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NASA Education Express Message — Oct. 19, 2017

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  Wave at #TeacherOnBoard the International Space Station!
Audience:
All Educators and Students
Contact: JSC-STEMonStation@mail.nasa.gov 

Did you know you can see the International Space Station fly overhead with the naked eye? It is the third brightest object in the sky, and is easy to spot if you know when to look. Visit the link above, put in your zip code and find out when the space station will fly over your town. Invite your friends and family, walk out under the dawn or dusk sky and wave to astronauts and cosmonauts on board the station, including former classroom teacher Joe Acaba.Connect with this opportunity and others during NASA’s A Year of Education on Station, a celebration of an almost 12-month presence of a teacher on board the International Space Station.

Testing Terror — Technology for Exploration: Speed of Sound
Audience: Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: Oct. 24, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Contact: barbie.buckner@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for free 60-minute webinar to explore NASA’s efforts to reduce aircraft noise. Learn about motions and forces, transfer of energy and the abilities of technological design to reduce or eliminate noise. Use hands-on experiments and physical demonstrations to make and share connections to aircraft noise research within the classroom. Online registration is required.

 
  Testing Terror – Technology for Exploration: Mysteries of Saturn and Cassini
Audience: Educators of Grades 4-10
Event Date: Oct. 26, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Contact: karen.c.roark@nasa.gov 

Saturn’s ringed world has attracted attention ever since humans first looked at the sky. Scientists first got a close-up look at the planet when the Pioneer and Voyager spacecrafts swung by Saturn in the 1970s and 1980s. Join the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar to explore the incredible Cassini mission and learn Saturn facts to share with your students.Online registration is required.

Free Download for Educators: Experience Mars in Virtual Reality With Mars 2030
Audience: All Educators and Museum Staff
Contact: http://mars2030-vr.com/contact-us  

Mars 2030 gives players the opportunity to explore the Red Planet. The virtual reality simulation was created using real data to deliver an authentic experience based on what is known about Mars today. A desktop version also is available for players without virtual reality hardware. Complimentary Mars 2030 software is available for educators and museum staff.

 

  2017 von Kármán Lecture — Sink or Swim? Using Radar to Protect California’s Water Supply
Audience: All Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education
Lecture Dates: Oct. 19 and Oct. 20, 2017, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)
Contact: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php 

California has highly variable annual precipitation and a great disparity between where precipitation falls and where people live and grow crops. To deal with these issues, a vast array of infrastructure is in place. Monitoring and maintaining this infrastructure is critical. Join Dr. Cathleen E. Jones, a signals analysis engineer, for a discussion about how NASA is using high-resolution, airborne radar to make this monitoring more efficient. Attend the lectures in person or view Thursday’s lecture via live webcast.

Earn STEM Digital Badges to Celebrate the Centennial of NASA’s Langley Research Center
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-9, Informal Educators
Deadline: Oct. 21, 2017
Contact: marile.colonrobles@nasa.gov 

To celebrate NASA’s Langley Research Center’s Centennial, three STEM digital badges are now available for educators and students in grades 5-9. Discover the role of cloud types in the Earth’s Energy Budget; how drag is used to land the Mars2020 Rover on Mars; and the importance of composite materials for airplanes. The first 1,000 educators to complete all three badges by Oct. 21, 2017, will receive a NASA insignia iron-on patch.

 
  Texas High School Aerospace Scholars Program
Audience: High School Juniors in Texas
Registration Deadline: Oct. 25, 2017
Contact: nancy.zigler@nasa.gov 

The Texas High School Aerospace Scholars program is a NASA-unique opportunity for Texas high school juniors to explore STEM disciplines in a learning community led by Texas-certified educators. After successful completion of the online course, students are eligible to compete for a spot in an all-expense-paid, weeklong camp at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. Students may be eligible to receive a high school elective credit upon successful completion of the course.

International Observe the Moon Night
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Oct. 28, 2017
Contact: https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/contact-us 

On Oct. 28, 2017, the whole world has the chance to admire and celebrate our moon on International Observe the Moon Night. And you can join in the fun! Visit the website to find a map of registered events and make plans to attend. If you don’t see an event near you, sign up to host your own! The website has step-by-step plans for hosting an event of any size. Ideas for hands-on activities are available to make your event a success.

 
  Call for Proposals — NASA Research Announcement for Use of the NASA Physical Sciences Informatics System: Appendix D
Audience: Graduate Students
Notice of Intent Deadline: Oct. 31, 2017
Proposal Deadline: Dec. 15, 2017
Contact: francis.p.chiaramonte@nasa.gov 

NASA invites graduate students and established researchers to submit proposals for ground-based research that uses NASA’s Physical Sciences Informatics system to develop new analyses and scientific insights. This solicitation appendix focuses on five research areas: combustion science, complex fluids, fluid physics, fundamental physics and materials science. Research and development efforts will take place over two years. The typical award will be $100,000 per year, for up to two years.


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience
: All Educators
Contact: https://science.nasa.gov/about-us/contact-us 

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up to receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.” It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other NASA science education activities.

 
  Apply to Receive Free ‘Explore Science: Earth & Space 2018’ Toolkits
Audience: Children’s Museums, Science Centers and Museums, NASA Visitor Centers, Public Planetariums and Observatories Located in the U.S.
Application Deadline: Nov. 1, 2017
Contact: cmccarthy@smm.org 

The National Informal STEM Education Network, in collaboration with NASA, has assembled a new set of engaging, hands-on Earth and space science experiences with connections to science, technology and society. A total of 250 toolkits will be awarded to eligible organizations through a competitive application process.

Be a Mosquito Habitat Mapper With ‘GLOBE Observer’ App
Audience: All Educators and Students
Project Dates: Now Through Nov. 10, 2017
Contact: Holli.riebeek@nasa.gov 

Citizen scientists can use the “GLOBE Observer” app, available for Apple and Android phones, to help those who are working to understand and reduce mosquito-borne diseases. The app helps users identify and eliminate mosquito breeding sites. This local, ground-based information helps NASA by supporting satellite-based research of environmental conditions that indicate possible outbreaks of mosquitoes.

 


  Send Your Name to Mars on NASA’s Next Red Planet Mission!
Audience: Educators and Students Worldwide
Submission Deadline: Nov. 1, 2017
Contact: http://mars.nasa.gov/feedback/ 

NASA invites the public to send their names to the Red Planet aboard NASA’s InSight Mars lander! InSight will launch in May 2018 and land on Nov. 26, 2018. The mission will do an in-depth study of the interior of Mars to answer key questions about how the solar system’s rocky planets formed, including Earth. InSight will place the first seismometer directly on the surface of Mars and deploy a self-hammering heat probe that will burrow deeper into the ground than any device on the planet has ever done.

Commercial Crew 2018 Calendar Artwork Contest
Audience: Students Ages 4 to 12
Entry Deadline: Nov. 2, 2017
Contact: ksc-connect2ccp@mail.nasa.gov 

NASA’s Commercial Crew Program is holding an art contest to create a 2018 calendar. Each month will have a different theme related to the International Space Station, astronauts, growing food in space and more! Unique and original artwork will be selected for each month. Once the calendar is complete, NASA will transmit it to astronauts aboard the space station. The calendar also will include supplemental education materials for kids on Earth to learn more about the space-related themes.

 
  NASA Space Technology Research Fellowships — Fall 2018
Audience: Graduate Students
Application Deadline: Nov. 2, 2017
Contact: hq-nstrf-call@mail.nasa.gov 

NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate seeks to sponsor graduate student researchers who are U.S. citizens or permanent U.S. residents. They must show significant potential to contribute to NASA’s goal of creating innovative space technologies for the nation’s science, exploration and economic future. The research grants, worth up to $75,000 per year, will coincide with the start of the 2018 fall academic term. Selected candidates will do research at their colleges or universities and at selected NASA centers.

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website! Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/

FOLLOW, SHARE, AND BE A PART OF THE STEM EDUCATION CONVERSATION WITH NASA!

 


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Education: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express Message — Oct. 12, 2017

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  #TeacherOnBoard — Astronauts Answer Your Students’ Questions — Live From Space!
Audience:
All Educators
Contact: JSC-STEMonStation@mail.nasa.gov 

Join astronaut and former classroom teacher Joe Acaba, along with crewmate Paolo Nespoli, for a Facebook Live event on Oct. 16, 2017, at 11:05-11:35 CDT. Acaba and Nespoli will respond to questions from media, educators and students from around the world! Submit questions ahead of time at @NASAEdu twitter using #TeacherOnBoard. Log on and ask questions: Maybe yours will get answered!This special event kicks off NASA’s A Year of Education on Station, a celebration of an almost 12-month presence of a teacher on board the International Space Station.

Space Center Houston Presents ‘Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission’ Exhibit
Audience: All Educators and Students
Exhibit Dates: Oct. 14, 2017 – March 18, 2018
Contact: schinfo@spacecenter.org 

Space Center Houston is the first of four stops for a new exhibit featuring the Apollo 11 command module. The exhibit will feature more than 20 one-of-a-kind mission artifacts. They include a lunar sample return container; astronaut Buzz Aldrin’s extravehicular visor and gloves; astronaut Michael Collins’ Omega Speedmaster Chronograph; a star chart; a survival kit; and more. Space Center Houston will be the only location where visitors can see the capsules for both the first (Apollo 11) and last (Apollo 17) lunar landings.

 
  Dance of the Planets: Motion Laws and the Solar System
Audience: Educators of Grades 4-6
Event Date: Oct. 16, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Contact: john.f.weis@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for free 60-minute webinar. Participants will get an overview of resources for relating motion equations from Isaac Newton and Johannes Kepler to the bodies of the solar system. The activities presented in this webinar address the Next Generation Science Standards ESS1, PS2 and PS3. Online registration is required.

Testing Terror — Technology for Exploration: Engineering a Satellite
Audience: Educators of Grades 4-10
Event Date: Oct. 18, 2017, at 5 p.m. EDT
Contact: susan.m.kohler@nasa.gov  

Materials going into space encounter extremely harsh conditions not normally encountered on Earth. Probes dropped into the atmosphere of a planet like Jupiter or Saturn’s moon, Titan, may encounter tremendous pressures, temperatures and corrosive gases. Join the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for free 60-minute webinar that will focus on two satellite engineering design challenges. Online registration is required.

 
  Send Your Name to Mars on NASA’s Next Red Planet Mission!
Audience: Educators and Students Worldwide
Submission Deadline: Nov. 1, 2017
Contact: http://mars.nasa.gov/feedback/ 

NASA invites the public to send their names to the Red Planet aboard NASA’s InSight Mars lander! InSight will launch in May 2018 and land on Nov. 26, 2018. The mission will do an in-depth study of the interior of Mars to answer key questions about how the solar system’s rocky planets formed, including Earth. InSight will place the first seismometer directly on the surface of Mars and deploy a self-hammering heat probe that will burrow deeper into the ground than any device on the planet has ever done.

Virginia Earth System Science Scholars Program
Audience: Virginia High School Juniors and Seniors
Application Deadline: Nov. 12, 2017
Contact: joyce.h.corriere@nasa.gov 

VESSS is an interactive online STEM learning experience for Virginia high school juniors and seniors. Participants will complete seven web-based modules and a final project. Those who perform well in the online course may be selected for a one-week residential summer academy at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. Participants will be eligible to receive college credits through Thomas Nelson Community College with costs underwritten by the Virginia Space Grant Consortium.

 
  Generation Nano Challenge: Superheroes Inspired by Science!
Audience: Students in Grades 6-12
Submission Deadline: Jan. 8, 2018
Contact: gennano@nsf.gov 

The National Science Foundation and the National Nanotechnology Initiative invite middle and high school students to use scientific research to imagine an original science-powered superhero. Entries consist of two parts: a written section, and either a short comic or a 90-second video. Entrants should introduce their superhero, demonstrate how scientific research is incorporated into their superhero’s story and explain how it drives them on their mission.

GLOBE Student Research Campaign — Water in Our Environment
Audience: K-12 Educators
Campaign Dates: Now Through June 30, 2018
Contact: http://www.globe.gov/support/contact 

Water continuously circulates through one of Earth’s most powerful systems: the water cycle. Join GLOBE for its latest campaign that uses a set of guiding investigative questions to enable students to meaningfully explore water in their local environment and collaborate to consider the influence of water on a global scale. The project is flexible, allowing teachers to choose between many options to involve their students. Visit the site for details about the project and upcoming informational webinars.

 
  Middle School Teacher Reviewers Needed — Online Astrobiology Game
Audience: Educators of Grades 7-8
Contact: daniella.m.scalice@nasa.gov 

The NASA Astrobiology Institute has funded the production of an exciting new online educational game called “Life Underground.” In the interactive experience, the student takes on the role of a scientist who navigates and investigates a subsurface environment, searching for and characterizing microbial life. The project’s development team at the University of Southern California’s School of Cinematic Arts is seeking educators to explore the software and review the accompanying supplemental materials.

Citizen Science Project: Cosmoquest’s Image Detective
Audience: All Educators and Students
Contact: info@cosmoquest.org 

CosmoQuest’s Image Detective, a NASA-funded citizen science project, invites the public to identify Earth features in photographs taken by astronauts aboard the International Space Station. Citizen scientists are asked to help identify geographic features (natural or human-made) in astronaut photographs and then determine the location on Earth where the photo is centered. Your efforts can enhance NASA’s database of images taken by astronauts from the space station.

 
  Teachable Moment — Nobel-Prize-Winning Research: Modeling Gravitational Waves
Audience: Educators of Grades 6-8
Contact: lyle.tavernier@jpl.nasa.gov 

Researchers Kip Thorne and Barry Barish of Caltech and Rainer Weiss of MIT have been awarded the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics for their “decisive contributions to the LIGO detector and the observation of gravitational waves.” Learn more about the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory and ways to bring its scientific breakthroughs into the classroom with the latest Teachable Moment resources from JPL Education.

Celebrate Earth Science Week With Resources From GLOBE
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Earth Science Week Dates: Oct. 8-14, 2017
Contact: Marile.ColonRobles@nasa.gov 

What determines the color of your sky? Use the Elementary GLOBE Aerosol book and a suggested phenomenon-based learning progression to teach your students about aerosols, clouds and sky color. Collect and submit your observations during Earth Science Week using the GLOBE Observer app, and NASA will send you observations from Earth-observing satellites. Educators may sign up for this opportunity and receive a free classroom set of the Elementary GLOBE book titled “What’s Up in the Atmosphere? Exploring Colors in the Sky.”

 
  Testing Terror — Technology for Exploration: Rockets to Mars
Audience: Educators of Grades 4-8
Event Date: Oct. 12, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT
Contact: stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov 

Join the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for free 60-minute webinar. Blast off into learning by exploring the STEM of rockets to Mars with NASA missions and classroom resources. Launch your students’ interest in forces and motion with NASA inquiry rocket activities and design challenges that include designing, building and launching simple rockets while recording and analyzing data. Online registration is required.

Earth Science Week 2017 Visual Arts Contest
Audience: K-5 Students
Entry Deadline: Oct. 13, 2017
Contact: info@earthsciweek.org 

Celebrate Earth Science Week 2017 with American Geosciences Institute’s visual arts contest. Artwork should focus on the topic “People and the Planet.” The contest is open to students in grades K-5 who are residents of the United States. Participants should submit an original 2-D visual arts project that shows how human activities shape, and are shaped by, Earth systems. Entries must be submitted by mail.

 
  Earth Science Week 2017 Photography Contest
Audience: All Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: 5 p.m. EDT on Oct. 13, 2017
Contact: info@earthsciweek.org 

Celebrate Earth Science Week 2017 with American Geosciences Institute’s photography contest. Photographs should support the topic “Earth and Human Activity Here” and show human interaction with natural systems where you are. Any resident of the United States or any AGI international affiliate may enter. Entries must be submitted electronically. Only one entry will be accepted per person.

Earth Science Week 2017 Essay Contest
Audience: Students in Grades 6-9
Entry Deadline: 5 p.m. EDT on Oct. 13, 2017
Contact: info@earthsciweek.org 

Celebrate Earth Science Week 2017 with American Geosciences Institute’s essay contest. Essays should focus on the theme “Human Interaction With Earth Systems.” The contest is open to students in grades 6-9 who are residents of the United States. Participants should submit an original essay no more than 300 words in length, typed and formatted to fit on one page. Entries must be submitted electronically.

 
  Earth Science Week 2017 Video Contest
Audience: All Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: 5 p.m. EDT on Oct. 13, 2017
Contact: info@earthsciweek.org 

Celebrate Earth Science Week 2017 with American Geosciences Institute’s video contest. Videos should focus on the theme “Earth and Human Activity.” Submit a brief, 30-90 second original video that tells viewers about how people have an impact on Earth systems, or how Earth systems have an impact on people, in your part of the world. The contest is open to individuals or teams of interested persons of any age in any part of the world. Entries must be submitted electronically.

2018 RASC-AL Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge Competition
Audience: Full-time Undergraduate and Graduate Students
NOI Deadline: Oct. 13, 2017
Project Plan Submission Deadline: Nov. 16, 2017
Contact: rascal@nianet.org 

This engineering design and technology demonstration contest challenges teams to design, build and test prototype systems capable of extracting water from simulated Martian subsurface ice. Up to 10 teams will be selected to participate in a multi-day competition in June 2018 at NASA’s Langley Research Center. In addition to the technology demonstrations, participation includes the submission of a technical paper and poster presentation to NASA and industry judges that details the team concept’s “path-to-fight” (i.e. essential modifications required to operate their system on Mars).

 
  2018 RASC-AL Design Competition
Audience: Full-time Undergraduate and Graduate Students
NOI Deadline: Oct. 15, 2017
Abstract Submission Deadline: Jan. 21, 2018
Contact: rascal@nianet.org 

The RASC-AL engineering design competition challenges teams to develop new concepts that leverage innovations to improve our ability to travel between Earth and other destinations. This year’s themes are (1) Reusable Hybrid Propulsion Stage; (2) Artificial Gravity Reusable Crewed Deep Space Transport; (3) Propellant Resupply Capability; and (4) Lunar Polar Sample Return Architecture. Up to 16 teams will be chosen to participate in a competitive design review at the RASC-AL Forum in Florida. Teams with the top two winning papers will be invited to present their design projects to industry experts at a major aerospace conference.

University Student Research Challenge — A Pilot Project
Audience: Students at U.S. Colleges and Universities
Proposal Deadline: Oct. 16, 2017
Contact: nspires-help@nasaprs.com 

NASA’s Transformative Aeronautics Concepts Program seeks to develop novel concepts with the potential to create new capabilities in aeronautics by stimulating aeronautics research in the student community. Through this solicitation, TACP will provide students from accredited U.S. colleges or universities with grants for aeronautics projects that also raise cost-sharing funds using crowdfunding platforms. This challenge, which is being run as a pilot project, seeks students who have an aeronautics-related project idea and have the passion to develop that idea.

 
  Now Accepting Applications for NASA Spring Internships
Audience
: High School, Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Application Deadline: Oct. 17, 2017
Contact: https://intern.nasa.gov/oic/ 

Now is your chance to apply for exciting hands-on spring internship opportunities available at all NASA centers. Help NASA scientists and engineers with ongoing scientific and engineering research, technology development and spaceflight operations activities. Internship opportunities also exist in nontechnical areas such as communications, budget, procurement, education and human resources. NASA internships are stipend-paid and offer students mentor-directed, degree-related, NASA-relevant tasks.


Earn STEM Digital Badges to Celebrate the Centennial of NASA’s Langley Research Center
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-9, Informal Educators
Deadline: Oct. 21, 2017
Contact: marile.colonrobles@nasa.gov 

To celebrate NASA’s Langley Research Center’s Centennial, three STEM digital badges are now available for educators and students in grades 5-9. Discover the role of cloud types in the Earth’s Energy Budget; how drag is used to land the Mars2020 Rover on Mars; and the importance of composite materials for airplanes. The first 1,000 educators to complete all three badges by Oct. 21, 2017, will receive a NASA insignia iron-on patch.

 
  Apply to Receive Free ‘Explore Science: Earth & Space 2018’ Toolkits
Audience: Children’s Museums, Science Centers and Museums, NASA Visitor Centers, Public Planetariums and Observatories Located in the U.S.
Application Deadline: Nov. 1, 2017
Contact: cmccarthy@smm.org 

The National Informal STEM Education Network, in collaboration with NASA, has assembled a new set of engaging, hands-on Earth and space science experiences with connections to science, technology and society. A total of 250 toolkits will be awarded to eligible organizations through a competitive application process.

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station Contact Opportunity
Audience: All Educators
Proposal Deadline: Nov. 15, 2017
Contact: ariss.us.education@gmail.com 

ARISS-US is accepting proposals from U.S. schools, museums, science centers and community youth organizations (working individually or together) to host an amateur radio event between July 1 and Dec. 31, 2018. To maximize these radio contact opportunities, ARISS-US is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed education plan. Radio contacts are approximately 10 minutes long.

 


  Texas High School Aerospace Scholars Program
Audience: High School Juniors in Texas
Registration Deadline: Oct. 25, 2017
Contact: nancy.zigler@nasa.gov 

The Texas High School Aerospace Scholars program is a NASA-unique opportunity for Texas high school juniors to explore STEM disciplines in a learning community led by Texas-certified educators. After successful completion of the online course, students are eligible to compete for a spot in an all-expense-paid, weeklong camp at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. Students may be eligible to receive a high school elective credit upon successful completion of the course.

International Observe the Moon Night
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Oct. 28, 2017
Contact: https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/contact-us 

On Oct. 28, 2017, the whole world has the chance to admire and celebrate our moon on International Observe the Moon Night. And you can join in the fun! Visit the website to find a map of registered events and make plans to attend. If you don’t see an event near you, sign up to host your own! The website has step-by-step plans for hosting an event of any size. Ideas for hands-on activities are available to make your event a success.

 
  Search for Gravitational Waves With ‘Gravity Spy’ Citizen Science Project
Audience: All Educators and Students
Contact: tyson.b.littenberg@nasa.gov 

A century after Einstein predicted the existence of gravitational waves, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory made the first direct detection of this phenomenon. LIGO is the most sensitive and complicated gravitational experiment ever created; it is susceptible to instrumental and environmental noise sources called “glitches.” In this online Zooniverse citizen science project, your input will help scientists classify and characterize glitches, which, in turn, will help scientists determine and eliminate the sources of noise.

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website! Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/

FOLLOW, SHARE, AND BE A PART OF THE STEM EDUCATION CONVERSATION WITH NASA!

 


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Education: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express Message — Sept. 14, 2017

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  #TeacherOnBoard Visit the New ‘A Year of Education on Station’ Website
Audience: All Educators and Students
Contact: JSC-STEMonStation@mail.nasa.govThe September 12 launch of astronaut and former classroom teacher Joe Acaba kicks off “A Year of Education on Station,” NASA’s celebration of an almost constant one-year presence of an educator on board the International Space Station. While in space, Joe and (later) astronaut and former classroom teacher Ricky Arnold will be the eyes and ears of teachers as the two travel at 17,500 miles per hour in low Earth orbit. Check out the new website designed to connect educators and students with Joe, Ricky, their crewmates and education resources related to their missions.
There’s Space in Your Classroom for Cross-Curricular: Marsbound!
Audience: Educators of Grades 5-8
Event Date: Sept. 18, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Contact: john.f.weis@nasa.govJoin the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for free 60-minute webinar to get an overview of the NASA education resource Marsbound! — Mission to the Red Planet. This cross-curricular activity combines science, engineering, mathematics and group interaction as students plan for an unmanned mission to the Red Planet. This webinar addresses Common Core – Mathematics standards and Next Generation Science Standard ETS1. Online registration required.
 
  Cosmology 101
Audience: Educators of Grades 5-8
Event Date: Sept. 19, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Contact: john.f.weis@nasa.govJoin the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for free 60-minute webinar. Participants will get a historical overview of the varying scientific views about the structure of the observed universe from ancient cultures to current theories. This webinar addresses Next Generation Science Standards ESS1.A. Online registration required.
There’s Space in Your Classroom for Cross-Curricular: Who Will Feed the World?
Audience: Educators of Grades 4-10
Event Date: Sept. 20, 2017, at 5 p.m. EDT
Contact: susan.m.kohler@nasa.govJoin the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for free 60-minute webinar. STEAM Educators will explore problem-based learning using the NASA resource, Mission Geography. This activity includes an investigation that focuses on meeting the food needs of an increasing global population. Online registration required.
 
  Hurricanes in Your Classroom: Ask a Hurricane Hunter Pilot
Audience: Educators of Grades 5-12
Event Date: Sept. 21, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT
Contact: stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov Join the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for free 60-minute webinar. Learn how to use real NASA data and STEM lessons to explore hurricanes in your classroom. A U.S. Air Force Reserve “Hurricane Hunters” pilot from Keesler Air Force Base in Biloxi, Mississippi, will share his experiences and expertise in the study of hurricanes. He also will take time to answer questions from participants. Online registration required.
2017 von Kármán Lecture — A Volcanologist’s Paradise
Audience: All Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education
Next Lecture Date: Sept. 21, 2017, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)
Contact: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.phpThe biggest volcanic eruptions in the solar system aren’t happening on Earth: They’re taking place on Jupiter’s moon, Io. Join research scientist Ashley Davies, a volcanologist at JPL, for a discussion of how studying volcanoes on Earth leads to a clearer understanding of how Io’s volcanoes work and how best to study them from spacecraft. Attend the lectures in person or view Thursday’s lecture via live webcast.
 
