechPort Request for Information

NASA is conducting this Request for Information, or RFI, to better understand user needs and identify potential improvements for the NASA Technology Portfolio System (TechPort).

NASA developed TechPort as an agencywide tool to capture detailed information on technology investments that support missions across aeronautics, space exploration and scientific discovery. NASA has used TechPort internally since 2012. Through continuous updates, the system now contains information on more than 840 active projects and more than 7,600 historical records. In February 2015, NASA opened a beta version of TechPort to the public.

To help enhance the TechPort system, NASA is seeking feedback via a short, 18-question survey that takes an estimated 5 to 10 minutes to complete. Feedback may be submitted through April 14, 2016.

To provide feedback, visit https://techport.nasa.gov/rfi.

To visit the NASA TechPort, visit http://techport.nasa.gov/home.

Please direct questions about NASA TechPort and this RFI to hq-techport@mail.nasa.gov.

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Host a Real-Time Conversation With Crew Members Aboard the International Space Station

ARISS-US is now accepting proposals from U.S. schools, museums, science centers and community youth organizations to host an Amateur Radio on the International Space Station, or ARISS, contact between Jan. 1 – June 30, 2017. To maximize these radio contact opportunities, ARISS-US is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed education plan. Proposals are due April 15, 2016.

Using amateur radio, students can ask astronauts questions about life in space and other space-related topics. Students fully engage in the ARISS contact by helping set up an amateur radio ground station at the school and then using that station to talk directly with a crew member on the International Space Station for approximately 10 minutes. ARISS provides experienced mentors and relies on local amateur radio volunteers to help organizations obtain the technology required to host this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for students.

For proposal information and more details such as expectations, proposal guidelines and proposal form, visit http://www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.

ARISS-US is offered through a partnership between NASA; the American Radio Relay League, or ARRL; and the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation, or AMSAT. ARISS was created and is managed by an international working group, including several countries in Europe as well as Japan, Russia, Canada, and the USA.

Questions about this opportunity should be emailed to ariss@arrl.org.

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2016 LiftOff Summer Institute

Registration is now open for the 2016 LiftOff Summer Institute, sponsored by NASA’s Texas Space Grant Consortium. This weeklong professional development training for teachers will be held June 26-July 1, 2016, at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. This competitive aerospace workshop emphasizes science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, learning experiences through speakers, hands-on activities and field investigations.

The theme for this year’s institute is “Exploration: Past, Present and Future.” The event will focus on how NASA is learning from past exploration and current space station research and how it will apply its discoveries to future missions to deep space.

Attendees must be U.S. citizens currently employed as classroom teachers of grades 4-12 with at least one year teaching experience prior to the institute. Texas Space Grant pays all expenses for any Texas teacher selected. Other Space Grant Consortia fund teachers from their states.

Applications are due April 15, 2016.

For more information and to access the online application, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/liftoff/.

If you have questions about the 2016 LiftOff Summer Institute, please email your inquiries to Margaret Baguio at baguio@tsgc.utexas.edu.

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Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions and museums to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

There will be a nominal shipping fee that must be paid online with a credit card.  To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.

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Future Engineers ‘Star Trek’ Replicator Challenge

Calling all Starfleet cadets! “Star Trek,” the American Society for Mechanical Engineers Foundation and NASA want you to pioneer the future of food in space. Your challenge is to create a digital model of a food-related item for astronauts to 3-D print in the year 2050. We want designs that boldly go where no human has 3-D printed before and that help astronauts eat nutritious meals so they can live long and prosper.

You must specify one of the following locations for your 3-D print: our moon, another planet, another planet’s moon, or a spacecraft beyond low-Earth orbit (explain where it is going and why). You also must specify the intended printing material (feedstock) for your 3-D print. This could be plastic, metal, recycled materials, locally sourced material, or any nonedible, 3-D printing feedstock you think would advance human space exploration.

Eating a meal in space goes beyond the actual food itself — from growing food to devouring it. There are many things to consider, so check out our rules, design guidelines and education resources before to starting your design.

Student winners will receive a range of prizes, including a trip to New York for a tour of the space shuttle Enterprise at the Intrepid Museum with an astronaut, a 3-D printer for the winners’ schools or a “Star Trek” prize pack.

Entries are due May 1, 2016. For more information about the challenge and how to enter, visit www.futureengineers.org/startrek.

Please email questions about this competition to info@futureengineers.org.

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Federal Aviation Administration Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues

The Airport Cooperative Research Program is seeking applicants for its Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues. Through this program, the ACRP strives to encourage applied research on airport and related aviation system issues and to foster the next generation of aviation community leaders. The program is intended to stimulate thought, discussion and research by those who may become the future airport managers, operators, designers and policy makers in aviation. The focus of this research program is on applied research to help the public sector continue to improve the quality, reliability, safety and security of the U.S. civil aviation system well into the foreseeable future.

The Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues will award up to 10 highly qualified applicants, selected by an ACRP panel of experts, a stipend of $10,000 each for successful completion of a research paper on a subject chosen by the candidate within the framework of the program’s purpose.

Applicants must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States, or have a current student visa. Each applicant also must be officially enrolled as a full-time student at an accredited North American institution of higher learning for the academic year in a graduate course leading to a master’s or doctoral degree. Proof of both may be required.

Applications are due May 15, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.trb.org/ACRP/ACRPGraduateAwardProgram.aspx.

The ACRP Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues is sponsored by the Federal Aviation Administration. Creating a selection panel, monitoring research progress, organizing a forum for presentation, and publishing the research papers are the responsibility of the ACRP of the Transportation Research Board. The Virginia Space Grant Consortium will manage the Graduate Research Award program under the ACRP’s direction.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to acrp@odu.edu.

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NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellowships

The NASA Postdoctoral Program provides early-career and more senior scientists the opportunity to share in NASA’s mission. NPP Fellows work on one- to three-year assignments with NASA scientists and engineers at NASA centers and institutes to advance NASA’s missions in Earth science, heliophysics, planetary science, astrophysics, space bioscience, aeronautics, engineering, human exploration and space operations, astrobiology, and science management.

U.S. citizens, lawful permanent residents and foreign nationals eligible for J-1 status as a research scholar may apply. Applicants must have completed a doctorate or equivalent degree before beginning the fellowship, but they may apply while completing degree requirements. Applicants who earned the Ph.D. more than five years before the deadline date are categorized as senior fellows; all applicants, no matter their category, must apply and become eligible for an NPP award via the same process.

Interested applicants may apply by one of three annual application deadlines: March 1, July 1 and November 1.

For more information and application procedures, go to https://npp.usra.edu/.

Please direct questions about this fellowship opportunity to npphelp@usra.edu.

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Help NASA Study Mars — Planet Four: Terrains

Help NASA study exotic landscape features near the south pole of Mars! In this citizen science project, you’ll view images from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter’s Context Camera. Your input will help scientists identify possible areas for even more detailed examination with the orbiter’s High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment camera. HiRISE can reveal more detail than any other camera ever put into orbit around Mars.

Some of Mars resembles deserts on Earth, but seasonal freezing and thawing of carbon-dioxide ice (known on Earth as “dry ice”) at the Martian poles creates some unusual landscape features. There’s a lot of territory to cover, so scientists need your help identifying what and where these features are.

For more information and to learn how to participate, visit the “Planet Four: Terrains” website at https://www.zooniverse.org/#/projects/mschwamb/planet-four-terrains.

To learn more about NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and its mission at the Red Planet, visit http://mars.nasa.gov/mro/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Whitney Clavin at whitney.clavin@jpl.nasa.gov.

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Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The Announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design (STEAMD); or activities culturally relevant to or focused on unrepresented in STEM careers populations, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or non-reimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA Announcement.

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Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — March 24, 2016

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.
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New This Week!
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Free NASA Educator Professional Development Webinars
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: March 24, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT

2016 International Summer School in Astrobiology
Audience: Graduate Students Studying at U.S. Institutions
Application Deadline: March 31, 2016
Summer School Dates: June 20-24, 2016

2016 Fellowship in Aerospace History
Audience: Recent Recipients of the Ph.D. in History or a Closely Related Field, or Students in Programs Granting Doctoral Degrees in Those Fields
Application Deadline: April 1, 2016

2016 NASA Fellowship in the History of Space Technology
Audience: Recent Recipients of the Ph.D. in History of Technology or a Closely Related Field, and Students Pursuing Doctoral Degrees in Those Fields
Application Deadline: April 1, 2016

Free Tours of Facilities at NASA’s Glenn Research Center
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: April 2, 2016

2016 History of Science Society Fellowship in the History of Space Science
Audience: Recent Recipients of the Ph.D. in History of Science or a Closely Related Field, or Students in Programs Granting Doctoral Degrees in Those Fields
Application Deadline: April 6, 2016

Sally Ride EarthKAM @ Space Camp Announces Spring 2016 Mission
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Mission Date: April 12-16, 2016

2016 National Academy of Engineering – Engineering for You Video Contest 3
Audience: All Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: May 31, 2016

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PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…
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New NASA Women of STEM Website
Audience: All Educators and Students

STEM@NASA Goddard: Women’s History Month
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: March 24, 2016, at 1 p.m. EST

2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators and 9-Higher Education Students
Next Lecture Date: March 24, 2016, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)

NASA/Applied Physics Laboratory Summer Internship 2016
Audience: Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Application Deadline: March 25, 2016

Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy
Audience: Designed for Families With Children Ages 10 to 14, but Open to All
Next Event Date: March 26, 2016, 10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. EST

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Live Video Chat: NASA STARS en Español
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: March 29, 2016, 1-2 p.m. EDT

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Video conferencia en vivo: NASA STARS en Español
Audiencia: Todos Los Educadores y Estudiantes
Fecha del Evento: Marzo 29, 2016, 1-2 p.m. EDT

Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents “STEM in 30” Webcast Series
Audience: Grades 6-8 Educators and Students
Next Webcast Date: March 30, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EDT

International FameLab Competition: San Juan Regional Event
Audience: Graduate Students, Postdoctoral Fellows and Early Career Researchers
Event Date: March 30-April 1, 2016

International Space Station Research Design Challenge: Capillary Effects on Liquids Exploratory Research Experiments
Audience: Grade 8-12 Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: April 1, 2016

2016 Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching
Audience: All Educators and Students
Nomination Deadline: April 1, 2016

Astrobiology Graduate Conference 2016
Audience: Astrobiology Graduate Students
Application Deadline: April 1, 2016
Conference Dates: July 24-27, 2016

Earth Observatory’s Tournament Earth 2016
Audience: All Educators and Students
Competition Dates: Through April 4, 2016

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Environmental Education Grants
Audience: State and Local Education Agencies, Colleges and Universities, Non-profit Organizations, Tribal Education Agencies, and Non-Commercial Educational Broadcasting Companies.
Application Deadline: April 8, 2016

NASA TechPort Request for Information
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Feedback Deadline: April 14, 2016

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

2016 Texas Space Grant Consortium Columbia Crew Memorial Undergraduate Scholarships
Audience: Undergraduate Students at Texas Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: April 29, 2016

2016 Texas Space Grant Consortium STEM Educator Scholarships
Audience: Educators Enrolled in STEM-field Programs for a Master’s Degree at Texas Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: April 29, 2016

2016-2017 Texas Space Grant Consortium Graduate Fellowships
Audience: Graduate Students at Texas Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: April 29, 2016

Institute of Museum and Library Services Grants: STEM Expert Facilitation of Family Learning in Libraries and Museums
Audience: Libraries, Museums and Higher Education Institutions
Application Deadline: May 1, 2016

2016 NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge: Distributed Electric Propulsion
Audience: Students at U.S. Colleges and Universities
Entry Deadline: May 16, 2016

Call for Papers: NASA in the ‘Long’ Civil Rights Movement Symposium
Audience: Academics, Graduate Students and Independent Scholars
Abstract Submission Deadline: July 31, 2016
Symposium Dates: March 16-17, 2017

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

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Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

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NEW THIS WEEK!
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Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Technology Drives Exploration: Pluto — Exploring a New World in Your Classroom
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-8
Event Date: March 24, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT
Pluto has fascinated humans since it was first discovered. What is Pluto? How is Pluto both different from and like other objects in our solar system? These are some of the questions to be investigated by New Horizons, NASA’s first robotic mission to Pluto. This webinar will discuss these questions by exploring NASA STEM education content, online resources, the Next Generation Science Standards and data from the New Horizons mission. Join this webinar to learn exciting ways to bring the fascination and mystery of Pluto into your classroom. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/168028

Technology Drives Exploration: Astronauts and Radiation — The Exploration Design Challenge
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: March 28, 2016, at 4 p.m. EDT
The NASA Exploration Design Challenge allows students to research and design ways to protect astronauts from space radiation. NASA and Lockheed Martin are developing the Orion spacecraft that will carry astronauts beyond low Earth orbit and on to an asteroid or Mars. Protecting astronauts from radiation on these distant travels is an important — and very real — problem that needs solving. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/166960

Virtual Missions and Exoplanets (vMAX): Part 1 – Curriculum Overview
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: March 30, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT
Learn how to engage students in the study of exoplanetary systems through hands-on experiences, scenario-based problem solving, and 3-D multi-user virtual world simulations with the Virtual Missions and Exoplanets curriculum. This webinar provides an overview of exoplanetary system resources that build upon the use of NASA data. These resources are organized for a one-week experience for middle school students but are flexible for any formal or informal audience and time period. It is suggested that participants also attend the vMAX Technical (Part 2) webinar for a complete understanding of how to implement these resources. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/166705

Virtual Missions and Exoplanets (vMAX): Part 2 – Technical Overview
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: March 31, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT
Learn how to engage students in the study of exoplanetary systems through hands-on experiences, scenario-based problem solving, and 3-D multi-user virtual world simulations with the Virtual Missions and Exoplanets curriculum. This webinar addresses technical requirements to download, install, and navigate the virtual world as an avatar in preparation for using the vMAX virtual world with students. It is suggested that participants also attend the vMAX Curriculum (Part 1) webinar for a complete understanding of how to implement these resources. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/166714

For a full schedule of upcoming webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Please direct questions about this series of webinars to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.

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2016 International Summer School in Astrobiology

The 2016 International Summer School in Astrobiology will be held at the summer campus of the Universidad Internacional Menéndez Pelayo, Palacio de la Magdalena, in Santander, Spain, on June 20-24, 2016.

This year’s theme will be “Earth Analog Environments and the Search for Life Beyond the Earth.” The school will provide an interdisciplinary examination of the chemical, physical and geological properties of potential extraterrestrial habitats and an in-depth description and analysis of sites on Earth with similar characteristics. In particular, lectures and activities will consider icy satellites, rocky planets in the solar system, extreme Earth environments, and terrestrial exoplanets.

The NASA Astrobiology Institute is offering scholarships that cover travel costs, school fees, accommodations and meals. To be eligible to apply for these scholarships, applicants must be graduate students studying at U.S. institutions.

Applications are due March 31, 2016.

For more information, visit http://nai.nasa.gov/uimp/2016-international-summer-school-astrobiology/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Edward Goolish at edward.goolish@nasa.gov.

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2016 Fellowship in Aerospace History

The Fellowship in Aerospace History, offered by the American Historical Association and supported by NASA, seeks applications for a predoctoral or postdoctoral fellowship related to the history of aerospace. The selected fellow will have the opportunity to engage in significant and sustained advanced research in all aspects of the history of aerospace from the earliest human interest in flight to the present. These areas will include cultural and intellectual history; economic history; history of law and public policy; and the history of science, engineering and management.

The fellowship carries a stipend of $20,000 for a six- to nine-month fellowship. Funds may not be used to support tuition or fees.

The fellowship is open to applicants who hold a doctoral degree in history or in a closely related field, or applicants who are enrolled in and have completed all course work for a program granting doctoral degrees in those fields.

Applications are due April 1, 2016.

For detailed information on the fellowship and the application process, visit http://www.historians.org/prizes/NASA.htm.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to awards@historians.org.

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2016 NASA Fellowship in the History of Space Technology

The NASA Fellowship in the History of Space Technology, offered by the Society for the History of Technology and supported by the NASA History Program Office, seeks applications for a yearlong predoctoral or postdoctoral fellowship related to the history of space technology. The fellowship may support advanced research related to all aspects of space history, leading to publications on the history of space technology in a broad sense, including cultural and intellectual history, institutional history, economic history, history of law and public policy, and history of engineering and management.

The fellowship carries a stipend of $21,500, paid quarterly. Funds may not be used to support tuition or fees. The NASA fellow also will receive complimentary membership in the Society for the History of Technology for the year of fellowship.

Applicants must possess a doctorate in the history of technology or in a closely related field, or be enrolled as a student in a doctoral degree program and have completed all requirements for the degree (except the dissertation) in history of technology or a related field. Eligibility is limited to U.S. citizens.

Applications are due April 1, 2016.

For detailed information on the fellowship and the application process, visit http://www.historyoftechnology.org/awards/nasa.html.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to shotsec@auburn.edu.

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Free Tours of Facilities at NASA’s Glenn Research Center

NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, is offering tours that take visitors behind the scenes and inside certain research facilities. Glenn scientists and engineers serve as guides. Tours and open house events will be held each month through October 2016. Tours are free for groups and individuals, but to guarantee admission, reservations are required. Visitor parking is also free.

On the days of the tours, a bus departs from Glenn’s main gate every hour, beginning at 10 a.m. The last tour departs at 1 p.m. Each tour lasts about 45 minutes and is followed by a stop at Glenn’s Gift Shop.

Glenn’s 2016 Tour Schedule

April 2, 2016 — Piloted Control Evaluation Facility and Distributed Engine Control Laboratory: Visit two laboratories that showcase how researchers evaluate propulsion control and aircraft engine control. Tour the Piloted Control Evaluation (Flight Simulator) Facility to see where researchers evaluate the effect of propulsion control on aircraft performance. Visit the Distributed Engine Control Laboratory to learn how NASA evaluates new hardware architectures for aircraft engine control.

May 21-22, 2016 — Open House at NASA’s Glenn Research Center: NASA Glenn is opening its doors to the public for a weekend open house. Visitors will be able to tour many of the center’s world-class facilities and see how the center improves aviation and fosters exploration to benefit everyone on Earth. Visitors also will be able to meet an astronaut and talk with engineers, scientists and technicians who work on space programs. Registration for this event is not required.

June 11-12, 2016 — Open House at NASA’s Plum Brook Station: NASA Glenn is opening the doors of Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, to the public for a weekend open house. Visitors will be able to tour the station’s world-class facilities and step inside the world’s largest vacuum chamber, which has tested parts of rockets, Mars landers and Orion hardware. Visitors also will be able to meet an astronaut and talk with engineers, scientists and technicians. Registration for this event is not required.