  NASA Internships, Fellowships, and Scholarships Virtual Career Summit
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Event Date: Sept. 27, 2017, 1-2:30 p.m. EDT
Contact: https://intern.nasa.gov/oic/Join the NIFS recruiting team for a virtual event showcasing the many internships, fellowships and scholarships available for higher education students. Participants will learn about NASA opportunities, eligibility requirements and tips for the application process. Previous and current interns will share their experiences. The session will allow students to ask questions and have them answered live by NASA professionals. Visit the website to register to attend.
NASA Mars Science: MAVEN Outreach Webinar — Deep Dips: Designing a Mission Orbiter
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Sept. 27, 2017, 7 p.m. EDT
Contact: epomail@lasp.colorado.eduJoin the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution, or MAVEN, mission team for an education professional development webinar. The MAVEN spacecraft has been orbiting Mars since 2014, making periodic “deep dips” to sample Mars’ upper atmosphere. Guy Beutelschies from Lockheed Martin will discuss the challenges engineers face in designing missions like MAVEN for success.
 
  2018 RASC-AL Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge Competition
Audience: Full-time Undergraduate and Graduate Students
NOI Deadline: Oct. 13, 2017
Project Plan Submission Deadline: Nov. 16, 2017
Contact: rascal@nianet.orgThis engineering design and technology demonstration contest challenges teams to design, build and test prototype systems capable of extracting water from simulated Martian subsurface ice. Up to 10 teams will be selected to participate in a multi-day competition in June 2018 at NASA’s Langley Research Center. In addition to the technology demonstrations, participation includes the submission of a technical paper and poster presentation to NASA and industry judges that details the team concept’s “path-to-fight” (i.e. essential modifications required to operate their system on Mars).
Free Educator Workshop — Classroom Lunacy: Lunar Samples in Your Classroom
Audience: Educators of Grades 5-9
Registration Deadline: Oct. 22, 2017 (maximum of 30 participants)
Event Date: Oct. 26, 2017, 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m. CDT
Contact: april.l.mcintosh@nasa.gov Join the Stennis Space Center Office of Education for a free workshop to train in the use and security of lunar and meteorite sample disks. Workshop participants will be certified to borrow lunar and meteorite sample disks from NASA for use in the classroom. The workshop will be held at the Infinity Science Center in Pearlington, Mississippi. (Map).
 
  Apply to Receive Free ‘Explore Science: Earth & Space 2018’ Toolkits
Audience: Children’s Museums, Science Centers and Museums, NASA Visitor Centers, Public Planetariums and Observatories Located in the U.S.
Application Deadline: Nov. 1, 2017
Contact: cmccarthy@smm.orgThe National Informal STEM Education Network, in collaboration with NASA, has assembled a new set of engaging, hands-on Earth and space science experiences with connections to science, technology and society. A total of 250 toolkits will be awarded to eligible organizations through a competitive application process.
Free Educator Workshop — Technology Drives Exploration: NASA Technology and Engineering Design Challenges
Audience: Educators of Grades 4-8
Registration Deadline: Nov. 12, 2017 (maximum of 30 participants)
Event Date: Nov. 16, 2017, 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m. CST
Contact: april.l.mcintosh@nasa.gov Join the Stennis Space Center Office of Education for a free, activity-filled technology and engineering workshop highlighting NASA’s cutting-edge space exploration missions. Explore NASA STEM engineering design challenges and apps. The workshop will be held at the Infinity Science Center in Pearlington, Mississippi. (Map).
 
  Free Educator Workshop — Network of States II: Classroom Lunacy and EV3 Robotics
Audience: NASA Network of States Educators Phase 2 and In-service STEM Educators of Grades 5-12 Interested in Joining the NASA Network of States Educator Institute
Registration Deadline: Dec. 4, 2017 (maximum of 30 participants)
Event Date: Dec. 9, 2017, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. CST
Contact: april.l.mcintosh@nasa.gov Join the Stennis Space Center Office of Education for a free workshop to train in the use and security of lunar and meteorite sample disks. Workshop participants will be certified to borrow lunar and meteorite sample disks from NASA for use in the classroom. The workshop also will include a short EV3 robotics follow-up training session. The workshop will be held at the Infinity Science Center in Pearlington, Mississippi. (Map).

NASA Swarmathon: Seeking College Teams for Virtual Robotics Competition!
Audience: Higher Education Faculty and Students at Minority Serving Universities and Minority Serving Community Colleges
Event Date: Sept. 15, 2017
Contact: info@nasaswarmathon.comThe 2018 NASA Swarmathon Virtual Competition challenges students to develop search algorithms for robotic swarms. These algorithms will be tested by competition organizers in a virtual environment. Selected teams will receive a $500 stipend for their faculty member; training via live webinars, videos and guides; and access to technical forums.
 
  NASA’s Digital Learning Network Live Event — Back-to-School Blast and Farewell Webcast
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Sept. 21, 2017, 9:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. EDT
Contact: DLiNfochannel@gmail.com

On Sept. 21, 2017, celebrate the beginning of a new school year and say goodbye to NASA’s Digital Learning Network! All missions must come to an end, and the DLN would like to go out with a bang. Please register at http://bit.ly/DLNFarewell to be eligible to participate in the live virtual audience, or tune in to the DLiNfo Channel and ask questions @NASADLN via Twitter using #askDLN or via email at DLiNfochannel@gmail.com.
NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Seek Educators for Climate Change Research Initiative
Audience: Full-time 9-12 STEM Educators Who Are U.S. Citizens and Reside Within 50 Miles of NYC
Application Deadline: Sept. 21, 2017
Contact: matthew.d.pearce@nasa.govThis yearlong STEM engagement opportunity allows high school STEM educators to work directly with NASA scientists, to lead research teams, and to develop STEM curricula for their current classes. Educators participating in this opportunity will become associate researchers who integrate NASA education resources and content into their classrooms while improving STEM education within their communities.
 
  NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Seek Students for Climate Change Research Initiative
Audience: Graduate Students Who Are U.S. Citizens and Reside Within 50 Miles of NYC
Application Deadline: Sept. 21, 2017
Contact: matthew.d.pearce@nasa.govThe CCRI internship is a yearlong opportunity to work directly with NASA scientists and research teams on a NASA research project related to climate change. This opportunity will not conflict with the student’s course work and class schedule during the fall and spring. The internship is considered a part-time position that supports the graduate student’s major area of study.


Become a Member of the Infiniscope Education Advisory Board
Audience: Formal and Informal Educators of Grades 5-12
Application Deadline: Sept. 29, 2017
Contact: jlswann@asu.eduInfiniscope invites you to apply to become an Infiniscope Education Advisory Board member for a renewable one-year term from 2017-2018. Board members will review Infiniscope-developed educational products and receive a stipend, training, collaborative space, and recognition on the Infiniscope website. Board members also will have opportunities to earn badges and attend group meet-ups at national conventions.
 
  Solar System Ambassadors Program Accepting Applications
Audience: All Educators
Application Period: Sept. 1-30, 2017
Contact: ambassad@jpl.nasa.govThe Solar System Ambassadors Program is a nationwide network of space enthusiast volunteers. Highly motivated enthusiasts nationwide are eligible to join — and those in Arkansas, Delaware, Idaho, Iowa, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont, West Virginia, Wyoming, the District of Columbia and U.S. territories are especially encouraged to apply.
Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience
: All Educators
Contact: https://science.nasa.gov/about-us/contact-usAre you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up to receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.” It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other NASA science education activities.
 

 


  Zero Robotics High School Tournament 2017
Audience: 9-12 Educators and Students
Registration Deadline: Sept. 27, 2017
Contact: zerorobotics@mit.edu

Teams of U.S. high school students are challenged to design a software program for small satellites called SPHERES that operate inside the cabin of the International Space Station. Finalists will have their codes sent to the station, where an astronaut will program the SPHERES to run their tests.
BIG Idea Challenge 2018
Audience: Full-time Undergraduate and Graduate Students
NoI Deadline: Oct. 1, 2017
Entry Deadline: Nov. 30, 2017
Contact: BigIdea@nianet.orgNASA’s 2018 Breakthrough, Innovative and Game-changing (BIG) Idea Challenge seeks innovations in the design, installation and sustainable operation of a large solar power system on Mars. Top teams present their concepts via a design review at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Virginia or NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Ohio. The winning team will receive NASA internship offers.
 
  NASA History Program Office Spring 2018 Internships
Audience: Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Application Deadline: Oct. 1, 2017
Contact: bill.barry@nasa.govThe NASA History Program Office is seeking undergraduate and graduate students for spring 2018 internships. The History Division maintains archival materials to answer research questions. The division edits and publishes several books and monographs each year, and it maintains websites and social media featuring NASA history. Strong research, writing and editing skills are essential to the internship. Students of all majors are welcome to apply.

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website! Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/

FOLLOW, SHARE, AND BE A PART OF THE STEM EDUCATION CONVERSATION WITH NASA!

 


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Education: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express Message — July 13, 2017

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: July 13, 2017, at 8 p.m. EDT


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

Teacher Professional Development Programs at the NASTAR Center
Audience: K-12 Educators
Workshop Dates: Multiple dates July 13-28, 2017

2017 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education
Next Lecture Date: July 13, 2017, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)

Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Family Day Events– Your Eclipse
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: July 15, 2017, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. EDT

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Virtual Visit — LEGO and NASA Engineering
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-12
Event Date: July 17, 2017, at 2 p.m. EDT

Lecture From Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum — Remembering John Glenn: The Man and the Legend
Audience: Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education; All Educators
Event Date: July 18, 2017, at 8 p.m. EDT

Mars Survival Kit: Lessons and Activities to Guide Your Exploration of Mars!
Audience: K-12 Educators

Mars Day! 2017 at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: July 21, 2017, at 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. EDT

NASA Education Workshop at Glenn Research Center — Modeling the Solar Eclipse
Audience: K-12 Educators
Workshop Date: July 25, 2017, 8:30 a.m. EDT

National Science Foundation’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities — Undergraduate Program
Audience: Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Research Initiation Awards — Notice of Intent Deadline: July 25, 2017
Various Projects — Notice of Intent Deadline: Sept. 5, 2017

‘CineSpace’ Short Film Competition
Audience: All Educators and Students
Entry Submission Period: June 1 – July 31, 2017

Translational Research Institute Postdoctoral Fellowship
Audience: Researchers Who Have Received a Ph.D. in the Last Seven Years and Have Fewer Than Five Years of Postdoctoral Training
Proposal Deadline: July 31, 2017

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

Get Ready for the 2017 Solar Eclipse With NASA Resources
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Aug. 21, 2017

Fly Your Exoplanet on the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite
Audience: All Educators and Students
Submission Deadline: Nov. 20, 2017

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

Bring the Story of “Hidden Figures” to the Classroom With the “Who Is Katherine Johnson?” Profiles and Modern Figures Toolkit
Audience: K-12 Educators

NASA Unveils New Searchable Video, Audio and Imagery Library
Audience: All Educators and Students

Help NASA Search the Realm Beyond Neptune at Backyard Worlds: Planet 9
Audience: All Educators and Students
Project Timeframe: Ongoing

Be a Citizen Scientist With the ‘Aurorasaurus’ Project
Audience: All Educators and Students
Project Timeframe: Ongoing


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Lava Layering: Making and Mapping a Volcano
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-8
Event Date: July 13, 2017, at 8 p.m. EDT
Participants will be introduced to an activity that focuses on interpreting geologic history through volcano formation and excavation. Baking soda, vinegar and play dough are used to model fluid lava flows. Various colors of play dough identify different eruption events. The activity challenges students to do the following:
1.Construct a model of a volcano.
2. Produce lava flows.
3. Observe, draw, record, and interpret the history and stratigraphy of a volcano produced by other students.
4. Make the connection between the life cycle of a volcano and see these features on Earth and Mars.
Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/261971

Solar Eclipse: Edible Experiments/The Great American Eclipse/Eclipse Book Reviews
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: July 17, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Explore resources for making edible models to teach about lunar and solar eclipses. Browse websites with hands-on activities on subjects such as protection from UV rays. Learn about a collection of children’s literature to use for studying the eclipse. These activities will be great for summer camps and back-to-school events before the solar eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017. Register online to participate. https://www.eiseverywhere.com/263976

Solar Eclipse: Guest Scientist — High-Altitude Ballooning
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: July 18, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Get an overview of high-altitude ballooning during eclipses with Bernhard Beck-Winchatz from the STEM Studies Department at DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois. Beck-Winchatz has worked on several NASA projects using weather balloon flights that provide affordable access to a spacelike environment for student research. Register online to participate. https://www.eiseverywhere.com/263980

Solar Eclipse: Building Your Own Eclipse Equipment for Your Classroom on a Budget
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: July 19, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Learn how to build inexpensive models to teach solar eclipse concepts in the classroom. Register online to participate. https://www.eiseverywhere.com/263974

Solar Eclipse: What, When, Where, How and Safety
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: July 20, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT
On Aug. 21, 2017, most Americans will experience their first total solar eclipse in almost 40 years. What is a solar eclipse? Where will the eclipse be visible? When will the eclipse occur? How can the eclipse be viewed safely? This webinar will explore these questions using some of the many NASA resources and classroom lessons supporting this solar event. Learn about the important safety of properly viewing the eclipse with your students. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/263468

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


Teacher Professional Development Programs at the NASTAR Center

The National AeroSpace Training and Research, or NASTAR, Center is hosting a series of teacher professional development programs throughout the month of July. Here’s your chance to experience acceleration in a centrifuge, pilot an airplane simulator, or explore the gas laws in an altitude chamber. Each one-day workshop is worth eight hours of continuing education.

One-day workshops are planned for multiple dates through July 28, 2017. To see a full list of workshop dates and to download a registration packet, visit http://www.nastarcenter.com/education/teachers/.

The NASTAR Center is located in Southampton, Pennsylvania, a northern suburb of Philadelphia. The center is an Affiliate Member of the NASA Pennsylvania Space Grant Consortium. Funding from the NASA Pennsylvania Space Grant Consortium supports these programs, so they are offered at no cost to teachers.

Questions about this series of workshops should be directed to Greg Kennedy at gkennedy@nastarcenter.com.


2017 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online

The Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, named after the founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and presented by JPL’s Office of Communication and Education, shares the excitement of the space program’s missions, instruments and other technologies.

Lectures take place twice per month, on consecutive Thursdays and Fridays. Thursday lectures take place in JPL’s Theodore von Kármán Auditorium, and Friday lectures take place at Pasadena City College’s Vosloh Forum. Both start at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT). Admission and parking are free for all lectures. No reservations are required, but seating is limited. The Thursday evening lectures are streamed live for viewing online. Archives of past lectures are also available online.

Next Lecture in the Series:

Five Years of Exploring Gale Crater With the Curiosity Mars Rover
Event Date:
July 13 and July 14, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2017&month=7
Nearly five years after its celebrated arrival at Mars, the Curiosity rover continues to reveal Mars as a once-habitable planet. Early in the planet’s history, generations of streams and lakes created the landforms that Curiosity explores today. Join James Erickson and Dr. Ashwin Vasavada, mission team members from the Mars Science Laboratory, for a discussion about the latest findings from the mission, the challenges of exploration with an aging robot, and what lies ahead.

For more information about the Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, including a complete list of upcoming lectures, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.php.

Questions about this series should be directed to http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php.


Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Family Day Event– Your Eclipse

Get ready for the upcoming total solar eclipse by attending a Family Day event hosted by the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum.

On Aug. 21, 2017, a solar eclipse will be visible from the entire continental U.S. During this Family Day event, visitors will learn about the science behind solar eclipses, participate in hands-on activities, and get information about how to safely view the eclipse.

July 15, 2017, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. EDT
National Air and Space Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia
https://airandspace.si.edu/events/your-eclipse-0

Please direct questions about this event to the Visitor Service line at 202-633-2214.


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Virtual Visit — LEGO and NASA Engineering

Join the Digital Network at NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center for a Virtual Visit event on July 17, 2017, at 2 p.m. EDT. The event will focus on LEGO and NASA engineering and will feature LEGO enthusiast Maia Weinstock. Weinstock is internationally known for her LEGO projects including “Women of NASA,” a LEGO Ideas-winning set that will soon be available in stores worldwide. LEGO engineering projects by female student guests at Armstrong also will be shared during the presentation.

This hourlong program will be streamed live at http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-dlinfo. Questions may be submitted by email to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com or via Twitter using #askDLN.

If your school or camp would like to participate directly in this program, please send an email to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com with the subject line “LEGO Virtual Visit.” Those not selected to be a part of the interactive audience will be able to view the webcast event live.

For more information about this and other DLN events, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln/virtual-visit.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please send them to dlinfochannel@gmail.com.


Lecture From Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum — Remembering John Glenn: The Man and the Legend

John Glenn is one of the most recognized names and public figures in the world, a consequence of his stature as the first American to orbit Earth. That brief event made him a legend, but Glenn’s full career spanned more than seven decades as an aviator, engineer, astronaut, businessman, U.S. senator, public servant and educator. Behind the legend was a man devoted to the nation, the American people and his family — a genial and thoughtful man of good humor, faith and eloquence. These aspects of Glenn’s life will be remembered in an intimate conversation among a select few speakers who knew him best. Bob Schieffer will moderate the event.

The lecture will be held July 18, 2017, at 8 p.m. EDT, at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in the Washington, D.C. Attendance is free, but tickets are required. The event will be webcast live for free viewing.

For more information, visit https://airandspace.si.edu/events/remembering-john-glenn-man-and-legend.

Questions about this event should be directed to the Visitor Service line at 202-633-2214.


Mars Survival Kit: Lessons and Activities to Guide Your Exploration of Mars!

NASA is embarking on a journey to Mars! Are your students ready to join in the adventure? Spark excitement in your classroom with the Mars Survival Kit.

The Mars Survival Kit is a collection of educational activities for students in grades K-12. Each educational activity includes a brief description, as well as information about how the activities and lessons align to the Next Generation Science Standards.

Start your classroom’s journey to Mars at http://go.nasa.gov/1NnZ0Rg.

To learn more about NASA’s Journey to Mars, visit http://www.nasa.gov/topics/journeytomars/index.html.


Mars Day! 2017 at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum

Celebrate “Mars Day! 2017” at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.! This annual event celebrates the Red Planet with a variety of educational and fun family activities. Visitors also can talk to scientists active in Mars research and learn about current and future missions.

The event takes place July 21, 2017, at 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. EDT.

For more information, visit https://airandspace.si.edu/mars-day.

Questions about this event should be directed to the Visitor Service line at 202-633-2214.


NASA Education Workshop at Glenn Research Center — Modeling the Solar Eclipse

On Aug. 21, 2017, the United States will experience a solar eclipse. This event will provide an excellent opportunity to engage and educate diverse audiences, and NASA has the resources to help.

Join the Office of Education at NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, for a STEM educator workshop on July 25, 2017. Participants will be introduced to problem-based-inquiry learning activities related to the solar eclipse. Learn how to bring STEM challenges and the adventure of space exploration to students in the classroom.

For full event details and registration information, visit https://www.eiseverywhere.com/ehome/index.php?eventid=237940&.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Stephanie Brown-Houston at sdbrown-houston@nasa.gov.


National Science Foundation’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities — Undergraduate Program

The National Science Foundation is seeking proposals for the Historically Black Colleges and Universities — Undergraduate Program. HBCU-UP is committed to enhancing the quality of undergraduate STEM education and research at Historically Black Colleges and Universities as a means to broaden participation in the nation’s STEM workforce. HBCU-UP realizes this purpose by providing awards to develop, implement, and study innovative models and approaches for making dramatic improvements in the preparation and success of HBCU undergraduate students so that they may participate successfully in graduate programs and/or careers in STEM disciplines.

HBCU-UP provides support for a variety of opportunities. These include the following:

Research Initiation Awards: These awards provide support for STEM faculty at HBCUs to pursue new research at the home institution, an NSF-funded research center, a research-intensive institution or a national laboratory. Eligible faculty members must not have received any federal funding during the last three years. The deadline to submit a required notice of intent for a Research Initiation Award is July 25, 2017. Full proposals are due Oct. 3, 2017.

Targeted Infusion Projects, Broadening Participation Research Projects, Implementation Projects, and Achieving Competitive Excellence Implementation Projects: These projects aim to support efforts that increase STEM participation at HBCUs. See the website for individual project descriptions. The deadline to submit a required notice of intent for these projects is Sept. 5, 2017. Full proposals are due Nov. 28, 2017.

For more information on the overall Historically Black Colleges and Universities — Undergraduate Program, visit http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5481.

Please direct questions about these opportunities to Claudia Rankins at crankins@nsf.gov and Andrea Johnson at andjohns@nsf.gov.


‘CineSpace’ Short Film Competition

NASA and the Houston Cinema Arts Society once again will offer filmmakers around the world a chance to share their works inspired by — and using — actual NASA imagery through “CineSpace,” a short-film competition.

Films featuring imagery captured by NASA and video collected throughout the agency’s 50-year history will be judged on creativity, innovation and attention to detail. Works submitted to “CineSpace” will compete for cash prizes and the opportunity to be shown to audiences both on and off Earth. In addition to being screened at the “CineSpace” awards ceremony during the Houston Cinema Arts Festival, winners and finalists may be screened at other film festivals across the country, as well as on NASA TV and even on the International Space Station.

“CineSpace” is open to all filmmakers, both professional and aspiring. The competition will accept submissions of all genres, including narrative, documentary, comedy, drama, animation, experimental and others, of up to 10 minutes running time. Entries must use at least 10 percent publicly available NASA imagery.

The submission period opens June 1, 2017, and closes July 31, 2017. Finalists and winners will be announced at a “CineSpace” event during the Houston Cinema Arts Festival in November. Entries will be competing for $26,000 in prizes with cash awards going to the top three submissions as well as the two films that best demonstrate the themes “Benefits of Space to Humanity” and “Future Space Exploration.”

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/cinespace-short-film-competition-returns-for-2017.

Please direct questions about this competition to cinespace@cinemartsociety.org.


Translational Research Institute Postdoctoral Fellowship

The Translational Research Institute leads a national effort in applying cutting edge terrestrial research to spaceflight human-risk-mitigation strategies for long-duration exploration missions. TRI was founded in 2016 and works in partnership with NASA’s Human Research Program through a cooperative agreement and cooperative agreement management plan.

Applications for postdoctoral fellowships offered through the Translational Research Institute are now being accepted. Fellowships will be competitively awarded in any laboratory in the U.S. conducting biomedical/biotechnological research aligned with TRI’s mission and goals. The fellowship is open to any researcher who is legally residing and/or working in the United States, i.e., U.S. citizens, permanent residents, or persons with pre-existing visas obtained through their sponsoring institutions that permit postdoctoral training for the project’s duration. To be eligible for this program, applicants may not have more than five years (cumulative) previous postdoctoral training as of the deadline for this proposal submission.

Proposals are due July 31, 2017.

For complete fellowship details and application procedures, visit http://go.nasa.gov/2rJD9iy.

Questions concerning this opportunity may be directed to Dorit B. Donoviel at donoviel@bcm.edu.


Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites U.S. educational institutions to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets, and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

Nonprofit museums, libraries and planetariums (sponsored through their respective State Agency Surplus Property, or SASP, organization) are also eligible to make requests. Visit the link below for special instructions to request items. To find the contact information for the SASP representative for your area, visit http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/100851.

A nominal shipping fee must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.


Get Ready for the 2017 Solar Eclipse With NASA Resources

On Aug. 21, 2017, the United States will experience a solar eclipse! This celestial event will provide a golden opportunity to engage and educate diverse audiences, and NASA has the resources to help.

Along a path 60 to 70 miles wide stretching from Oregon to South Carolina, observers will be able to see a total solar eclipse. Others across North America will see a partial eclipse. The event will happen around lunch time across the country. For an interactive map with timing information along the path of the eclipse, visit http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEgoogle/SEgoogle2001/SE2017Aug21Tgoogle.html.

Visit the following websites to find additional information and resources, including:
— Tips for safely viewing the solar eclipse.
— Recorded interviews with NASA scientists, mission specialists and eclipse path communities.
— Topical online eclipse videos, featuring a variety of STEM and cultural topics.
— Social media community development and networking.
— Mobile educational eclipse applications.
— Public challenges and engagement activities.
— 2-D and 3-D printing exercises for K-16 students.
— Citizen science campaigns in partnership with NASA mission observations.
— Adjunct activities and educational resources.
— Live streaming of observations and programming.

Total Eclipse 2017 — Through the Eyes of NASA
http://eclipse2017.nasa.gov

Eclipses and Transits
http://www.nasa.gov/eclipse


Fly Your Exoplanet on the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite

Set to launch in June 2018, the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite is an explorer-class planet finder. In the first-ever spaceborne all-sky transit survey, TESS will identify planets ranging from Earth-sized to gas giants and will orbit a wide range of stellar types and orbital distances. As the TESS team prepares for launch, it invites the public to ponder what exoplanets might look like and share their ideas in the form of sketches and graphics.

This opportunity is open to all ages and skill levels. Submissions will be collected via email. To download the template for submitting your artwork, visit https://tess.gsfc.nasa.gov/fly_your_exoplanet.html.

The deadline for submissions is Nov. 20, 2017, or when capacity of the drive carrying the submissions to space is reached, whichever occurs first.

To learn more about the TESS mission, visit https://tess.gsfc.nasa.gov/.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to GSFC-TESS@mail.nasa.gov.


Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design, or STEAMD; or activities culturally relevant to or focused on populations underrepresented in STEM careers, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or nonreimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA announcement.


Bring the Story of “Hidden Figures” to the Classroom With the “Who Is Katherine Johnson?” Profiles and Modern Figures Toolkit

In the 1960s, the U.S. was on an ambitious journey to the moon, and Katherine Johnson and her fellow human computers helped get NASA there. Bring the excitement of their story to your classroom with new resources from NASA Education.

Learn more about Katherine Johnson with the “Who Is Katherine Johnson?” profiles written just for students. Versions written for K-4 and 5-8 students are available.

“Who Is Katherine Johnson?” — K-4 Students Version
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/k-4/stories/nasa-knows/who-is-katherine-johnson-k4

“Who Is Katherine Johnson?” — 5-8 Students Version
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/5-8/features/nasa-knows/who-is-katherine-johnson-5-8

Also available online, the Modern Figures Toolkit is a collection of resources and educational activities for students in grades K-12. Each educational activity and resource includes a brief description, as well as information about how the activities and lessons align to education standards. Resources highlighted include videos, historical references and STEM materials.

Bring Katherine Johnson’s inspiring story to your classroom by downloading the Modern Figures Toolkit at www.nasa.gov/modernfigures-education-toolkit.


NASA Unveils New Searchable Video, Audio and Imagery Library

NASA has launched a new resource to help the public search and download out-of-this-world images, videos and audio files. The NASA Image and Video Library website consolidates imagery spread across more than 60 collections into one searchable location.

The NASA Image and Video Library allows users to search, discover and download a treasure trove of more than 140,000 NASA images, videos and audio files from across the agency’s many missions. Users can browse the most recently uploaded files, as well as discover historic and the most popularly searched images, audio files and videos. Topic areas include aeronautics, astrophysics, Earth science, human spaceflight and more.

Users can embed content in their own sites and choose from multiple resolutions to download. The website also displays the metadata associated with images.

To learn more, visit https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-unveils-new-searchable-video-audio-and-imagery-library-for-the-public.

To browse or start your multimedia search, visit the NASA Image and Video Library at https://images.nasa.gov/#/.


Help NASA Search the Realm Beyond Neptune at Backyard Worlds: Planet 9

Is a large planet at the fringes of our solar system awaiting discovery, a world astronomers call Planet Nine? Using data from NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer mission, NASA scientists are looking for this planet and for new brown dwarfs in the backyard of the solar system. But they need your help! Finding these dim objects requires the human eye to comb through the images to distinguish moving celestial bodies from ghosts and other artifacts. Participants in this citizen science project will share the credit for their discoveries in any scientific publications that result from the project.

For more information and to learn how to participate, visit the “Backyard Worlds: Planet 9” website at http://backyardworlds.org.

To learn more about NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer and its mission to image the entire sky in the infrared, visit https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/WISE/main/index.html.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Marc Kuchner at marc.j.kuchner@nasa.gov.


Be a Citizen Scientist With the ‘Aurorasaurus’ Project

Aurorasaurus is the first and only citizen science project that tracks auroras around the world via online reports, mobile apps and social media.

Aurorasaurus is a citizen science project that gathers real-time data about aurora sightings and sends out notifications to users when the northern or southern lights are likely visible in their area. Registered users get location-based notifications and a real-time monitor of space weather activity. The project also allows users to help verify tweets and search for real sightings. Plus, the website features answers to science and aurora questions.

To learn more, visit http://www.aurorasaurus.org/.

Please direct questions about this project to aurorasaurus.info@gmail.com.

This project receives support from the National Science Foundation and NASA’s Science Mission Directorate.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Eduation: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express Message — March 16, 2017

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: March 16, 2017, at 8 p.m. EDT

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management — 2017 Minority Serving Institutions Partnership Program Internships
Audience: Full-time Undergraduate and Graduate Students at Accredited Minority-Serving Institutions
Application Deadline: March 20, 2017

2017 Columbia Crew Memorial Undergraduate Scholarships
Audience: Undergraduate Students at Texas Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: April 28, 2017

2017 Texas Space Grant Consortium STEM Educator Scholarships
Audience: Educators Enrolled in Programs for a Master’s Degree in a STEM Field at Member Institutions of the Texas Space Grant Consortium
Application Deadline: April 28, 2017

2017-2018 Texas Space Grant Consortium Graduate Fellowships
Audience: Graduate Students at Member Institutions of the Texas Space Grant Consortium
Application Deadline: April 28, 2017

2017 DREAM2Explore Workshop for Educators
Audience: In-service and Pre-service Science Educators of Grades 6-9
Workshop Dates: June 26-30, 2017

Space Center Houston Presents ‘Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission’ Exhibit
Audience: All Educators and Students
Exhibit Dates: Oct. 14, 2017 – March 18, 2018

Search for Gravitational Waves With ‘Gravity Spy’ Citizen Science Project
Audience: All Educators and Students
Project Timeframe: Ongoing

2017-2018 NASA Software Catalog Now Available
Audience: 9-12 and Higher Education Educators and Students


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Celebrate Women’s History Month With a Series of Webcast Events From NASA’s Digital Learning Network
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: March 16, 2017, 1 p.m. EST

Host a Real-Time Conversation With Astronauts Aboard the International Space Station
Audience: All Educators
Optional Informational Session: March 16, 2017, at 4 p.m. EST
Proposal Deadline: Apr. 15, 2017

Library of Congress 2017 Summer Institutes — Teaching With Primary Sources
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: March 17, 2017
Institute Dates: Multiple Dates in June and July 2017

Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘Making STEM Magic’ Program
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: March 18, 2017, at 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. EST

2016-2017 NASA College and University Aeronautics Design Challenges: Supersonic Business Jet and Low Noise Subsonic Transport
Audience: Only Students at U.S. Colleges and Universities
Required Notice of Intent Due: March 20, 2017
Proposal Deadline: June 1, 2017

Bring the Story of “Hidden Figures” to the Classroom With the “Who Is Katherine Johnson?” Profiles and Modern Figures Toolkit
Audience: K-12 Educators

National Science Foundation’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities — Undergraduate Program
Audience: Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Broadening Participation Research Centers — Preliminary Proposal Deadline: March 21, 2017

Education Webcast Series — STEM @ NASA Goddard: Women’s History Month
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: March 22, 2017, at 1 p.m. EST

‘RockOn! 2017’ University Rocket Science Workshop
Audience: Higher Education Faculty and Students
Early Bird Registration Deadline: March 23, 2017
Registration Deadline: May 1, 2017
Workshop Dates: June 17-22, 2017

Call for Papers: 2017 International Space Station Research and Development Conference
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Abstract Submission Deadline: March 24, 2017

NASA/Applied Physics Laboratory Summer Internship 2017
Audience: Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Application Deadline: March 26, 2017

Celebrate Women’s History Month: Download New NASA Women of Color Lithograph
Audience: All Educators and Students

Celebrate Solar Week — Spring 2017
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-9, Informal Educators
Event Dates: March 27-31, 2017

NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate — Early Career Faculty Opportunity
Audience: Early Career Faculty Members at Accredited U.S. Universities
Proposal Deadline: March 31, 2017

Exploration of the Moon and Asteroids by Secondary Students (ExMASS) High School Research Program
Audience: Educators of Grades 9-12
Application Deadline: March 31, 2017
Program Dates: September 2017 – April 2018

NASA and the American Historical Society Seek Applicants for Fellowships in Aerospace History
Audience: Recent Recipients of the Ph.D. in History or a Closely Related Field, and Students Pursuing Doctoral Degrees in Those Fields
Application Deadline: April 1, 2017

Earn STEM Digital Badges to Celebrate the Centennial of NASA’s Langley Research Center
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-9, Informal Educators
Deadline: April 30, 2017

Grant Competition — USAID Development Innovation Ventures
Audience: Higher Education Faculty and Students
Application Deadline: Proposals Accepted Year-round

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

NASA’s Centennial Challenges: Vascular Tissue Challenge
Audience: All Interested U.S. Citizens, Including Higher Education Educators and Students
Deadline: No Later Than Sept. 30, 2019


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Astrobiology and Looking for Life
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: March 16, 2017, at 8 p.m. EDT
In this webinar, we will discuss how NASA has turned the search for alien life from science fiction to a quickly growing research field. Topics in Earth and space science linked to biology will help us understand the most current theories for how life came to be here on Earth and where we could find it next. Classroom activities for numerous grades will put this exploration into the hands of the next generation of scientists. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/234109

Teachers Connect: NASA’s Langley Research Center Centennial Badge
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School, and Informal Educators of Grades 6-8
Event Date: March 21, 2017, at 4 p.m. EDT
The first half of the webinar will focus on clouds and their role in Earth’s energy budget and on implementation ideas using GLOBE for different classroom settings as part of the “Earth Right Now: LaRC 100th” digital badge. Participants will talk about student badge implementations, extension ideas and extra resources. The second half-hour will center on the engineering design process using the “Drag Race to Mars Engineering Design Challenge” as part of the “Journey to Mars: LaRC 100th” digital badge. This portion of the webinar will focus on forces and motion and on math calculations using paper airplanes and testing different materials as part of the “Aeronautics: LaRC 100th” digital badge.

This webinar meets requirements of teacher discussions within the NASA Langley 100th Educator Professional Development Collaborative digital badges. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/224590. To learn more about the Langley 100th digital badges, log in to https://nasatxstate-epdc.net/ and search for LaRC 100th.

Earth Right Now — Weather to Fly By
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: March 21, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Participants will learn about basic meteorological concepts including the general characteristics of the atmosphere and how weather conditions and weather phenomena occur. There will be hands-on, standards-aligned mathematics, science and engineering activities about density, mass, fluid dynamics and weather so participants can take new ideas back to their classrooms. Real-world connections with NASA and the airplanes that do weather research will be discussed as the webinar highlights a partnership between NASA Armstrong and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA, with the Sensing Hazards with Operational Unmanned Technology, or SHOUT, mission. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/229951

Earth Right Now: From Earth to the Moon
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-12
Event Date: March 23, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT
Earth is influenced by our moon. Humankind has always observed and asked questions about the moon. NASA has studied our moon for almost 60 years and has sent humans there. Explore that technological accomplishment and the Earth/moon relationship by integrating NASA missions, online resources and STEM classroom lessons. Experience some real “classroom lunacy.” Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/229609

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management — 2017 Minority Serving Institutions Partnership Program Internships

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management is accepting applications for Minority Serving Institutions Partnership Program Internships for 2017. MSIPP internships promote the education and development of the next generation workforce in critical science, engineering, technology and mathematics fields for full-time students currently enrolled at accredited minority-serving institutions.

Internships will run for approximately 10 weeks during the summer at one of the Department of Energy’s national laboratories. Interns will complete research projects aligned with ongoing DOE efforts. Students also will be involved in enrichment activities provided by the host laboratory. These activities may include laboratory and site tours, professional development seminars, workshops, lectures, and even social or off-site activities.

Participants will be compensated by either a stipend or salary, commensurate with cost of living at the location of the host laboratory.

To be eligible, applicants must be U.S. citizens currently enrolled full-time as an undergraduate or graduate student at an accredited minority-serving institution. Applicants must be working toward a STEM degree and have a minimum grade point average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.

Applications are due March 20, 2017.

Additional information about the program, including internship locations and access to the online application, may be found at http://www.orise.orau.gov/MSIPP/.

Please direct inquiries about this opportunity to Vivian Cato at vivian.cato@srnl.doe.gov.


2017 Columbia Crew Memorial Undergraduate Scholarships
The Texas Space Grant Consortium and the Aviation and Space Foundation of Texas, in partnership with NASA, are offering undergraduate scholarships of $1,500 in memory of the Space Shuttle Columbia astronauts. These seven men and women made the ultimate sacrifice to expand the exploration of space and our knowledge of the world that we live in.

These scholarships are intended to recognize high-quality students and encourage their consideration of graduate studies in science, technology, engineering and mathematics that would ultimately lead to careers in STEM-related fields. The scholarships stress excellence in academics, participation in STEM education and research projects, and the exhibition of leadership qualities.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens and registered for at least a half-time course load at a Texas Space Grant Consortium institution. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 28, 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/grants/scholars_announcement.html. Please email any questions about this opportunity to scholarships@tsgc.utexas.edu.


2017 Texas Space Grant Consortium STEM Educator Scholarships

The Texas Space Grant Consortium’s Educator STEM Scholarship Program provides $1,500 scholarships to eligible teachers enrolled in master’s programs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens who hold a bachelor’s degree and are enrolled in a master’s program at a Texas Space Grant Consortium institution. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 28, 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/edu_stem/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to scholarships@tsgc.utexas.edu.


2017-2018 Texas Space Grant Consortium Graduate Fellowships

Texas Space Grant Consortium Fellowships encourage graduate study in the fields of space science and engineering. Interdisciplinary and integrated work experience are emphasized.

Each $5,000 award supplements half-time graduate support (or fellowship) provided by a consortium institution. The fellowship award is good for one year. Each fellowship may be renewed for a maximum of three years, provided the recipient has spent no more than two of those years as a master’s candidate.

Applicants must be registered for full-time study in a graduate program at one or more of the Texas Space Grant Consortium institutions and must be promised financial support at that institution. Applicants must also be U.S. citizens. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 28, 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/grants/fellows_announcement.html. Please email any questions about this opportunity to fellowships@tsgc.utexas.edu.


2017 DREAM2Explore Workshop for Educators

The “Dynamic Response of the Environments at Asteroids, the Moon, and moons of Mars,” or DREAM2, team at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center is hosting a free workshop for educators of students in grades 6-9. Participants will learn how our understanding of Earth’s moon, asteroids and the moons of Mars is growing with new information from planetary missions and the work of the DREAM2 team.

Workshop participants will reinforce their understanding of lunar and planetary science concepts; gain tools to help address common student misconceptions about the moon; and interact with NASA scientists who study the dynamic environments surrounding moons, asteroids and other rocky objects. Participants will work with real scientific data, and they will learn how to bring the data and information to their students using hands-on activities aligned with Next Generation Science Standards for grades 6-9.

The workshop will take place June 26-30, 2017, at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Workshop participants will be certified to borrow meteorite samples from NASA and will receive Certificates of Participation and Letters of Completion that indicate 30 hours of instruction.

For more information and to register to attend, visit http://ssed.gsfc.nasa.gov/dream/DREAM/DREAM2Explore.html.

Questions about this workshop should be directed to Nikki Whelley at nicole.l.whelley@nasa.gov.


Space Center Houston Presents ‘Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission’ Exhibit

Space Center Houston is the first of four stops for a brand-new exhibit featuring the Apollo 11 command module. This exhibit will be the first time the Apollo 11 command module has left the Smithsonian since a 1971 national tour. Space Center Houston will be the only location where visitors can see the space capsules for both the first and last lunar landings. The center is the home of the Apollo 17 command module, the last mission to land on the moon.

The awe-inspiring “Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission” exhibit will be on display Oct. 14, 2017 – March 18, 2018. The unveiling of the new exhibit is part of Space Center Houston’s 25th anniversary celebration.

In a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, guests will see more than 20 one-of-a-kind Apollo 11 mission artifacts, some of which flew on the historic Apollo 11 mission. They include the hatch, the F-1 injector plate, a lunar sample return container, astronaut Buzz Aldrin’s extravehicular visor and gloves, astronaut Michael Collins’ Omega Speedmaster Chronograph, a star chart, a survival kit, and more.

For more information about the “Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission” exhibit, visit https://spacecenter.org/destination-moon/.

Please direct questions about this exhibit to schinfo@spacecenter.org.

The “Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission” exhibition, a partnership of the National Air and Space Museum and the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, commemorates the 50th anniversary in 2019 of the extraordinary achievement of man’s first step on the moon.


Search for Gravitational Waves With ‘Gravity Spy’ Citizen Science Project

In 1916, Einstein predicted the existence of ripples in spacetime known as gravitational waves. A century later, on Sept. 14, 2015, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory, or LIGO, made the first direct detection of this elusive phenomenon. This discovery is the first of many that will give researchers a whole new way to explore the universe. However, LIGO needs your help!

Being the most sensitive and most complicated gravitational experiment ever created, LIGO is susceptible to many instrumental and environmental noise sources called “glitches.” These glitches are difficult to model using computers, can mimic true astrophysical signals, and generally make LIGO less sensitive to gravitational waves.

Classifying glitches using computers has proven to be an exceedingly difficult task. That’s where the Gravity Spy Zooniverse Citizen Science Project comes in! Human intuition has proven time and time again to be a useful tool in pattern recognition problems such as this. One of the innovations of this project is that citizen scientists and computer algorithms will work in a symbiotic relationship, helping one another to optimally classify and characterize glitches. By selecting the right classification for a given glitch, you will help computers learn to do this classification themselves on much larger datasets. That capability will help scientists determine and eliminate the sources of noise.

For more information and to learn how to participate, visit the “Gravity Spy” website at https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/zooniverse/gravity-spy.

To learn more about the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory and its mission to detect gravitational waves, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2016/nsf-s-ligo-has-detected-gravitational-waves.

Download the “Direct Observation of Gravitational Waves” Educator Guide for activities and background information designed for grades 5-12. https://dcc.ligo.org/LIGO-P1600015/public.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Tyson Littenberg at tyson.b.littenberg@nasa.gov.

“Gravity Spy” is a collaboration between the following entities:
–Northwestern University, led by Scott Coughlin and Michael Zevin with PI Vicky Kalogera and co-PI Aggelos Katsaggelos. Northwestern’s team is composed of a LIGO group in the CIERA astrophysics research center and a machine learning group in the Image and Video Processing Laboratory.
–The Adler Planetarium Zooniverse Team, led by co-PI Laura Trouille.
–Syracuse University, led by co-PI’s Kevin Crowston and Carsten Østerlund.
–California State University at Fullerton, led by co-PI Josh Smith.
–The LIGO Scientific Collaboration, of which NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center and Goddard Space Flight Center are member institutions.

The project is funded by the National Science Foundation.


2017-2018 NASA Software Catalog Now Available

NASA has released its 2017-2018 software catalog, which offers an extensive portfolio of software products for a wide variety of technical applications, all free of charge to the public without any royalty or copyright fees.

Available in both hard copy and online, this third edition of the publication has contributions from all the agency’s centers on data processing/storage, business systems, operations, propulsion and aeronautics. It includes many of the tools NASA uses to explore space and broaden our understanding of the universe. A number of software packages are being presented for release for the first time. Each catalog entry is accompanied with a plain language description of what it does.

Some of the software available include codes for more advanced drones and quieter aircraft. While access restrictions apply to some codes, NASA has automated and updated its software release process over the last two years to ensure that it is as quick, easy and straightforward as possible.

The software catalog is a product of NASA’s Technology Transfer program, managed for the agency by NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate. The program ensures technologies developed for missions in exploration and discovery are broadly available to the public, maximizing the benefit to the nation.

For more information, visit https://software.nasa.gov/.


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Celebrate Women’s History Month With a Series of Webcast Events From NASA’s Digital Learning Network

NASA’s Digital Learning Network will be celebrating Women’s History Month all throughout the month of March by featuring some of the amazing women that work at NASA. Each 45-minute program will feature a different female lead at the agency and how they started their career with NASA.

March 16, 2017, at 1 p.m. EDT — Nettie Halcomb — Fluid Mechanics Engineer from NASA’s Ames Research Center
March 23, 2017, at 2 p.m. EDT — Erica Alston — Atmospheric Scientist from NASA’s Langley Research Center
March 28, 2017, at 2 p.m. EDT — Kaitlin Liles — Thermal Engineer from NASA’s Langley Research Center

The events will be livestreamed for all schools to watch. For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln/virtual-visit.

Four schools will be selected to interact with speakers during each event. To apply for this special opportunity, visit https://goo.gl/forms/FD6Toxowp1Ngkptp2. Schools may register for only one event. Registration ends Feb. 28, 2017, at 5 p.m. EST.

To learn about other Digital Learning Network events, visit http://www.nasa.gov/dln.


Host a Real-Time Conversation With Astronauts Aboard the International Space Station

ARISS-US is accepting proposals from U.S. schools, museums, science centers and community youth organizations (working individually or together) to host an Amateur Radio on the International Space Station, or ARISS, radio contact with an orbiting space station crew member between Jan. 1 and June 30, 2018. Proposals are due April 15, 2017.

ARISS is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed education plan. Students can learn about satellite communications, wireless technology, science research conducted on the space station, working conditions in space, radio science, and any related STEM subject. Students learn to use amateur radio to talk directly to an astronaut to ask their STEM-related questions. ARISS will help educational organizations locate amateur radio groups who can assist with equipment for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for students. Exact dates for the 10-minute radio contact are determined by crew scheduling and space station orbits.

Informational Sessions
To help organizations learn about ARISS radio contacts and the proposal process, ARISS offers one-hour online information sessions and welcomes all questions. Attending an online session is not required but strongly encouraged.

An informational session will be offered March 16, 2017, at 4 p.m. EDT.

Advance registration is necessary. Email ARISS (ariss@arrl.org) to sign up for an information session.

For proposal information and more details such as expectations, proposal guidelines and proposal forms, visit http://www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.

Please email questions about this opportunity to ariss@arrl.org.

ARISS-US is offered through a partnership between NASA, the American Radio Relay League, and the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation. ARISS was created and is managed by an international working group.


Library of Congress 2017 Summer Institutes — Teaching With Primary Sources

The Library of Congress is now accepting applications for its weeklong summer programs for K-12 educators. Held at the Library of Congress in the District of Columbia, this professional development opportunity provides educators with tools and resources to effectively integrate primary sources into K-12 classroom teaching. Each session focuses on pedagogy, with an emphasis on supporting student engagement, critical thinking and construction of knowledge.

The Library of Congress is offering five programs this summer: Three of the programs are open to teachers and librarians across all content areas; one focuses on primary sources in science, technology and engineering; and the fifth program focuses on World War I. During each five-day institute, participants work with Library of Congress education specialists and subject-matter experts to learn effective practices for using primary sources in the classroom, while exploring some of the millions of digitized historical artifacts and documents available on the library’s website.

General Institutes: Open to K-12 teachers and school librarians across the content areas
— June 19-23, 2017
— June 26-30, 2017
— July 10-14, 2017

Science, Technology and Engineering Institute: Recommended for K-12 educators who teach science, technology or engineering, or collaborate with those who do
— July 17-21, 2017

World War I Institute: Recommended for K-12 educators who teach some aspect of WWI as part of their curriculum, or collaborate with those who do
— July 31-Aug. 4, 2017

Tuition and materials are free. Participants are responsible for transportation to and from Washington, D.C., and any required overnight accommodations.

Applications are due March 17, 2017, and require a letter of recommendation.

For more information and to submit an application, visit http://www.loc.gov/teachers/professionaldevelopment/teacherinstitute/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to teachinglcsummer@loc.gov.


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘Making STEM Magic’ Program

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is presenting a series of free education events called “Making STEM Magic.” This new program introduces young visitors to engineering in a fun and creative way. Participants learn by doing. Each challenge involves designing, building and testing a prototype. Each month, a new theme will be introduced with a new problem to solve.

Events are scheduled each Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. ET at the National Air and Space Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia. The events are free and open to the public.

Suit Up!: Working in Space
Each Saturday in March 2017
Space: It is the final frontier, and the most dangerous. Do you want to be an astronaut? Learn how to suit up and protect yourself from the dangers of space.

In the Heat of the Moment: Space Capsules
Each Saturday in April 2017
Imagine an astronaut hurtling toward Earth in a space capsule at tremendous speeds. In this challenge, participants will design a heat shield to keep the astronaut cool from the heat of re-entry.

Blast Off!: Propulsion
Each Saturday in May 2017
It really is rocket science. Try your hand at designing a rocket and staying on target.

Red Rover: Mission to Mars
Each Saturday in June 2017
Did you know that rovers are robotic ambassadors? Learn more about NASA’s mobile labs and construct your own rolling rover.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s “Making STEM Magic” program, visit https://airandspace.si.edu/visit/events/stem-magic.

Please direct questions about this series of events to the Visitor Service line at 703-572-4118.


2016-2017 NASA College and University Aeronautics Design Challenges: Supersonic Business Jet and Low Noise Subsonic Transport

NASA’s Aeronautics Mission Directorate is seeking entries for the 2016-2017 NASA College and University Aeronautics Design Challenge. Students are invited to submit technical papers outlining their solutions for one of two aeronautics design challenges.

The Supersonic Business Jet Challenge seeks ideas for a commercial supersonic business jet that might fly in 2025 and that meets NASA’s goals for noise, emissions, speed, range, payload and fuel efficiency. The Low Noise Subsonic Transport Challenge seeks designs for a large commercial airliner that would enter service between 2025 and 2035 and would address NASA’s goals for reductions in noise, emissions and fuel use.

The contest is only open to teams of full-time students enrolled in higher education institutions of the United States or its territories. This particular design challenge is for colleges and universities only. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

Interested teams must submit a notice of intent no later than March 20, 2017. Final entries are due June 1, 2017.

For more information and a complete list of rules, visit https://aero.larc.nasa.gov/university-contest/.

Questions about the challenge should be directed to Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.


Bring the Story of “Hidden Figures” to the Classroom With the “Who Is Katherine Johnson?” Profiles and Modern Figures Toolkit

In the 1960s, the U.S. was on an ambitious journey to the moon, and Katherine Johnson and her fellow human computers helped get NASA there. Bring the excitement of their story to your classroom with new resources from NASA Education.

Learn more about Katherine Johnson with the “Who Is Katherine Johnson?” profiles written just for students. Versions written for K-4 and 5-8 students are available.

“Who Is Katherine Johnson?” — K-4 Students Version
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/k-4/stories/nasa-knows/who-is-katherine-johnson-k4

“Who Is Katherine Johnson?” — 5-8 Students Version
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/5-8/features/nasa-knows/who-is-katherine-johnson-5-8

Also available online, the Modern Figures Toolkit is a collection of resources and educational activities for students in grades K-12. Each educational activity and resource includes a brief description, as well as information about how the activities and lessons align to education standards. Resources highlighted include videos, historical references and STEM materials.

Bring Katherine Johnson’s inspiring story to your classroom by downloading the Modern Figures Toolkit at www.nasa.gov/modernfigures-education-toolkit.


National Science Foundation’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities — Undergraduate Program

The National Science Foundation is seeking proposals for the Historically Black Colleges and Universities — Undergraduate Program. HBCU-UP is committed to enhancing the quality of undergraduate STEM education and research at Historically Black Colleges and Universities as a means to broaden participation in the nation’s STEM workforce. HBCU-UP realizes this purpose by providing awards to develop, implement, and study innovative models and approaches for making dramatic improvements in the preparation and success of HBCU undergraduate students so that they may participate successfully in graduate programs and/or careers in STEM disciplines.

HBCU-UP provides support for a variety of opportunities. These include:

Broadening Participation Research Centers: These centers represent the collective intelligence of HBCU STEM higher education and serve as the national hubs for the rigorous study and broad dissemination of the critical pedagogies and culturally sensitive interventions that contribute to the success of HBCUs in educating African-American STEM undergraduates. Centers are expected to conduct research on STEM education and broadening participation in STEM; perform outreach to HBCUs to build capacity for conducting this type of research; and work to transfer and disseminate promising participation-broadening research to enhance STEM education and research outcomes for African-American undergraduates across the country. The preliminary proposal deadline for this opportunity is March 21, 2017. Full proposals are due Nov. 22, 2017.

For more information on the overall Historically Black Colleges and Universities — Undergraduate Program, visit http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5481.

Please direct questions about these opportunities to Claudia Rankins at crankins@nsf.gov and Andrea Johnson at andjohns@nsf.gov.


Education Webcast Series — STEM @ NASA Goddard: Women’s History Month

Join NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in March for “STEM @ NASA Goddard: Women’s History Month.” On Wednesdays at 1 p.m. ET (March 22 and 29), the Goddard Office of Education will celebrate Women’s History Month by highlighting women in STEM. Women from GSFC in Greenbelt, Maryland, and Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia will share how they practice science, technology, engineering and mathematics through their research, missions, careers, etc.

The 30-minute programs will be streamed live on UStream, and participants will be able to interact with the guest speakers by submitting questions through email and Twitter.

To view the programs on Ustream, visit http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-gsfc.

For more information or to express interest in participating, please contact Erin McKinley at erin.e.mckinley@nasa.gov.


‘RockOn! 2017’ University Rocket Science Workshop

University and community college faculty and students are invited to a weeklong workshop to learn how to build and launch a scientific experiment into space. NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia is hosting the “RockOn! 2017” workshop June 17-22, 2017, in partnership with the Colorado and Virginia Space Grant Consortia. Workshop participants must be U.S. citizens. The registration deadline for the workshop is May 1, 2017.

The hands-on workshop teaches participants to build experiments that fly on sounding rockets. During the week, participants will work in teams of three to construct and integrate a sounding rocket payload from a kit. On the fifth day of the workshop, the experiments will fly on a sounding rocket expected to reach an altitude of more than 70 miles.

Each experiment will provide valuable scientific data, analyzed as part of the student-led science and engineering research. The program encourages faculty and students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics to develop skills critical to NASA’s future engineering, scientific and technical missions.

Register before March 23, 2017, and save $100 on workshop registration.

For more information about “RockOn!” and to register online, visit http://spacegrant.colorado.edu/national-programs/rockon-2017-home.

Since 2008, more than 448 people have participated in the “RockOn!” workshops and successfully built and launched 146 payloads to space. Images and information from past years’ workshops can be found at the “RockOn!” website.

Questions about the workshop or the registration process should be directed to Chris Koehler by email at koehler@colorado.edu or by telephone at 303-492-4750.


Call for Papers: 2017 International Space Station Research and Development Conference

The sixth annual International Space Station Research and Development Conference will be held July 17-20, 2017, in Washington, D.C.

NASA, the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space, and the American Astronomical Society are seeking abstracts under the categories of Biology and Medicine; Human Health in Space; Commercialization and Nongovernment Utilization; Physical Sciences and Materials Development; Plant Science; Earth Science and Remote Sensing; Technology Development and Demonstration; Finances, and STEM Education (science, technology, engineering and mathematics). Topics should relate to science, exploration and technology activities (past, present, planned or under development) on the International Space Station.

Both the conference and abstract submittal are open to entrepreneurial, commercial, academic and government agency attendees, both from and outside the United States. Eligible attendees include professionals, young professionals, students and interested parties. The working language for the conference is English. The conference will include plenaries for topics of general interest and technical sessions for focused discussions.

Because of the large number of expected submissions, presenters are encouraged to submit abstracts early. The deadline is March 24, 2017.

For more information about the conference and how to submit an abstract for consideration, visit http://www.issconference.org/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to ISSTechChair@atdl-inc.com.


NASA/Applied Physics Laboratory Summer Internship 2017

The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, or APL, is offering summer projects for students interested in working on NASA missions or space-related research opportunities.

Students participating in the 2017 NASA/APL Internship Program will work at the APL facility in Laurel, Maryland. Students will receive a stipend for the 10-week program, and housing will be provided.

Eligible students include undergraduate rising sophomores through Ph.D. students as of fall 2017. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and have a minimum GPA of 3.0.

Applications are due March 26, 2017.

For more information about the internship and to apply online, visit http://jhuapl.edu/nasaintern/.

Questions about the NASA/APL Internships Program should be emailed to aplnasaintern-web@jhuapl.edu.


Celebrate Women’s History Month: Download New NASA Women of Color Lithograph

Through their accomplishments and dedication to their jobs, women at NASA embody the essence of Women’s History Month. They serve as role models to young women in their pursuit of careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

The new “Women of Color: Pioneers and Innovators” lithograph features administrators, astronauts, pilots and mathematicians who have been or are currently pioneers and innovators in the fields of aeronautics and astronautics. To download this lithograph, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/Women_of_Color_Lithograph.html.

Are you looking for more insight into the innovative work being done by women across NASA? Visit the NASA Women of STEM website to read career profiles, watch videos and more! Check it out at http://www.nasa.gov/education/womenstem.


Celebrate Solar Week — Spring 2017

Solar Week provides a weeklong series of web-based educational classroom activities and games with a focus on the sun-Earth connection. This spring’s Solar Week activities will take place March 27-31, 2017, and will highlight safe solar viewing and the total solar eclipse happening on Aug. 21, 2017.

Solar Week is ideal for young teens or groups wanting to know more about the solar system, the stars or astronomy in general. Students can learn about solar careers, sunspots, solar energy and solar storms through a series of activities, games and lessons. Many activities are suitable for fun in the computer lab as well. Participants can interact on the online bulletin board with leading scientists at the forefront of sun-Earth research.

To learn more and to register to participate, visit http://www.solarweek.org.

Questions about Solar Week may be emailed to solarweek@solarweek.org.


NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate — Early Career Faculty Opportunity

NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate seeks proposals from accredited U.S. universities on behalf of faculty members early in their careers to conduct space technology research of high priority to NASA. NASA is seeking proposals that plan to pursue innovative, early-stage space technology research in the topic areas specifically enumerated in the solicitation.

Only accredited U.S. universities are eligible to submit proposals on behalf of their outstanding new faculty members who intend to develop academic careers related to space technology. The proposed research must be led by a single, eligible principal investigator. The PI must be an untenured assistant professor on the tenure track at the sponsoring U.S. university at the time of award. The PI must be a U.S. citizen or have lawful status of permanent residency. The PI must be the primary researcher on the effort; co-investigators are not permitted. Collaborators (other than NASA civil servants/JPL) are permitted. See the solicitation for complete requirements regarding eligibility and for definitions and restrictions regarding collaborators.

Proposals are due on or before March 31, 2017.

For complete details and proposal procedures, visit http://go.nasa.gov/2l86ywA.

Questions concerning this opportunity may be directed to hq-ecf-call@mail.nasa.gov.


Exploration of the Moon and Asteroids by Secondary Students (ExMASS) High School Research Program

NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, and the Center for Lunar Science and Exploration at the Lunar and Planetary Institute are looking for 10 teams of motivated high school students and their teachers to participate in a national standards-based lunar/asteroid research program for the 2017-2018 academic year.

Supervised by their teacher and aided by a scientist advisor, participants undertake student-led open-inquiry research projects that engage them in the process of science and support the goals of the NASA Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute. At the end of the year, four teams compete for a chance to present their research at the Exploration Science Forum held at NASA’s Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, California, in July 2018.

Participation in the ExMASS program is free. Interested teachers must submit an application. Applications are due March 31, 2017.

For more information and to apply for the ExMASS program, visit http://www.lpi.usra.edu/exploration/education/hsResearch/.

Please direct questions about the ExMASS program to Andy Shaner at shaner@lpi.usra.edu.


NASA and the American Historical Society Seek Applicants for Fellowships in Aerospace History

The Fellowships in Aerospace History are offered annually by NASA to support significant scholarly research projects in aerospace history. These fellowships grant the opportunity to engage in significant and sustained advanced research in all aspects of the history of aerospace from the earliest human interest in flight to the present, including cultural and intellectual history, economic history, history of law and public policy, and the history of science, engineering, and management.

NASA provides funds to the American Historical Association, the History of Science Society, and the Society for the History of Technology to allow each association to award a fellowship. These include the Fellowship in Aerospace History, the Fellowship in the History of Space Technology and the Fellowship in the History of Space Science.

The fellowship term is for a period of at least six months, but not more than nine months, and should commence no later than Nov. 15, 2017. The fellow will be expected to devote the term entirely to the proposed research project. Each fellowship carries a stipend of $21,250, which includes travel expenses.

Applicants must possess a PhD in history or in a closely related field, or be enrolled as a student (having completed all coursework) in a doctoral degree-granting program.

Application materials are due April 1, 2017. Applications will be entered into consideration for all three fellowships.

For more information and complete application process details, visit https://apply.interfolio.com/40406.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to awards@historians.org.


Earn STEM Digital Badges to Celebrate the Centennial of NASA’s Langley Research Center

To celebrate NASA’s Langley Research Center’s Centennial, three STEM digital badges are now available for educators and students in grades 5-9. Discover the role of cloud types in the Earth’s Energy Budget; how drag is used to land the Mars2020 Rover on Mars; and the importance of composite materials for airplanes.

Educators may earn up to 15 hours of professional development. Student badges include up to six hours of content aligned to the educator badge.

The first 1,000 educators to complete all three badges by April 30, 2017, will receive a NASA insignia iron-on patch.

For more information and to begin earning badges, visit https://nasatxstate-epdc.net/. After logging in to the site, click on the Explore icon and type “NASA Langley” in the search area to find and select the NASA Langley Centennial Mission.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Marilé Colón Robles at marile.colonrobles@nasa.gov.


Grant Competition — USAID Development Innovation Ventures

The U.S. Agency for International Development seeks proposals for Development Innovation Ventures grants. Development Innovation Ventures supports breakthrough solutions to the world’s most intractable development challenges by finding and testing bold ideas that could change millions of lives at a fraction of the usual cost.

DIV welcomes applications from U.S. and non-U.S. organizations, individuals, and nonprofit and for-profit entities, provided their work is in a country where USAID operates.

Examples of innovations that USAID/DIV is likely to support include:
— Behavior-change approaches drawing on insights from psychology and behavioral economics.
— Solutions that advance equality between females and males and that empower women and girls to participate fully in and benefit from the development of their societies.
— New methods to reduce absenteeism among frontline health and education workers.
— Testing proof of concept for a solar lighting system distributed by local entrepreneurs at a price/service point that induces wide adoption.

Proposals are accepted year-round.

For more information about this opportunity, visit https://www.usaid.gov/div.

Please email questions about this opportunity to div@usaid.gov.


Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design, or STEAMD; or activities culturally relevant to or focused on populations underrepresented in STEM careers, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or nonreimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA announcement.


NASA’s Centennial Challenges: Vascular Tissue Challenge

NASA, in partnership with the nonprofit Methuselah Foundation’s New Organ Alliance, is seeking ways to advance the field of bioengineering through a new prize competition. The Vascular Tissue Challenge offers a $500,000 prize to be divided among the first three teams that successfully create thick, metabolically functional, human vascularized organ tissue in a controlled laboratory environment.

Competitors must produce vascularized tissue that is more than .39 inches (1 centimeter) in thickness and maintains more than 85 percent survival of the required cells throughout a 30-day trial period. To win an award, teams must demonstrate three successful trials with at least a 75 percent success rate. In addition to the laboratory trials, teams must submit a proposal that details how they would further advance some aspect of their research through a microgravity experiment that could be conducted in the U.S. National Laboratory on the International Space Station.

The first registered team(s) to meet the required guidelines and complete their trials by Sept. 30, 2019, will win the awards.

The Vascular Tissue Challenge prize purse is provided by NASA’s Centennial Challenges Program, part of NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate. Centennial Challenges, managed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, is NASA’s citizen-inventor prize program. It invites the nation to help advance the technologies that will enable us to go to Mars and beyond, as well as improve life on Earth. The New Organ Alliance is administering the competition on behalf of NASA. The alliance is a nonprofit organization focused on regenerative medicine research and development to benefit human disease research and tissue engineering.

For information about the Methuselah Foundation’s New Organ Alliance, official challenge documents, rules and schedule of events, visit https://neworgan.org/vtc-prize.php.

For more information about the Vascular Tissue Challenge, visit http://www.nasa.gov/vtchallenge.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Eduation: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express Message — Dec. 22, 2016

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


NEW THIS WEEK!


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event – Virtual Field Trip to Kennedy Space Center
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-12
Event Date: Jan. 12, 2017

Free Educator Workshop: Earth Science Workshop
Audience: Formal and Informal Educators of Grades K-8
Event Date: Jan. 14, 2017, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. PST

Free Educator Workshop — Solar System and Beyond: Modern Figures
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Event Dates: Jan. 18, 2017, 4:30-6 p.m. PST

Nancy Grace Roman Technology Fellowships for Early Career Researchers
Audience: Researchers Who Have Received a Ph.D. in the Last Eight Years
Notice of Intent Deadline: Jan. 20, 2017
Proposal Deadline: March 17, 2017

2017 NOAA Undergraduate Scholarships
Audience: Undergraduate Students
Application Deadline: Jan. 31, 2017

NASA History Program Office Internships — Summer 2017
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 1, 2017

2017 Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program
Audience: Undergraduate Students Majoring in Geology or a Related Science
Application Deadline: Feb. 10, 2017

FY2017 and FY2018 NASA Cooperative Agreement Notice for the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR)
Audience: Higher Education Institutions in Jurisdictions With a Currently Serving NASA EPSCoR Director
Notice of Intent Deadline: Feb. 13, 2017
Proposal Deadline: March 16, 2017

2017 NASA Marshall Faculty Fellowship Program
Audience: Higher Education Educators
Application Deadline: Feb. 15, 2017


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

Modern Figures Toolkit: Activities and Resources Related to Katherine Johnson and Human Computers
Audience: K-12 Educators

Summer Research Team Program for Minority Serving Institutions
Audience: Faculty at Minority-Serving Institutions
Application Deadline: Dec. 26, 2016, at 11:59 p.m. EST

2017 Space Exploration Educators Conference
Audience: K-12 Educators
Early Bird Registration Deadline: Dec. 30, 2016
Event Date: Feb. 9-11, 2017

NASA’s Langley Research Center Centennial Student Art Contest
Audience: K-12 Students
Entry Period: Nov. 1 – Dec. 31, 2016

2017 Mission X: Train Like an Astronaut “Walk to the Moon” Challenge
Audience: All Educators and Students, Home School Parents and After-school Groups
Registration Deadline: Dec. 31, 2016
Challenge Dates: Jan. 12 – April 28, 2017

Center for Astronomy Education Regional Teaching Exchanges and Workshops — Fall/Winter 2016-2017
Audience: Current and Future College Instructors of Astronomy
Next Event Date: Jan. 4, 2017

Free Program — Cubes in SpaceTM

Audience: Students Ages 11-18 and Their Teachers
Registration Deadline: Jan. 6, 2017

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

Research Grants: Partnerships for Enhanced Engagement in Research
Audience: Researchers at Academic Institutions in Developing Countries
Application Deadline: Jan. 13, 2017

Mars Survival Kit: Lessons and Activities to Guide Your Exploration of Mars!
Audience: K-12 Educators

National Science Foundation’s Mathematical Sciences Graduate Internship Program
Audience: Mathematical Sciences Doctoral Students
Application Deadline: Jan. 16, 2017

U.S. Department of Energy’s BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge
Audience: Students in Grades 9-12
Registration Deadline: Feb. 3, 2017
Infographic Submission Deadline: March 3, 2017

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students and Higher Education Institutions


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html


NEW THIS WEEK!


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event – Virtual Field Trip to Kennedy Space Center

Join the education specialists of NASA’s Digital Learning Network as they travel to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Jan. 12, 2017. The multipart series of Virtual Field Trips will feature different landmarks and projects taking place at Kennedy.

Explore Kennedy Space Center during the following 30-minute sessions:

10 a.m. EST — Join DLN education specialists Caryn Long from NASA’s Langley Research Center and Lisa Ilowsky from NASA’s Ames Research Center to learn more about the Vehicle Assembly Building and Mobile Launch Pad.

Noon EST — Join DLN education specialists Lindsey Jones from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center and Rachel Power from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center to learn more about Kennedy’s Swamp Works project.

2 p.m. EST — Join DLN education specialists Kristy Brumfield from NASA’s Stennis Space Center and David Alexander from NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center to learn more about the Orion and Crew Exploration Vehicle.

Up to three schools will be able to join DLN live and interactively during each of the three individual webcasts. To register for this opportunity, please complete the form found at https://goo.gl/forms/U4UvoCJXHSCpDZNv2. Each school may request to participate in only one session.

Schools that are not selected to be a part of the interactive audience will be able to view the webcast event live at https://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-dlinfo.

For more information about this and other DLN events, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please send them to dlinfochannel@gmail.com.


Educator Workshop: Earth Science Workshop

Explore the impact of increasing global temperature on glaciers and sea level using real satellite data from NASA. Then, discover ways to turn these resources into engineering, mathematics and science lessons for students. Finally, learn to use the engineering design process to develop water-filtration and recycling systems to minimize our adverse impact on the water cycle.

Join NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory on Jan. 14, 2017, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. PST for this workshop at the von Kármán Auditorium at NASA’s JPL in Pasadena, California.

For more information and to register to attend, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/events/2017/1/14/earth-science-workshop/.

Can’t make it to the workshop? Explore these lessons online at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/teach/activity/water-filtration-challenge/ and http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/teach/activity/the-science-of-earths-rising-seas/.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Paula Partida at Paula.S.Partida@jpl.nasa.gov.


Free Educator Workshop — Solar System and Beyond: Modern Figures

Join the Office of Education of NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center for an educator professional development workshop as we look back at the history of human computers like Katherine Johnson and look forward toward exploration of the solar system. Learn about OSIRIS-REx (Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, and Security – Regolith Explorer) on its search for asteroids using modern-day technology to calculate launch windows and orbits. Educators will engage in standards-aligned mathematics, science and engineering activities about launch windows, planetary orbits and robotics. Participants will receive hands-on activities for students that combine math, science, engineering and social studies.

The workshop will take place Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2017, 4:30-6 p.m. PST at NASA’s Armstrong Educator Resource Center at the AERO Institute in Palmdale, California.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/erc_workshop_01_18_17a.pdf

Please direct questions about this workshop to Sondra Geddes at sondra.l.geddes@nasa.gov.


Nancy Grace Roman Technology Fellowships for Early Career Researchers

The Nancy Grace Roman Technology Fellowship in astrophysics seeks to provide early-career researchers the opportunity to develop the skills necessary to lead astrophysics flight instrument development projects, including suborbital investigations, in preparation to become principal investigators of future astrophysics missions; to develop innovative technologies for space astrophysics that have the potential to enable major scientific breakthroughs; and to foster new talent by putting early-career instrument builders on a trajectory toward long-term positions. NASA is committed to supporting deserving early-career researchers by selecting one or more Roman Technology Fellows every year.

This fellowship consists of two components with two different submission procedures. (1) The first component is the application to be named a Roman Technology Fellow through a one-page application submitted along with a proposal submitted to D.3, the Astrophysics Research and Analysis, or APRA, program element. (2) The second component is the subsequent submission of a proposal for up to $300K in fellowship funds by a previously selected Roman Technology Fellow once that individual obtains a permanent or permanent track position.

A notice of intent to submit a proposal is required and is due Jan. 20, 2017. Proposals are due March 17, 2017.

For complete fellowship details and application procedures, visit http://go.nasa.gov/2hmrro0.

Questions concerning this opportunity may be directed to William Lightsey at Billy.Lightsey@nasa.gov.


2017 NOAA Undergraduate Scholarships

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is accepting applications for its 2017 Educational Partnership Program Undergraduate Scholarship and 2017 Ernest F. Hollings Scholarship Programs.

The Educational Partnership Program Undergraduate Scholarship Program provides scholarships for two years of undergraduate study to students majoring in STEM fields that directly support NOAA’s mission. Participants conduct research at a NOAA facility during two paid summer internships. A stipend and housing allowance is provided. Students attending an accredited Minority Serving Institution as defined by the U.S. Department of Education (Hispanic Serving Institutions, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tribal Colleges and Universities, Alaskan-Native Serving Institutions, and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions) are eligible to apply for the program. The institutions must be within the United States or U.S. Territories. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and must earn and maintain a minimum 3.2 grade point average on a 4.0 scale.

The Ernest F. Hollings Scholarship Program provides scholarships for two years of undergraduate study with a paid internship at a NOAA facility during the interim summer session. A stipend and housing allowance is provided. Applicants must be U.S. citizens enrolled full-time at an accredited college or university. Applicants must have and maintain a declared major in a discipline including, but not limited to, oceanic, environmental, biological and atmospheric sciences; mathematics; engineering; remote-sensing technology; physical and social sciences including geography, physics, hydrology and geomatics; or teacher education that supports NOAA’s programs and mission. Participants must earn and maintain a minimum 3.0 grade point average on a 4.0 scale.

Applications for both scholarship programs are due Jan. 31, 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.oesd.noaa.gov/scholarships/.

Please direct questions about these scholarship opportunities to StudentScholarshipPrograms@noaa.gov.


NASA History Program Office Internships — Summer 2017

The NASA History Program Office is seeking undergraduate and graduate students for summer 2017 internships. The History Program Office maintains archival materials to answer research questions from NASA personnel, journalists, scholars, students at all levels and others from around the world. The division also edits and publishes several books and monographs each year. It maintains a large number of websites on NASA history.

Students of all majors are welcome to apply. While detailed prior knowledge of the aeronautics and space fields is not necessary, a keen interest and some basic familiarity with these topics are needed. Strong research, writing and editing skills are essential. Experience with social media is a plus.

Intern projects are flexible. Typical projects include handling a variety of information requests, writing posts for the NASA history Twitter and Facebook pages, editing historical manuscripts, doing research and writing biographical sketches, and identifying and captioning photos.

Applications for summer 2017 internships are due Feb. 1, 2017. Applications for fall 2017 internship applications are due June 1, 2017 and applications for spring 2018 internships are due Oct. 1, 2017.

For more information, visit http://history.nasa.gov/interncall.htm.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please contact Bill Barry at bill.barry@nasa.gov.


2017 Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program

The Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program, or PGGURP, pairs qualified undergraduate students with NASA-funded investigators at research locations across the U.S. for eight weeks during the summer. Students spend the summer at the NASA scientists’ home institutions. Selected students receive a cost-of-living stipend and compensation for housing and travel.

Undergraduate students majoring in geology or related sciences are eligible to apply. Students graduating in 2017 who have not started graduate school yet are also eligible. Preference is given to U.S. citizens and permanent residents.

Applications are due Feb. 10, 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/~tgregg/pggurp_homepage.html.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please email Robyn Wagner, PGGURP administrator, at pggurp@buffalo.edu.


FY2017 and FY2018 NASA Cooperative Agreement Notice for the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR)

NASA’s Office of Education is seeking proposals for the NASA Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research, or EPSCoR, program. Each funded NASA EPSCoR proposal is expected to establish research activities that will contribute significantly to the strategic research and technology development priorities of one or more of NASA’s mission directorates. Funded proposals are expected to contribute to the overall research infrastructure; science and technology capabilities; higher education; and economic development of the jurisdiction receiving funding.

While proposals can be accepted only from institutions where a NASA EPSCoR Director is currently serving, all institutions of higher education within the jurisdiction shall be made aware of this NASA EPSCoR CAN and given the opportunity to compete.

NASA EPSCoR is moving to a two-year procurement cycle. As a result, jurisdictions responding to this CAN may submit up to two proposals. It is anticipated that three to five awards for FY 2017 and three to five awards for FY 2018 of up to $750,000 to be expended over a three-year period of performance may be made under this CAN. The exact number of awards depends on the available EPSCoR research budget.