July 9, 2016: Radioisotope Power System, Systems Integration Laboratory: See how NASA emulates the electrical characteristics of a spacecraft system in the Radioisotope Power System, Systems Integration Laboratory. RPS is a source of electricity for NASA space missions from the surface of Mars to the realm of the outer planets.

Aug. 6, 2016 — See Things a Different Way: Check out Glenn’s Graphics and Visualization, or GVIS, and the Reconfigurable User-interface and Virtual Reality Exploration, or GRUVE, Laboratories. The GVIS lab uses advanced computer input and output devices paired with a variety of natural user interface devices and 3-D displays. The GRUVE lab is used to analyze data obtained either by computer simulation or from research test facilities.

Sept. 10, 2016 — Vibration Testing: Join us on a tour of Glenn’s Structural Dynamics Laboratory, where things get shaken to verify their survivability. Several experiments that currently are operating on the International Space Station were tested in this lab.

Oct. 1, 2016 — Prepare for Impact: Come explore Glenn’s Ballistic Impact Facility. See the laboratory that helped to identify the cause of the space shuttle Columbia accident and return NASA’s shuttle fleet to flight.

Tours are open to U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents. To guarantee admission, reservations are required. For more information on tours and how to make reservations, visit http://www.nasa.gov/centers/glenn/events/tours.html.

Please direct questions about the tours to Sheila Reese at sheila.d.reese@nasa.gov.

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2016 History of Science Society Fellowship in the History of Space Science

The Fellowship in the History of Space Science, offered by the History of Science Society and supported by the NASA History Program Office, seeks applications for a nine-month predoctoral or postdoctoral fellowship related to the history of space science. The fellowship may support advanced research related to all aspects of the history of space science, from the earliest human interest in space to the present.

The fellowship carries a stipend of $21,250. Funds may not be used to support tuition or fees.

Applicants must possess a doctorate in history of science or in a closely related field, or be enrolled as a student in a doctoral degree program and have completed all requirements for the degree (except the dissertation) in history of science or a related field. Eligibility is not limited to U.S. citizens or residents.

Applications are due April 6, 2016.

For detailed information on the fellowship and the application process, visit http://hssonline.org/employment/fellowship-in-the-history-of-space-science/2015-16-hss-fellowship-in-the-history-of-space-science/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to info@hssonline.org.

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Sally Ride EarthKAM @ Space Camp Announces Spring 2016 Mission

Registration is open for the Spring 2016 mission for the Sally Ride EarthKAM @ Space Camp program taking place April 12-16, 2016. During the mission, students worldwide may submit requests to have a camera aboard the International Space Station capture an image of a specific location on Earth. Related resources, including images and activities, are available for use in the classroom. The optional online activities are targeted at middle school students but are adaptable for other grade levels. All students and educators are welcome, including participants in afterschool programs.

For more information and to register for the upcoming mission, visit https://www.earthkam.org/.

Please submit questions about the Sally Ride EarthKAM @ Space Camp program via https://www.earthkam.org/contact.

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2016 National Academy of Engineering – Engineering for You Video Contest 3

The National Academy of Engineering, or NAE, is launching the Engineering for You Video Contest 3, or E4U3.

This year, participants are tasked with creating a 1- to 2-minute video focused on mega-engineering. Mega-engineering projects typically address important needs of large populations and/or societies, require teams working across countries and cultures on a solution, and involve at least three disciplines including engineering.

The competition is open to all individuals or teams in the following competition categories:
— Middle school students and younger (grades K-8)
— High school students (grades 9-12)
— Tertiary education students (two-year college through graduate school, full or part time)
— The general public

The main prize is $25,000, and videos will be accepted through May 31, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.nae.edu/e4u3/.

Questions about the E4U3 Video Contest should be directed to E4Uvideocontest@nae.edu.

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PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…
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New NASA Women of STEM Website

Celebrate Women’s History Month with the new NASA Women of STEM website!

Through their accomplishments and dedication to their jobs, women at NASA embody the essence of Women’s History Month. They serve as role models to young women in their pursuit of careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Read career profiles, watch videos and more! Visit the new website at http://www.nasa.gov/education/womenstem.

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STEM@NASA Goddard: Women’s History Month

Join NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in March for “STEM@NASA Goddard: Women’s History Month”! On select Tuesdays and Thursdays at 1 p.m. EST (March 24, 29 and 31), the Goddard Office of Education will celebrate Women’s History Month by highlighting women in STEM. Women from across Goddard will share how they practice science, technology, engineering and mathematics — through their research, missions, career and the like — with participating schools and other groups.

The 30-minute programs will be streamed live on UStream, and participants will be able to interact with the guest speakers by submitting questions through email and Twitter.

To view the programs on Ustream, visit http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-gsfc.

For more information or to express interest in participating, please contact Erin McKinley at erin.e.mckinley@nasa.gov.

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2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online

The Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, named after the founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and presented by JPL’s Office of Communication and Education, shares the excitement of the space program’s missions, instruments and other technologies.

Lectures take place twice per month, on consecutive Thursdays and Fridays. The Thursday lectures take place in JPL’s Theodore von Kármán Auditorium, and Friday lectures take place at Pasadena City College’s Vosloh Forum. Both start at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT). Admission and parking are free for all lectures. No reservations are required, but seating is limited. The Thursday evening lectures also are streamed live for viewing online. Archives of past lectures are also available online.

The next lecture in the series is “The Europa Mission.”

What 10 Years at Mars Can Tell Us About the Planet
Event Date:
March 24 and March 25, 2016, at 7 pm. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2016&month=3
The Mars Reconnaissance Orbit has been circling the Red Planet for 10 years. During its decade in orbit, MRO has sent back thousands of high-resolution images and more data than all other Mars missions combined. Join MRO scientists Rich Zurek, Ph.D., and Leslie Tamppari, Ph.D., for a discussion of Mars discoveries and what the future of Red Planet research holds.

For more information about the Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, including a complete list of upcoming lectures, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.php.

Questions about this series should be directed to http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php.

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NASA/Applied Physics Laboratory Summer Internship 2016

The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, or APL, is offering summer projects for students interested in working on NASA missions or space-related research opportunities.

Students participating in the 2016 NASA/APL Internship Program will work at the APL facility in Laurel, Maryland. Students will receive a stipend for the 10-week program, and housing will be provided.

Eligible students include undergraduate rising sophomores through Ph.D. students as of fall 2016. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and have a minimum GPA of 3.0.

Applications are due March 25, 2016.

For more information about the internship and to apply online, visit https://portals.jhuapl.edu/aplnasaintern/Home.aspx.

Questions about the NASA/APL Internships Program should be emailed to aplnasaintern-web@jhuapl.edu.

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Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy

Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy, at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia, is a free alternate-reality game that will challenge you to become an astronaut-in-training for a future trip to Mars. Choose what role you will play on the mission; engage in fun interactive activities; and explore the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics skills you will need as a next-generation space traveler. Along the way, you’ll learn about some of the museum’s fascinating artifacts.

Instructions and guidance are given via a special webpage accessed on your mobile device. Players should bring their own phones or devices equipped with an internet browser and a camera. Having a digital picture-taking device (smartphone, tablet, camera) is highly recommended but not required.

The game is aimed at upper elementary and middle school visitors and their families. Do you want to bring a group? Reservations are required for groups larger than 15.

The next offering of the Astronaut Academy is on March 26, 2016. Begin your training with Astronaut Orientation in the Claude Moore Education Center Classroom 1 located on the first level across from the restrooms. Astronaut Orientation is offered at regular intervals between 10:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. The last opportunity to start the game is at 2:30 p.m. A self-guided activity, the game should take between 60 and 90 minutes, and staff will help you along the way.

For more information, including a full list of upcoming Astronaut Academy dates, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/techquest/.

Please direct questions about the Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy to the visitor service line at 202-633-2214.

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NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Live Video Chat: NASA STARS en Español

Do you want to be one of NASA’s STARS? In this series of live, Spanish video chats, “Students Talk About Real STEM” (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) with NASA professionals who work in these areas. Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network and Educator Professional Development Collaborative for an inside look at NASA missions, research and careers. Submit questions via Twitter using #NASASTARS or via email to astrosdeNASA@gmail.com.

Sign up to connect your class directly and participate in a live event. Please direct questions about this event to astrosdeNASA@gmail.com.

The next hourlong event will be webcast on the NASA DLiNfo Channel on March 29, 2016, at 1 p.m. EDT.

For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/dln.

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NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Video conferencia en vivo: NASA STARS en Español

¿Quieres ser uno de los Astros de NASA? En esta serie de video conferencia en Español y en vivo, los estudiantes hablarán de lo que es en realidad STEM (ciencias, tecnología, ingeniería y matemáticas) con profesionales de NASA que están trabajando en estas ramas. Acompaña a los programas  de conexión digital de NASA (DLN for sus siglas en Ingles) y el programa de colaboraciones de desarrolló profesional educativo (EPDC por sus siglas en Ingles) hablando de diferentes misiones, investigaciones, y carreras en NASA. Inscribe tu escuela y conectate ó envia tus preguntas por medio de Twitter usando #NASASTARS ó correo electrónico astrosdeNASA@gmail.com.

Escribanos si usted esta interesado en conectarse directo para participar y cualquier pregunta sobre el programa astrosdeNASA@gmail.com.

El siguiente programa de una hora será transmitido por NASA DLiNfo Channel el 29 de Marzo de 2016 a la 1 p.m. EDT.

Para más información visite la página http://www.nasa.gov/dln.

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Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents “STEM in 30” Webcast Series

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is presenting a series of free education webcast events called “STEM in 30.” This new program consists of live, fast-paced 30-minute webcasts designed to increase interest and engagement in science, technology, engineering and mathematics for students. To enhance the learning experience, students can get involved with the content through the interactive “Cover It Live” feature, which includes poll questions and classroom activities. The webcasts will be available live on the National Air and Space Museum website and will be archived for on-demand viewing.

Mars Rovers
March 30, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EDT
Two separate rovers are traversing Mars right this instant. It took many people and thousands of parts (many of them made of titanium) to build these rovers. Explore the construction of the Mars rovers as well as the science that is being done 140 million miles away on the Red Planet.

Moon Rocks
May 25, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EDT
Twelve men have walked on the moon. While the rest of us remain Earth-bound, we’re able to learn about the moon from the rocks these 12 astronauts brought back for scientific study. We also have found lunar meteorites here on Earth — meteorites produced by impacts hitting the moon. Explore moon rocks and what they can tell us not only about the moon but also about our own planet.

Milestones of Flight: Lunar Module
May 25, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EDT
To date, only one spacecraft has flown exclusively in space: the Lunar Module. This craft was designed for the sole purpose of getting men to the moon and then back to the Command Service Module orbiting above. Six of these crafts landed on the moon with a seventh being used as a lifeboat for the crew of Apollo 13. This webcast will explore this amazing spacecraft.

“STEM in 30” webcasts are online learning experiences but are filmed in front of a live audience. If you are interested in bringing your school group to a live filming of “STEM in 30,” please email STEMin30@si.edu for details.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s “STEM in 30” Webcast Series, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/explore-and-learn/stem-in-30/.

Questions about this series should be directed to the visitor service line at 202-633-2214.

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International FameLab Competition: San Juan Regional Event

NASA, the University of Puerto Rico, Rio Pedras and Arecibo Observatory are hosting an International FameLab regional competition event on March 30-April 1, 2016, in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Are you passionate about science? Do you love to communicate?

At regional competitions throughout the U.S., early career scientists from numerous disciplines are competing to convey their research and related science concepts. Each contestant has the spotlight for only three minutes. No slides or charts are allowed. Contestants may only use the power of words and any prop that can be held in their hands.

Winners from each regional event will face off in April 2016. Contestants will compete for a grand prize and the opportunity to compete with peers from around the world at the FameLab International Final in the United Kingdom in June 2016.

For more information and to register to take part in the competition, visit http://famelab.arc.nasa.gov/.

Questions about this competition should be emailed to Desireemoi Bridges at desireemoi.r.bridges@nasa.gov.

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International Space Station Research Design Challenge: Capillary Effects on Liquids Exploratory Research Experiments

NASA and Portland State University are seeking participants for the International Space Station Research Design Challenge: Capillary Effects on Liquids Exploratory Research Experiments, or CELERE. This design challenge enables students to participate in microgravity research on capillary action, similar to that conducted on the space station.

Teams or individuals create their own experiment using computer-aided design with a provided template and submit short proposals presenting the experiments. Portland State University then manufactures test cells using the CAD drawings and a computer-controlled laser cutter. Each experiment is conducted in a drop tower. Video of the drop is provided for student analysis and reporting of results.

CELERE is open to individuals and teams in grades 8-12. To facilitate the participation of informal science clubs, Scouts, etc., teams may include younger students as long as at least one team member is in grades 8-12. Teams may be of any size and may include an entire class or science club. The program is limited to students from the U.S., including the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Students at Department of Defense Education Activity schools (www.dodea.edu), including those outside the U.S., are also eligible to participate.

The CELERE design challenge is a relatively new program and, as a result, the odds of selection are quite high. In 2014 and 2015, 100 percent of the entries were selected for full participation, where the student experiments were built and tested in microgravity. In 2016, selection of at least one qualifying entry is guaranteed from each state and listed territory, at least one DODEA school, and at least one Bureau of Indian Education school (http://bie.edu/). Students are strongly encouraged to apply!

Design proposals are now being accepted. Submissions are due April 1, 2016.

For more information about this opportunity, visit http://spaceflightsystems.grc.nasa.gov/CELERE/.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please email your inquiries to the CELERE team at celere@lists.nasa.gov.

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2016 Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching

The National Science Foundation currently is accepting nominations and applications for the Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching program. PAEMST is the highest recognition that a teacher of K-12 mathematics or science (including computer science) may receive for outstanding teaching in the United States. Since 1983, more than 4,400 teachers have been recognized for their contributions to mathematics and science education. Awardees serve as models for their colleagues, inspiration to their communities, and leaders in the improvement of mathematics and science education. Up to 108 awardees may be recognized each year.

Presidential awardees receive a certificate signed by the President of the United States; a trip for two to Washington, D.C., to attend a series of recognition events and professional development opportunities; and a $10,000 award from the National Science Foundation. The National Science Foundation administers PAEMST on the behalf of The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.

The PAEMST program is open to outstanding mathematics and science teachers in the 50 states and the four U.S. jurisdictions (Washington, D.C.; Puerto Rico; Department of Defense education activity schools; and the U.S. territories as a group). Anyone — principals, teachers, parents, students or members of the public — may nominate a teacher by completing the nomination form available on the PAEMST website. Teachers also may apply directly. Teachers from groups underrepresented in STEM teaching and learning are encouraged to apply.

Nominations for elementary school teachers (grades K-6) are due April 1, 2016. Secondary school teachers (grades 7-12) are eligible to apply in 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.paemst.org/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to info@paemst.org.

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Astrobiology Graduate Conference 2016

The next Astrobiology Graduate Conference, AbGradCon 2016, will be held at the University of Colorado in Boulder on July 24-27, 2016. This conference is run by graduate students for other graduate students and early career scientists with the purpose of having conference attendees share their astrobiology-related research, collaborate with their peers, and make new professional connections in a low-pressure setting.

Conference attendees share their research by presenting a 15-minute talk or presenting a poster (though talks are preferred). Topics to be covered include astrochemistry, exoplanet research, planetary science, geobiology, computer science, origins of life research, and aerospace engineering. The conference culminates with a field trip to a site relevant to astrobiology. This year’s conference attendees will visit Dinosaur Ridge in Morrison, Colorado. A Public Speaking Workshop will be held as an alternative for those who do not want to participate in the field trip.

Attendees also have the option of joining, separate from the conference, the Research Focus Group workshop that will take place July 22-24 in Estes Park, Colorado. The RFG is a proposal-writing workshop targeted at developing better fundable proposals for research.

Food and lodging for conference attendees will be covered by the conference. We also expect to be able to cover most travel costs for attendees.

Applications are due April 1, 2016.

For more information, visit http://astrobiology.nasa.gov/careers-employment/abgradcon-2016/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to abgradcon@gmail.com.

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Earth Observatory’s Tournament Earth 2016

Thirty-two of the best Earth Observatory images will compete in Tournament Earth 4.0, but only one can be the winner! From Feb. 29 through April 4, 2016, visitors to NASA’s Earth Observatory website can vote for their favorite images from 2015, whittling them down each week in a tournament of remote-sensing science. The competition is divided into four categories: data, art, event and photograph.

Voting takes place online, and a printable bracket is available to let you pick your favorites and track your selections as the competition progresses.

To get started, visit http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/TournamentEarth/.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Kevin Ward at kevin.a.ward@nasa.gov.

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Environmental Education Grants

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency seeks proposals for grants to support environmental education projects that promote environmental awareness and stewardship and help people develop the skills to take responsible actions to protect the environment. This grant program provides financial support for projects that design, demonstrate and/or disseminate environmental education practices, methods or techniques.

Entities that are eligible to apply include local education agencies, state education or environmental agencies, colleges and universities, nonprofit organizations, noncommercial educational broadcasting entities, and tribal education agencies (including schools and community colleges controlled by an Indian tribe, band or nation). Applicant organizations must be located in the United States or its territories, and the majority of the educational activities must take place in the U.S.; in the U.S. and Canada or Mexico; or in the territories of the U.S.

Applications are due April 8, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.epa.gov/education/environmental-education-ee-grants.

Please direct questions about this grant opportunity to eegrants@epa.gov.

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NASA TechPort Request for Information

NASA is conducting this Request for Information, or RFI, to better understand user needs and identify potential improvements for the NASA Technology Portfolio System (TechPort).

NASA developed TechPort as an agencywide tool to capture detailed information on technology investments that support missions across aeronautics, space exploration and scientific discovery. NASA has used TechPort internally since 2012. Through continuous updates, the system now contains information on more than 840 active projects and more than 7,600 historical records. In February 2015, NASA opened a beta version of TechPort to the public.

To help enhance the TechPort system, NASA is seeking feedback via a short, 18-question survey that takes an estimated 5 to 10 minutes to complete. Feedback may be submitted through April 14, 2016.

To provide feedback, visit https://techport.nasa.gov/rfi.

To visit the NASA TechPort, visit http://techport.nasa.gov/home.

Please direct questions about NASA TechPort and this RFI to hq-techport@mail.nasa.gov.

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Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions and museums to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

There will be a nominal shipping fee that must be paid online with a credit card.  To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.

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2016 Texas Space Grant Consortium Columbia Crew Memorial Undergraduate Scholarships

The Texas Space Grant Consortium and the Aviation and Space Foundation of Texas, in partnership with NASA, are offering undergraduate scholarships of $1,500 in memory of the Space Shuttle Columbia astronauts. These seven men and women paid the ultimate sacrifice to expand the exploration of space and our knowledge of the world that we live in.