A required notice of intent is due Feb. 13, 2017. Proposals are due March 16, 2017.

For more information and instructions for submitting a proposal, visit http://go.nasa.gov/2gaYION.

Please direct questions about this request to Jeppie Compton at Jeppie.R.Compton@nasa.gov.


2017 NASA Marshall Faculty Fellowship Program

Applications are being accepted for the 2017 NASA Marshall Faculty Fellowship Program. This program provides a summer residency at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The 10-week fellowship begins on Monday, June 5, 2017, and runs through Friday, Aug. 11, 2017.

To be eligible for the program, applicants must hold a full-time teaching or research appointment in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, at an accredited university or college in the United States. Applicants must be U.S. citizens. Women, underrepresented minorities and persons with disabilities are particularly encouraged to apply.

The program covers limited travel expenses for qualified and accepted faculty, as well as stipends for all accepted faculty. Please note that stipend payments or salaries from other federal funding sources, including research grants and contracts, may not be accepted during the 10-week tenure of a Marshall faculty fellowship appointment.

The deadline for applications is Feb. 15, 2017. For more information about this opportunity, visit https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/descriptions/MSFC-Faculty-Fellowship.html.

Inquiries about NASA’s Marshall Faculty Fellowship Program should be directed to Dr. Frank Six at Frank.Six@nasa.gov.


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


Modern Figures Toolkit: Activities and Resources Related to Katherine Johnson and Human Computers

In the 1960’s, the U.S. was on an ambitious journey to the moon, and Katherine Johnson and her fellow human computers helped get NASA there. Bring the excitement of their story to your classroom with the Modern Figures Toolkit.

The Modern Figures Toolkit is a collection of resources and educational activities for students in grades K-12. Each educational activity and resource includes a brief description, as well as information about how the activities and lessons align to education standards. Resources highlighted include videos, historical references and STEM materials.

Bring Katherine Johnson’s inspiring story to your classroom by downloading the Modern Figures Toolkit at www.nasa.gov/modernfigures-education-toolkit.


Summer Research Team Program for Minority Serving Institutions

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is accepting applications for the Summer Research Team Program for Minority Serving Institutions. This 10-week program offers the opportunity to enhance the scientific leadership at MSIs in research areas that support the mission and goals of the Department of Homeland Security. Faculty, along with undergraduate and graduate students, will conduct collaborative research that provides opportunities to help advance the DHS Areas of Research and strengthen the talent pool of scientists and engineers.

Faculty members currently teaching at an MSI are encouraged to apply. Selected faculty will be invited to submit a research project proposal in collaboration with a DHS Center researcher and put a team together composed of one or two qualified students to complete the summer research experience.

Participants will receive a weekly stipend plus travel expenses. Some participants may be eligible for a housing allowance. Faculty are encouraged to apply for up to $50,000 in follow-on funding at the end of their appointment.

To be eligible, applicants must be U.S. citizens. Applications are due Dec. 26, 2016, at 11:59 p.m. EST.

Additional information about the program, including eligibility requirements, program benefits, application requirements and access to the online application system may be found at http://www.orau.gov/dhseducation/faculty/index.html.

Please direct inquiries about this opportunity to DHSed@orau.org.


2017 Space Exploration Educators Conference

Make plans to attend the 23rd Annual Space Exploration Educators Conference to be held Feb. 9-11, 2017, at Space Center Houston. This conference is for all K-12 educators. Activities presented use space-related themes to teach across the curricula. The activities may be used for science, language arts, mathematics, history and more.

Attend sessions hosted by scientists and engineers working on exciting projects like the International Space Station and the exploration of Mars and other parts of our solar system. Hear from astronauts who will be “leading the charge” in exploration. Attend sessions presented by educators and receive ready-to-implement classroom ideas. Attendees can earn up to 24 hours of continuing professional education credit.

For discounted registration, sign up to attend before the Early Bird Registration deadline on Dec. 30, 2016!

For more information, visit http://spacecenter.org/teacher-programs/teachers-seec/.

Please email any questions about the conference to seec@spacecenter.org.


NASA’s Langley Research Center Centennial Student Art Contest

Calling all artists, grades K-12!

On July 17, 2017, NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, will turn 100 years old! To celebrate, Langley invites you to take part in its Centennial Art Contest. The theme for this year’s contest is “A Storied Legacy, A Soaring Future.”

The contest is open to all children in grades K-12 who are attending public, private, parochial and homeschools in the United States. Artwork entries may consist of drawings, paintings, mixed media and digital creations.

A grand prize winner will be chosen from all contest entries. A first place winner will be chosen from each grade level, as well as second place, third place and honorable mention. Each entry will receive a certificate of participation.

The art contest submission period began on Nov. 1, 2016, and concludes on Dec. 31, 2016, at midnight EST.

For more information, visit https://artcontest.larc.nasa.gov/.

Please direct questions about this contest to Kristina Cors at larc-art-contest@mail.nasa.gov.


2017 Mission X: Train Like an Astronaut “Walk to the Moon” Challenge

Mission X encourages children of all ages, as well as people with particular needs, to pursue healthy lifestyles based on the model of training like an astronaut. During six- to nine-week “challenges” each fall and spring, schools and student groups from around the world complete Mission X classroom-based science lessons and physical education activities.

In 2017, Mission X is challenging Fit Explorers around the world to work together to perform activities that will move Astro Charlie the 478 million steps it would take to walk from Earth to the moon! That’s 238,857 miles, or 384,403 kilometers! At an average walking speed, that would take one person about nine years to complete.

The challenge kicks off in January. For full challenge details and to do your part to help reach this out-of-this-world goal, visit http://trainlikeanastronaut.org/wttm. The deadline to register for this challenge is Dec. 31, 2016. You may apply for Team USA at http://trainlikeanastronaut.org/usa_application.

In 2016, Mission X was represented by 30 countries and more than 53,000 participants. The challenge was available in 17 languages.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Nubia Carvajal at nubia.a.carvajal@nasa.gov.


Center for Astronomy Education Regional Teaching Exchanges and Workshops — Fall/Winter 2016-2017

NASA’s Center for Astronomy Education, or CAE, announces a series of regional teaching exchanges and workshops for astronomy and space science educators.

Teaching exchanges foster a sense of community among geographically linked current and future college instructors of astronomy. Regional experts from the broader CAE community are ready to provide the opportunity for you to meet your neighbors, expand your instructional repertoire and share your own expertise.

Workshops provide participants with experiences needed to create effective and productive active-learning classroom environments. Workshop leaders model best practices in implementing many different classroom-tested instructional strategies. But more importantly, workshop participants will gain first-hand experience implementing these proven strategies.

Jan. 4, 2017 — Gaylord Texan Resort and Convention Center in Grapevine, Texas
CAE Tier I Teaching Excellence Workshop — New Methods for Teaching About Exoplanets

Jan. 5, 2017 — Gaylord Texan Resort and Convention Center in Grapevine, Texas
CAE Tier I Teaching Excellence Workshop — New Methods for Teaching in the Flipped Classroom

For more information and to register for the teaching exchanges, visit http://astronomy101.jpl.nasa.gov/workshops/index.cfm.

Inquiries about this series of events should be directed to Gina Brissenden at gbrissenden@as.arizona.edu.

CAE is funded through NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s Exoplanet Exploration Program.


Free Program — Cubes in SpaceTM

Cubes in Space™ provides students ages 11-18 an opportunity to design and compete to launch an experiment into space at no cost! Cubes in Space™ is offered by idoodledu, inc., in partnership with NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center’s Wallops Flight Facility, the Colorado Space Grant Consortium and NASA’s Langley Research Center.

This global education program based on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics) enables students to learn about space exploration using innovative problem-solving and inquiry-based learning methods. Participants have access to resources that help prepare them to design and develop an experiment to be integrated into a small cube.

This year, experiments will be launched into space via sounding rocket from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island, Virginia, in late June 2017 or from a high-altitude balloon launched from NASA’s Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility in Fort Sumner, New Mexico, in August 2017.

The deadline for program registration is Jan. 6, 2017. For more information, visit http://www.cubesinspace.com. Questions about this program may be directed to info@cubesinspace.com.

About idoodedu inc.

idoodledu inc., a charitable nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization, is a wholly owned subsidiary of idoodlelearning inc., and was created in 2015 as a legal vehicle to bring public/private partnerships and publicly funded programs to all learners and educators. idoodlelearning inc. is an education company based in Ottawa, Canada; London, England; and Virginia Beach, Virginia, USA.


Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites U.S. educational institutions to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets, and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

Nonprofit museums, libraries and planetariums (sponsored through their respective State Agency Surplus Property, or SASP, organization) are also eligible to make requests. Visit the link below for special instructions to request items. To find the contact information for the SASP representative for your area, visit http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/100851.

A nominal shipping fee must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.


Research Grants: Partnerships for Enhanced Engagement in Research

The Partnerships for Enhanced Engagement in Research, or PEER, program is a competitive awards program that invites scientists in developing countries to apply for funds to support research and capacity-building activities on topics of importance to the United States Agency for International Development and conducted in partnership with U.S. government-supported and selected private sector partners.

PEER applicants who submit pre-proposals to PEER must be based at an academic institution, nonprofit organization, or government-managed research laboratory, center or institute in a PEER-eligible country. Applicants also must hold a career-track position or equivalent at their respective institution or organization. Applicants should be working in the country from which they are applying and should be nationals (citizens or permanent residents) of a PEER-eligible country for the focus area to which they are applying.

The deadline for submission of pre-proposals is Jan. 13, 2017. Pre-proposals should be completed through the PEER online application site no later than 11:59 p.m. (U.S. Eastern Standard Time) on that date.

For more information, visit http://www.nationalacademies.org/peer.

The PEER program is supported by the United States Agency for International Development and implemented by the U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to peer@nas.edu.


Mars Survival Kit: Lessons and Activities to Guide Your Exploration of Mars!

NASA is embarking on a journey to Mars! Are your students ready to join in the adventure? Spark excitement in your classroom with the Mars Survival Kit.

The Mars Survival Kit is a collection of educational activities for students in grades K-12. Each educational activity includes a brief description, as well as information about how the activities and lessons align to the Next Generation Science Standards.

Start your classroom’s journey to Mars at http://go.nasa.gov/1NnZ0Rg.

To learn more about NASA’s Journey to Mars, visit https://www.nasa.gov/topics/journeytomars/index.html.


National Science Foundation’s Mathematical Sciences Graduate Internship Program

The National Science Foundation is accepting applications for its Mathematical Sciences Graduate Internship Program. MSGI provides an opportunity for mathematical sciences doctoral students to participate in internships at national laboratories, industry and other approved facilities. Participation in an internship will provide first-hand experience of the use of mathematics in a nonacademic setting. The internships are aimed at students who are interested in understanding the application of advanced mathematical and statistical techniques to “real-world” problems, regardless of whether the student plans to pursue an academic or nonacademic career.

MSGI is open to graduate students pursuing a doctoral degree in mathematics, statistics or applied mathematics who are enrolled as full-time graduate students at an accredited U.S. college or university during the 2016-2017 academic year. Applicants must have a cumulative GPA of 3.30 or higher on a 4.0 scale, including fall 2016 grades.

The application submission deadline is Jan. 16, 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.orise.orau.gov/nsf-msgi/default.html.

Questions about this internship opportunity should be directed to nsf-msgi@orise.orau.gov.


U.S. Department of Energy’s BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge

Registration is open for the U.S. Department of Energy’s BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. This competition challenges teams of high school students to research one of five specific cross-curricular bioenergy topics and design infographics to share what they have learned through social media.

Selected infographics will be promoted nationally on the Challenge website and via social media. One team of students will be selected to present their infographic at the Bioenergy Technologies Office’s annual conference in Washington, D.C.

Registration for student teams closes on Feb. 3, 2017, and teams have until March 3, 2017, to submit their infographics.

For more information, visit http://www.energy.gov/eere/bioenergy/infographic-challenge.

Check out the interactive BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Map to see submissions from teams across the country from prior years. Put your school on the BioenergizeME map by participating in this year’s Challenge.

Please direct questions about the Challenge to BioenergizeME@ee.doe.gov.


Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design, or STEAMD; or activities culturally relevant to or focused on populations underrepresented in STEM careers, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or nonreimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA announcement.


Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Are you an undergraduate or graduate student seeking opportunities in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)? The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science — in collaboration with the participating agencies in the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on STEM Education (CoSTEM) and the Science.gov Alliance — has launched a search portal for both students and universities to discover federally sponsored STEM education training and funding opportunities.

Student users can search the site for opportunities they can apply to directly, such as research internships and fellowships. Likewise, universities can search the site for federal funding opportunities to establish innovative training programs for undergraduates or graduate students.

Users can search the site through faceted searching capabilities for characteristics such as program type, STEM discipline, institution location, federal sponsor, and eligibility. Or they can search through the open text option.

For programs and opportunities for undergraduates, visit http://stemundergrads.science.gov/.

For graduate programs and opportunities, visit http://stemgradstudents.science.gov/.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at https://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the new ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Eduation: https://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — Sept. 15, 2016

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


New This Week!


Free NASA Educator Professional Development Webinars
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: Sept. 15, 2016, at 4 p.m. EDT

NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Seeks Educators and Students for Climate Change Research Initiative
Audience: 9-12 Educators and Graduate Students
Application Deadline: Sept. 19, 2016

Educator Workshop — Comets Close Up
Audience: Formal and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: Sept. 24, 2016, 8:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. PDT

Join STEM@NASA Goddard in Celebrating International Observe the Moon Night!
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Sept. 28, 2016, 1-1:30 p.m. EDT

REGISTRATION OPEN: Zero Robotics High School Tournament 2016
Audience: 9-12 Educators and Students
Registration Deadline: Sept. 28, 2016

Celebrate Solar Week — Fall 2016
Audience: Informal Educators and Students in Grades 5-9
Event Dates: Oct. 17-21, 2016

Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘STEM in 30’ Webcast Series
Audience: Grades 6-8 Educators and Students
Next Webcast Date: Oct. 26, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EDT


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Seeking High School Classes for Interactive Event About Game-Changing Technology
Audience: 9-12 Educators
Application Deadline: Sept. 16, 2016
Event Date: Oct. 19, 2016, at Noon EDT

Free Tours of Facilities at NASA’s Glenn Research Center
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: Sept. 17, 2016

Free Education Webinar Series From the GOES-R Education Proving Ground
Audience: 6-12 Educators
Next Event Date: Sept. 17, 2016, at 11:30 a.m. EDT

2016 NASA Kennedy Space Center Community Day
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Sept. 17, 2016, 2-6 p.m. EDT

GLOBE El Niño Field Campaign and Webinar Series
Audience: K-12 Educators
Next Webinar Date: Sept. 19, 2016, at 8 p.m. EDT

Host a Real-Time Conversation With Astronauts Aboard the International Space Station
Audience: All Educators
Next Optional Informational Session: Sept. 20, 2016, at 4 p.m. EDT
Proposal Deadline: Nov. 1, 2016

2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education
Next Lecture Date: Sept. 22 and Sept. 23, 2016, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)

Center for Astronomy Education Regional Teaching Exchanges and Workshops — Fall/Winter 2016-2017
Audience: Current and Future College Instructors of Astronomy
Next Event Date: Sept. 24, 2016

NASA Swarmathon: Seeking College Teams for Virtual Robotics Competition!

Audience: Higher Education Faculty and Students at Minority Serving Universities and Minority Serving Community Colleges
Application Deadline: Sept. 30, 2016

Solar System Ambassadors Program Accepting Applications
Audience: All Educators
Application Period: Sept. 1-30, 2016

2017 BIG Idea Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Students and Faculty
Notice of Intent Deadline: Sept. 30, 2016
Entry Deadline: Nov. 30, 2016

Celebrate World Space Week 2016
Audience: All Educators
Event Date: Oct. 4-10, 2016

NASA’s Centennial Challenges: Space Robotics Challenge
Audience: All Interested U.S. Citizens, Including Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Deadline: 5 p.m. EDT on Oct. 7, 2016

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

NASA’s Centennial Challenges: Vascular Tissue Challenge
Audience: All Interested U.S. Citizens, Including Higher Education Educators and Students
Deadline: No Later Than Sept. 30, 2019

Be a Citizen Earth Scientist With New ‘GLOBE Observer’ App
Audience: All Educators and Students

Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students and Higher Education Institutions


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at https://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Education: https://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Seeing Your Students at NASA: Engineering for Mars — Part 1
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 3-10
Event Date: Sept. 15, 2016, at 4 p.m. EDT
In Part 1 of this series, educators will review two classroom activities in which students work in engineering design teams to test various components of a Mars exploration vehicle. This ready-to-go facilitation guide, Gaining Traction, is aligned to the Next Generation Science Standards and includes a pre-assessment, handouts, rubrics and a post-assessment. In the first two activities of the project, students build batteries and test wheel friction while focusing on the subject areas of engineering, motion and interaction. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/198527

Seeing Your Students at NASA: STEM Careers Exploration Webquest
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: Sept. 19, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT
Consider using a webquest in your classroom to engage students in guided inquiry. Students will begin to identify STEM career opportunities that they are interested in while clicking on video links about scientists and engineers who work with environmental issues and problems. The webquest and resources may be used by students working independently or for the whole class to stimulate discussion and collaboration.
Link to the webquest:
https://pmm.pps.eosdis.nasa.gov/education/interactive/stem-careers-exploration
Register online to participate:
https://www.etouches.com/199703

Seeing Your Students at NASA: Rocks From Space and Other Worlds
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 3-8
Event Date: Sept. 20, 2016, at 5 p.m. EDT
Astromaterials scientists at NASA study rocks and “soil” samples from other planetary bodies. Learn how students can use GLOBE materials to study Earth rocks and soils; find out about the Lunar and Meteorite Certification program for educators; and take a tour of the various missions and research NASA has conducted and continues to conduct in our solar system and beyond. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/198916

Virtual Missions and Exoplanets (vMAX): Part 1 — Curriculum Overview
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: Sept. 21, 2016, at 4 p.m. EDT
Learn how to help students study exoplanetary systems through hands-on activities, scenario-based problem solving, and 3-D multiuser virtual world simulations. The vMAX Curriculum (Part 1) webinar gives an overview of exoplanetary system resources that build upon the use of NASA data. These resources are organized for a one-week experience for middle school students but are flexible enough for any formal or informal audience and time period. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/196414

Virtual Missions and Exoplanets (vMAX): Part 2 — Technical Overview
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: Sept. 22, 2016, at 4 p.m. EDT
Learn how to help students study exoplanetary systems through hands-on activities, scenario-based problem solving, and 3-D multiuser virtual world simulations. To prepare teachers to use the vMAX virtual world with students, the vMAX Technical (Part 2) webinar addresses technical requirements to download, install and navigate the virtual world as an avatar. It is suggested that educators participate in BOTH webinars for a complete understanding of how to implement these resources. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/196416

For a full schedule of upcoming webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Please direct questions about this series of webinars to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Seeks Educators and Students for Climate Change Research Initiative

The NASA GISS Climate Change Research Initiative is an opportunity for high school educators and graduate students to work directly with NASA scientists in a NASA research project associated with the science related to climate change.

High school STEM educators participating in this yearlong opportunity will become associate researchers at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and STEM education experts. They will integrate NASA education resources and content into their classrooms while improving STEM education within their communities.

For graduate students, this yearlong opportunity will not conflict with the student’s course work and class schedule during the fall and spring. The internship is considered to be a part-time position that supports the graduate student’s major area of study.

All applicants must be U.S. citizens who reside within a 50-mile radius of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies, located in New York City.

Applications are due Sept. 16, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.giss.nasa.gov/edu/ccri/.

Please direct inquiries about the NASA GISS Climate Change Research Initiative to Matthew Pearce at matthew.d.pearce@nasa.gov.


Educator Workshop — Comets Close Up

The Rosetta spacecraft is on a 10-year mission to study the comet “67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko” (C-G) and answer questions about comets. Join lead scientists for the Rosetta mission in an educational workshop that explores hands-on activities and resources for engaging students in the science of comets and small bodies.

In this workshop, Rosetta project scientist Bonnie Buratti and project manager Art Chmielewski will share some of the basic physics of comets and discuss how the Rosetta mission was able to land on one for the first time. Hear about the mission’s latest discoveries, see incredible up-close images of the comet, and get the inside scoop on a second landing on the comet scheduled for Sept. 30, 2016.

The target audience for the workshop is formal and informal educators of grades 6-12, but it is open to all educators.

The event will take place Sept. 24, 2016, from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. PDT at the von Kármán Auditorium at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

For more information, directions to the workshop location, and instructions for reserving a spot, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/events/2016/9/24/educator-workshop-comets-close-up.

To learn more about the Rosetta mission, visit http://rosetta.jpl.nasa.gov/.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Andrea Angrum at 818-354-6775.


Join STEM@NASA Goddard in Celebrating International Observe the Moon Night!

Are you ready to look at the moon in an entirely new way? Join NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center on Sept. 28, 2016, at 1 p.m. EDT for STEM@NASA Goddard: International Observe the Moon Night. During this 30-minute event, Andrea Jones, education specialist for Planetary Science Institute at NASA Goddard, will share how International Observe the Moon Night encourages appreciation and understanding of our moon and its connection to NASA planetary science and exploration.

The program will stream live on NASA Goddard’s Ustream channel, and participants will be able to submit questions by email and Twitter.

For more information, please contact Erin McKinley at erin.e.mckinley@nasa.gov.


REGISTRATION OPEN: Zero Robotics High School Tournament 2016

The Zero Robotics High School Tournament 2016 will take place this fall.
The tournament will offer U.S. high school students the opportunity to design experiments that will be tested in space. Zero Robotics challenges high school student teams to write their own algorithms to fly the Synchronized, Position, Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. The competition starts online where, guided by mentors, teams compete to solve an annual challenge. Students can create, edit, share, save, simulate and submit code from a web browser. After several phases of virtual competition, finalists will be selected to compete virtually in a live championship aboard the International Space Station.

Registration closes on Sept. 28, 2016.

For more information about the tournament and to register your team to participate, visit http://zerorobotics.mit.edu/.

The competition began with a live webcast kickoff from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology on Sept. 10, 2016. Visit the Zero Robotics website to watch an archived video of the kickoff event.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to zerorobotics@mit.edu.


Celebrate Solar Week — Fall 2016

Solar Week, October 17-21, provides a weeklong series of web-based activities with a focus on the sun-Earth connection. Young people ages 10-14 can learn about solar careers, sunspots, solar eclipses, solar energy and solar storms through a series of cool facts, activities and games.

Solar Week is ideal for young teens or groups wanting to know more about the solar system, the stars or astronomy in general. Many activities are suitable for fun in the computer lab as well. After doing the activities, participants can interact on the bulletin board with leading scientists at the forefront of sun-Earth research. Solar Week is great for learning about our nearest star, the sun.

To learn more and to register to participate, visit http://www.solarweek.org.

Questions about Solar Week may be emailed to solarweek@solarweek.org.


Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘STEM in 30’ Webcast Series

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is presenting a series of free education webcast events called “STEM in 30.” This program consists of live, fast-paced 30-minute webcasts designed to increase interest and engagement in science, technology, engineering and mathematics for students. To enhance the learning experience, students can get involved with the content through the interactive “Cover It Live” feature, which includes poll questions and classroom activities. The webcasts are available live on the National Air and Space Museum website and NASA TV, and they will be archived for on-demand viewing.

Seven Minutes of Terror: The Engineering Behind Landing on Other Planets
Oct. 26, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EDT
Rocket thrusters, giant airbags and a sky crane: These are just a few ways we have landed on other planets. Join the webcast to explore the engineering behind these different techniques and what is in store for future missions.

Scientist or Guinea Pig: Science on the Station
Nov. 16, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EST
Do you like being poked, prodded and analyzed? If you said yes, then you may have a future as an astronaut. Astronauts on the International Space Station don’t just conduct scientific experiments — they are part of an experiment themselves. Learning about the human factors of spaceflight is an important element to a future trip to Mars. Join the webcast to explore the effects of space on the humans who travel there.

The Wright Stuff: Flying the Wright Flyer
Dec. 14, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EST
The birth of aeronautical engineering began in the Wright brothers’ bike shop in Dayton, Ohio. The family tree of airplanes can be traced back to the Wright brothers’ 1903 Flyer. The principles of flight that got the Wrights into the air are the same today. Join the webcast to investigate the principles of flight and how the Wright Flyer made it into the air and then into the history books.

“STEM in 30” webcasts are online learning experiences but are filmed in front of a live audience. If you are interested in bringing your school group to a live filming of “STEM in 30,” please email STEMin30@si.edu for details.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s “STEM in 30” Webcast Series, including a full list of upcoming webcasts, visit https://airandspace.si.edu/connect/stem-30.

Questions about this series should be directed to STEMin30@si.edu.


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” mailing list. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites U.S. educational institutions to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets, and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

Nonprofit museums, libraries and planetariums (sponsored through their respective State Agency Surplus Property, or SASP, organization) are also eligible to make requests. Visit the link below for special instructions to request items. To find the contact information for the SASP representative for your area, visit http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/100851.

A nominal shipping fee must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Seeking High School Classes for Interactive Event About Game-Changing Technology

In 2013, life changed drastically for the families of 19 firefighters trapped in an Arizona wildfire. The fire shelters the firefighters were carrying were unable to protect them. That tragedy inspired scientists and engineers at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Virginia to look at how technology developed for inflatable heat shields for spacecraft could be used to prevent this kind of tragedy from happening to others.

Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network for a special web conference on Oct. 19, 2016 at Noon EDT. During this event, students can learn personally from the scientists, engineers and representatives of the National Forestry Service about how they will use this technology to save lives. The DLN is currently accepting requests for high school classes to participate live during the webcast.

To be considered for this opportunity, please send an email to dlinfochannel@gmail.com. Use “CHIEFS Webcast” in the message’s Subject line and include the following information in the email message:

Point of Contact (POC) Name
School Name
POC Email
POC Phone Number
Grade Level of Students Who Will Participate
Approximate Number of Students Who Will Participate

To be considered, requests to participate must be received by Sept. 16, 2016.

Please direct questions about this event to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com.

For more information about other DLN events, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln.


Free Tours of Facilities at NASA’s Glenn Research Center

NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, is offering tours that take visitors behind the scenes and inside certain research facilities. Glenn scientists and engineers serve as guides. Tours and open house events will be held each month through October 2016. Tours are free for groups and individuals, but reservations are required to guarantee admission. Visitor parking is also free.

On the days of the tours, a bus departs from Glenn’s main gate every hour, beginning at 10 a.m. The last tour departs at 1 p.m. Each tour lasts about 45 minutes, and a stop at Glenn’s Gift Shop follows the tour.

Glenn’s 2016 Tour Schedule

Sept. 17, 2016 — Historic District Tour: Join us on a free tour of Glenn’s newly established historic district. The tour will feature the Zero Gravity Research Facility, a National Historic Landmark that was built in the 1960s and is still used for research today.

Oct. 1, 2016 — Prepare for Impact: Come explore Glenn’s Ballistic Impact Facility. See the laboratory that helped to identify the cause of the space shuttle Columbia accident and to return NASA’s shuttle fleet to flight.

Tours are open to U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents. To guarantee admission, reservations are required. For more information on tours and how to make reservations, visit https://www.nasa.gov/centers/glenn/events/tours.html.

Please direct questions about the tours to Sheila Reese at sheila.d.reese@nasa.gov.


Free Education Webinar Series From the GOES-R Education Proving Ground

The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites-R series is the next generation of geostationary Earth-observing systems. The GOES-R series satellites will provide continuous imagery and atmospheric measurements of Earth’s Western Hemisphere. The satellites will collect lightning data and monitor space weather to provide critical atmospheric, hydrologic, oceanic, climatic, solar and space data. The first satellite in the GOES-R series is scheduled to launch in October 2016.

To help educators prepare for the new satellite imagery and data that will be available during the GOES-R era, the GOES-R Education Proving Ground will host a series of education webcasts leading up to launch.

The webinars will take place on the following Saturday mornings at 11:30 a.m. Eastern Time.

Sept. 17, 2016: Countdown to Launch!

For more information, including log-in instructions for the webinars, visit http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/education/goesr/.

Please direct questions about this series of webinars to Margaret Mooney at Margaret.Mooney@ssec.wisc.edu.


2016 NASA Kennedy Space Center Community Day

NASA is hosting its annual NASA Kennedy Space Center Community Day at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex on Sept. 17, 2016, with free admission from 2-6 p.m. EDT.

The event, targeted for K-12 students and their families, will focus on science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, with the theme “Express to Mars.” Educational activities and demonstrations will highlight the future of America’s space program. Community Day will give visitors the opportunity to talk with real-life astronauts and engage in awesome experiments, cool demonstrations, and fun hands-on activities.

For more information, visit https://twitter.com/NASA_KETI and https://www.facebook.com/nasaketi.

Please direct questions about the event to KSC-KETI-program@mail.nasa.gov.


GLOBE El Niño Field Campaign and Webinar Series

El Niño and La Niña are important phenomena that can impact the climate by causing global flooding and droughts as well as changes in seasonal weather. These interactions around the world are called teleconnections. Because of the importance of this issue, a GLOBE ENSO (El Niño Southern Oscillation) Campaign has been formulated to engage students in determining where and how much El Niño affects local places and to put students in contact with their local environment.

To learn more about the campaign and how to participate, visit http://www.globe.gov/web/el-nino/el-nino-campaign.

To help educators prepare for the El Niño Campaign, GLOBE is hosting a series of free education webinars to discuss the mechanics of the campaign, give updates on data collection, and give participants the opportunity to learn science content from experts.

The final hourlong webinar in the series will take place on the following date at 8 p.m. EDT.

Sept. 19, 2016: El Niño Student Campaign Refresher and Update

For more information, including log-in instructions for the webinars and recordings of previous webinars in the series, visit http://www.globe.gov/web/el-nino/el-nino-campaign/webinars.

Please direct questions about this opportunity and series of webinars to http://www.globe.gov/support/contact.


Host a Real-Time Conversation With Astronauts Aboard the International Space Station

ARISS-US is now accepting proposals from U.S. schools, museums, science centers and community youth organizations (working individually or together) to host an Amateur Radio on the International Space Station, or ARISS, radio contact with an orbiting space station crew member between July 1 – Dec. 31, 2017. Proposals are due Nov. 1, 2016.

ARISS is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed education plan. Students can learn about satellite communications, wireless technology, science research conducted on the space station, what it is like to work in space, radio science, and any related STEM subject. Students learn to use amateur radio to talk directly to an astronaut and ask their STEM-related questions. ARISS will help educational organizations locate amateur radio groups who can assist with equipment for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for students. Exact dates for the 10-minute radio contact are determined by crew scheduling and space station orbits.

Informational Sessions
To help organizations learn about ARISS radio contacts and the proposal process, ARISS offers one-hour online information sessions; all questions are welcomed. Attending an online session is not required but strongly encouraged.

Informational sessions will be offered Sept. 20, 2016, at 4 p.m. EDT and Sept. 28, 2016, at 7 p.m. EDT.

Advance registration is necessary. Email ARISS (ariss@arrl.org) to sign up for an information session.

For proposal information and more details such as expectations, proposal guidelines and proposal form, visit http://www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.

ARISS-US is offered through a partnership between NASA; the American Radio Relay League, or ARRL; and the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation, or AMSAT. ARISS was created and is managed by an international working group.

Please email questions about this opportunity to ariss@arrl.org.


2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online

The Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, named after the founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and presented by JPL’s Office of Communication and Education, shares the excitement of the space program’s missions, instruments and other technologies.

Lectures take place twice per month, on consecutive Thursdays and Fridays. The Thursday lectures take place in JPL’s Theodore von Kármán Auditorium, and Friday lectures take place at Pasadena City College’s Vosloh Forum. Both start at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT). Admission and parking are free for all lectures. No reservations are required, but seating is limited. The Thursday evening lectures are streamed live for viewing online. Archives of past lectures are also available online.

Next Lecture in the Series:

Revealing Saturn: Cassini Science Highlights and the Grand Finale
Event Date:
Sept. 22 and Sept. 23, 2016, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2016&month=9
The Cassini mission’s findings have revolutionized our understanding of Saturn. With its mission winding down, what new puzzles will Cassini solve before it plunges into Saturn’s atmosphere? Cassini Project Scientist Dr. Linda Spilker will present highlights of Cassini’s ambitious inquiry at Saturn and an overview of science observations in the final orbits. Dr. Earl Maize, Cassini program manager, will discuss Cassini’s exciting challenges and the final year of the mission, ultimately flying through a region where no spacecraft has ever flown before.

For more information about the Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, including a complete list of upcoming lectures, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.php.

Questions about this series should be directed to http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php.


Center for Astronomy Education Regional Teaching Exchanges and Workshops — Fall/Winter 2016-2017

NASA’s Center for Astronomy Education, or CAE, announces a series of regional teaching exchanges and workshops for astronomy and space science educators.

Teaching exchanges foster a sense of community among geographically linked current and future college instructors of astronomy. Regional experts from the broader CAE community are ready to provide the opportunity for you to meet your neighbors, expand your instructional repertoire and share your own expertise.

Workshops provide participants with experiences needed to create effective and productive active-learning classroom environments. Workshop leaders model best practices in implementing many different classroom-tested instructional strategies. But more importantly, workshop participants will gain first-hand experience implementing these proven strategies.

Sept. 24, 2016 — Seattle University in Seattle, Washington
CAE Northwest Regional Teaching Exchange

Sept. 24, 2016 — Guilford Technical Community College in Jamestown, North Carolina
CAE Southeast Regional Teaching Exchange

Jan. 4, 2017 — Gaylord Texan Resort and Convention Center in Grapevine, Texas
CAE Tier I Teaching Excellence Workshop — New Methods for Teaching About Exoplanets

Jan. 5, 2017 — Gaylord Texan Resort and Convention Center in Grapevine, Texas
CAE Tier I Teaching Excellence Workshop — New Methods for Teaching in the Flipped Classroom

For more information and to register for the teaching exchanges, visit http://astronomy101.jpl.nasa.gov/workshops/index.cfm.

Inquiries about this series of events should be directed to Gina Brissenden at gbrissenden@as.arizona.edu.

CAE is funded through NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s Exoplanet Exploration Program.


NASA Swarmathon: Seeking College Teams for Virtual Robotics Competition!

The NASA Swarmathon is now accepting applications for the 2017 NASA Swarmathon Virtual Competition. Selected teams will receive a $500 stipend for their faculty member; training via live webinars, videos and guides; and access to technical forums to post questions and receive answers. The top scoring team will receive a $3,000 prize.

The Swarmathon Virtual Competition will challenge students to develop search algorithms for robotic swarms, and these algorithms will be tested by competition organizers in a virtual environment. Winners will be announced at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in April 2017.

Swarmathon participation will (1) improve students’ skills in robotics and computer science and (2) further advance technologies related to future NASA space exploration missions. Faculty members at Minority Serving Universities and Minority Serving Community Colleges are eligible to apply. The deadline for applications is Sept. 30, 2016.

For more information, visit http://nasaswarmathon.com/.

Please direct questions about the NASA Swarmathon Virtual Competition to Info@NASASwarmathon.com.


Solar System Ambassadors Program Accepting Applications

The NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory Solar System Ambassadors Program, a nationwide network of space enthusiast volunteers, will be accepting applications from Sept. 1 through Sept. 30, 2016.

Highly motivated individuals will be given the opportunity to represent NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory as volunteer SSAs to the public for a one-year, renewable term beginning Jan. 1, 2017.

While applications are being sought nationwide, interested parties from the following areas are especially encouraged to apply: Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Mississippi, Nebraska, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Vermont, West Virginia, Wyoming, the District of Columbia and U.S. territories. SSA hopes to add 100 new volunteers to the program in 2017.

To learn more about the SSA Program and to apply online, visit https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/ssa/home.cfm. The Announcement of Opportunity and application form will be available on Sept. 1.

If you have questions about this opportunity, contact Kay Ferrari, SSA coordinator, by email at ambassad@jpl.nasa.gov.


2017 BIG Idea Challenge

NASA’s Game Changing Development Program and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2017 Breakthrough, Innovative, and Game-changing Idea Challenge. The BIG Idea Challenge invites teams and their faculty advisors to work together to design and analyze potential modular concepts and systems that provide the ability to construct large solar electric propulsion, or SEP, tugs in space that can transfer payloads for low Earth orbit to a lunar distant retrograde orbit. Concepts can employ new approaches for packaging modules in one or more launch vehicles that minimize launch loads; modular (distributed) solar arrays and ion engines; and robust robotic assembly (joining) of the modules that form the SEP tug.

Interested teams of three to five undergraduate and/or graduate students will submit proposals (eight to10 pages) describing their BIG Idea. Based on a review of the proposals, four teams will be selected to submit full technical papers and present their concepts to a panel of NASA judges at the 2017 BIG Idea Forum at NASA’s Langley Research Center on Feb. 15 and 16, 2017, in Hampton, Virginia.

The final four qualifying teams will receive a $6,000 stipend to facilitate participation in the BIG Idea Forum. The winning team will receive offers to participate in paid internships with the Game Changing Development team at Langley Research Center where they can work toward further developing their concept under the mentorship of NASA experts.

Interested teams are encouraged to submit a notice of intent by Sept 30, 2016, and teams must submit proposals by Nov. 30, 2016.

For full competition details, including design constraints and submission guidelines, please visit http://BigIdea.nianet.org.

If you have any questions about the competition, please contact BigIdea@nianet.org.


Celebrate World Space Week 2016

Join educators and space enthusiasts around the world to celebrate the United Nations-declared World Space Week, Oct. 4-10, 2016. This international event commemorates the beginning of the Space Age with the launch of Sputnik 1 on Oct. 4, 1957.

World Space Week is the largest public space event in the world, with celebrations in more than 70 nations. During World Space Week, teachers are encouraged to use space-themed activities to excite students about science and technology.

Participating is easy. Visit the World Space Week website to find educational resources to use in the classroom. Share your own lessons and events to get maximum recognition for your school. After your events, visit the website to share details and lessons learned.

To learn more about World Space Week, visit http://www.worldspaceweek.org.


NASA’s Centennial Challenges: Space Robotics Challenge

NASA, in partnership with Space Center Houston and NineSigma, has opened registration for a new competition — the Space Robotics Challenge. This event seeks to develop the capabilities of humanoid robots to help astronauts on the journey to Mars.

The Space Robotics Challenge is a $1 million prize competition designed to push the boundaries of robotic dexterity. Teams must program a virtual robot, modeled after NASA’s Robonaut 5, or R5 robot, to complete a series of tasks in a simulation that includes periods of latency to represent communications delay from Earth to Mars.

The competition will be held in a virtual environment. Each team’s R5 will be challenged with resolving the aftermath of a dust storm that has damaged a Martian habitat. This involves three objectives: aligning a communications dish, repairing a solar array and fixing a habitat leak.

Registration for the Space Robotics Challenge closes at 5 p.m. EDT on Oct. 7, 2016. A qualifying round will run from mid-September to mid-November. Finalists of that round will be announced in December and will engage in open practice from January to early June 2017. The final virtual competition will be held in June 2017, and winners will be announced at the end of June at Space Center Houston.

For more information about the Space Robotics Challenge, visit https://www.nasa.gov/spacebot.

Please direct questions about this competition to info@spaceroboticschallenge.com.


Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design, or STEAMD; or activities culturally relevant to or focused on populations underrepresented in STEM careers, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or nonreimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA announcement.


NASA’s Centennial Challenges: Vascular Tissue Challenge

NASA, in partnership with the nonprofit Methuselah Foundation’s New Organ Alliance, is seeking ways to advance the field of bioengineering through a new prize competition. The Vascular Tissue Challenge offers a $500,000 prize to be divided among the first three teams that successfully create thick, metabolically functional, human vascularized organ tissue in a controlled laboratory environment.

Competitors must produce vascularized tissue that is more than .39 inches (1 centimeter) in thickness and maintains more than 85 percent survival of the required cells throughout a 30-day trial period. To win an award, teams must demonstrate three successful trials with at least a 75 percent success rate. In addition to the laboratory trials, teams must submit a proposal that details how they would further advance some aspect of their research through a microgravity experiment that could be conducted in the U.S. National Laboratory on the International Space Station.

The first registered team(s) to meet the required guidelines and complete their trials by Sept. 30, 2019, will win the awards.

The Vascular Tissue Challenge prize purse is provided by NASA’s Centennial Challenges Program, part of NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate. Centennial Challenges, managed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, is NASA’s citizen-inventor prize program. It invites the nation to help advance the technologies that will enable us to go to Mars and beyond, as well as improve life on Earth. The New Organ Alliance is administering the competition on behalf of NASA. The alliance is a nonprofit organization focused on regenerative medicine research and development to benefit human disease research and tissue engineering.

For information about the Methuselah Foundation’s New Organ Alliance, official challenge documents, rules and schedule of events, visit https://neworgan.org/vtc-prize.php.

For more information about the Vascular Tissue Challenge, visit https://www.nasa.gov/vtchallenge.


Be a Citizen Earth Scientist With New ‘GLOBE Observer’ App

Want to be a citizen Earth scientist? To contribute to NASA’s studies of our home planet, all you need is a smartphone, access to the outdoors, and the new “GLOBE Observer” app.

Now available for Apple and Android phones, the app is an initiative of the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment program. For over two decades, GLOBE has enabled schools and students in over 110 countries to investigate their local environment and put their observations in a global context.

To learn more, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2016/nasa-launches-new-citizen-science-opportunity and http://observer.globe.gov.


Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Are you an undergraduate or graduate student seeking opportunities in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)? The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science — in collaboration with the participating agencies in the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on STEM Education (CoSTEM) and the Science.gov Alliance — has launched a search portal for both students and universities to discover federally sponsored STEM education training and funding opportunities.

Student users can search the site for opportunities they can apply to directly, such as research internships and fellowships. Likewise, universities can search the site for federal funding opportunities to establish innovative training programs for undergraduates or graduate students.

Users can search the site through faceted searching capabilities for characteristics such as program type, STEM discipline, institution location, federal sponsor, and eligibility. Or they can search through the open text option.

For programs and opportunities for undergraduates, visit http://stemundergrads.science.gov/.

For graduate programs and opportunities, visit http://stemgradstudents.science.gov/.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at https://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” message for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — April 21, 2016

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


New This Week!


Free NASA Educator Professional Development Webinars
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: April 21, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT

Free Webinar — Learn How to Navigate the Federal Application Process and Tips on Writing Your Federal Résumé
Audience: Graduate STEM Students
Event Date: April 27, 2016, 2-4 p.m. EDT

2016 NASA Johnson Space Center Educator Professional Development Institutes
Audience: Grades 6-8 Educators
Application Deadline: May 2, 2016
Institute Dates: Multiple Dates in July 2016

Free Educator Workshop — Space Technology: Green Propellant Infusion Mission
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Event Dates: May 18, 2016, 4:30-6 p.m. PDT

Smallsat Technology Partnerships Solicitation
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Proposal Deadline: May 25, 2016

Future Engineers ‘Think Outside the Box’ Challenge
Audience: K-12 Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: Aug. 1, 2016

Join STEM on Station for #mISSionimaginaTIon — Design Challenge #4
Audience: Grades 6-12 — Educators and Students


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education
Next Lecture Date: April 21, 2016, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)

White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities — 2016 All-Star Students Program
Audience: Higher Education Students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Application Deadline: April 22, 2016

2016 International Space Apps Challenge
Audience: Problem Solvers of All Ages
Event Dates: April 22-24, 2016

Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy
Audience: Designed for Families With Children Ages 10 to 14, but Open to All
Next Event Date: April 23, 2016, 10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. EDT

Free Education Webinar Series From the GOES-R Education Proving Ground
Audience: 6-12 Educators
Next Event Date: April 23, 2016, at 11:30 a.m. EDT

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — CASIS Academy Live: Microbes in Space
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: April 26, 2016, 11 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. EDT

2017 eXploration Habitat (X-Hab) Academic Innovation Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Faculty and Students
Proposal Deadline: April 29, 2016

2016 Texas Space Grant Consortium Columbia Crew Memorial Undergraduate Scholarships
Audience: Undergraduate Students at Texas Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: April 29, 2016

2016 Texas Space Grant Consortium STEM Educator Scholarships
Audience: Educators Enrolled in STEM-field Programs for a Master’s Degree at Texas Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: April 29, 2016

2016-2017 Texas Space Grant Consortium Graduate Fellowships
Audience: Graduate Students at Texas Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: April 29, 2016

Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 11 to the International Space Station
Audience: School Districts Serving Grades 5-12, Informal Education Institutions, Colleges and Universities
Inquiry Deadline: April 29, 2016

Future Engineers ‘Star Trek’ Replicator Challenge
Audience: Students in the United States Ages 5-19
Entry Deadline: May 1, 2016

Institute of Museum and Library Services Grants: STEM Expert Facilitation of Family Learning in Libraries and Museums
Audience: Libraries, Museums and Higher Education Institutions
Application Deadline: May 1, 2016

Exploration of the Moon and Asteroids by Secondary Students (ExMASS) High School Research Program
Audience: 9-12 Educators
Application Deadline: May 2, 2016
Program Dates: September 2016 – April 2017

GLOBE El Niño Field Campaign and Webinar Series
Audience: K-12 Educators
Next Webinar Date: May 3, 2016, at 8 p.m. EDT

NASA/NSTA Webinar — Global Precipitation Measurement Mission: Weather
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Date: May 5, 2016, 6:30 p.m. EDT

Federal Aviation Administration Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues
Audience: Graduate Students
Application Deadline: May 15, 2016

2016 NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge: Distributed Electric Propulsion
Audience: Students at U.S. Colleges and Universities
Entry Deadline: May 16, 2016

2016 National Academy of Engineering – Engineering for You Video Contest 3
Audience: All Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: May 31, 2016

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

2016 Lunar Workshop for Educators
Audience: In-service and Pre-service Science Educators of Grades 6-9
Workshop Dates: June 27-July 1, 2016

2016 DREAM2Explore Workshop for Educators
Audience: In-service and Pre-service Science Educators of Grades 6-9
Workshop Dates: July 11-15, 2016

Call for Papers: NASA in the ‘Long’ Civil Rights Movement Symposium
Audience: Academics, Graduate Students and Independent Scholars
Abstract Submission Deadline: July 31, 2016
Symposium Dates: March 16-17, 2017

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at https://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Air and Space — Airplanes and Rockets: NASA Rockets 101
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-8
Event Date: April 21, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT
Launch your students’ interest and excitement in forces and motion. Explore forces, motion and flight with inquiry-based rocket activities and design challenges that include designing, building and launching simple rockets while recording and analyzing data. This webinar will also investigate rockets by integrating NASA missions, STEM curriculum, online education resources and the Next Generation Science Standards into teaching strategies that will guide educators into a learning journey “blast off.” Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/162228

Air and Space — Airplanes and Rockets: Contrails — Clouds and Human Activity
Audience:
Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: April 25, 2016, at 4 p.m. EDT
This webinar will focus on cloud types, in particular contrails, and Earth’s energy balance. This session will highlight the S’COOL and GLOBE programs with emphasis on using computer-based statistical analysis of student observations. Clouds are the largest variable controlling Earth’s atmospheric temperature and climate. Contrails, especially persistent contrails, represent a human-caused increase in high, thin clouds in the Earth’s atmosphere. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/172360

Air and Space — Airplanes and Rockets: Smart Skies FlyBy MathTM
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-9
Event Date: April 26, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Discover the excitement of air traffic control through this webinar. It will focus on mathematics skills in grades 5-9 where students solve distance-rate-time problems related to in air traffic control by using an online graphing tool. A hands-on experiment will demonstrate these math skills. Lesson materials align with the Common Core Math Standards. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/167220

Solar System and Beyond: Kepler Mission Exploring Strange New Worlds
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: April 28, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT
Explore how the Kepler Space Telescope searches for planets orbiting stars beyond our sun. Participants will investigate how to use actual Kepler Telescope data and Kepler’s Third Law to construct graphs and interpret data that determines if a planet, orbiting a star in another solar system, is Earth-like and a candidate to support “life.” Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/159277

For a full schedule of upcoming webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Please direct questions about this series of webinars to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


Free Webinar — Learn How to Navigate the Federal Application Process and Tips on Writing Your Federal Résumé

Join Karlos DelToro of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management for an informative webinar session on Wednesday, April 27, 2016, at 2 p.m. EDT. During the two-hour session, participants will learn more about the federal employment application process, including how to navigate USAJOBS (the federal employment portal) when applying for civil service positions. DelToro will also share tips on preparing a federal résumé.

Interested participants may attend the session in person in Room 1461 at the General Services Administration building at 1800 F St. NW, Washington, D.C.

The event will be streamed online at https://nsf.webex.com/nsf/onstage/g.php?MTID=e5a74da347803326346e4be0f0e64771c. Use the following event information to access the webinar.
Event number: 745 127 849
Event password: 9sHUf8T@


2016 NASA Johnson Space Center Educator Professional Development Institutes

NASA’s Johnson Space Center is seeking middle school educators to attend this year’s Educator Professional Development Institutes. The JSC EPDI feature online interactions and weeklong, face-to-face training that is grade-level specific. All activities align NASA’s current missions and education resources to state and national standards for teaching science, technology, engineering and mathematics in middle school classrooms.

Participants must be U.S. citizens currently employed as classroom teachers of grades 6-8. The institute will include online assignments, hands-on training, tours of NASA facilities, and presentations from NASA scientists and engineers. Participants will receive a $450 stipend and a certificate showing 50 Continuing Professional Education hours.

Institutes will take place in July. Applications are due May 2, 2016.

For more information, visit https://opportunities.nasa.okstate.edu/index.cfm?liftoff=EPDI.Home.

If you have questions about the 2016 JSC EPDI, please email your inquiries to JSC-EPD@mail.nasa.gov.


Free Educator Workshop — Space Technology: Green Propellant Infusion Mission

Are you ready to go green? Join NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center Office of Education for a free educator professional development workshop to investigate “green” alternatives to conventional space technologies. Through hands-on experiments and physical demonstrations, educators will learn how to design, construct and test a simple mock spacecraft and “green” propellant using the Beginning Engineering Science & Technology, or BEST, curriculum and the engineering design process.

BEST is a demonstrated pedagogical framework that teaches students the engineering design process. Activities can supplement instruction during the school day or out of school, and they can be implemented individually or as a themed series. During the workshop, teaching connections will be made to real-world applications including NASA’s Green Propellant Infusion Mission and Armstrong’s GREEN technology research.

The workshop will take place Wednesday, May 18, 2016, 4:30-6 p.m. PDT at NASA’s Armstrong Educator Resource Center at the AERO Institute in Palmdale, California.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/erc_workshop_05_18_16.pdf.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Sondra Geddes at sondra.l.geddes@nasa.gov.