These scholarships are intended to recognize high-quality students and encourage their consideration of graduate studies in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, ultimately leading to careers in STEM-related fields. The scholarships stress excellence in academics, participation in STEM education and research projects, and the exhibition of leadership qualities.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens and registered for at least a half-time course load at a Texas Space Grant Consortium institution. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 29, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/grants/2016/scholars_announcement.html.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to scholarships@tsgc.utexas.edu.

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2016 Texas Space Grant Consortium STEM Educator Scholarships

The Texas Space Grant Consortium has established a new Educator STEM Scholarship Program. These $1,500 scholarships are intended to recognize teachers enrolled in master’s programs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields at a TSGC member institution.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens who hold a bachelor’s degree and are enrolled in a master’s program at a Texas Space Grant Consortium institution. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 29, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/edu_stem/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to scholarships@tsgc.utexas.edu.

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2016-2017 Texas Space Grant Consortium Graduate Fellowships

Texas Space Grant Consortium Fellowships encourage graduate study in the fields of space science and engineering. Interdisciplinary and integrated work experience are emphasized.

Each $5,000 award supplements half-time graduate support (or fellowship) provided by a Consortium institution. The fellowship award is good for one year. Each fellowship may be renewed for a maximum of three years, providing the recipient has spent no more than two of those years as a master’s candidate.

Applicants must be registered for full-time study in a graduate program at one or more of the Texas Space Grant Consortium institutions and must be promised financial support at that institution. Applicants must also be U.S. citizens. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 29, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/grants/2016/fellows_announcement.html.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to fellowships@tsgc.utexas.edu.

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Institute of Museum and Library Services Grants: STEM Expert Facilitation of Family Learning in Libraries and Museums

The Institute of Museum and Library Services seeks proposals for design-based research projects focused on inquiry-based STEM programs delivered by scientists, engineers, and related technical practitioners to children ages 6-10 and their families. Proposals should address the role of experts’ oral narratives (e.g., storytelling or personal histories) as part of object-based science inquiry and include information about how findings will be applicable in both museum and library settings.

Entities that are eligible to apply include libraries, agencies, institutions of higher education, museums, and other entities that advance the museum and library fields. Grant amounts up to $1,000,000 are available for a period of performance up to two years.

Applications are due May 1, 2016.

For more information, visit https://www.imls.gov/grants/available/stem-expert-facilitation-family-learning-libraries-and-museums-stemex.

Library representatives with questions about this opportunity should email Sandra Toro at storo@imls.gov. Museum representatives with questions should email Helen Wechsler at hwechsler@imls.gov or Sandra Narva at snarva@imls.gov.

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2016 NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge: Distributed Electric Propulsion

Distributed Electric Propulsion, or DEP, is an emerging aircraft design concept that has the potential to improve aircraft performance in a number of areas, including efficiency, takeoff and landing performance, emissions, noise abatement, safety, and ride quality. DEP also has the potential to enable new novel control systems. In this year’s NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge, student teams are challenged to design a commuter aircraft that applies DEP technology. The main source of thrust for the students’ concept may come from DEP or a combination of DEP and conventional propulsion devices (turboprops, turbofans, etc.). The challenge for the design team is to determine the most advantageous application of DEP for their aircraft and to justify their selection.

The contest is open to teams of full-time students enrolled in higher education institutions of the United States or its territories. This category includes universities, colleges, trade schools, community colleges, professional schools, etc. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

Final entries are due May 16, 2016.

For more information and a complete list of rules, visit http://aero.larc.nasa.gov/university-contest/.

Questions about the challenge should be directed to Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.

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Call for Papers: NASA in the ‘Long’ Civil Rights Movement Symposium

The History Office at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center and the Department of History at the University of Alabama Huntsville invite academics, graduate students and independent scholars to submit proposals for papers to be presented at a two-day symposium, March 16-17, 2017. The symposium will take place at the University of Alabama Huntsville and will address the role/relationship of NASA to the “Long” Civil Rights Movement, particularly in, but not limited to, the Deep South (Huntsville, Florida, Houston, Mississippi and New Orleans).

The conceptual framework for the symposium is provided by Jacquelyn Dowd Hall’s 2005 essay in the Journal of American History, “The Long Civil Rights Movement and the Political Uses of the Past,” which called upon historians to produce new “modes of writing and speaking that emphasize individual agency … while also dramatizing the hidden history of politics and institutions.” Along these lines, the conference welcomes papers addressing the Civil Rights experience across NASA that not only explore the experience of African Americans, but also of women, immigrants and other politically/legally marginalized groups. The intention is to publish a subset of the papers as an anthology.

Those interested in presenting a paper at the symposium should send an abstract of no more than 400 words and a short biography or curriculum vita, including affiliation, to Brian Odom at brian.c.odom@nasa.gov or Dr. Stephen Waring at warings@uah.edu by July 31, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/centers/marshall/history/call-for-papers-nasa-in-the-long-civil-rights-movement-symposium-university-of-alabama.html.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Brian Odom at brian.c.odom@nasa.gov.

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Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The Announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design (STEAMD); or activities culturally relevant to or focused on unrepresented in STEM careers populations, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or non-reimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA Announcement.

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Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — March 17, 2016

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.
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New This Week!
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Free NASA Educator Professional Development Webinars
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: March 17, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EDT

We the Explorers: Send Your Artwork to an Asteroid
Audience: All Educators and Students
Submission Deadline: March 20, 2016

GLOBE El Niño Field Campaign and Webinar Series
Audience: K-12 Educators
Next Webinar Date: March 22, 2016, at 8 p.m. EDT

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Live Video Chat: NASA STARS en Español
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: March 29, 2016, 1-2 p.m. EDT

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Video conferencia en vivo: NASA STARS en Español
Audiencia: Todos Los Educadores y Estudiantes
Fecha del Evento: Marzo 29, 2016, 1-2 p.m. EDT

2016 International Summer School in Astrobiology
Audience: Graduate Students Studying at U.S. Institutions
Application Deadline: March 31, 2016
Summer School Dates: June 20-24, 2016

Astrobiology Graduate Conference 2016
Audience: Astrobiology Graduate Students
Application Deadline: April 1, 2016
Conference Dates: July 24-27, 2016

NASA TechPort Request for Information
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Feedback Deadline: April 14, 2016

2017 eXploration Habitat (X-Hab) Academic Innovation Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Faculty and Students
Proposal Deadline: April 29, 2016

National Science Foundation’s Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers
Audience: Organizations Interested in Implementing Pre-K-12 STEM Education Programs
Full Proposal Deadline: Aug. 10, 2016

National Science Foundation’s Advancing Informal STEM Learning Program
Audience: Organizations Interested in Advancing STEM Learning in Informal Environments
Full Proposal Deadline: Nov. 8, 2016

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PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…
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STEM@NASA Goddard: Women’s History Month
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: March 17, 2016, at 1 p.m. EST

New NASA Women of STEM Website
Audience: All Educators and Students

Call for Proposals — NASA Research Announcement for Use of the NASA Physical Sciences Informatics System: Appendix B
Audience: Graduate Students
Proposal Deadline: March 17, 2016

‘The Impact of Discovery’ Engagement Workshops
Audience: K-12, Informal Educators, and the General Public
Registration Deadline: March 18, 2016
Event Date: April 9, 2016

2016 MAVEN Elementary Teachers’ Summit
Audience: Elementary Educators
Application Deadline: March 18, 2016
Workshop Dates: June 14-17, 2016

Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy
Audience: Designed for Families With Children Ages 10 to 14, but Open to All
Next Event Date: March 19, 2016, 10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. EST

2016 NASA STEM Enhancement in Earth and Space Science Internship
Audience: Current High School Sophomores and Juniors
Application Deadline: March 20, 2016

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators and 9-Higher Education Students
Next Lecture Date: March 24, 2016, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)

NASA/Applied Physics Laboratory Summer Internship 2016
Audience: Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Application Deadline: March 25, 2016

Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents “STEM in 30” Webcast Series
Audience: Grades 6-8 Educators and Students
Next Webcast Date: March 30, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EDT

International FameLab Competition: San Juan Regional Event
Audience: Graduate Students, Postdoctoral Fellows and Early Career Researchers
Event Date: March 30-April 1, 2016

International Space Station Research Design Challenge: Capillary Effects on Liquids Exploratory Research Experiments
Audience: Grade 8-12 Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: April 1, 2016

2016 Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching
Audience: All Educators and Students
Nomination Deadline: April 1, 2016

Earth Observatory’s Tournament Earth 2016
Audience: All Educators and Students
Competition Dates: Through April 4, 2016

Early Career Fellowships for Planetary Science Researchers
Audience: Higher Education Students
Proposal Deadline: Various Dates Depending on Specific Program

NASA/NSTA Webinar — Global Precipitation Measurement Mission: Watersheds
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Date: April 13, 2016, 6:30 p.m. EDT

DEADLINE EXTENDED: U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s National Summer Teacher Institute on Innovation, STEM, and Intellectual Property
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: April 18, 2016
Event Date: July 17-22, 2016

Mars Survival Kit: Lessons and Activities to Guide Your Exploration of Mars!
Audience: K-12 Educators

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

‘ISS: Science on Orbit’ Exhibit at U.S. Space & Rocket Center
Audience: All Educators and Students

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Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

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NEW THIS WEEK!
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Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Light but Strong: A Lesson in Engineering
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-5
Event Date: March 17, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Discover what it’s like to be a NASA materials engineer! In this session, participants will learn about the engineering design process, then design and build a mobile launcher platform. The activity presented in this webinar aligns with Next Generation Science Standards. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/164249

Making Waves With NASA: Optics Resources
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-12
Event Date: March 22, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Participants will get an overview of the NASA resources for teaching about waves, lenses and mirrors. This webinar addresses the Next Generation Science Standard PS4. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/155803

Technology Drives Exploration: Using Images and Data in the Classroom
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-10
Event Date: March 23, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT
Explore NASA resources developed to introduce teaching strategies using images and data. These resources may be used to illustrate a concept, to engage students, and to develop an educational exhibit, program or product. Learn about the latest science discoveries and more. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/168109

Technology Drives Exploration: Pluto — Exploring a New World in Your Classroom
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-8
Event Date: March 24, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT
Pluto has fascinated humans since it was first discovered. What is Pluto? How is Pluto both different from and like other objects in our solar system? These are some of the questions to be investigated by New Horizons, NASA’s first robotic mission to Pluto. This webinar will discuss these questions by exploring NASA STEM education content, online resources, the Next Generation Science Standards and data from the New Horizons mission. Join this webinar to learn exciting ways to bring the fascination and mystery of Pluto into your classroom. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/168028

For a full schedule of upcoming webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Please direct questions about this series of webinars to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.

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We the Explorers: Send Your Artwork to an Asteroid

Set to launch in September 2016, OSIRIS-REx will be the first U.S. mission to return samples from an asteroid to Earth. As the OSIRIS-REx team prepares for launch, it invites the public to ponder what it means to be an explorer and what this mission might teach us about ourselves and our universe.

Participants are asked to share their reflections in a creative work that will ride aboard the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft on its journey to the asteroid Bennu!

This opportunity is open to all ages and skill levels. Submissions will be collected via social media and may take the form of a sketch, photograph, graphic, poem, song, short video, or other creative or artistic expression.

The deadline for submissions is March 20, 2016, or when capacity of the drive carrying the submissions to space is reached, whichever occurs first.

For more information, visit http://www.asteroidmission.org/WeTheExplorers/.

To learn more about the OSIRIS-REx mission, visit http://www.asteroidmission.org/mission/.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to http://www.asteroidmission.org/contact/.

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GLOBE El Niño Field Campaign and Webinar Series

El Niño and La Niña are important phenomena that can impact the climate by causing global flooding and droughts as well as changes in seasonal weather. These interactions around the world are called teleconnections. Because of the importance of this issue, a GLOBE ENSO (El Niño Southern Oscillation) Campaign has been formulated to engage students in determining where and how much El Niño affects local places and to put students in contact with their local environment.

To learn more about the campaign and how to participate, visit http://www.globe.gov/web/el-nino/el-nino-campaign.

To help educators prepare for the El Niño Campaign, GLOBE is hosting a series of free education webinars to discuss the mechanics of the campaign, give updates on data collection, and give participants the opportunity to learn science content from experts.

The hourlong webinars will take place on the following dates at 8 p.m. EDT.

March 22, 2016: Maximum/Minimum Air Temperature and Precipitation
April 6, 2016: Surface Temperature and Soil Temperature
April 20, 2016: SMAP Soil Moisture
May 3, 2016: Biometry and Ground Cover
May 17, 2016: The 2015-2016 El Niño Event
June 13, 2016: Using El Niño GLOBE Data for Scientific Research
Sept. 19, 2016: El Niño Student Campaign Refresher and Update

For more information, including log-in instructions for the webinars and recordings of previous webinars in the series, visit http://www.globe.gov/web/el-nino/el-nino-campaign/webinars.

Please direct questions about this opportunity and series of webinars to http://www.globe.gov/support/contact.

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NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Live Video Chat: NASA STARS en Español

Do you want to be one of NASA’s STARS? In this series of live, Spanish video chats, “Students Talk About Real STEM” (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) with NASA professionals who work in these areas. Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network and Educator Professional Development Collaborative for an inside look at NASA missions, research and careers. Submit questions via Twitter using #NASASTARS or via email to astrosdeNASA@gmail.com.

Sign up to connect your class directly and participate in a live event. Please direct questions about this event to astrosdeNASA@gmail.com.

The next hourlong event will be webcast on the NASA DLiNfo Channel on March 29, 2016, at 1 p.m. EDT.

For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/dln.

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NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Video conferencia en vivo: NASA STARS en Español

¿Quieres ser uno de los Astros de NASA? En esta serie de video conferencia en Español y en vivo, los estudiantes hablarán de lo que es en realidad STEM (ciencias, tecnología, ingeniería y matemáticas) con profesionales de NASA que están trabajando en estas ramas. Acompaña a los programas  de conexión digital de NASA (DLN for sus siglas en Ingles) y el programa de colaboraciones de desarrolló profesional educativo (EPDC por sus siglas en Ingles) hablando de diferentes misiones, investigaciones, y carreras en NASA. Inscribe tu escuela y conectate ó envia tus preguntas por medio de Twitter usando #NASASTARS ó correo electrónico astrosdeNASA@gmail.com.

Escribanos si usted esta interesado en conectarse directo para participar y cualquier pregunta sobre el programa astrosdeNASA@gmail.com.

El siguiente programa de una hora será transmitido por NASA DLiNfo Channel el 29 de Marzo de 2016 a la 1 p.m. EDT.

Para más información visite la página http://www.nasa.gov/dln.

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2016 International Summer School in Astrobiology

The 2016 International Summer School in Astrobiology will be held at the summer campus of the Universidad Internacional Menéndez Pelayo, Palacio de la Magdalena, in Santander, Spain, on June 20-24, 2016.

This year’s theme will be “Earth Analog Environments and the Search for Life Beyond the Earth.” The school will provide an interdisciplinary examination of the chemical, physical and geological properties of potential extraterrestrial habitats and an in-depth description and analysis of sites on Earth with similar characteristics. In particular, lectures and activities will consider icy satellites, rocky planets in the solar system, extreme Earth environments, and terrestrial exoplanets.

The NASA Astrobiology Institute is offering scholarships that cover travel costs, school fees, accommodations and meals. To be eligible to apply for these scholarships, applicants must be graduate students studying at U.S. institutions.

Applications are due March 31, 2016.

For more information, visit http://nai.nasa.gov/uimp/2016-international-summer-school-astrobiology/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Edward Goolish at edward.goolish@nasa.gov.

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Astrobiology Graduate Conference 2016

The next Astrobiology Graduate Conference, AbGradCon 2016, will be held at the University of Colorado in Boulder on July 24-27, 2016. This conference is run by graduate students for other graduate students and early career scientists with the purpose of having conference attendees share their astrobiology-related research, collaborate with their peers, and make new professional connections in a low-pressure setting.

Conference attendees share their research by presenting a 15-minute talk or presenting a poster (though talks are preferred). Topics to be covered include astrochemistry, exoplanet research, planetary science, geobiology, computer science, origins of life research, and aerospace engineering. The conference culminates with a field trip to a site relevant to astrobiology. This year’s conference attendees will visit Dinosaur Ridge in Morrison, Colorado. A Public Speaking Workshop will be held as an alternative for those who do not want to participate in the field trip.

Attendees also have the option of joining, separate from the conference, the Research Focus Group workshop that will take place July 22-24 in Estes Park, Colorado. The RFG is a proposal-writing workshop targeted at developing better fundable proposals for research.

Food and lodging for conference attendees will be covered by the conference. We also expect to be able to cover most travel costs for attendees.

Applications are due April 1, 2016.

For more information, visit http://astrobiology.nasa.gov/careers-employment/abgradcon-2016/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to abgradcon@gmail.com.

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NASA TechPort Request for Information

NASA is conducting this Request for Information, or RFI, to better understand user needs and identify potential improvements for the NASA Technology Portfolio System (TechPort).

NASA developed TechPort as an agencywide tool to capture detailed information on technology investments that support missions across aeronautics, space exploration and scientific discovery. NASA has used TechPort internally since 2012. Through continuous updates, the system now contains information on more than 840 active projects and more than 7,600 historical records. In February 2015, NASA opened a beta version of TechPort to the public.

To help enhance the TechPort system, NASA is seeking feedback via a short, 18-question survey that takes an estimated 5 to 10 minutes to complete. Feedback may be submitted through April 14, 2016.

To provide feedback, visit https://techport.nasa.gov/rfi.

To visit the NASA TechPort, visit http://techport.nasa.gov/home.

Please direct questions about NASA TechPort and this RFI to hq-techport@mail.nasa.gov.

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2017 eXploration Habitat (X-Hab) Academic Innovation Challenge

NASA is seeking university teams to develop innovative design solutions for deep space human exploration systems in the 2017 eXploration Systems and Habitation Academic Innovation Challenge. This year, the X-Hab Challenge scope is being formally extended not only to include habitation topics but other areas of exploration systems as well. Topic areas include in-space recycling/reclamation, quantification of condensed water on the lunar surface, a wastewater to plant nutrient solution, a microgravity plant-watering system and a microgravity food production system.

The winners of the challenge will receive between $10,000 and $30,000 to design and produce functional products of interest to NASA human spaceflight. Proposals are due April 29, 2016, and awardees will follow a tailored systems-engineering process with the completion of the projects in the May 2017 timeframe.

Proposals will be accepted from university faculty who are U.S. citizens and who teach at an accredited university in the U.S. Eligible educators must be teaching a senior or graduate engineering design, industrial design or architecture curriculum that is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.

Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tribal Colleges and other minority-serving educational institutions are particularly encouraged to apply. Proposals from women, members of underrepresented minority groups and persons with disabilities also are highly encouraged.

For more information about the challenge and how to submit a proposal, visit http://spacegrant.org/xhab/.

Please email questions about the X-Hab Challenge to xhab@spacegrant.org.

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National Science Foundation’s Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers

The National Science Foundation is accepting proposals for the Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers, or ITEST, program. This program supports the development, implementation and selective spread of innovative strategies for engaging students in experiences that do the following:

— Increase student awareness of STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) and ICT (information and communications technology) careers
— Motivate students to pursue the education necessary to participate in those careers
— And/or provide students with technology-rich experiences that develop their knowledge of related content and skills (including critical thinking skills) needed for entering the STEM workforce.

ITEST projects must involve students but may also include teachers. The ITEST program is especially focused on broadening participation of students from traditionally underrepresented groups in STEM fields and related education and workforce domains. ITEST strongly encourages projects that actively engage business and industry partners. The resulting relationships better ensure that the students’ experiences foster the knowledge and skill sets needed for emerging STEM-related occupations.

Proposals are due Aug. 10, 2016.

For additional information about the program, including anticipated awards, visit http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2015/nsf15599/nsf15599.htm.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to DRLITEST@NSF.gov.

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National Science Foundation’s Advancing Informal STEM Learning Program

The National Science Foundation is accepting proposals for the Advancing Informal STEM Learning, or AISL, program. This program seeks to advance new approaches to evidence-based understanding of the design and development of STEM learning opportunities for the public in informal environments; to provide multiple pathways for broadening access to and engagement in STEM learning experiences; and to advance innovative research on and assessment of STEM learning in informal environments.

Proposals are due Nov. 8, 2016.

For additional information about the program, including anticipated awards, visit http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2015/nsf15593/nsf15593.htm.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to DRLAISL@NSF.gov.

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PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…
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STEM@NASA Goddard: Women’s History Month

Join NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in March for “STEM@NASA Goddard: Women’s History Month”! On select Tuesdays and Thursdays at 1 p.m. EST (March 17, 22, 24, 29 and 31), the Goddard Office of Education will celebrate Women’s History Month by highlighting women in STEM. Women from across Goddard will share how they practice science, technology, engineering and mathematics — through their research, missions, career and the like — with participating schools and other groups.

The 30-minute programs will be streamed live on UStream, and participants will be able to interact with the guest speakers by submitting questions through email and Twitter.

To view the programs on Ustream, visit http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-gsfc.

For more information or to express interest in participating, please contact Erin McKinley at erin.e.mckinley@nasa.gov.

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New NASA Women of STEM Website

Celebrate Women’s History Month with the new NASA Women of STEM website!

Through their accomplishments and dedication to their jobs, women at NASA embody the essence of Women’s History Month. They serve as role models to young women in their pursuit of careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Read career profiles, watch videos and more! Visit the new website at http://www.nasa.gov/education/womenstem.

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Call for Proposals — NASA Research Announcement for Use of the NASA Physical Sciences Informatics System: Appendix B

NASA is seeking ground-based research proposals from graduate students to use NASA’s Physical Sciences Informatics system to develop new analyses and scientific insights. The PSI system is designed to be a resource for researchers to data mine information generated from completed physical sciences experiments performed on the International Space Station or from related ground-based studies.

This solicitation appendix focuses on the following five research areas: combustion science, complex fluids, fluid physics, fundamental physics and materials science.

For graduate students (students working toward an advanced degree), this NASA Research Announcement is soliciting proposals that advance fundamental research in one of the physical sciences disciplines identified above and also assist in the awarding of an advanced degree to the graduate student. This call is open to students who meet the following eligibility requirements:

— The student is pursuing an advanced degree directly related to a physical sciences discipline — only technical degrees are permitted (not degrees in policy or management).
— The student is a U.S. citizen, a permanent resident alien of the U.S., or on a student visa at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission.
— The student is enrolled in a master’s or doctoral degree program at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission, or, if the student is an undergraduate starting their graduate studies, he or she has been accepted to a master’s or doctoral degree program at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission and will start during the next academic year.
— The student has an academic graduate advisor who will submit the application for the graduate student. The student must perform the proposed research under the guidance of the assigned graduate advisor.

The agency expects to make approximately 10-15 awards in spring 2016. Research and development efforts will take place over two years. The typical award will be $75,000-$100,000 per year, for up to two years.

The deadline for submitting proposals is March 17, 2016.

For information concerning this NASA Research Announcement solicitation, visit http://tinyurl.com/NASA-15PSI-B.

For more information about the Physical Science Informatics System, visit http://psi.nasa.gov .

Please direct questions about this NASA Research Announcement to Dr. Francis Chiaramonte at francis.p.chiaramonte@nasa.gov.

Additional technical information about the Physical Science Informatics System for this NASA Research Announcement is available from the contact below:

Name: Teresa Miller
Title: Physical Sciences Informatics System – Technical POC
NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center
Email: teresa.y.miller@nasa.gov
Phone: 256-544-7815

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‘The Impact of Discovery’ Engagement Workshops

STEM+Arts = STEAM! Explore how the arts can enhance learner understanding of science, technology, engineering and mathematics concepts.

This annual workshop presented by NASA’s Discovery and New Frontiers programs is designed for individuals who want to connect with NASA and discover STEAM opportunities to share inside and outside the classroom, in settings including libraries, museums, science centers and out-of-school-time programs. Investigate how scientists and engineers work together to move fantastic ideas from dream to reality to meet the challenges of complex space missions. Learn the latest on current missions and make your own “shoebox rover.”

The Impact of Discovery workshop will take place on April 9, 2016, in four locations.
— NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California
— NASA’s Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas
— Think 360 Arts for Learning, Denver, Colorado
— Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Maryland

All sites offer hands-on activities and multimedia resources to take home. The cost of the workshop is $25. Lunch and snacks will be provided. Registration closes on March 18, 2016.

Can’t make it to one of our workshop sites? Watch the special speaker presentations over the Internet through our free webinar. Check the website for details.

For more information, visit http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/discovery/impact_of_discovery.asp.

Please email any questions about the Impact of Discovery workshops to Laura Arndt at LArndt@mcrel.org.

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2016 MAVEN Elementary Teachers’ Summit

The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution mission began orbiting Mars on Sept. 21, 2014. MAVEN is exploring the planet′s upper atmosphere, ionosphere and interactions with the solar wind. The mission is providing invaluable insight into the history of Mars′ atmosphere, climate, liquid water and planetary habitability.

Join the MAVEN education team for a four-day workshop in Boulder, Colorado. This professional development for elementary educators is a great opportunity to explore hands-on activities and blended science/literacy lessons.

The workshop will take place June 14-17, 2016. Participants will receive free dorm housing, a $150 stipend, continental breakfast and lunch, and a certificate of completion. Travel expenses are not covered.

Applications are due March 18, 2016. Space is limited, so interested educators are encouraged to apply early.

For more information about the workshop and to apply online, visit http://lasp.colorado.edu/home/maven/education-outreach/for-educators/summit/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to epomail@lasp.colorado.edu.

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Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy

Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy, at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia, is a free alternate-reality game that will challenge you to become an astronaut-in-training for a future trip to Mars. Choose what role you will play on the mission; engage in fun interactive activities; and explore the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics skills you will need as a next-generation space traveler. Along the way, you’ll learn about some of the museum’s fascinating artifacts.

Instructions and guidance are given via a special webpage accessed on your mobile device. Players should bring their own phones or devices equipped with an internet browser and a camera. Having a digital picture-taking device (smartphone, tablet, camera) is highly recommended but not required.

The game is aimed at upper elementary and middle school visitors and their families. Do you want to bring a group? Reservations are required for groups larger than 15.

The next offering of the Astronaut Academy is on March 19, 2016. Begin your training with Astronaut Orientation in the Claude Moore Education Center Classroom 1 located on the first level across from the restrooms. Astronaut Orientation is offered at regular intervals between 10:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. The last opportunity to start the game is at 2:30 p.m. A self-guided activity, the game should take between 60 and 90 minutes, and staff will help you along the way.

For more information, including a full list of upcoming Astronaut Academy dates, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/techquest/.

Please direct questions about the Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy to the visitor service line at 202-633-2214.

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2016 NASA STEM Enhancement in Earth and Space Science Internship

STEM Enhancement in Earth and Space Science, or SEES, is a nationally competitive summer intern program for students in grades 10 and 11. NASA, the Texas Space Grant Consortium and The University of Texas at Austin Center for Space Research, or UT/CSR, have joined forces to provide this opportunity for high school students to increase their understanding of and interest in STEM careers.

Scientists and engineers at UT/CSR are conducting NASA-supported research in astronomy, remote sensing and space geodetic techniques to help understand Earth systems, natural hazards and climate science. The SEES project provides selected students with exposure to Earth and space research. Participants will learn how to interpret NASA satellite data while working with scientists and engineers in their chosen area of work.

The summer 2016 internship allows students to work remotely from July 1-15 and on-site in Austin, Texas, July 17-29. Housing, transportation and meals will be provided. Students are selected on the basis of their academic records, written application that includes essay questions, and interest in STEM.

Applications are due March 20, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.csr.utexas.edu/internship/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to Margaret Baguio at baguio@csr.utexas.edu.

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Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions and museums to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

There will be a nominal shipping fee that must be paid online with a credit card.  To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.

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2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online

The Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, named after the founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and presented by JPL’s Office of Communication and Education, shares the excitement of the space program’s missions, instruments and other technologies.

Lectures take place twice per month, on consecutive Thursdays and Fridays. The Thursday lectures take place in JPL’s Theodore von Kármán Auditorium, and Friday lectures take place at Pasadena City College’s Vosloh Forum. Both start at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT). Admission and parking are free for all lectures. No reservations are required, but seating is limited. The Thursday evening lectures also are streamed live for viewing online. Archives of past lectures are also available online.

The next lecture in the series is “The Europa Mission.”

What 10 Years at Mars Can Tell Us About the Planet
Event Date:
March 24 and March 25, 2016, at 7 pm. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2016&month=3
The Mars Reconnaissance Orbit has been circling the Red Planet for 10 years. During its decade in orbit, MRO has sent back thousands of high-resolution images and more data than all other Mars missions combined. Join MRO scientists Rich Zurek, Ph.D., and Leslie Tamppari, Ph.D., for a discussion of Mars discoveries and what the future of Red Planet research holds.

For more information about the Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, including a complete list of upcoming lectures, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.php.

Questions about this series should be directed to http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php.

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NASA/Applied Physics Laboratory Summer Internship 2016

The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, or APL, is offering summer projects for students interested in working on NASA missions or space-related research opportunities.

Students participating in the 2016 NASA/APL Internship Program will work at the APL facility in Laurel, Maryland. Students will receive a stipend for the 10-week program, and housing will be provided.

Eligible students include undergraduate rising sophomores through Ph.D. students as of fall 2016. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and have a minimum GPA of 3.0.

Applications are due March 25, 2016.

For more information about the internship and to apply online, visit https://portals.jhuapl.edu/aplnasaintern/Home.aspx.

Questions about the NASA/APL Internships Program should be emailed to aplnasaintern-web@jhuapl.edu.

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Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents “STEM in 30” Webcast Series

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is presenting a series of free education webcast events called “STEM in 30.” This new program consists of live, fast-paced 30-minute webcasts designed to increase interest and engagement in science, technology, engineering and mathematics for students. To enhance the learning experience, students can get involved with the content through the interactive “Cover It Live” feature, which includes poll questions and classroom activities. The webcasts will be available live on the National Air and Space Museum website and will be archived for on-demand viewing.

Mars Rovers
March 30, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EDT
Two separate rovers are traversing Mars right this instant. It took many people and thousands of parts (many of them made of titanium) to build these rovers. Explore the construction of the Mars rovers as well as the science that is being done 140 million miles away on the Red Planet.

Moon Rocks
May 25, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EDT
Twelve men have walked on the moon. While the rest of us remain Earth-bound, we’re able to learn about the moon from the rocks these 12 astronauts brought back for scientific study. We also have found lunar meteorites here on Earth — meteorites produced by impacts hitting the moon. Explore moon rocks and what they can tell us not only about the moon but also about our own planet.

Milestones of Flight: Lunar Module
May 25, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EDT
To date, only one spacecraft has flown exclusively in space: the Lunar Module. This craft was designed for the sole purpose of getting men to the moon and then back to the Command Service Module orbiting above. Six of these crafts landed on the moon with a seventh being used as a lifeboat for the crew of Apollo 13. This webcast will explore this amazing spacecraft.

“STEM in 30” webcasts are online learning experiences but are filmed in front of a live audience. If you are interested in bringing your school group to a live filming of “STEM in 30,” please email STEMin30@si.edu for details.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s “STEM in 30” Webcast Series, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/explore-and-learn/stem-in-30/.

Questions about this series should be directed to the visitor service line at 202-633-2214.

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International FameLab Competition: San Juan Regional Event

NASA, the University of Puerto Rico, Rio Pedras and Arecibo Observatory are hosting an International FameLab regional competition event on March 30-April 1, 2016, in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Are you passionate about science? Do you love to communicate?

At regional competitions throughout the U.S., early career scientists from numerous disciplines are competing to convey their research and related science concepts. Each contestant has the spotlight for only three minutes. No slides or charts are allowed. Contestants may only use the power of words and any prop that can be held in their hands.

Winners from each regional event will face off in April 2016. Contestants will compete for a grand prize and the opportunity to compete with peers from around the world at the FameLab International Final in the United Kingdom in June 2016.

For more information and to register to take part in the competition, visit http://famelab.arc.nasa.gov/.

Questions about this competition should be emailed to Desireemoi Bridges at desireemoi.r.bridges@nasa.gov.

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International Space Station Research Design Challenge: Capillary Effects on Liquids Exploratory Research Experiments

NASA and Portland State University are seeking participants for the International Space Station Research Design Challenge: Capillary Effects on Liquids Exploratory Research Experiments, or CELERE. This design challenge enables students to participate in microgravity research on capillary action, similar to that conducted on the space station.

Teams or individuals create their own experiment using computer-aided design with a provided template and submit short proposals presenting the experiments. Portland State University then manufactures test cells using the CAD drawings and a computer-controlled laser cutter. Each experiment is conducted in a drop tower. Video of the drop is provided for student analysis and reporting of results.

CELERE is open to individuals and teams in grades 8-12. To facilitate the participation of informal science clubs, Scouts, etc., teams may include younger students as long as at least one team member is in grades 8-12. Teams may be of any size and may include an entire class or science club. The program is limited to students from the U.S., including the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Students at Department of Defense Education Activity schools (www.dodea.edu), including those outside the U.S., are also eligible to participate.

The CELERE design challenge is a relatively new program and, as a result, the odds of selection are quite high. In 2014 and 2015, 100 percent of the entries were selected for full participation, where the student experiments were built and tested in microgravity. In 2016, selection of at least one qualifying entry is guaranteed from each state and listed territory, at least one DODEA school, and at least one Bureau of Indian Education school (http://bie.edu/). Students are strongly encouraged to apply!

Design proposals are now being accepted. Submissions are due April 1, 2016.

For more information about this opportunity, visit http://spaceflightsystems.grc.nasa.gov/CELERE/.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please email your inquiries to the CELERE team at celere@lists.nasa.gov.

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2016 Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching

The National Science Foundation currently is accepting nominations and applications for the Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching program. PAEMST is the highest recognition that a teacher of K-12 mathematics or science (including computer science) may receive for outstanding teaching in the United States. Since 1983, more than 4,400 teachers have been recognized for their contributions to mathematics and science education. Awardees serve as models for their colleagues, inspiration to their communities, and leaders in the improvement of mathematics and science education. Up to 108 awardees may be recognized each year.

Presidential awardees receive a certificate signed by the President of the United States; a trip for two to Washington, D.C., to attend a series of recognition events and professional development opportunities; and a $10,000 award from the National Science Foundation. The National Science Foundation administers PAEMST on the behalf of The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.

The PAEMST program is open to outstanding mathematics and science teachers in the 50 states and the four U.S. jurisdictions (Washington, D.C.; Puerto Rico; Department of Defense education activity schools; and the U.S. territories as a group). Anyone — principals, teachers, parents, students or members of the public — may nominate a teacher by completing the nomination form available on the PAEMST website. Teachers also may apply directly. Teachers from groups underrepresented in STEM teaching and learning are encouraged to apply.

Nominations for elementary school teachers (grades K-6) are due April 1, 2016. Secondary school teachers (grades 7-12) are eligible to apply in 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.paemst.org/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to info@paemst.org.

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Earth Observatory’s Tournament Earth 2016

Thirty-two of the best Earth Observatory images will compete in Tournament Earth 4.0, but only one can be the winner! From Feb. 29 through April 4, 2016, visitors to NASA’s Earth Observatory website can vote for their favorite images from 2015, whittling them down each week in a tournament of remote-sensing science. The competition is divided into four categories: data, art, event and photograph.

Voting takes place online, and a printable bracket is available to let you pick your favorites and track your selections as the competition progresses.

To get started, visit http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/TournamentEarth/.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Kevin Ward at kevin.a.ward@nasa.gov.

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Early Career Fellowships for Planetary Science Researchers

The Early Career Fellowship program supports the development of individual research programs of outstanding scientists in the early stages of their careers and stimulates research careers in the areas supported by the Planetary Sciences Division. This program is based on the idea that supporting key individuals is a critical mechanism for impacting science with new concepts, technologies and methods.

This program consists of two components with two different submission procedures: The first is the one-page application to be an “Early Career Fellow,” and the second is the subsequent submission of a seven-page proposal for startup funds once selected as an ECF. To be eligible to apply, applicants must have received their Ph.D. (or equivalent degree such as a DPhil) within seven calendar years of the year of the submission of the research proposal.

For consideration as a Fellow (new applicants), submit a proposal to the participating program element by the deadline specified in Tables 2 and 3 in the ROSES Summary of Solicitation. Proposals from Fellows selected in prior years for start-up funds may be submitted at any time in response to this program element.

For complete fellowship details and application procedures, visit http://go.nasa.gov/1MkySUk.

Questions concerning this opportunity may be directed to Doris Daou at Doris.Daou@nasa.gov.

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NASA/NSTA Webinar — Global Precipitation Measurement Mission: Watersheds

Join the National Science Teachers Association for a free interactive webinar to learn about watersheds and NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement, or GPM, mission. The 90-minute session will take place on April 13, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EDT.