Smallsat Technology Partnerships Solicitation

NASA is extending an opportunity to college and university teams to propose small spacecraft technology projects that they can conduct in collaboration with NASA researchers. The Smallsat Technology Partnerships solicitation is being issued by the Small Spacecraft Technology Program as an appendix to the Space Technology Mission Directorate’s NASA Research Announcement for 2016.

NASA expects to competitively select about eight projects from among those proposed by university teams. The teams can form proposal partnerships with researchers from any of NASA’s 10 field centers. Awards for each project will include up to $100,000 to each university team per year. In addition, NASA will fund the time for one NASA employee to work with each selected team. Project funding is for one year with the potential to continue for a second year.

Proposed projects could involve laboratory work to advance a particular spacecraft technology or the development of a new smallsat. NASA will be accepting proposals in four topic areas: 1) enhanced power generation and storage, 2) cross-linking communications systems, 3) relative navigation for multiple small spacecraft, and 4) instruments and sensors for small spacecraft science missions.

Proposals are due May 25, 2016.

Details and instructions for submitting proposals may be found at http://go.nasa.gov/1qc751z.

Questions about this solicitation may be directed to Rachel Khattab at rachel.khattab@nasa.gov.


Future Engineers ‘Think Outside the Box’ Challenge

To celebrate the launch of the first-ever expandable habitat to the International Space Station (Bigelow Aerospace’s BEAM) and the launch of the first-ever commercial 3-D printer in space (Made In Space’s Advanced Manufacturing Facility), NASA and the American Society for Mechanical Engineers Foundation are challenging students to think outside the box with 3-D printing — literally. If you are a K-12 student in the United States, your challenge is to design a useful object that assembles, telescopes, hinges, accordions, grows, or expands to become larger than the printing bounds of the Advanced Manufacturing Facility 3-D printer in space (14cm length by 10cm width by 10cm height). The function of your assembled or expanded item can be anything you think would be useful for an astronaut living on the International Space Station.

The ‘Out of the Box’ Challenge is the fourth in a series of challenges where students in grades K-12 will create and submit a digital 3-D model of an object that they think astronauts might need in space. Future Engineers is a multiyear education initiative that consists of 3-D space challenges and curriculum videos on the site that parents and educators can use to get kids designing today.

Think big. Think outside of the box! And good luck!

Entries must be submitted by Aug. 1, 2016.

For more information about the challenge and to watch the launch video, go to www.futureengineers.org/thinkoutsidethebox.

Please email questions about this competition to info@futureengineers.org.


Join STEM on Station for #mISSionimaginaTIon — Design Challenge #4

Did you know that pollution occurs in space too? Right now, over 100 million pieces of orbital debris are orbiting Earth, and most are 1mm or smaller. NASA and Texas Instruments present the fourth and final #mISSionImaginaTIon design challenge. We need your help to design a spacecraft that can detect and prevent potential collisions with orbital debris during a deep space mission.

To find out more about #mISSionimaginaTIon, visit www.missionimagination.com.

Learn more about this exciting opportunity and other ways you can bring the space station into your classroom by visiting NASA’s STEM on Station website. While you are there, stop by and learn more about the yearlong mission and how it is still helping us on our #JourneytoMars. Opportunities, resources and more await at this site that focuses on the International Space Station!

To check out the website, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/STEMonStation.


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online

The Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, named after the founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and presented by JPL’s Office of Communication and Education, shares the excitement of the space program’s missions, instruments and other technologies.

Lectures take place twice per month, on consecutive Thursdays and Fridays. The Thursday lectures take place in JPL’s Theodore von Kármán Auditorium, and Friday lectures take place at Pasadena City College’s Vosloh Forum. Both start at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT). Admission and parking are free for all lectures. No reservations are required, but seating is limited. The Thursday evening lectures are streamed live for viewing online. Archives of past lectures are also available online.

Next Lecture in the Series:

CubeSats: Big Goals, Tiny Package
Event Date:
April 21 and April 22, 2016, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2016&month=4
Over the last 15 years, a miniature revolution in space science has been underway: CubeSats! First flown as educational tools the size of soup cans, significant capabilities have now been developed to allow these nanospacecraft to travel to the moon, asteroids and even Mars. Join Dr. Andrew Klesh, Chief Engineer for Interplanetary Small Spacecraft, for a discussion about these small spacecraft and the types of missions they are being used for.

For more information about the Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, including a complete list of upcoming lectures, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.php.

Questions about this series should be directed to http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php.


White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities — 2016 All-Star Students Program

The White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities works to promote HBCU excellence, innovation and sustainability. The Initiative will recognize current HBCU students for their dedication to academics, leadership and civic engagement as 2016 HBCU All-Star Students.

The appointment period will last approximately one year. During this time, HBCU All-Stars will serve as ambassadors of the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities by providing outreach opportunities and communications to their fellow students about the value of education and the Initiative as a networking resource. Through social media and personal and professional relationships with community-based organizations, students will share promising and proven practices that support opportunities for all young people to realize their educational and career potential. The program will provide an opportunity to participate in regional and national events as well as webchats with Initiative staff and other professionals from a wide range of disciplines that support a spirit of engagement and personal and professional development.

Nominees must be current undergraduate, graduate or professional students at an HBCU. Students must be enrolled for the 2016-2017 fall semester. Applications must be submitted by 11:59 p.m. EDT on April 22, 2016.

For more information and to download an application, visit http://sites.ed.gov/whhbcu/resources/hbcu-all-star-students/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to hbcuallstars@ed.gov.


2016 International Space Apps Challenge

NASA and space agencies around the world are preparing for the fifth annual International Space Apps Challenge, which will be held April 22-24, 2016. Participants will develop mobile applications, software, hardware, data visualization and platform solutions that could contribute to space exploration missions and help improve life on Earth.

This year’s challenge kicks off with a boot camp event on April 22 that will be live-streamed globally. The two-day “code-athon” event will follow on April 23-24. It will be hosted locally at over 193 locations spanning 72 countries. More than 200 data sources, including data sets, data services and tools, will be available. This event will bring tech-savvy citizens, scientists, entrepreneurs, educators and students together to help solve challenges relevant to both space exploration and broader subjects that impact life on Earth.

Registration for citizen participation is now open.

To learn more about the International Space Apps Challenge, get the latest updates and register to attend an event, visit https://2016.spaceappschallenge.org/.

If you have questions about the challenge, please visit https://2016.spaceappschallenge.org/contact.


Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy

Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy, at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia, is a free alternate-reality game that will challenge you to become an astronaut-in-training for a future trip to Mars. Choose what role you will play on the mission; engage in fun interactive activities; and explore the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics skills you will need as a next-generation space traveler. Along the way, you’ll learn about some of the museum’s fascinating artifacts.

Instructions and guidance are given via a special webpage accessed on your mobile device. Players should bring their own phones or devices equipped with an internet browser and a camera. Having a digital picture-taking device (smartphone, tablet, camera) is highly recommended but not required.

The game is aimed at upper elementary and middle school visitors and their families. Do you want to bring a group? Reservations are required for groups larger than 15.

The next offering of the Astronaut Academy is on April 23, 2016. Begin your training with Astronaut Orientation in the Claude Moore Education Center Classroom 1 located on the first level across from the restrooms. Astronaut Orientation is offered at regular intervals between 10:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. The last opportunity to start the game is at 2:30 p.m. A self-guided activity, the game should take between 60 and 90 minutes, and staff will help you along the way.

For more information, including a full list of upcoming Astronaut Academy dates, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/techquest/.

Please direct questions about the Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy to the visitor service line at 202-633-2214.


Free Education Webinar Series From the GOES-R Education Proving Ground

The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites — R Series is the next generation of geostationary Earth-observing systems. The GOES-R series satellites will provide continuous imagery and atmospheric measurements of Earth’s Western Hemisphere. The satellites will collect lightning data and monitor space weather to provide critical atmospheric, hydrologic, oceanic, climatic, solar and space data. The first satellite in the GOES-R series is scheduled to launch in October 2016.

To help educators prepare for the new satellite imagery and data that will be available during the GOES-R era, the GOES-R Education Proving Ground is hosting a series of education webcasts leading up to launch.

The webinars will take place on the following Saturday mornings at 11:30 a.m. Eastern Time.

April 23, 2016: Additional GOES-R Resources and Educational Tools
Sept. 17, 2016: Countdown to Launch!

For more information, including log-in instructions for the webinars, visit http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/education/goesr/.

Please direct questions about this series of webinars to Margaret Mooney at Margaret.Mooney@ssec.wisc.edu.


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — CASIS Academy Live: Microbes in Space

Why does life depend on microbes and what do extremophiles tell us about the potential for life beyond Earth? Join DLN and the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space for this CASIS Academy Live event with Dr. Michael Roberts to learn more about microbes in space. During the live video chat, Roberts will answer your questions.

The 45-minute event will be webcast on the NASA DLiNfo Channel on April 26, 2016, at 11 a.m. EDT.

Ask questions via Twitter using #askDLN or via email to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com.

Sign up to connect your class directly and participate in a CASIS Academy Live event. Please direct questions about this event to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln.


2017 eXploration Habitat (X-Hab) Academic Innovation Challenge

NASA is seeking university teams to develop innovative design solutions for deep space human exploration systems in the 2017 eXploration Systems and Habitation Academic Innovation Challenge. This year, the X-Hab Challenge scope is being formally extended not only to include habitation topics but other areas of exploration systems as well. Topic areas include in-space recycling/reclamation, quantification of condensed water on the lunar surface, a wastewater to plant nutrient solution, a microgravity plant-watering system and a microgravity food production system.

The winners of the challenge will receive between $10,000 and $30,000 to design and produce functional products of interest to NASA human spaceflight. Proposals are due April 29, 2016, and awardees will follow a tailored systems-engineering process with the completion of the projects in the May 2017 timeframe.

Proposals will be accepted from university faculty who are U.S. citizens and who teach at an accredited university in the U.S. Eligible educators must be teaching a senior or graduate engineering design, industrial design or architecture curriculum that is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.

Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tribal Colleges and other minority-serving educational institutions are particularly encouraged to apply. Proposals from women, members of underrepresented minority groups and persons with disabilities also are highly encouraged.

For more information about the challenge and how to submit a proposal, visit http://spacegrant.org/xhab/.

Please email questions about the X-Hab Challenge to xhab@spacegrant.org.


2016 Texas Space Grant Consortium Columbia Crew Memorial Undergraduate Scholarships

The Texas Space Grant Consortium and the Aviation and Space Foundation of Texas, in partnership with NASA, are offering undergraduate scholarships of $1,500 in memory of the Space Shuttle Columbia astronauts. These seven men and women paid the ultimate sacrifice to expand the exploration of space and our knowledge of the world that we live in.

These scholarships are intended to recognize high-quality students and encourage their consideration of graduate studies in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, ultimately leading to careers in STEM-related fields. The scholarships stress excellence in academics, participation in STEM education and research projects, and the exhibition of leadership qualities.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens and registered for at least a half-time course load at a Texas Space Grant Consortium institution. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 29, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/grants/2016/scholars_announcement.html.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to scholarships@tsgc.utexas.edu.


2016 Texas Space Grant Consortium STEM Educator Scholarships

The Texas Space Grant Consortium has established a new Educator STEM Scholarship Program. These $1,500 scholarships are intended to recognize teachers enrolled in master’s programs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields at a TSGC member institution.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens who hold a bachelor’s degree and are enrolled in a master’s program at a Texas Space Grant Consortium institution. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 29, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/edu_stem/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to scholarships@tsgc.utexas.edu.


2016-2017 Texas Space Grant Consortium Graduate Fellowships

Texas Space Grant Consortium Fellowships encourage graduate study in the fields of space science and engineering. Interdisciplinary and integrated work experience are emphasized.

Each $5,000 award supplements half-time graduate support (or fellowship) provided by a Consortium institution. The fellowship award is good for one year. Each fellowship may be renewed for a maximum of three years, providing the recipient has spent no more than two of those years as a master’s candidate.

Applicants must be registered for full-time study in a graduate program at one or more of the Texas Space Grant Consortium institutions and must be promised financial support at that institution. Applicants must also be U.S. citizens. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 29, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/grants/2016/fellows_announcement.html.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to fellowships@tsgc.utexas.edu.


Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 11 to the International Space Station

The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education and the Arthur C. Clarke Institute for Space Education, in partnership with NanoRacks LLC, announce a science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, opportunity for school districts across the U.S. and space station partner nations. The newest flight opportunity, Mission 11 to the International Space Station, gives students across a community the ability to design and propose real experiments to fly in low-Earth orbit on the space station. This opportunity is part of the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program, or SSEP.

Each participating community will receive a real microgravity research mini-laboratory capable of supporting a single microgravity experiment and all launch services to fly the minilab to the space station in spring 2017 and return it to Earth. An experiment design competition in each community — engaging typically 300+ students — allows student teams to design and propose real experiments vying for their community′s reserved minilab.

Content resources for teachers and students support foundational instruction on science in microgravity and experimental design. Additional SSEP programming uses the experiment design competition to engage the community in embracing a learning-community model for STEM education.

This competition is open to students in grades 5-12 and college. Informal education groups and organizations also are encouraged to participate. Interested communities must inquire about the program no later than April 29, 2016. The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education is available to help interested communities in the U.S. secure the needed funding.

To learn more about this opportunity, visit the SSEP Mission 11 to International Space Station National Announcement of Opportunity at http://ssep.ncesse.org/2016/03/new-flight-opportunity-for-school-districts-announcing-student-spaceflight-experiments-program-ssep-mission-11-to-the-international-space-station-starting-september-2016/.

SSEP is enabled through a strategic partnership with NanoRacks LLC working with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the use of the International Space Station as a national laboratory. The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (http://www.iss-casis.org/) is a national partner on SSEP. To view a list of all SSEP national partners, visit http://ssep.ncesse.org/national-partners/.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please email SSEP National Program Director Jeff Goldstein at jeffgoldstein@ncesse.org.


Future Engineers ‘Star Trek’ Replicator Challenge

Calling all Starfleet cadets! “Star Trek,” the American Society for Mechanical Engineers Foundation and NASA want you to pioneer the future of food in space. Your challenge is to create a digital model of a food-related item for astronauts to 3-D print in the year 2050. We want designs that boldly go where no human has 3-D printed before and that help astronauts eat nutritious meals so they can live long and prosper.

You must specify one of the following locations for your 3-D print: our moon, another planet, another planet’s moon, or a spacecraft beyond low-Earth orbit (explain where it is going and why). You also must specify the intended printing material (feedstock) for your 3-D print. This could be plastic, metal, recycled materials, locally sourced material, or any nonedible, 3-D printing feedstock you think would advance human space exploration.

Eating a meal in space goes beyond the actual food itself — from growing food to devouring it. There are many things to consider, so check out our rules, design guidelines and education resources before to starting your design.

Student winners will receive a range of prizes, including a trip to New York for a tour of the space shuttle Enterprise at the Intrepid Museum with an astronaut, a 3-D printer for the winners’ schools or a “Star Trek” prize pack.

Entries are due May 1, 2016. For more information about the challenge and how to enter, visit www.futureengineers.org/startrek.

Please email questions about this competition to info@futureengineers.org.


Institute of Museum and Library Services Grants: STEM Expert Facilitation of Family Learning in Libraries and Museums

The Institute of Museum and Library Services seeks proposals for design-based research projects focused on inquiry-based STEM programs delivered by scientists, engineers, and related technical practitioners to children ages 6-10 and their families. Proposals should address the role of experts’ oral narratives (e.g., storytelling or personal histories) as part of object-based science inquiry and include information about how findings will be applicable in both museum and library settings.

Entities that are eligible to apply include libraries, agencies, institutions of higher education, museums, and other entities that advance the museum and library fields. Grant amounts up to $1,000,000 are available for a period of performance up to two years.

Applications are due May 1, 2016.

For more information, visit https://www.imls.gov/grants/available/stem-expert-facilitation-family-learning-libraries-and-museums-stemex.

Library representatives with questions about this opportunity should email Sandra Toro at storo@imls.gov. Museum representatives with questions should email Helen Wechsler at hwechsler@imls.gov or Sandra Narva at snarva@imls.gov.


Exploration of the Moon and Asteroids by Secondary Students (ExMASS) High School Research Program

NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, and the Center for Lunar Science and Exploration at the Lunar and Planetary Institute are looking for 10 teams of motivated high school students and their teachers to participate in a national standards-based lunar/asteroid research program for the 2016-2017 academic year.

Supervised by their teacher and aided by a scientist advisor, students undertake open-inquiry research projects that engage them in the process of science and support the goals of the NASA Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute. At the end of the year, four teams compete for a chance to present their research at the Exploration Science Forum held at NASA’s Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, California, in July 2017.

Participation in the ExMASS program is free. Interested teachers must submit an application. Applications are due May 2, 2016.

For more information and to apply for the ExMASS program, visit http://www.lpi.usra.edu/exploration/education/hsResearch/.

Please direct questions about the ExMASS program to Andy Shaner at shaner@lpi.usra.edu.


GLOBE El Niño Field Campaign and Webinar Series

El Niño and La Niña are important phenomena that can impact the climate by causing global flooding and droughts as well as changes in seasonal weather. These interactions around the world are called teleconnections. Because of the importance of this issue, a GLOBE ENSO (El Niño Southern Oscillation) Campaign has been formulated to engage students in determining where and how much El Niño affects local places and to put students in contact with their local environment.

To learn more about the campaign and how to participate, visit http://www.globe.gov/web/el-nino/el-nino-campaign.

To help educators prepare for the El Niño Campaign, GLOBE is hosting a series of free education webinars to discuss the mechanics of the campaign, give updates on data collection, and give participants the opportunity to learn science content from experts.

The hourlong webinars will take place on the following dates at 8 p.m. EDT.

May 3, 2016: Biometry and Ground Cover
May 17, 2016: The 2015-2016 El Niño Event
June 13, 2016: Using El Niño GLOBE Data for Scientific Research
Sept. 19, 2016: El Niño Student Campaign Refresher and Update

For more information, including log-in instructions for the webinars and recordings of previous webinars in the series, visit http://www.globe.gov/web/el-nino/el-nino-campaign/webinars.

Please direct questions about this opportunity and series of webinars to http://www.globe.gov/support/contact.


NASA/NSTA Webinar — Global Precipitation Measurement Mission: Weather

Join the National Science Teachers Association for a free interactive webinar to learn about weather and NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement, or GPM, mission. The 90-minute session will take place on May 5, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EDT.

Topics presented at this webinar will include types of weather, weather basics, extreme weather, monitoring extreme weather with satellites, and hands-on investigations for students to collect data about weather — including GLOBE protocols. A NASA scientist will discuss the difference between weather and climate and will describe ground validation campaigns.

GPM is an international satellite mission managed by NASA and JAXA (the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) that will provide next-generation observations of rain and snow. The GPM mission will help us learn more about Earth’s water and energy cycles, improve the forecasting of extreme events that cause natural disasters, and extend current capabilities of using satellite precipitation information to directly benefit society.

All participants will receive a certificate of participation and 100 Learning Center activity points for attending and completing the post-program evaluation. An archive and presentation slides will be available at the end of the program.

For more information and to register to attend the webinar event, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/resource/?id=10.2505/9/WSNASA15_May5.

For more information about GPM, visit https://www.nasa.gov/gpm or http://gpm.nasa.gov.

Please email questions about this opportunity to webseminars@nsta.org.


Federal Aviation Administration Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues

The Airport Cooperative Research Program is seeking applicants for its Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues. Through this program, the ACRP strives to encourage applied research on airport and related aviation system issues and to foster the next generation of aviation community leaders. The program is intended to stimulate thought, discussion and research by those who may become the future airport managers, operators, designers and policy makers in aviation. The focus of this research program is on applied research to help the public sector continue to improve the quality, reliability, safety and security of the U.S. civil aviation system well into the foreseeable future.

The Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues will award up to 10 highly qualified applicants, selected by an ACRP panel of experts, a stipend of $10,000 each for successful completion of a research paper on a subject chosen by the candidate within the framework of the program’s purpose.

Applicants must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States, or have a current student visa. Each applicant also must be officially enrolled as a full-time student at an accredited North American institution of higher learning for the academic year in a graduate course leading to a master’s or doctoral degree. Proof of both may be required.

Applications are due May 15, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.trb.org/ACRP/ACRPGraduateAwardProgram.aspx.

The ACRP Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues is sponsored by the Federal Aviation Administration. Creating a selection panel, monitoring research progress, organizing a forum for presentation, and publishing the research papers are the responsibility of the ACRP of the Transportation Research Board. The Virginia Space Grant Consortium will manage the Graduate Research Award program under the ACRP’s direction.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to acrp@odu.edu.


2016 NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge: Distributed Electric Propulsion

Distributed Electric Propulsion, or DEP, is an emerging aircraft design concept that has the potential to improve aircraft performance in a number of areas, including efficiency, takeoff and landing performance, emissions, noise abatement, safety, and ride quality. DEP also has the potential to enable new novel control systems. In this year’s NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge, student teams are challenged to design a commuter aircraft that applies DEP technology. The main source of thrust for the students’ concept may come from DEP or a combination of DEP and conventional propulsion devices (turboprops, turbofans, etc.). The challenge for the design team is to determine the most advantageous application of DEP for their aircraft and to justify their selection.

The contest is open to teams of full-time students enrolled in higher education institutions of the United States or its territories. This category includes universities, colleges, trade schools, community colleges, professional schools, etc. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

Final entries are due May 16, 2016.

For more information and a complete list of rules, visit http://aero.larc.nasa.gov/university-contest/.

Questions about the challenge should be directed to Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.


2016 National Academy of Engineering – Engineering for You Video Contest 3

The National Academy of Engineering, or NAE, is launching the Engineering for You Video Contest 3, or E4U3.

This year, participants are tasked with creating a 1- to 2-minute video focused on mega-engineering. Mega-engineering projects typically address important needs of large populations and/or societies, require teams working across countries and cultures on a solution, and involve at least three disciplines including engineering.

The competition is open to all individuals or teams in the following competition categories:
— Middle school students and younger (grades K-8)
— High school students (grades 9-12)
— Tertiary education students (two-year college through graduate school, full or part time)
— The general public

The main prize is $25,000, and videos will be accepted through May 31, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.nae.edu/e4u3/.

Questions about the E4U3 Video Contest should be directed to E4Uvideocontest@nae.edu.


Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions and museums to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

There will be a nominal shipping fee that must be paid online with a credit card.  To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.


2016 Lunar Workshop for Educators

NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, mission is sponsoring a workshop for educators of students in grades 6-9. The workshop will focus on lunar science, exploration, and how our understanding of the moon is growing and changing with the new data from current and recent lunar missions.

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has allowed scientists to measure the coldest known place in the solar system, map the surface of the moon in unprecedented detail and accuracy, find evidence of recent lunar geologic activity, characterize the radiation environment around the moon and its potential effects on future lunar explorers, and much, much more!

Workshop participants will reinforce their understanding of lunar science concepts; gain tools to help address common student misconceptions about the moon; and interact with lunar scientists and engineers. Participants will work with LRO data and learn how to bring the data and information to their students using hands-on activities aligned with Next Generation Science Standards for grades 6-9.

The workshop will take place June 27-July 1, 2016, at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Workshop participants will have the opportunity to tour the LRO Mission Operation Center and the Goddard spacecraft testing facilities.

For more information and to register to attend, visit http://lunar.gsfc.nasa.gov/lwe/index.html.

Questions about this workshop should be directed to Andrea Jones at Andrea.J.Jones@nasa.gov.


2016 DREAM2Explore Workshop for Educators

The “Dynamic Response of the Environments at Asteroids, the Moon, and moons of Mars,” or DREAM2, team at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center is hosting a free workshop for educators of students in grades 6-9. Participants will learn how our understanding of Earth’s moon, asteroids and the moons of Mars is growing and changing with new data and models from current and recent planetary missions and the work of the DREAM2 team.

Workshop participants will reinforce their understanding of lunar and planetary science concepts; gain tools to help address common student misconceptions about the moon; and interact with NASA scientists who study the dynamic environments surrounding these rocky objects. Participants will work with real scientific data and learn how to bring the data and information to their students using hands-on activities aligned with Next Generation Science Standards for grades 6-9.

The workshop will take place July 11-15, 2016, at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Workshop participants will become certified to borrow meteorite samples from NASA and will receive Certificates of Participation and Letters of Completion that indicate 30 hours of instruction.

For more information and to register to attend, visit http://ssed.gsfc.nasa.gov/dream/DREAM/DREAM2Explore.html.

Questions about this workshop should be directed to Andrea Jones at Andrea.J.Jones@nasa.gov.


Call for Papers: NASA in the ‘Long’ Civil Rights Movement Symposium

The History Office at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center and the Department of History at the University of Alabama Huntsville invite academics, graduate students and independent scholars to submit proposals for papers to be presented at a two-day symposium, March 16-17, 2017. The symposium will take place at the University of Alabama Huntsville and will address the role/relationship of NASA to the “Long” Civil Rights Movement, particularly in, but not limited to, the Deep South (Huntsville, Florida, Houston, Mississippi and New Orleans).