What is a watershed? Why are watersheds important? What are signs of a healthy watershed? Why are some watersheds or water reservoirs losing their water? Topics presented at this webinar will include watershed basics and hands-on investigations students can conduct to monitor their local watershed areas. NASA scientists will give background science information about watersheds and how NASA helps monitor watershed regions.

GPM is an international satellite mission managed by NASA and JAXA (the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) that will provide next-generation observations of rain and snow. The GPM mission will help us learn more about Earth’s water and energy cycles, improve the forecasting of extreme events that cause natural disasters, and extend current capabilities of using satellite precipitation information to directly benefit society.

All participants will receive a certificate of participation and 100 Learning Center activity points for attending and completing the post-program evaluation. An archive and presentation slides will be available at the end of the program.

For more information and to register to attend the webinar event, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/resource/?id=10.2505/9/WSNASA15_Apr13.

For more information about GPM, visit http://www.nasa.gov/gpm or http://gpm.nasa.gov.

Please email questions about this opportunity to webseminars@nsta.org.

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DEADLINE EXTENDED: U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s National Summer Teacher Institute on Innovation, STEM, and Intellectual Property

The United States Patent and Trademark Office, or USPTO, will host its third annual National Summer Teacher Institute on Innovation, STEM, and Intellectual Property on July 17-22, 2016, at Michigan State University in East Lansing.

This multiday, professional development opportunity will train elementary, middle and high school teachers to incorporate concepts of making, inventing, creating and protecting intellectual property into classroom instruction. Participants are expected to implement lessons learned from the institute into their schools and school districts.

The institute is open to teachers nationwide, so apply to be a part of this exciting cohort! In accordance with the Federal Travel Regulations and USPTO travel policy, travel and lodging expenses will be covered for teachers who are traveling more than 50 miles to the venue. Space is limited.

The deadline for applications has been extended to April 18, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.uspto.gov/learning-and-resources/outreach-and-education/national-summer-teacher-institute.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to NSTI_Applications@uspto.gov.

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Mars Survival Kit: Lessons and Activities to Guide Your Exploration of Mars!

NASA is embarking on a journey to Mars! Are your students ready to join in the adventure? Spark excitement in your classroom with the Mars Survival Kit.

The Mars Survival Kit is a collection of educational activities for students in grades K-12. Each educational activity includes a brief description, as well as information about how the activities and lessons align to the Next Generation Science Standards.

Start your classroom’s journey to Mars at http://go.nasa.gov/1NnZ0Rg.

To learn more about NASA’s Journey to Mars, visit http://www.nasa.gov/topics/journeytomars/index.html.

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Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The Announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design (STEAMD); or activities culturally relevant to or focused on unrepresented in STEM careers populations, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or non-reimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31, 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA Announcement.

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‘ISS: Science on Orbit’ Exhibit at U.S. Space & Rocket Center

The U.S. Space & Rocket Center’s “ISS: Science on Orbit” exhibit provides visitors with a true sense of what it’s like to live and work in space. This NASA grant-funded exhibit begins with a model of NASA’s Payload Operations Integration Center, where scientists and engineers on Earth manage the complex, international science experiments that astronauts conduct on the International Space Station.

Two mockups of space station modules contain 20 full-scale replica racks that illustrate the Environmental Control and Life Support Systems, the astronauts’ food, and a sleeping berth, among other necessary aspects of life and work aboard the station. A connecting node contains a full-scale replica of the Cupola Observation Module, which provides space station crew members with a view of Earth and space.

For more information, visit http://rocketcenter.com/.

Questions about the exhibit can be directed to Dr. Kay Taylor at kay.taylor@spacecamp.com.

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Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — March 10, 2016

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.
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New This Week!
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Free NASA Educator Professional Development Webinars
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: March 10, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EST

Live Video Chat With Researcher Studying Protein Crystals on Space Station
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: March 18, 2016, 11-11:45 a.m. EDT

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Environmental Education Grants
Audience: State and Local Education Agencies, Colleges and Universities, Non-profit Organizations, Tribal Education Agencies, and Non-Commercial Educational Broadcasting Companies.
Application Deadline: April 8, 2016

White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities — 2016 All-Star Students Program
Audience: Higher Education Students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Application Deadline: April 22, 2016

2016 Lunar Workshop for Educators
Audience: In-service and Pre-service Science Educators of Grades 6-9
Workshop Dates: June 27-July 1, 2016

2016 DREAM2Explore Workshop for Educators
Audience: In-service and Pre-service Science Educators of Grades 6-9
Workshop Dates: July 11-15, 2016

STEM on Station — Welcome Home, Scott Kelly!
Audience: Grades 6-12 — Educators and Students

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PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…
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STEM@NASA Goddard: Women’s History Month
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: March 10, 2016, at 1 p.m. EST

Host a Real-Time Conversation With Crew Members Aboard the International Space Station
Audience: All Educators
Next Optional Informational Session: March 10, 2016, at 7 p.m. EST
Proposal Deadline: April 15, 2016

New NASA Women of STEM Website
Audience: All Educators and Students

Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy
Audience: Designed for Families With Children Ages 10 to 14, but Open to All
Next Event Date: March 11, 2016, 10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. EST

Mars Survival Kit: Lessons and Activities to Guide Your Exploration of Mars!
Audience: K-12 Educators

Family Day Events at Smithsonian’s Air and Space Museum
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: March 12, 2016

Free Education Webinar Series From the GOES-R Education Proving Ground
Audience: 6-12 Educators
Next Event Date: March 12, 2016, at 11:30 a.m. EST

2016-2017 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Community College STEM Scholarship
Audience: Freshman Students at Community Colleges in Virginia
Application Deadline: March 14, 2016

2016-2017 Virginia Space Grant Consortium STEM Bridge Scholarships
Audience: Minority Undergraduate Students (Underclassmen) at Virginia Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: March 14, 2016

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Call for Papers: 2016 International Space Station Research and Development Conference
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Abstract Submission Deadline: March 14, 2016

U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s National Summer Teacher Institute on Innovation, STEM, and Intellectual Property
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: March 15, 2016
Event Date: July 17-22, 2016

Call for Proposals — NASA Research Announcement for Use of the NASA Physical Sciences Informatics System: Appendix B
Audience: Graduate Students
Proposal Deadline: March 17, 2016

‘The Impact of Discovery’ Engagement Workshops
Audience: K-12, Informal Educators, and the General Public
Registration Deadline: March 18, 2016
Event Date: April 9, 2016

2016 MAVEN Elementary Teachers’ Summit
Audience: Elementary Educators
Application Deadline: March 18, 2016
Workshop Dates: June 14-17, 2016

2016 NASA STEM Enhancement in Earth and Space Science Internship
Audience: Current High School Sophomores and Juniors
Application Deadline: March 20, 2016

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

NASA/Applied Physics Laboratory Summer Internship 2016
Audience: Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Application Deadline: March 25, 2016

International FameLab Competition: San Juan Regional Event
Audience: Graduate Students, Postdoctoral Fellows and Early Career Researchers
Event Date: March 30-April 1, 2016

Earth Observatory’s Tournament Earth 2016
Audience: All Educators and Students
Competition Dates: Through April 4, 2016

NASA History Program Office Fall 2016 Internships
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Fall 2016 Application Deadline: June 1, 2016

‘CineSpace’ Short Film Competition
Audience: All Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: July 31, 2016

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

Free “NASA’s Journey to Mars” Planetarium/Dome Show
Audience: All Formal and Informal Educators

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Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

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NEW THIS WEEK!
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Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Technology Drives Exploration: NASA’s BEST Next Generation Technology Demonstration Challenges
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-8
Event Date: March 10, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EST
Explore the engineering design process through NASA’s Technology Demonstration Missions. These challenges focus on bringing in real-world science, mathematics and technology into the classroom for 5-8 educators. These activities align with Next Generation Science Standards and Common Core Math Standards. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/164243

Technology Drives Exploration: NASA Rockets 2 Racecars — From Racecars to Spacesuits
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-9
Event Date: March 14, 2016, at 4 p.m. EDT
Get your students revved up about STEM with NASA Rockets 2 Racecars hands-on activities. Discover the correlations between racecars and rockets with activities relating to Bernoulli’s Principle and see if the force will uplift you … or not! Explore g-forces, the importance of fitness, and similarities between race suits and spacesuits. Activities and resources presented in this webinar will align with Next Generation Science Standards. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/166953

Technology Drives Exploration: Deep Space
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-9
Event Date: March 15, 2016, at 4 p.m. EDT
Since the earliest days of astronomy, astronomers have shared a single goal — to see more, see farther, see deeper. The Space Telescope Science Institute, or STScI, is the science operations center for the Hubble Space Telescope and for the James Webb Space Telescope. Learn from STScI about how the evolution of space telescopes has inspired today’s explorations into deep space. Discover NASA activities and resources related to disciplines such as physics, mathematics, space technology, and even music! Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/166939

Technology Drives Exploration: Space Telescopes — Eyes in the Sky
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: March 16, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT
Explore the past, present and future of NASA space telescopes as they expand our understanding of the solar system and the universe beyond. This webinar will focus on the Hubble Space Telescope and the James Webb Space Telescope. NASA STEM curriculum, online resources, careers and the Next Generation Science Standards will be integrated in the “out-of-this-world” webinar. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/161921

Light but Strong: A Lesson in Engineering
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-5
Event Date: March 17, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Discover what it’s like to be a NASA materials engineer! In this session, participants will learn about the engineering design process, then design and build a mobile launcher platform. The activity presented in this webinar aligns with Next Generation Science Standards. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/164249

For a full schedule of upcoming webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Please direct questions about this series of webinars to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.

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Live Video Chat With Researcher Studying Protein Crystals on Space Station

Connect your class with NASA’s Digital Learning Network to talk with Dr. Joseph Ng, a researcher at iXpressGenes. This synthetic biology company is studying the growth of protein crystals on the International Space Station. The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space manages the U.S. National Laboratory and sponsors this experiment. This investigation is critical to understanding human disease and developing new treatments.

The 45-minute event will be webcast on the NASA DLiNfo Channel on March 18, 2016, at 11 a.m. EDT.

Ask questions via Twitter using #askDLN or via email to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com.

Sign up to connect your class directly and participate in a CASIS Academy Live event. Please direct questions about this event to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com.

For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/dln.

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Environmental Education Grants

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency seeks proposals for grants to support environmental education projects that promote environmental awareness and stewardship and help people develop the skills to take responsible actions to protect the environment. This grant program provides financial support for projects that design, demonstrate and/or disseminate environmental education practices, methods or techniques.

Entities that are eligible to apply include local education agencies, state education or environmental agencies, colleges and universities, nonprofit organizations, noncommercial educational broadcasting entities, and tribal education agencies (including schools and community colleges controlled by an Indian tribe, band or nation). Applicant organizations must be located in the United States or its territories, and the majority of the educational activities must take place in the U.S.; in the U.S. and Canada or Mexico; or in the territories of the U.S.

Applications are due April 8, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.epa.gov/education/environmental-education-ee-grants.

Please direct questions about this grant opportunity to eegrants@epa.gov.

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White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities — 2016 All-Star Students Program

The White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities works to promote HBCU excellence, innovation and sustainability. The Initiative will recognize current HBCU students for their dedication to academics, leadership and civic engagement as 2016 HBCU All-Star Students.

The appointment period will last approximately one year. During this time, HBCU All-Stars will serve as ambassadors of the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities by providing outreach opportunities and communications to their fellow students about the value of education and the Initiative as a networking resource. Through social media and personal and professional relationships with community-based organizations, students will share promising and proven practices that support opportunities for all young people to realize their educational and career potential. The program will provide an opportunity to participate in regional and national events as well as webchats with Initiative staff and other professionals from a wide range of disciplines that support a spirit of engagement and personal and professional development.

Nominees must be current undergraduate, graduate or professional students at an HBCU. Students must be enrolled for the 2016-2017 fall semester. Applications must be submitted by 11:59 p.m. EDT on April 22, 2016.

For more information and to download an application, visit http://sites.ed.gov/whhbcu/resources/hbcu-all-star-students/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to hbcuallstars@ed.gov.

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2016 Lunar Workshop for Educators

NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, mission is sponsoring a workshop for educators of students in grades 6-9. The workshop will focus on lunar science, exploration, and how our understanding of the moon is growing and changing with the new data from current and recent lunar missions.

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has allowed scientists to measure the coldest known place in the solar system, map the surface of the moon in unprecedented detail and accuracy, find evidence of recent lunar geologic activity, characterize the radiation environment around the moon and its potential effects on future lunar explorers, and much, much more!

Workshop participants will reinforce their understanding of lunar science concepts; gain tools to help address common student misconceptions about the moon; and interact with lunar scientists and engineers. Participants will work with LRO data and learn how to bring the data and information to their students using hands-on activities aligned with Next Generation Science Standards for grades 6-9.

The workshop will take place June 27-July 1, 2016, at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Workshop participants will have the opportunity to tour the LRO Mission Operation Center and the Goddard spacecraft testing facilities.

For more information and to register to attend, visit http://lunar.gsfc.nasa.gov/lwe/index.html.

Questions about this workshop should be directed to Andrea Jones at Andrea.J.Jones@nasa.gov.

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2016 DREAM2Explore Workshop for Educators

The “Dynamic Response of the Environments at Asteroids, the Moon, and moons of Mars,” or DREAM2, team at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center is hosting a free workshop for educators of students in grades 6-9. Participants will learn how our understanding of Earth’s moon, asteroids and the moons of Mars is growing and changing with new data and models from current and recent planetary missions and the work of the DREAM2 team.

Workshop participants will reinforce their understanding of lunar and planetary science concepts; gain tools to help address common student misconceptions about the moon; and interact with NASA scientists who study the dynamic environments surrounding these rocky objects. Participants will work with real scientific data and learn how to bring the data and information to their students using hands-on activities aligned with Next Generation Science Standards for grades 6-9.

The workshop will take place July 11-15, 2016, at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Workshop participants will become certified to borrow meteorite samples from NASA and will receive Certificates of Participation and Letters of Completion that indicate 30 hours of instruction.

For more information and to register to attend, visit http://ssed.gsfc.nasa.gov/dream/DREAM/DREAM2Explore.html.

Questions about this workshop should be directed to Andrea Jones at Andrea.J.Jones@nasa.gov.

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STEM on Station — Welcome Home, Scott Kelly!

Astronaut Scott Kelly spent a #YearinSpace and has returned to Earth.

Learn about the science behind Kelly’s mission. http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/news/1Y_in_space_infographic

Find out about the top “Ten Things to Know” about his time in space. http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/news/top_ten_1YM.

Learn more about ways you can bring the space station into your classroom by visiting NASA’s STEM on Station website. While you are there, stop by and learn more about the year-long mission and how it is helping us on our #JourneytoMars. Opportunities, resources and more await at this site focusing on the International Space Station!

To check out the website, visit http://www.nasa.gov/education/STEMstation.

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PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…
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STEM@NASA Goddard: Women’s History Month

Join NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in March for “STEM@NASA Goddard: Women’s History Month”! On select Tuesdays and Thursdays at 1 p.m. EST (March 10, 15, 17, 22, 24, 29 and 31), the Goddard Office of Education will celebrate Women’s History Month by highlighting women in STEM. Women from across Goddard will share how they practice science, technology, engineering and mathematics — through their research, missions, career and the like — with participating schools and other groups.

The 30-minute programs will be streamed live on UStream, and participants will be able to interact with the guest speakers by submitting questions through email and Twitter.

To view the programs on Ustream, visit http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-gsfc.

For more information or to express interest in participating, please contact Erin McKinley at erin.e.mckinley@nasa.gov.

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Host a Real-Time Conversation With Crew Members Aboard the International Space Station

ARISS-US is now accepting proposals from U.S. schools, museums, science centers and community youth organizations to host an Amateur Radio on the International Space Station, or ARISS, contact between Jan. 1 – June 30, 2017. To maximize these radio contact opportunities, ARISS-US is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed education plan. Proposals are due April 15, 2016.

Using amateur radio, students can ask astronauts questions about life in space and other space-related topics. Students fully engage in the ARISS contact by helping set up an amateur radio ground station at the school and then using that station to talk directly with a crew member on the International Space Station for approximately 10 minutes. ARISS provides experienced mentors and relies on local amateur radio volunteers to help organizations obtain the technology required to host this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for students.

Informational Sessions
To help organizations in preparing their proposals, the ARISS program coordinator will offer hourlong online information sessions. These are designed to provide more information regarding U.S. ARISS contacts and the proposal process, and offer an opportunity to ask questions. While attending an online information session is not required, it is strongly encouraged.

An informational session will be offered March 10, 2016, at 7 p.m. EST.

Advance registration is necessary. Email ARISS (ariss@arrl.org) to sign up for an information session.

For proposal information and more details such as expectations, proposal guidelines and proposal form, visit http://www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.

ARISS-US is offered through a partnership between NASA; the American Radio Relay League, or ARRL; and the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation, or AMSAT. ARISS was created and is managed by an international working group, including several countries in Europe as well as Japan, Russia, Canada, and the USA.

Questions about this opportunity should be emailed to ariss@arrl.org.

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New NASA Women of STEM Website

Celebrate Women’s History Month with the new NASA Women of STEM website!

Through their accomplishments and dedication to their jobs, women at NASA embody the essence of Women’s History Month. They serve as role models to young women in their pursuit of careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Read career profiles, watch videos and more! Visit the new website at http://www.nasa.gov/education/womenstem.

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Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy

Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy, at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia, is a free alternate-reality game that will challenge you to become an astronaut-in-training for a future trip to Mars. Choose what role you will play on the mission; engage in fun interactive activities; and explore the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics skills you will need as a next-generation space traveler. Along the way, you’ll learn about some of the museum’s fascinating artifacts.

Instructions and guidance are given via a special webpage accessed on your mobile device. Players should bring their own phones or devices equipped with an internet browser and a camera. Having a digital picture-taking device (smartphone, tablet, camera) is highly recommended but not required.

The game is aimed at upper elementary and middle school visitors and their families. Do you want to bring a group? Reservations are required for groups larger than 15.

The next offering of the Astronaut Academy is on March 11, 2016. Begin your training with Astronaut Orientation in the Claude Moore Education Center Classroom 1 located on the first level across from the restrooms. Astronaut Orientation is offered at regular intervals between 10:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. The last opportunity to start the game is at 2:30 p.m. A self-guided activity, the game should take between 60 and 90 minutes, and staff will help you along the way.

For more information, including a full list of upcoming Astronaut Academy dates, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/techquest/.

Please direct questions about the Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy to the visitor service line at 202-633-2214.

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Mars Survival Kit: Lessons and Activities to Guide Your Exploration of Mars!

NASA is embarking on a journey to Mars! Are your students ready to join in the adventure? Spark excitement in your classroom with the Mars Survival Kit.

The Mars Survival Kit is a collection of educational activities for students in grades K-12. Each educational activity includes a brief description, as well as information about how the activities and lessons align to the Next Generation Science Standards.

Start your classroom’s journey to Mars at http://go.nasa.gov/1NnZ0Rg.

To learn more about NASA’s Journey to Mars, visit http://www.nasa.gov/topics/journeytomars/index.html.

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Family Day Events at Smithsonian’s Air and Space Museum

The Smithsonian’s Family Day event series celebrates the diverse ethnic and cultural communities that have contributed to aviation and space exploration. Events will commemorate historic and current contributions through presentations and activities for the entire family. The events are free and open to the public.

Women in Aviation and Space
March 12, 2016, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. EST
National Air and Space Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia

Throughout the history of aviation and space exploration, women have fought to be on equal terms with their male counterparts. Celebrate the incredible contributions of women in aviation and space exploration at this event featuring presentations by women in the field, hands-on activities and stories.
http://airandspace.si.edu/events/heritage-days/womens-history/

Explore the Universe
April 9, 2016, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. EST
National Air and Space Museum in Washington, District of Columbia
People around the world have always looked to the sky, but they don’t always see the same things. Bring your family to experience how different people study the sky and to hear their stories. Learn about telescopes and, if weather permits, do some daytime observations.
http://airandspace.si.edu/events/heritage-days/explore-universe/

Please direct questions about this series of events to the Visitor Service line at 202-633-2214.

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Free Education Webinar Series From the GOES-R Education Proving Ground

The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites — R Series is the next generation of geostationary Earth-observing systems. The GOES-R series satellites will provide continuous imagery and atmospheric measurements of Earth’s Western Hemisphere. The satellites will collect lightning data and monitor space weather to provide critical atmospheric, hydrologic, oceanic, climatic, solar and space data. The first satellite in the GOES-R series is scheduled to launch in October 2016.

To help educators prepare for the new satellite imagery and data that will be available during the GOES-R era, the GOES-R Education Proving Ground is hosting a series of education webcasts leading up to launch.

The webinars will take place on the following Saturday mornings at 11:30 a.m. Eastern Time.

March 12, 2016: GOES-R Lesson Plans: For Teachers, By Teachers
April 23, 2016: Additional GOES-R Resources and Educational Tools
Sept. 17, 2016: Countdown to Launch!

For more information, including log-in instructions for the webinars, visit http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/education/goesr/.

Please direct questions about this series of webinars to Margaret Mooney at Margaret.Mooney@ssec.wisc.edu.

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2016-2017 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Community College STEM Scholarship

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium encourages academically talented individuals to pursue studies and careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM. The VSGC is offering a limited number of scholarships to students majoring in STEM fields at any campus in the Virginia Community College System.

These $2,000 scholarships are competitive awards based on academic merit for students demonstrating an interest in NASA’s missions and STEM-related careers. The VSGC strongly supports students in technical career pathways who are preparing to transfer to institutions of higher learning while developing the essential skills for a competitive global workforce.

Underrepresented minority students, female students and students with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and enrolled in the Virginia Community College System.

The deadline for submitting applications is March 14, 2016.

For more information, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/ccstem/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to Anne Weiss at aweiss@odu.edu.

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2016-2017 Virginia Space Grant Consortium STEM Bridge Scholarships

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium is offering renewable scholarships to undergraduate students studying science, technology, engineering or mathematics. The STEM Bridge Scholarships are $1,000.

The scholarships are available to students who are U.S. citizens from any federally recognized minority group and are enrolled fulltime at one of the five VSGC member universities: The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia, and Virginia Tech. Applicants must have completed at least one year of a STEM undergraduate program and be classified as a sophomore during the 2016-2017 academic year.

The STEM Bridge Program connects students to future opportunities by mentoring and guiding them to future VSGC scholarships and NASA-related paid internships. The program encourages students to explore how their majors can apply to NASA’s mission.

This is a competitive program, and awards are based on student academic merit and the quality of interest essay, as well as letters of recommendation from current college faculty who can attest to the student’s interest in STEM areas.

The deadline for submitting applications is March 14, 2016.

For more information, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/Bridge/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to Anne Weiss at aweiss@odu.edu.

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DEADLINE EXTENDED: Call for Papers: 2016 International Space Station Research and Development Conference

The fifth annual International Space Station Research and Development Conference will be held July 12-14, 2016, at the Town and Country Resort & Convention Center in San Diego, California.

NASA, the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space, and the American Astronautical Society are seeking abstracts under the categories of biology and medicine; human health in space; commercialization and nongovernment utilization; physical sciences and materials development; plant science; Earth science and remote sensing; technology development and demonstration; and science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, education. Topics should relate to science, exploration and technology activities (past, present, planned or under development) on the International Space Station.

Both the conference and abstract submittal are open to entrepreneurial, commercial, academic and government agency attendees, both from and outside the United States. Eligible attendees include professionals, young professionals, students and interested parties. The working language for the conference is English. The conference will include plenaries for topics of general interests and technical sessions for focused discussions.

Because of the large number of expected submissions, presenters are encouraged to submit abstracts early; the deadline is March 14, 2016.

For more information about the conference and how to submit an abstract for consideration, visit http://www.issconference.org/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to ISSTechChair@atdl-inc.com.

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U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s National Summer Teacher Institute on Innovation, STEM, and Intellectual Property

The United States Patent and Trademark Office, or USPTO, will host its third annual National Summer Teacher Institute on Innovation, STEM, and Intellectual Property on July 17-22, 2016, at Michigan State University in East Lansing.

This multiday, professional development opportunity will train elementary, middle and high school teachers to incorporate concepts of making, inventing, creating and protecting intellectual property into classroom instruction. Participants are expected to implement lessons learned from the institute into their schools and school districts.

The institute is open to teachers nationwide, so apply to be a part of this exciting cohort! In accordance with the Federal Travel Regulations and USPTO travel policy, travel and lodging expenses will be covered for teachers who are traveling more than 50 miles to the venue. Space is limited.

Applications are due March 15, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.uspto.gov/learning-and-resources/outreach-and-education/national-summer-teacher-institute.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to NSTI_Applications@uspto.gov.

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Call for Proposals — NASA Research Announcement for Use of the NASA Physical Sciences Informatics System: Appendix B

NASA is seeking ground-based research proposals from graduate students to use NASA’s Physical Sciences Informatics system to develop new analyses and scientific insights. The PSI system is designed to be a resource for researchers to data mine information generated from completed physical sciences experiments performed on the International Space Station or from related ground-based studies.

This solicitation appendix focuses on the following five research areas: combustion science, complex fluids, fluid physics, fundamental physics and materials science.

For graduate students (students working toward an advanced degree), this NASA Research Announcement is soliciting proposals that advance fundamental research in one of the physical sciences disciplines identified above and also assist in the awarding of an advanced degree to the graduate student. This call is open to students who meet the following eligibility requirements:

— The student is pursuing an advanced degree directly related to a physical sciences discipline — only technical degrees are permitted (not degrees in policy or management).
— The student is a U.S. citizen, a permanent resident alien of the U.S., or on a student visa at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission.
— The student is enrolled in a master’s or doctoral degree program at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission, or, if the student is an undergraduate starting their graduate studies, he or she has been accepted to a master’s or doctoral degree program at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission and will start during the next academic year.
— The student has an academic graduate advisor who will submit the application for the graduate student. The student must perform the proposed research under the guidance of the assigned graduate advisor.

The agency expects to make approximately 10-15 awards in spring 2016. Research and development efforts will take place over two years. The typical award will be $75,000-$100,000 per year, for up to two years.

The deadline for submitting proposals is March 17, 2016.

For information concerning this NASA Research Announcement solicitation, visit http://tinyurl.com/NASA-15PSI-B.

For more information about the Physical Science Informatics System, visit http://psi.nasa.gov .

Please direct questions about this NASA Research Announcement to Dr. Francis Chiaramonte at francis.p.chiaramonte@nasa.gov.

Additional technical information about the Physical Science Informatics System for this NASA Research Announcement is available from the contact below:

Name: Teresa Miller
Title: Physical Sciences Informatics System – Technical POC
NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center
Email: teresa.y.miller@nasa.gov
Phone: 256-544-7815

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‘The Impact of Discovery’ Engagement Workshops

STEM+Arts = STEAM! Explore how the arts can enhance learner understanding of science, technology, engineering and mathematics concepts.

This annual workshop presented by NASA’s Discovery and New Frontiers programs is designed for individuals who want to connect with NASA and discover STEAM opportunities to share inside and outside the classroom, in settings including libraries, museums, science centers and out-of-school-time programs. Investigate how scientists and engineers work together to move fantastic ideas from dream to reality to meet the challenges of complex space missions. Learn the latest on current missions and make your own “shoebox rover.”

The Impact of Discovery workshop will take place on April 9, 2016, in four locations.
— NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California
— NASA’s Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas
— Think 360 Arts for Learning, Denver, Colorado
— Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Maryland

All sites offer hands-on activities and multimedia resources to take home. The cost of the workshop is $25. Lunch and snacks will be provided. Registration closes on March 18, 2016.

Can’t make it to one of our workshop sites? Watch the special speaker presentations over the Internet through our free webinar. Check the website for details.

For more information, visit http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/discovery/impact_of_discovery.asp.

Please email any questions about the Impact of Discovery workshops to Laura Arndt at LArndt@mcrel.org.

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2016 MAVEN Elementary Teachers’ Summit

The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution mission began orbiting Mars on Sept. 21, 2014. MAVEN is exploring the planet′s upper atmosphere, ionosphere and interactions with the solar wind. The mission is providing invaluable insight into the history of Mars′ atmosphere, climate, liquid water and planetary habitability.

Join the MAVEN education team for a four-day workshop in Boulder, Colorado. This professional development for elementary educators is a great opportunity to explore hands-on activities and blended science/literacy lessons.

The workshop will take place June 14-17, 2016. Participants will receive free dorm housing, a $150 stipend, continental breakfast and lunch, and a certificate of completion. Travel expenses are not covered.

Applications are due March 18, 2016. Space is limited, so interested educators are encouraged to apply early.

For more information about the workshop and to apply online, visit http://lasp.colorado.edu/home/maven/education-outreach/for-educators/summit/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to epomail@lasp.colorado.edu.

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2016 NASA STEM Enhancement in Earth and Space Science Internship

STEM Enhancement in Earth and Space Science, or SEES, is a nationally competitive summer intern program for students in grades 10 and 11. NASA, the Texas Space Grant Consortium and The University of Texas at Austin Center for Space Research, or UT/CSR, have joined forces to provide this opportunity for high school students to increase their understanding of and interest in STEM careers.

Scientists and engineers at UT/CSR are conducting NASA-supported research in astronomy, remote sensing and space geodetic techniques to help understand Earth systems, natural hazards and climate science. The SEES project provides selected students with exposure to Earth and space research. Participants will learn how to interpret NASA satellite data while working with scientists and engineers in their chosen area of work.

The summer 2016 internship allows students to work remotely from July 1-15 and on-site in Austin, Texas, July 17-29. Housing, transportation and meals will be provided. Students are selected on the basis of their academic records, written application that includes essay questions, and interest in STEM.

Applications are due March 20, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.csr.utexas.edu/internship/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to Margaret Baguio at baguio@csr.utexas.edu.

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Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions and museums to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

There will be a nominal shipping fee that must be paid online with a credit card.  To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.

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NASA/Applied Physics Laboratory Summer Internship 2016

The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, or APL, is offering summer projects for students interested in working on NASA missions or space-related research opportunities.

Students participating in the 2016 NASA/APL Internship Program will work at the APL facility in Laurel, Maryland. Students will receive a stipend for the 10-week program, and housing will be provided.

Eligible students include undergraduate rising sophomores through Ph.D. students as of fall 2016. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and have a minimum GPA of 3.0.

Applications are due March 25, 2016.

For more information about the internship and to apply online, visit https://portals.jhuapl.edu/aplnasaintern/Home.aspx.

Questions about the NASA/APL Internships Program should be emailed to aplnasaintern-web@jhuapl.edu.

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International FameLab Competition: San Juan Regional Event

NASA, the University of Puerto Rico, Rio Pedras and Arecibo Observatory are hosting an International FameLab regional competition event on March 30-April 1, 2016, in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Are you passionate about science? Do you love to communicate?

At regional competitions throughout the U.S., early career scientists from numerous disciplines are competing to convey their research and related science concepts. Each contestant has the spotlight for only three minutes. No slides or charts are allowed. Contestants may only use the power of words and any prop that can be held in their hands.

Winners from each regional event will face off in April 2016. Contestants will compete for a grand prize and the opportunity to compete with peers from around the world at the FameLab International Final in the United Kingdom in June 2016.

For more information and to register to take part in the competition, visit http://famelab.arc.nasa.gov/.

Questions about this competition should be emailed to Desireemoi Bridges at desireemoi.r.bridges@nasa.gov.

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Earth Observatory’s Tournament Earth 2016

Thirty-two of the best Earth Observatory images will compete in Tournament Earth 4.0, but only one can be the winner! From Feb. 29 through April 4, 2016, visitors to NASA’s Earth Observatory website can vote for their favorite images from 2015, whittling them down each week in a tournament of remote-sensing science. The competition is divided into four categories: data, art, event and photograph.

Voting takes place online, and a printable bracket is available to let you pick your favorites and track your selections as the competition progresses.

To get started, visit http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/TournamentEarth/.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Kevin Ward at kevin.a.ward@nasa.gov.

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NASA History Program Office Fall 2016 Internships

The NASA History Program Office is seeking undergraduate and graduate students for fall 2016 internships. The History Program Office maintains archival materials to answer research questions from NASA personnel, journalists, scholars, students at all levels and others from around the world. The division also edits and publishes several books and monographs each year. It maintains a large number of websites on NASA history.

Students of all majors are welcome to apply. While detailed prior knowledge of the aeronautics and space fields is not necessary, a keen interest and some basic familiarity with these topics are needed. Strong research, writing and editing skills are essential. Experience with social media is a plus.

Intern projects are flexible. Typical projects include handling a variety of information requests, writing posts for the NASA history Twitter and Facebook pages, editing historical manuscripts, doing research and writing biographical sketches, and identifying and captioning photos.

Applications for fall 2016 internships are due June 1, 2016.

For more information, visit http://history.nasa.gov/interncall.htm.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please contact Bill Barry at bill.barry@nasa.gov.

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‘CineSpace’ Short Film Competition

NASA and the Houston Cinema Arts Society once again will offer filmmakers around the world a chance to share their works inspired by — and using — actual NASA imagery through “CineSpace,” a short-film competition.

Films featuring NASA-captured imagery and video collected throughout the agency’s 50-year history will be judged on creativity, innovation and attention to detail. Works submitted to “CineSpace” will compete for cash prizes and the opportunity to be shown to audiences both on and off Earth. In addition to being screened at the “CineSpace” awards ceremony during the Houston Cinema Arts Festival, winners and finalists may be screened at other film festivals across the country, as well as on NASA TV and even on the International Space Station.

“CineSpace” is open to all filmmakers, both professional and aspiring. The competition will accept submissions of all genres, including narrative, documentary, comedy, drama, animation, experimental and others, of up to 10 minutes running time. Entries must use at least 10 percent publically available NASA imagery.

The submission period opens June 1, 2016, and closes July 31, 2016. Finalists and winners will be announced at a “CineSpace” event during the Houston Cinema Arts Festival in November. Entries will be competing for $26,000 in prizes with cash awards going to the top three submissions as well as the two films that best demonstrate the themes “Benefits of Space to Humanity” and “Future Space Exploration.”

For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press-release/cinespace-short-film-competition-returns-for-2016.

Please direct questions about this competition to cinespace@cinemartsociety.org.

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Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The Announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design (STEAMD); or activities culturally relevant to or focused on unrepresented in STEM careers populations, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or non-reimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA Announcement.

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Free “NASA’s Journey to Mars” Planetarium/Dome Show

Are you looking for ways to prepare your students for STEM-related career opportunities in the future? Do you want to spark their interest in pushing the boundaries of technology and innovation? Right now, NASA’s fleet of Mars robotic explorers is paving the way for human exploration of the solar system in the coming decades. Have your students join NASA in preparing for a monumental journey of a lifetime — to Mars!

“NASA’s Journey to Mars” is a short planetarium presentation that can be used in the educational domes of your school district, as well as local planetariums, to inspire interest in STEM. To learn more, including how you can acquire the show for use in your area, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/journey-of-a-lifetime-mars-education-resources/.

Please direct questions about the “NASA’s Journey to Mars” planetarium/dome show to Elsie Weigel at elsie.weigel@nasa.gov.

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Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — March 3, 2016

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.
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New This Week!
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New ‘NASA Women of STEM’ Website
Audience: All Educators and Students

Free NASA Educator Professional Development Webinars
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: March 3, 2016, at 6 p.m. EST

NASA/NSTA Webinar — Global Precipitation Measurement Mission: Water Cycle
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Date: March 3, 2016, 6:30 p.m. EST

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Call for Papers: 2016 International Space Station Research and Development Conference
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Abstract Submission Deadline: March 14, 2016

U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s National Summer Teacher Institute on Innovation, STEM, and Intellectual Property
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: March 15, 2016
Event Date: July 17-22, 2016

‘The Impact of Discovery’ Engagement Workshops
Audience: K-12, Informal Educators, and the General Public
Registration Deadline: March 18, 2016
Event Date: April 9, 2016

International FameLab Competition: San Juan Regional Event
Audience: Graduate Students, Postdoctoral Fellows and Early Career Researchers
Event Date: March 30-April 1, 2016

Earth Observatory’s Tournament Earth 2016
Audience: All Educators and Students
Competition Dates: Through April 4, 2016

NASA/NSTA Webinar — Global Precipitation Measurement Mission: Watersheds
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Date: April 13, 2016, 6:30 p.m. EDT

NASA/NSTA Webinar — Global Precipitation Measurement Mission: Weather
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Date: May 5, 2016, 6:30 p.m. EDT

What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website
Audience: K-6 Educators

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PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…
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NASA Digital Learning Network Webcast: NASA Space Grant Student Presentations
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: March 3, 2016, 3:15-5 p.m. EST

Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy
Audience: Designed for Families With Children Ages 10 to 14, but Open to All
Next Event Date: March 5, 2016, 10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. EST

2016 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Promotion and Research Challenge
Audience: Students in Grades 3-12
Entry Deadline: March 8, 2016

STEM@NASA Goddard: Women’s History Month
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: March 10, 2016, at 1 p.m. EST

Host a Real-Time Conversation With Crew Members Aboard the International Space Station
Audience: All Educators
Next Optional Informational Session: March 10, 2016, at 7 p.m. EST
Proposal Deadline: April 15, 2016

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

Family Day Events at Smithsonian’s Air and Space Museum
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: March 12, 2016

Free Education Webinar Series From the GOES-R Education Proving Ground
Audience: 6-12 Educators
Next Event Date: March 12, 2016, at 11:30 a.m. EST

2016-2017 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Community College STEM Scholarship
Audience: Freshman Students at Community Colleges in Virginia
Application Deadline: March 14, 2016

2016-2017 Virginia Space Grant Consortium STEM Bridge Scholarships
Audience: Minority Undergraduate Students (Underclassmen) at Virginia Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: March 14, 2016

Call for Proposals — NASA Research Announcement for Use of the NASA Physical Sciences Informatics System: Appendix B
Audience: Graduate Students
Proposal Deadline: March 17, 2016

2016 MAVEN Elementary Teachers’ Summit
Audience: Elementary Educators
Application Deadline: March 18, 2016
Workshop Dates: June 14-17, 2016

2016 NASA STEM Enhancement in Earth and Space Science Internship
Audience: Current High School Sophomores and Juniors
Application Deadline: March 20, 2016

NASA/Applied Physics Laboratory Summer Internship 2016
Audience: Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Application Deadline: March 25, 2016

International Space Station Research Design Challenge: Capillary Effects on Liquids Exploratory Research Experiments
Audience: Grade 8-12 Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: April 1, 2016

2016 Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching
Audience: All Educators and Students
Nomination Deadline: April 1, 2016

Early Career Fellowships for Planetary Science Researchers
Audience: Higher Education Students
Proposal Deadline: Various Dates Depending on Specific Program

2016 LiftOff Summer Institute
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: April 15, 2016
Institute Dates: June 26-July 1, 2016

Future Engineers ‘Star Trek’ Replicator Challenge
Audience: Students in the United States Ages 5-19
Entry Deadline: May 1, 2016

‘RockOn! 2016’ University Rocket Science Workshop
Audience: Higher Education Faculty and Students
Registration Deadline: May 2, 2016
Workshop Dates: June 18-23, 2016

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

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Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

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NEW THIS WEEK!
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New ‘NASA Women of STEM’ Website

Celebrate Women’s History Month with the new NASA Women of STEM website!

Through their accomplishments and dedication to their jobs, women at NASA embody the essence of Women’s History Month. They serve as role models to young women in their pursuit of careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Read career profiles, watch videos and more! Visit the new website at http://www.nasa.gov/education/womenstem.

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Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Technology Drives Exploration: Robotics on a Budget
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-8
Event Date: March 3, 2016, at 6 p.m. EST
Robots are part of our everyday lives. We use them in ways we don’t always realize. What are robots? How are they used in our lives? How they are used at NASA? These are some of the questions explored in this webinar. Participants will learn how to use robotics inexpensively in the classroom to enhance students’ STEM understanding by integrating NASA STEM robotics missions, curriculum, online resources and the NGSS Engineering, Technology, and Applications of Science, or ETS. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/161659

Technology Drives Exploration: Calculator Robotics
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-10
Event Date: March 7, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EST
Participants will get an overview of the NASA resource “Calculator-Based Robots” and the basics of programming calculator robots. This webinar addresses the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics Equations and Expressions, Functions and Geometry. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/155802

Technology Drives Exploration: Spinoffs
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades Pre-K – 12
Event Date: March 8, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EST
NASA has a long history of transferring technologies from their original mission applications to secondary uses. This is the 40th anniversary of the NASA Spinoff publication, which has highlighted over 2,000 different ways that NASA spinoff technology is impacting our daily lives. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/161520

Technology Drives Exploration: NASA’s BEST Next Generation Technology Demonstration Challenges
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-8
Event Date: March 10, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EST
Explore the engineering design process through NASA’s Technology Demonstration Missions. These challenges focus on bringing in real-world science, mathematics and technology into the classroom for 5-8 educators. These activities align with Next Generation Science Standards and Common Core Math Standards. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/164243

For a full schedule of upcoming webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Please direct questions about this series of webinars to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.

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NASA/NSTA Webinar — Global Precipitation Measurement Mission: Water Cycle

Join the National Science Teachers Association for a free interactive webinar to learn about the water cycle and NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement, or GPM, mission. The 90-minute session will take place on March 3, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EST.

What is water? Where did Earth’s water come from? Topics presented at this webinar will include water cycle basics, water management, and freshwater availability. A NASA scientist will give background science information about water and how NASA helps us better understand the water cycle.

GPM is an international satellite mission managed by NASA and JAXA (the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) that will provide next-generation observations of rain and snow. The GPM mission will help us learn more about Earth’s water and energy cycles, improve the forecasting of extreme events that cause natural disasters, and extend current capabilities of using satellite precipitation information to directly benefit society.

All participants will receive a certificate of participation and 100 Learning Center activity points for attending and completing the post-program evaluation. An archive and presentation slides will be available at the end of the program.

For more information and to register to attend the webinar event, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/GPM/webseminar1.aspx.

For more information about GPM, visit http://www.nasa.gov/gpm or http://gpm.nasa.gov.

Please email questions about this opportunity to webseminars@nsta.org.

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DEADLINE EXTENDED: Call for Papers: 2016 International Space Station Research and Development Conference

The fifth annual International Space Station Research and Development Conference will be held July 12-14, 2016, at the Town and Country Resort & Convention Center in San Diego, California.

NASA, the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space, and the American Astronautical Society are seeking abstracts under the categories of biology and medicine; human health in space; commercialization and nongovernment utilization; physical sciences and materials development; plant science; Earth science and remote sensing; technology development and demonstration; and science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, education. Topics should relate to science, exploration and technology activities (past, present, planned or under development) on the International Space Station.

Both the conference and abstract submittal are open to entrepreneurial, commercial, academic and government agency attendees, both from and outside the United States. Eligible attendees include professionals, young professionals, students and interested parties. The working language for the conference is English. The conference will include plenaries for topics of general interests and technical sessions for focused discussions.

Because of the large number of expected submissions, presenters are encouraged to submit abstracts early; the deadline is March 14, 2016.

For more information about the conference and how to submit an abstract for consideration, visit http://www.issconference.org/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to ISSTechChair@atdl-inc.com.

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U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s National Summer Teacher Institute on Innovation, STEM, and Intellectual Property

The United States Patent and Trademark Office, or USPTO, will host its third annual National Summer Teacher Institute on Innovation, STEM, and Intellectual Property on July 17-22, 2016, at Michigan State University in East Lansing.

This multiday, professional development opportunity will train elementary, middle and high school teachers to incorporate concepts of making, inventing, creating and protecting intellectual property into classroom instruction. Participants are expected to implement lessons learned from the institute into their schools and school districts.

The institute is open to teachers nationwide, so apply to be a part of this exciting cohort! In accordance with the Federal Travel Regulations and USPTO travel policy, travel and lodging expenses will be covered for teachers who are traveling more than 50 miles to the venue. Space is limited.

Applications are due March 15, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.uspto.gov/learning-and-resources/outreach-and-education/national-summer-teacher-institute.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to NSTI_Applications@uspto.gov.

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‘The Impact of Discovery’ Engagement Workshops

STEM+Arts = STEAM! Explore how the arts can enhance learner understanding of science, technology, engineering and mathematics concepts.

This annual workshop presented by NASA’s Discovery and New Frontiers programs is designed for individuals who want to connect with NASA and discover STEAM opportunities to share inside and outside the classroom, in settings including libraries, museums, science centers and out-of-school-time programs. Investigate how scientists and engineers work together to move fantastic ideas from dream to reality to meet the challenges of complex space missions. Learn the latest on current missions and make your own “shoebox rover.”

The Impact of Discovery workshop will take place on April 9, 2016, in four locations.
— NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California
— NASA’s Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas
— Think 360 Arts for Learning, Denver, Colorado
— Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Maryland

All sites offer hands-on activities and multimedia resources to take home. The cost of the workshop is $25. Lunch and snacks will be provided. Registration closes on March 18, 2016.

Can’t make it to one of our workshop sites? Watch the special speaker presentations over the Internet through our free webinar. Check the website for details.

For more information, visit http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/discovery/impact_of_discovery.asp.

Please email any questions about the Impact of Discovery workshops to Laura Arndt at LArndt@mcrel.org.

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International FameLab Competition: San Juan Regional Event

NASA, the University of Puerto Rico, Rio Pedras and Arecibo Observatory are hosting an International FameLab regional competition event on March 30-April 1, 2016, in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Are you passionate about science? Do you love to communicate?

At regional competitions throughout the U.S., early career scientists from numerous disciplines are competing to convey their research and related science concepts. Each contestant has the spotlight for only three minutes. No slides or charts are allowed. Contestants may only use the power of words and any prop that can be held in their hands.

Winners from each regional event will face off in April 2016. Contestants will compete for a grand prize and the opportunity to compete with peers from around the world at the FameLab International Final in the United Kingdom in June 2016.

For more information and to register to take part in the competition, visit http://famelab.arc.nasa.gov/.

Questions about this competition should be emailed to Desireemoi Bridges at desireemoi.r.bridges@nasa.gov.

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Earth Observatory’s Tournament Earth 2016

Thirty-two of the best Earth Observatory images will compete in Tournament Earth 4.0, but only one can be the winner! From Feb. 29 through April 4, 2016, visitors to NASA’s Earth Observatory website can vote for their favorite images from 2015, whittling them down each week in a tournament of remote-sensing science. The competition is divided into four categories: data, art, event and photograph.

Voting takes place online, and a printable bracket is available to let you pick your favorites and track your selections as the competition progresses.

To get started, visit http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/TournamentEarth/.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Kevin Ward at kevin.a.ward@nasa.gov.

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NASA/NSTA Webinar — Global Precipitation Measurement Mission: Watersheds

Join the National Science Teachers Association for a free interactive webinar to learn about watersheds and NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement, or GPM, mission. The 90-minute session will take place on April 13, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EDT.

What is a watershed? Why are watersheds important? What are signs of a healthy watershed? Why are some watersheds or water reservoirs losing their water? Topics presented at this webinar will include watershed basics and hands-on investigations students can conduct to monitor their local watershed areas. NASA scientists will give background science information about watersheds and how NASA helps monitor watershed regions.

GPM is an international satellite mission managed by NASA and JAXA (the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) that will provide next-generation observations of rain and snow. The GPM mission will help us learn more about Earth’s water and energy cycles, improve the forecasting of extreme events that cause natural disasters, and extend current capabilities of using satellite precipitation information to directly benefit society.

All participants will receive a certificate of participation and 100 Learning Center activity points for attending and completing the post-program evaluation. An archive and presentation slides will be available at the end of the program.

For more information and to register to attend the webinar event, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/resource/?id=10.2505/9/WSNASA15_Apr13.

For more information about GPM, visit http://www.nasa.gov/gpm or http://gpm.nasa.gov.

Please email questions about this opportunity to webseminars@nsta.org.

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NASA/NSTA Webinar — Global Precipitation Measurement Mission: Weather

Join the National Science Teachers Association for a free interactive webinar to learn about weather and NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement, or GPM, mission. The 90-minute session will take place on May 5, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EDT.

Topics presented at this webinar will include types of weather, weather basics, extreme weather, monitoring extreme weather with satellites, and hands-on investigations for students to collect data about weather — including GLOBE protocols. A NASA scientist will discuss the difference between weather and climate and will describe ground validation campaigns.

GPM is an international satellite mission managed by NASA and JAXA (the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) that will provide next-generation observations of rain and snow. The GPM mission will help us learn more about Earth’s water and energy cycles, improve the forecasting of extreme events that cause natural disasters, and extend current capabilities of using satellite precipitation information to directly benefit society.

All participants will receive a certificate of participation and 100 Learning Center activity points for attending and completing the post-program evaluation. An archive and presentation slides will be available at the end of the program.

For more information and to register to attend the webinar event, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/resource/?id=10.2505/9/WSNASA15_May5.

For more information about GPM, visit http://www.nasa.gov/gpm or http://gpm.nasa.gov.

Please email questions about this opportunity to webseminars@nsta.org.

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What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website

NASA Space Place has a new look! We’ve made our content more accessible — check it out at www.spaceplace.nasa.gov. To keep up with all the latest, follow us on Facebook and Twitter @nasaspaceplace. If you’d like to be added to our e-newsletter, email us at info@spaceplace.nasa.gov.

What’s New? What Is the Kuiper Belt?
Explore what else is out there past Neptune! The Kuiper Belt is a ring of icy bodies where you’ll find dwarf planet Pluto and other interesting objects like Eris and Haumea. And the New Horizons spacecraft is continuing its exploration of this mysterious place!
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/kuiper-belt

What’s New? Stretchy Universe Slime
Our universe has been stretching out in all directions since it began about 13.8 billion years ago. The evidence for this can be seen through telescopes! In fact, the farthest galaxies are moving faster than those near us. Make your own stretchy universe slime, and hold the universe in the palm of your hand!
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/universe-slime

Out-of-School Time
Are you stuck inside because of bad weather, or are you simply staying home for the weekend? Why not try some of our make-and-do activities! One of our favorites is “Earth Fan.” Did you know that a lot is going on beneath the surface of Earth? We pretty much spend all our time on Earth’s crust, but if you dig deeper you’ll find the mantle, the outer core and the inner core. Learn more about Earth’s layers by making an Earth fan!
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/earth-fan

Science Fair Project Ideas
It’s that time of year again! Are your students looking for project ideas? Do they know the necessary steps to follow? Here are a few suggestions for where to start!
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/science-fair

Educational Posters
NASA Space Place has downloadable posters featuring brief summaries and graphics of popular space topics. Click on the “download the poster” link on each page!

Where does the solar system end?
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/oort-cloud

What is a black hole?
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/black-holes

How did the solar system form?
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/solar-system-formation

Where does the sun’s energy come from?
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/sun-heat

Tectonic Forces
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/tectonics-snap

GPS and the Quest for Pizza
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/gps-pizza

Special Days to Celebrate
Find out about noteworthy days in NASA and space history that you can observe in your classroom.

March 5: In 1979, the Voyager 1 spacecraft flew past Jupiter.

Learn more fun facts about Jupiter, like how this gas giant has rings that are very hard to see.
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/all-about-jupiter

March 13: Uranus was discovered on this day in 1781.
Did you know that Uranus rotates on its side?
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/all-about-uranus

March 18: In 1965, the first walk in space took place!
Protect Earth’s satellites from harmful space weather in our “Shields Up” game.
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/shields-up

April 9: In 1959, NASA announced the first group of astronauts.
Check out our gallery of astronauts.
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/gallery-technology

April 11: Apollo 13, the third mission intended to land on the moon, launched on this day in 1970.
Why is the moon so scarred with craters anyway?
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/craters

April 22: Happy Earth Day!
Earth’s atmosphere has many different layers. Explore them all!
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/atmosphere

Share
Do you want some help spreading the word about NASA’s Space Place? We have a page with ready-to-use website descriptions, logos and links to all our social media. Check out http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/share.

Send Feedback
Please let us know your ideas about ways to use The Space Place in your teaching. Send them to info@spaceplace.nasa.gov.

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PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…
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NASA Digital Learning Network Webcast: NASA Space Grant Student Presentations

The National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program is a national network that includes over 850 affiliates from universities, colleges, industry, museums, science centers, and state and local agencies. Each year, Space Grant sponsors interns at NASA facilities. Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network for presentations from three of these Space Grant interns.

On Thursday, March 3, 2016, at 3:15 p.m. EST, Eric Day will moderate the webcast event. Presentations will include the following:

— David Hinckley, University of Vermont: “Interplanetary Spacecraft Trajectory Optimization”
— Rachel Carmichael, University of Nevada, Reno: “Efficient Cyclization Methodology for Biologically Relevant Precursors”
— Jeff Tessein, University of Delaware: “Effect of Coherent Structures on Energetic Particle Intensity in the Solar Wind”

For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/dln/special-events.

Please direct questions about this event to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com.

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Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy

Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy, at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia, is a free alternate-reality game that will challenge you to become an astronaut-in-training for a future trip to Mars. Choose what role you will play on the mission; engage in fun interactive activities; and explore the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics skills you will need as a next-generation space traveler. Along the way, you’ll learn about some of the museum’s fascinating artifacts.

Instructions and guidance are given via a special webpage accessed on your mobile device. Players should bring their own phones or devices equipped with an internet browser and a camera. Having a digital picture-taking device (smartphone, tablet, camera) is highly recommended but not required.

The game is aimed at upper elementary and middle school visitors and their families. Do you want to bring a group? Reservations are required for groups larger than 15.

The next offering of the Astronaut Academy is on March 5, 2016. Begin your training with Astronaut Orientation in the Claude Moore Education Center Classroom 1 located on the first level across from the restrooms. Astronaut Orientation is offered at regular intervals between 10:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. The last opportunity to start the game is at 2:30 p.m. A self-guided activity, the game should take between 60 and 90 minutes, and staff will help you along the way.

For more information, including a full list of upcoming Astronaut Academy dates, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/techquest/.

Please direct questions about the Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy to the visitor service line at 202-633-2214.

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2016 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Promotion and Research Challenge

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center is rolling out a new look and format for this year’s spinoff challenge. The OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Promotion and Research Challenge, or OPSPARC, challenges students to help raise awareness and understanding of NASA technologies and their many benefits to our everyday lives.

The newest incarnation of the challenge will provide contestants (students in grades 3 through 12) with a new tool, developed by Glogster, for creating and submitting their entries. Glogster is a cloud-based platform for presentation and interactive learning. The tool will allow contestants to combine different kinds of media on a virtual canvas to create multimedia posters and to access an existing library of educational content created by students and educators worldwide. Contestants will develop a Glog of their own as part of OPSPARC that will include information on spinoffs and NASA missions. The students also will create video describing their own ideas for a new NASA spinoff technology.

After completing their Glogs, 20 teams of students in grades 9 through 12 will be invited to work with college student mentors to further develop their spinoff concept within a 3-D, multi-user, virtual-world setting through creation of computer-aided design, or CAD, models and application of engineering and business analyses on their spinoff concepts. This year’s InWorld portion of the contest is being sponsored by NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope project.

Students who submit the winning entries in each age category will have the opportunity to visit NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, for an awards ceremony and workshop to be held in their honor. The workshop will include a behind-the-scenes look at Goddard, the chance to meet some of the top minds at NASA, and the opportunity for the students to design and create their own public service announcement video with guidance from NASA video producers and actor Peter Cullen, the voice of the TRANSFORMERS character OPTIMUS PRIME.

The deadline to register and submit Glogs is 11:59 PM EST on March 8, 2016.

To learn more about the challenge and to register to participate, visit http://itpo.gsfc.nasa.gov/opsparc/.

Please direct questions about this contest to Darryl Mitchell at Darryl.R.Mitchell@nasa.gov.

TRANSFORMERS and OPTIMUS PRIME are trademarks of Hasbro and are used with permission. © 2015 Hasbro. All rights reserved.

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STEM@NASA Goddard: Women’s History Month

Join NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in March for “STEM@NASA Goddard: Women’s History Month”! On select Tuesdays and Thursdays at 1 p.m. EST (March 10, 15, 17, 22, 24, 29 and 31), the Goddard Office of Education will celebrate Women’s History Month by highlighting women in STEM. Women from across Goddard will share how they practice science, technology, engineering and mathematics — through their research, missions, career and the like — with participating schools and other groups.

The 30-minute programs will be streamed live on UStream, and participants will be able to interact with the guest speakers by submitting questions through email and Twitter.

To view the programs on Ustream, visit http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-gsfc.

For more information or to express interest in participating, please contact Erin McKinley at erin.e.mckinley@nasa.gov.

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Host a Real-Time Conversation With Crew Members Aboard the International Space Station

ARISS-US is now accepting proposals from U.S. schools, museums, science centers and community youth organizations to host an Amateur Radio on the International Space Station, or ARISS, contact between Jan. 1 – June 30, 2017. To maximize these radio contact opportunities, ARISS-US is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed education plan. Proposals are due April 15, 2016.

Using amateur radio, students can ask astronauts questions about life in space and other space-related topics. Students fully engage in the ARISS contact by helping set up an amateur radio ground station at the school and then using that station to talk directly with a crew member on the International Space Station for approximately 10 minutes. ARISS provides experienced mentors and relies on local amateur radio volunteers to help organizations obtain the technology required to host this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for students.

Informational Sessions
To help organizations in preparing their proposals, the ARISS program coordinator will offer hourlong online information sessions. These are designed to provide more information regarding U.S. ARISS contacts and the proposal process, and offer an opportunity to ask questions. While attending an online information session is not required, it is strongly encouraged.

An informational session will be offered March 10, 2016, at 7 p.m. EST.

Advance registration is necessary. Email ARISS (ariss@arrl.org) to sign up for an information session.

For proposal information and more details such as expectations, proposal guidelines and proposal form, visit http://www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.

ARISS-US is offered through a partnership between NASA; the American Radio Relay League, or ARRL; and the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation, or AMSAT. ARISS was created and is managed by an international working group, including several countries in Europe as well as Japan, Russia, Canada, and the USA.

Questions about this opportunity should be emailed to ariss@arrl.org.

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Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions and museums to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

There will be a nominal shipping fee that must be paid online with a credit card.  To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.

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Family Day Events at Smithsonian’s Air and Space Museum

The Smithsonian’s Family Day event series celebrates the diverse ethnic and cultural communities that have contributed to aviation and space exploration. Events will commemorate historic and current contributions through presentations and activities for the entire family. The events are free and open to the public.

Women in Aviation and Space
March 12, 2016, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. EST
National Air and Space Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia

Throughout the history of aviation and space exploration, women have fought to be on equal terms with their male counterparts. Celebrate the incredible contributions of women in aviation and space exploration at this event featuring presentations by women in the field, hands-on activities and stories.
http://airandspace.si.edu/events/heritage-days/womens-history/

Explore the Universe
April 9, 2016, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. EST
National Air and Space Museum in Washington, District of Columbia
People around the world have always looked to the sky, but they don’t always see the same things. Bring your family to experience how different people study the sky and to hear their stories. Learn about telescopes and, if weather permits, do some daytime observations.
http://airandspace.si.edu/events/heritage-days/explore-universe/

Please direct questions about this series of events to the Visitor Service line at 202-633-2214.

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Free Education Webinar Series From the GOES-R Education Proving Ground

The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites — R Series is the next generation of geostationary Earth-observing systems. The GOES-R series satellites will provide continuous imagery and atmospheric measurements of Earth’s Western Hemisphere. The satellites will collect lightning data and monitor space weather to provide critical atmospheric, hydrologic, oceanic, climatic, solar and space data. The first satellite in the GOES-R series is scheduled to launch in October 2016.

To help educators prepare for the new satellite imagery and data that will be available during the GOES-R era, the GOES-R Education Proving Ground is hosting a series of education webcasts leading up to launch.

The webinars will take place on the following Saturday mornings at 11:30 a.m. Eastern Time.

March 12, 2016: GOES-R Lesson Plans: For Teachers, By Teachers
April 23, 2016: Additional GOES-R Resources and Educational Tools
Sept. 17, 2016: Countdown to Launch!

For more information, including log-in instructions for the webinars, visit http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/education/goesr/.

Please direct questions about this series of webinars to Margaret Mooney at Margaret.Mooney@ssec.wisc.edu.

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2016-2017 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Community College STEM Scholarship

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium encourages academically talented individuals to pursue studies and careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM. The VSGC is offering a limited number of scholarships to students majoring in STEM fields at any campus in the Virginia Community College System.

These $2,000 scholarships are competitive awards based on academic merit for students demonstrating an interest in NASA’s missions and STEM-related careers. The VSGC strongly supports students in technical career pathways who are preparing to transfer to institutions of higher learning while developing the essential skills for a competitive global workforce.

Underrepresented minority students, female students and students with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and enrolled in the Virginia Community College System.

The deadline for submitting applications is March 14, 2016.

For more information, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/ccstem/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to Anne Weiss at aweiss@odu.edu.

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2016-2017 Virginia Space Grant Consortium STEM Bridge Scholarships

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium is offering renewable scholarships to undergraduate students studying science, technology, engineering or mathematics. The STEM Bridge Scholarships are $1,000.

The scholarships are available to students who are U.S. citizens from any federally recognized minority group and are enrolled fulltime at one of the five VSGC member universities: The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia, and Virginia Tech. Applicants must have completed at least one year of a STEM undergraduate program and be classified as a sophomore during the 2016-2017 academic year.

The STEM Bridge Program connects students to future opportunities by mentoring and guiding them to future VSGC scholarships and NASA-related paid internships. The program encourages students to explore how their majors can apply to NASA’s mission.

This is a competitive program, and awards are based on student academic merit and the quality of interest essay, as well as letters of recommendation from current college faculty who can attest to the student’s interest in STEM areas.

The deadline for submitting applications is March 14, 2016.

For more information, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/Bridge/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to Anne Weiss at aweiss@odu.edu.

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Call for Proposals — NASA Research Announcement for Use of the NASA Physical Sciences Informatics System: Appendix B

NASA is seeking ground-based research proposals from graduate students to use NASA’s Physical Sciences Informatics system to develop new analyses and scientific insights. The PSI system is designed to be a resource for researchers to data mine information generated from completed physical sciences experiments performed on the International Space Station or from related ground-based studies.

This solicitation appendix focuses on the following five research areas: combustion science, complex fluids, fluid physics, fundamental physics and materials science.

For graduate students (students working toward an advanced degree), this NASA Research Announcement is soliciting proposals that advance fundamental research in one of the physical sciences disciplines identified above and also assist in the awarding of an advanced degree to the graduate student. This call is open to students who meet the following eligibility requirements:

— The student is pursuing an advanced degree directly related to a physical sciences discipline — only technical degrees are permitted (not degrees in policy or management).
— The student is a U.S. citizen, a permanent resident alien of the U.S., or on a student visa at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission.
— The student is enrolled in a master’s or doctoral degree program at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission, or, if the student is an undergraduate starting their graduate studies, he or she has been accepted to a master’s or doctoral degree program at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission and will start during the next academic year.
— The student has an academic graduate advisor who will submit the application for the graduate student. The student must perform the proposed research under the guidance of the assigned graduate advisor.

The agency expects to make approximately 10-15 awards in spring 2016. Research and development efforts will take place over two years. The typical award will be $75,000-$100,000 per year, for up to two years.

The deadline for submitting proposals is March 17, 2016.

For information concerning this NASA Research Announcement solicitation, visit http://tinyurl.com/NASA-15PSI-B.

For more information about the Physical Science Informatics System, visit http://psi.nasa.gov .

Please direct questions about this NASA Research Announcement to Dr. Francis Chiaramonte at francis.p.chiaramonte@nasa.gov.

Additional technical information about the Physical Science Informatics System for this NASA Research Announcement is available from the contact below:

Name: Teresa Miller
Title: Physical Sciences Informatics System – Technical POC
NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center
Email: teresa.y.miller@nasa.gov
Phone: 256-544-7815

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2016 MAVEN Elementary Teachers’ Summit

The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution mission began orbiting Mars on Sept. 21, 2014. MAVEN is exploring the planet′s upper atmosphere, ionosphere and interactions with the solar wind. The mission is providing invaluable insight into the history of Mars′ atmosphere, climate, liquid water and planetary habitability.

Join the MAVEN education team for a four-day workshop in Boulder, Colorado. This professional development for elementary educators is a great opportunity to explore hands-on activities and blended science/literacy lessons.

The workshop will take place June 14-17, 2016. Participants will receive free dorm housing, a $150 stipend, continental breakfast and lunch, and a certificate of completion. Travel expenses are not covered.

Applications are due March 18, 2016. Space is limited, so interested educators are encouraged to apply early.

For more information about the workshop and to apply online, visit http://lasp.colorado.edu/home/maven/education-outreach/for-educators/summit/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to epomail@lasp.colorado.edu.

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2016 NASA STEM Enhancement in Earth and Space Science Internship

STEM Enhancement in Earth and Space Science, or SEES, is a nationally competitive summer intern program for students in grades 10 and 11. NASA, the Texas Space Grant Consortium and The University of Texas at Austin Center for Space Research, or UT/CSR, have joined forces to provide this opportunity for high school students to increase their understanding of and interest in STEM careers.

Scientists and engineers at UT/CSR are conducting NASA-supported research in astronomy, remote sensing and space geodetic techniques to help understand Earth systems, natural hazards and climate science. The SEES project provides selected students with exposure to Earth and space research. Participants will learn how to interpret NASA satellite data while working with scientists and engineers in their chosen area of work.

The summer 2016 internship allows students to work remotely from July 1-15 and on-site in Austin, Texas, July 17-29. Housing, transportation and meals will be provided. Students are selected on the basis of their academic records, written application that includes essay questions, and interest in STEM.

Applications are due March 20, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.csr.utexas.edu/internship/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to Margaret Baguio at baguio@csr.utexas.edu.

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NASA/Applied Physics Laboratory Summer Internship 2016

The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, or APL, is offering summer projects for students interested in working on NASA missions or space-related research opportunities.

Students participating in the 2016 NASA/APL Internship Program will work at the APL facility in Laurel, Maryland. Students will receive a stipend for the 10-week program, and housing will be provided.

Eligible students include undergraduate rising sophomores through Ph.D. students as of fall 2016. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and have a minimum GPA of 3.0.

Applications are due March 25, 2016.

For more information about the internship and to apply online, visit https://portals.jhuapl.edu/aplnasaintern/Home.aspx.

Questions about the NASA/APL Internships Program should be emailed to aplnasaintern-web@jhuapl.edu.

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International Space Station Research Design Challenge: Capillary Effects on Liquids Exploratory Research Experiments

NASA and Portland State University are seeking participants for the International Space Station Research Design Challenge: Capillary Effects on Liquids Exploratory Research Experiments, or CELERE. This design challenge enables students to participate in microgravity research on capillary action, similar to that conducted on the space station.

Teams or individuals create their own experiment using computer-aided design with a provided template and submit short proposals presenting the experiments. Portland State University then manufactures test cells using the CAD drawings and a computer-controlled laser cutter. Each experiment is conducted in a drop tower. Video of the drop is provided for student analysis and reporting of results.

CELERE is open to individuals and teams in grades 8-12. To facilitate the participation of informal science clubs, Scouts, etc., teams may include younger students as long as at least one team member is in grades 8-12. Teams may be of any size and may include an entire class or science club. The program is limited to students from the U.S., including the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Students at Department of Defense Education Activity schools (www.dodea.edu), including those outside the U.S., are also eligible to participate.

The CELERE design challenge is a relatively new program and, as a result, the odds of selection are quite high. In 2014 and 2015, 100 percent of the entries were selected for full participation, where the student experiments were built and tested in microgravity. In 2016, selection of at least one qualifying entry is guaranteed from each state and listed territory, at least one DODEA school, and at least one Bureau of Indian Education school (http://bie.edu/). Students are strongly encouraged to apply!

Design proposals are now being accepted. Submissions are due April 1, 2016.

For more information about this opportunity, visit http://spaceflightsystems.grc.nasa.gov/CELERE/.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please email your inquiries to the CELERE team at celere@lists.nasa.gov.

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2016 Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching

The National Science Foundation currently is accepting nominations and applications for the Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching program. PAEMST is the highest recognition that a teacher of K-12 mathematics or science (including computer science) may receive for outstanding teaching in the United States. Since 1983, more than 4,400 teachers have been recognized for their contributions to mathematics and science education. Awardees serve as models for their colleagues, inspiration to their communities, and leaders in the improvement of mathematics and science education. Up to 108 awardees may be recognized each year.

Presidential awardees receive a certificate signed by the President of the United States; a trip for two to Washington, D.C., to attend a series of recognition events and professional development opportunities; and a $10,000 award from the National Science Foundation. The National Science Foundation administers PAEMST on the behalf of The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.

The PAEMST program is open to outstanding mathematics and science teachers in the 50 states and the four U.S. jurisdictions (Washington, D.C.; Puerto Rico; Department of Defense education activity schools; and the U.S. territories as a group). Anyone — principals, teachers, parents, students or members of the public — may nominate a teacher by completing the nomination form available on the PAEMST website. Teachers also may apply directly. Teachers from groups underrepresented in STEM teaching and learning are encouraged to apply.

Nominations for elementary school teachers (grades K-6) are due April 1, 2016. Secondary school teachers (grades 7-12) are eligible to apply in 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.paemst.org/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to info@paemst.org.

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Early Career Fellowships for Planetary Science Researchers

The Early Career Fellowship program supports the development of individual research programs of outstanding scientists in the early stages of their careers and stimulates research careers in the areas supported by the Planetary Sciences Division. This program is based on the idea that supporting key individuals is a critical mechanism for impacting science with new concepts, technologies and methods.

This program consists of two components with two different submission procedures: The first is the one-page application to be an “Early Career Fellow,” and the second is the subsequent submission of a seven-page proposal for startup funds once selected as an ECF. To be eligible to apply, applicants must have received their Ph.D. (or equivalent degree such as a DPhil) within seven calendar years of the year of the submission of the research proposal.

For consideration as a Fellow (new applicants), submit a proposal to the participating program element by the deadline specified in Tables 2 and 3 in the ROSES Summary of Solicitation. Proposals from Fellows selected in prior years for start-up funds may be submitted at any time in response to this program element.

For complete fellowship details and application procedures, visit http://go.nasa.gov/1MkySUk.

Questions concerning this opportunity may be directed to Doris Daou at Doris.Daou@nasa.gov.

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2016 LiftOff Summer Institute

Registration is now open for the 2016 LiftOff Summer Institute, sponsored by NASA’s Texas Space Grant Consortium. This weeklong professional development training for teachers will be held June 26-July 1, 2016, at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. This competitive aerospace workshop emphasizes science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, learning experiences through speakers, hands-on activities and field investigations.

The theme for this year’s institute is “Exploration: Past, Present and Future.” The event will focus on how NASA is learning from past exploration and current space station research and how it will apply its discoveries to future missions to deep space.

Attendees must be U.S. citizens currently employed as classroom teachers of grades 4-12 with at least one year teaching experience prior to the institute. Texas Space Grant pays all expenses for any Texas teacher selected. Other Space Grant Consortia fund teachers from their states.

Applications are due April 15, 2016.

For more information and to access the online application, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/liftoff/.

If you have questions about the 2016 LiftOff Summer Institute, please email your inquiries to Margaret Baguio at baguio@tsgc.utexas.edu.

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Future Engineers ‘Star Trek’ Replicator Challenge

Calling all Starfleet cadets! “Star Trek,” the American Society for Mechanical Engineers Foundation and NASA want you to pioneer the future of food in space. Your challenge is to create a digital model of a food-related item for astronauts to 3-D print in the year 2050. We want designs that boldly go where no human has 3-D printed before and that help astronauts eat nutritious meals so they can live long and prosper.

You must specify one of the following locations for your 3-D print: our moon, another planet, another planet’s moon, or a spacecraft beyond low-Earth orbit (explain where it is going and why). You also must specify the intended printing material (feedstock) for your 3-D print. This could be plastic, metal, recycled materials, locally sourced material, or any nonedible, 3-D printing feedstock you think would advance human space exploration.

Eating a meal in space goes beyond the actual food itself — from growing food to devouring it. There are many things to consider, so check out our rules, design guidelines and education resources before to starting your design.

Student winners will receive a range of prizes, including a trip to New York for a tour of the space shuttle Enterprise at the Intrepid Museum with an astronaut, a 3-D printer for the winners’ schools or a “Star Trek” prize pack.

Entries are due May 1, 2016. For more information about the challenge and how to enter, visit www.futureengineers.org/startrek.

Please email questions about this competition to info@futureengineers.org.

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‘RockOn! 2016’ University Rocket Science Workshop

University and community college faculty and students are invited to a weeklong workshop to learn how to build and launch a scientific experiment into space. NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia is hosting the “RockOn! 2016” workshop June 18-23, 2016, in partnership with the Colorado and Virginia Space Grant Consortia. Workshop participants must be U.S. citizens. The registration deadline for the workshop is May 2, 2016.

The hands-on workshop teaches participants to build experiments that fly on sounding rockets. During the week, participants will work in teams of three to construct and integrate a sounding rocket payload from a kit. On the fifth day of the workshop, the experiments will fly on a sounding rocket expected to reach an altitude of more than 70 miles.

Each experiment will provide valuable scientific data, analyzed as part of the student-led science and engineering research. The program engages faculty and students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics skills critical to NASA’s future engineering, scientific and technical missions.

Register before March 23, 2016, and save $100 on workshop registration.

For more information about “RockOn!” and to register online, visit http://spacegrant.colorado.edu/national-programs/rockon-2016-home/.

Since 2008, more than 376 people have participated in the “RockOn!” workshops and successfully built and launched 119 payloads to space. Images and information from past years’ workshops can be found at the “RockOn!” website.

Questions about the workshop or the registration process should be directed to Chris Koehler by email at koehler@colorado.edu or by telephone at 303-492-4750.

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Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The Announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design (STEAMD); or activities culturally relevant to or focused on unrepresented in STEM careers populations, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or non-reimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA Announcement.

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Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

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