The conceptual framework for the symposium is provided by Jacquelyn Dowd Hall’s 2005 essay in the Journal of American History, “The Long Civil Rights Movement and the Political Uses of the Past,” which called upon historians to produce new “modes of writing and speaking that emphasize individual agency … while also dramatizing the hidden history of politics and institutions.” Along these lines, the conference welcomes papers addressing the Civil Rights experience across NASA that not only explore the experience of African Americans, but also of women, immigrants and other politically/legally marginalized groups. The intention is to publish a subset of the papers as an anthology.

Those interested in presenting a paper at the symposium should send an abstract of no more than 400 words and a short biography or curriculum vita, including affiliation, to Brian Odom at brian.c.odom@nasa.gov or Dr. Stephen Waring at warings@uah.edu by July 31, 2016.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/centers/marshall/history/call-for-papers-nasa-in-the-long-civil-rights-movement-symposium-university-of-alabama.html.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Brian Odom at brian.c.odom@nasa.gov.


Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The Announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design (STEAMD); or activities culturally relevant to or focused on unrepresented in STEM careers populations, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or non-reimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA Announcement.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at https://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — March 24, 2016

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.
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New This Week!
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Free NASA Educator Professional Development Webinars
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: March 24, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT

2016 International Summer School in Astrobiology
Audience: Graduate Students Studying at U.S. Institutions
Application Deadline: March 31, 2016
Summer School Dates: June 20-24, 2016

2016 Fellowship in Aerospace History
Audience: Recent Recipients of the Ph.D. in History or a Closely Related Field, or Students in Programs Granting Doctoral Degrees in Those Fields
Application Deadline: April 1, 2016

2016 NASA Fellowship in the History of Space Technology
Audience: Recent Recipients of the Ph.D. in History of Technology or a Closely Related Field, and Students Pursuing Doctoral Degrees in Those Fields
Application Deadline: April 1, 2016

Free Tours of Facilities at NASA’s Glenn Research Center
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: April 2, 2016

2016 History of Science Society Fellowship in the History of Space Science
Audience: Recent Recipients of the Ph.D. in History of Science or a Closely Related Field, or Students in Programs Granting Doctoral Degrees in Those Fields
Application Deadline: April 6, 2016

Sally Ride EarthKAM @ Space Camp Announces Spring 2016 Mission
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Mission Date: April 12-16, 2016

2016 National Academy of Engineering – Engineering for You Video Contest 3
Audience: All Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: May 31, 2016

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PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…
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New NASA Women of STEM Website
Audience: All Educators and Students

STEM@NASA Goddard: Women’s History Month
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: March 24, 2016, at 1 p.m. EST

2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators and 9-Higher Education Students
Next Lecture Date: March 24, 2016, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)

NASA/Applied Physics Laboratory Summer Internship 2016
Audience: Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Application Deadline: March 25, 2016

Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy
Audience: Designed for Families With Children Ages 10 to 14, but Open to All
Next Event Date: March 26, 2016, 10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. EST

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Live Video Chat: NASA STARS en Español
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: March 29, 2016, 1-2 p.m. EDT

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Video conferencia en vivo: NASA STARS en Español
Audiencia: Todos Los Educadores y Estudiantes
Fecha del Evento: Marzo 29, 2016, 1-2 p.m. EDT

Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents “STEM in 30” Webcast Series
Audience: Grades 6-8 Educators and Students
Next Webcast Date: March 30, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EDT

International FameLab Competition: San Juan Regional Event
Audience: Graduate Students, Postdoctoral Fellows and Early Career Researchers
Event Date: March 30-April 1, 2016

International Space Station Research Design Challenge: Capillary Effects on Liquids Exploratory Research Experiments
Audience: Grade 8-12 Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: April 1, 2016

2016 Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching
Audience: All Educators and Students
Nomination Deadline: April 1, 2016

Astrobiology Graduate Conference 2016
Audience: Astrobiology Graduate Students
Application Deadline: April 1, 2016
Conference Dates: July 24-27, 2016

Earth Observatory’s Tournament Earth 2016
Audience: All Educators and Students
Competition Dates: Through April 4, 2016

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Environmental Education Grants
Audience: State and Local Education Agencies, Colleges and Universities, Non-profit Organizations, Tribal Education Agencies, and Non-Commercial Educational Broadcasting Companies.
Application Deadline: April 8, 2016

NASA TechPort Request for Information
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Feedback Deadline: April 14, 2016

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

2016 Texas Space Grant Consortium Columbia Crew Memorial Undergraduate Scholarships
Audience: Undergraduate Students at Texas Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: April 29, 2016

2016 Texas Space Grant Consortium STEM Educator Scholarships
Audience: Educators Enrolled in STEM-field Programs for a Master’s Degree at Texas Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: April 29, 2016

2016-2017 Texas Space Grant Consortium Graduate Fellowships
Audience: Graduate Students at Texas Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: April 29, 2016

Institute of Museum and Library Services Grants: STEM Expert Facilitation of Family Learning in Libraries and Museums
Audience: Libraries, Museums and Higher Education Institutions
Application Deadline: May 1, 2016

2016 NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge: Distributed Electric Propulsion
Audience: Students at U.S. Colleges and Universities
Entry Deadline: May 16, 2016

Call for Papers: NASA in the ‘Long’ Civil Rights Movement Symposium
Audience: Academics, Graduate Students and Independent Scholars
Abstract Submission Deadline: July 31, 2016
Symposium Dates: March 16-17, 2017

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

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Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at https://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

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NEW THIS WEEK!
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Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Technology Drives Exploration: Pluto — Exploring a New World in Your Classroom
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-8
Event Date: March 24, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT
Pluto has fascinated humans since it was first discovered. What is Pluto? How is Pluto both different from and like other objects in our solar system? These are some of the questions to be investigated by New Horizons, NASA’s first robotic mission to Pluto. This webinar will discuss these questions by exploring NASA STEM education content, online resources, the Next Generation Science Standards and data from the New Horizons mission. Join this webinar to learn exciting ways to bring the fascination and mystery of Pluto into your classroom. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/168028

Technology Drives Exploration: Astronauts and Radiation — The Exploration Design Challenge
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: March 28, 2016, at 4 p.m. EDT
The NASA Exploration Design Challenge allows students to research and design ways to protect astronauts from space radiation. NASA and Lockheed Martin are developing the Orion spacecraft that will carry astronauts beyond low Earth orbit and on to an asteroid or Mars. Protecting astronauts from radiation on these distant travels is an important — and very real — problem that needs solving. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/166960

Virtual Missions and Exoplanets (vMAX): Part 1 – Curriculum Overview
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: March 30, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT
Learn how to engage students in the study of exoplanetary systems through hands-on experiences, scenario-based problem solving, and 3-D multi-user virtual world simulations with the Virtual Missions and Exoplanets curriculum. This webinar provides an overview of exoplanetary system resources that build upon the use of NASA data. These resources are organized for a one-week experience for middle school students but are flexible for any formal or informal audience and time period. It is suggested that participants also attend the vMAX Technical (Part 2) webinar for a complete understanding of how to implement these resources. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/166705

Virtual Missions and Exoplanets (vMAX): Part 2 – Technical Overview
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: March 31, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT
Learn how to engage students in the study of exoplanetary systems through hands-on experiences, scenario-based problem solving, and 3-D multi-user virtual world simulations with the Virtual Missions and Exoplanets curriculum. This webinar addresses technical requirements to download, install, and navigate the virtual world as an avatar in preparation for using the vMAX virtual world with students. It is suggested that participants also attend the vMAX Curriculum (Part 1) webinar for a complete understanding of how to implement these resources. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/166714

For a full schedule of upcoming webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Please direct questions about this series of webinars to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.

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2016 International Summer School in Astrobiology

The 2016 International Summer School in Astrobiology will be held at the summer campus of the Universidad Internacional Menéndez Pelayo, Palacio de la Magdalena, in Santander, Spain, on June 20-24, 2016.

This year’s theme will be “Earth Analog Environments and the Search for Life Beyond the Earth.” The school will provide an interdisciplinary examination of the chemical, physical and geological properties of potential extraterrestrial habitats and an in-depth description and analysis of sites on Earth with similar characteristics. In particular, lectures and activities will consider icy satellites, rocky planets in the solar system, extreme Earth environments, and terrestrial exoplanets.

The NASA Astrobiology Institute is offering scholarships that cover travel costs, school fees, accommodations and meals. To be eligible to apply for these scholarships, applicants must be graduate students studying at U.S. institutions.

Applications are due March 31, 2016.

For more information, visit http://nai.nasa.gov/uimp/2016-international-summer-school-astrobiology/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Edward Goolish at edward.goolish@nasa.gov.

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2016 Fellowship in Aerospace History

The Fellowship in Aerospace History, offered by the American Historical Association and supported by NASA, seeks applications for a predoctoral or postdoctoral fellowship related to the history of aerospace. The selected fellow will have the opportunity to engage in significant and sustained advanced research in all aspects of the history of aerospace from the earliest human interest in flight to the present. These areas will include cultural and intellectual history; economic history; history of law and public policy; and the history of science, engineering and management.

The fellowship carries a stipend of $20,000 for a six- to nine-month fellowship. Funds may not be used to support tuition or fees.

The fellowship is open to applicants who hold a doctoral degree in history or in a closely related field, or applicants who are enrolled in and have completed all course work for a program granting doctoral degrees in those fields.

Applications are due April 1, 2016.

For detailed information on the fellowship and the application process, visit http://www.historians.org/prizes/NASA.htm.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to awards@historians.org.

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2016 NASA Fellowship in the History of Space Technology

The NASA Fellowship in the History of Space Technology, offered by the Society for the History of Technology and supported by the NASA History Program Office, seeks applications for a yearlong predoctoral or postdoctoral fellowship related to the history of space technology. The fellowship may support advanced research related to all aspects of space history, leading to publications on the history of space technology in a broad sense, including cultural and intellectual history, institutional history, economic history, history of law and public policy, and history of engineering and management.

The fellowship carries a stipend of $21,500, paid quarterly. Funds may not be used to support tuition or fees. The NASA fellow also will receive complimentary membership in the Society for the History of Technology for the year of fellowship.

Applicants must possess a doctorate in the history of technology or in a closely related field, or be enrolled as a student in a doctoral degree program and have completed all requirements for the degree (except the dissertation) in history of technology or a related field. Eligibility is limited to U.S. citizens.

Applications are due April 1, 2016.

For detailed information on the fellowship and the application process, visit http://www.historyoftechnology.org/awards/nasa.html.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to shotsec@auburn.edu.

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Free Tours of Facilities at NASA’s Glenn Research Center

NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, is offering tours that take visitors behind the scenes and inside certain research facilities. Glenn scientists and engineers serve as guides. Tours and open house events will be held each month through October 2016. Tours are free for groups and individuals, but to guarantee admission, reservations are required. Visitor parking is also free.

On the days of the tours, a bus departs from Glenn’s main gate every hour, beginning at 10 a.m. The last tour departs at 1 p.m. Each tour lasts about 45 minutes and is followed by a stop at Glenn’s Gift Shop.

Glenn’s 2016 Tour Schedule

April 2, 2016 — Piloted Control Evaluation Facility and Distributed Engine Control Laboratory: Visit two laboratories that showcase how researchers evaluate propulsion control and aircraft engine control. Tour the Piloted Control Evaluation (Flight Simulator) Facility to see where researchers evaluate the effect of propulsion control on aircraft performance. Visit the Distributed Engine Control Laboratory to learn how NASA evaluates new hardware architectures for aircraft engine control.

May 21-22, 2016 — Open House at NASA’s Glenn Research Center: NASA Glenn is opening its doors to the public for a weekend open house. Visitors will be able to tour many of the center’s world-class facilities and see how the center improves aviation and fosters exploration to benefit everyone on Earth. Visitors also will be able to meet an astronaut and talk with engineers, scientists and technicians who work on space programs. Registration for this event is not required.

June 11-12, 2016 — Open House at NASA’s Plum Brook Station: NASA Glenn is opening the doors of Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, to the public for a weekend open house. Visitors will be able to tour the station’s world-class facilities and step inside the world’s largest vacuum chamber, which has tested parts of rockets, Mars landers and Orion hardware. Visitors also will be able to meet an astronaut and talk with engineers, scientists and technicians. Registration for this event is not required.

July 9, 2016: Radioisotope Power System, Systems Integration Laboratory: See how NASA emulates the electrical characteristics of a spacecraft system in the Radioisotope Power System, Systems Integration Laboratory. RPS is a source of electricity for NASA space missions from the surface of Mars to the realm of the outer planets.

Aug. 6, 2016 — See Things a Different Way: Check out Glenn’s Graphics and Visualization, or GVIS, and the Reconfigurable User-interface and Virtual Reality Exploration, or GRUVE, Laboratories. The GVIS lab uses advanced computer input and output devices paired with a variety of natural user interface devices and 3-D displays. The GRUVE lab is used to analyze data obtained either by computer simulation or from research test facilities.

Sept. 10, 2016 — Vibration Testing: Join us on a tour of Glenn’s Structural Dynamics Laboratory, where things get shaken to verify their survivability. Several experiments that currently are operating on the International Space Station were tested in this lab.

Oct. 1, 2016 — Prepare for Impact: Come explore Glenn’s Ballistic Impact Facility. See the laboratory that helped to identify the cause of the space shuttle Columbia accident and return NASA’s shuttle fleet to flight.

Tours are open to U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents. To guarantee admission, reservations are required. For more information on tours and how to make reservations, visit https://www.nasa.gov/centers/glenn/events/tours.html.

Please direct questions about the tours to Sheila Reese at sheila.d.reese@nasa.gov.

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2016 History of Science Society Fellowship in the History of Space Science

The Fellowship in the History of Space Science, offered by the History of Science Society and supported by the NASA History Program Office, seeks applications for a nine-month predoctoral or postdoctoral fellowship related to the history of space science. The fellowship may support advanced research related to all aspects of the history of space science, from the earliest human interest in space to the present.

The fellowship carries a stipend of $21,250. Funds may not be used to support tuition or fees.

Applicants must possess a doctorate in history of science or in a closely related field, or be enrolled as a student in a doctoral degree program and have completed all requirements for the degree (except the dissertation) in history of science or a related field. Eligibility is not limited to U.S. citizens or residents.

Applications are due April 6, 2016.

For detailed information on the fellowship and the application process, visit http://hssonline.org/employment/fellowship-in-the-history-of-space-science/2015-16-hss-fellowship-in-the-history-of-space-science/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to info@hssonline.org.

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Sally Ride EarthKAM @ Space Camp Announces Spring 2016 Mission

Registration is open for the Spring 2016 mission for the Sally Ride EarthKAM @ Space Camp program taking place April 12-16, 2016. During the mission, students worldwide may submit requests to have a camera aboard the International Space Station capture an image of a specific location on Earth. Related resources, including images and activities, are available for use in the classroom. The optional online activities are targeted at middle school students but are adaptable for other grade levels. All students and educators are welcome, including participants in afterschool programs.

For more information and to register for the upcoming mission, visit https://www.earthkam.org/.

Please submit questions about the Sally Ride EarthKAM @ Space Camp program via https://www.earthkam.org/contact.

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2016 National Academy of Engineering – Engineering for You Video Contest 3

The National Academy of Engineering, or NAE, is launching the Engineering for You Video Contest 3, or E4U3.

This year, participants are tasked with creating a 1- to 2-minute video focused on mega-engineering. Mega-engineering projects typically address important needs of large populations and/or societies, require teams working across countries and cultures on a solution, and involve at least three disciplines including engineering.

The competition is open to all individuals or teams in the following competition categories:
— Middle school students and younger (grades K-8)
— High school students (grades 9-12)
— Tertiary education students (two-year college through graduate school, full or part time)
— The general public

The main prize is $25,000, and videos will be accepted through May 31, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.nae.edu/e4u3/.

Questions about the E4U3 Video Contest should be directed to E4Uvideocontest@nae.edu.

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PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…
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New NASA Women of STEM Website

Celebrate Women’s History Month with the new NASA Women of STEM website!

Through their accomplishments and dedication to their jobs, women at NASA embody the essence of Women’s History Month. They serve as role models to young women in their pursuit of careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Read career profiles, watch videos and more! Visit the new website at https://www.nasa.gov/education/womenstem.

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STEM@NASA Goddard: Women’s History Month

Join NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in March for “STEM@NASA Goddard: Women’s History Month”! On select Tuesdays and Thursdays at 1 p.m. EST (March 24, 29 and 31), the Goddard Office of Education will celebrate Women’s History Month by highlighting women in STEM. Women from across Goddard will share how they practice science, technology, engineering and mathematics — through their research, missions, career and the like — with participating schools and other groups.

The 30-minute programs will be streamed live on UStream, and participants will be able to interact with the guest speakers by submitting questions through email and Twitter.

To view the programs on Ustream, visit http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-gsfc.

For more information or to express interest in participating, please contact Erin McKinley at erin.e.mckinley@nasa.gov.

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2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online

The Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, named after the founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and presented by JPL’s Office of Communication and Education, shares the excitement of the space program’s missions, instruments and other technologies.

Lectures take place twice per month, on consecutive Thursdays and Fridays. The Thursday lectures take place in JPL’s Theodore von Kármán Auditorium, and Friday lectures take place at Pasadena City College’s Vosloh Forum. Both start at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT). Admission and parking are free for all lectures. No reservations are required, but seating is limited. The Thursday evening lectures also are streamed live for viewing online. Archives of past lectures are also available online.

The next lecture in the series is “The Europa Mission.”

What 10 Years at Mars Can Tell Us About the Planet
Event Date:
March 24 and March 25, 2016, at 7 pm. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2016&month=3
The Mars Reconnaissance Orbit has been circling the Red Planet for 10 years. During its decade in orbit, MRO has sent back thousands of high-resolution images and more data than all other Mars missions combined. Join MRO scientists Rich Zurek, Ph.D., and Leslie Tamppari, Ph.D., for a discussion of Mars discoveries and what the future of Red Planet research holds.

For more information about the Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, including a complete list of upcoming lectures, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.php.

Questions about this series should be directed to http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php.

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NASA/Applied Physics Laboratory Summer Internship 2016

The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, or APL, is offering summer projects for students interested in working on NASA missions or space-related research opportunities.

Students participating in the 2016 NASA/APL Internship Program will work at the APL facility in Laurel, Maryland. Students will receive a stipend for the 10-week program, and housing will be provided.

Eligible students include undergraduate rising sophomores through Ph.D. students as of fall 2016. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and have a minimum GPA of 3.0.

Applications are due March 25, 2016.

For more information about the internship and to apply online, visit https://portals.jhuapl.edu/aplnasaintern/Home.aspx.

Questions about the NASA/APL Internships Program should be emailed to aplnasaintern-web@jhuapl.edu.

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Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy

Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy, at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia, is a free alternate-reality game that will challenge you to become an astronaut-in-training for a future trip to Mars. Choose what role you will play on the mission; engage in fun interactive activities; and explore the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics skills you will need as a next-generation space traveler. Along the way, you’ll learn about some of the museum’s fascinating artifacts.

Instructions and guidance are given via a special webpage accessed on your mobile device. Players should bring their own phones or devices equipped with an internet browser and a camera. Having a digital picture-taking device (smartphone, tablet, camera) is highly recommended but not required.

The game is aimed at upper elementary and middle school visitors and their families. Do you want to bring a group? Reservations are required for groups larger than 15.

The next offering of the Astronaut Academy is on March 26, 2016. Begin your training with Astronaut Orientation in the Claude Moore Education Center Classroom 1 located on the first level across from the restrooms. Astronaut Orientation is offered at regular intervals between 10:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. The last opportunity to start the game is at 2:30 p.m. A self-guided activity, the game should take between 60 and 90 minutes, and staff will help you along the way.

For more information, including a full list of upcoming Astronaut Academy dates, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/techquest/.

Please direct questions about the Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy to the visitor service line at 202-633-2214.

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NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Live Video Chat: NASA STARS en Español

Do you want to be one of NASA’s STARS? In this series of live, Spanish video chats, “Students Talk About Real STEM” (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) with NASA professionals who work in these areas. Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network and Educator Professional Development Collaborative for an inside look at NASA missions, research and careers. Submit questions via Twitter using #NASASTARS or via email to astrosdeNASA@gmail.com.

Sign up to connect your class directly and participate in a live event. Please direct questions about this event to astrosdeNASA@gmail.com.

The next hourlong event will be webcast on the NASA DLiNfo Channel on March 29, 2016, at 1 p.m. EDT.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln.

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NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Video conferencia en vivo: NASA STARS en Español

¿Quieres ser uno de los Astros de NASA? En esta serie de video conferencia en Español y en vivo, los estudiantes hablarán de lo que es en realidad STEM (ciencias, tecnología, ingeniería y matemáticas) con profesionales de NASA que están trabajando en estas ramas. Acompaña a los programas  de conexión digital de NASA (DLN for sus siglas en Ingles) y el programa de colaboraciones de desarrolló profesional educativo (EPDC por sus siglas en Ingles) hablando de diferentes misiones, investigaciones, y carreras en NASA. Inscribe tu escuela y conectate ó envia tus preguntas por medio de Twitter usando #NASASTARS ó correo electrónico astrosdeNASA@gmail.com.

Escribanos si usted esta interesado en conectarse directo para participar y cualquier pregunta sobre el programa astrosdeNASA@gmail.com.

El siguiente programa de una hora será transmitido por NASA DLiNfo Channel el 29 de Marzo de 2016 a la 1 p.m. EDT.

Para más información visite la página https://www.nasa.gov/dln.

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Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents “STEM in 30” Webcast Series

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is presenting a series of free education webcast events called “STEM in 30.” This new program consists of live, fast-paced 30-minute webcasts designed to increase interest and engagement in science, technology, engineering and mathematics for students. To enhance the learning experience, students can get involved with the content through the interactive “Cover It Live” feature, which includes poll questions and classroom activities. The webcasts will be available live on the National Air and Space Museum website and will be archived for on-demand viewing.

Mars Rovers
March 30, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EDT
Two separate rovers are traversing Mars right this instant. It took many people and thousands of parts (many of them made of titanium) to build these rovers. Explore the construction of the Mars rovers as well as the science that is being done 140 million miles away on the Red Planet.

Moon Rocks
May 25, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EDT
Twelve men have walked on the moon. While the rest of us remain Earth-bound, we’re able to learn about the moon from the rocks these 12 astronauts brought back for scientific study. We also have found lunar meteorites here on Earth — meteorites produced by impacts hitting the moon. Explore moon rocks and what they can tell us not only about the moon but also about our own planet.

Milestones of Flight: Lunar Module
May 25, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EDT
To date, only one spacecraft has flown exclusively in space: the Lunar Module. This craft was designed for the sole purpose of getting men to the moon and then back to the Command Service Module orbiting above. Six of these crafts landed on the moon with a seventh being used as a lifeboat for the crew of Apollo 13. This webcast will explore this amazing spacecraft.

“STEM in 30” webcasts are online learning experiences but are filmed in front of a live audience. If you are interested in bringing your school group to a live filming of “STEM in 30,” please email STEMin30@si.edu for details.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s “STEM in 30” Webcast Series, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/explore-and-learn/stem-in-30/.

Questions about this series should be directed to the visitor service line at 202-633-2214.

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International FameLab Competition: San Juan Regional Event

NASA, the University of Puerto Rico, Rio Pedras and Arecibo Observatory are hosting an International FameLab regional competition event on March 30-April 1, 2016, in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Are you passionate about science? Do you love to communicate?

At regional competitions throughout the U.S., early career scientists from numerous disciplines are competing to convey their research and related science concepts. Each contestant has the spotlight for only three minutes. No slides or charts are allowed. Contestants may only use the power of words and any prop that can be held in their hands.

Winners from each regional event will face off in April 2016. Contestants will compete for a grand prize and the opportunity to compete with peers from around the world at the FameLab International Final in the United Kingdom in June 2016.

For more information and to register to take part in the competition, visit http://famelab.arc.nasa.gov/.

Questions about this competition should be emailed to Desireemoi Bridges at desireemoi.r.bridges@nasa.gov.

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International Space Station Research Design Challenge: Capillary Effects on Liquids Exploratory Research Experiments

NASA and Portland State University are seeking participants for the International Space Station Research Design Challenge: Capillary Effects on Liquids Exploratory Research Experiments, or CELERE. This design challenge enables students to participate in microgravity research on capillary action, similar to that conducted on the space station.

Teams or individuals create their own experiment using computer-aided design with a provided template and submit short proposals presenting the experiments. Portland State University then manufactures test cells using the CAD drawings and a computer-controlled laser cutter. Each experiment is conducted in a drop tower. Video of the drop is provided for student analysis and reporting of results.

CELERE is open to individuals and teams in grades 8-12. To facilitate the participation of informal science clubs, Scouts, etc., teams may include younger students as long as at least one team member is in grades 8-12. Teams may be of any size and may include an entire class or science club. The program is limited to students from the U.S., including the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Students at Department of Defense Education Activity schools (www.dodea.edu), including those outside the U.S., are also eligible to participate.

The CELERE design challenge is a relatively new program and, as a result, the odds of selection are quite high. In 2014 and 2015, 100 percent of the entries were selected for full participation, where the student experiments were built and tested in microgravity. In 2016, selection of at least one qualifying entry is guaranteed from each state and listed territory, at least one DODEA school, and at least one Bureau of Indian Education school (http://bie.edu/). Students are strongly encouraged to apply!

Design proposals are now being accepted. Submissions are due April 1, 2016.

For more information about this opportunity, visit http://spaceflightsystems.grc.nasa.gov/CELERE/.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please email your inquiries to the CELERE team at celere@lists.nasa.gov.

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2016 Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching

The National Science Foundation currently is accepting nominations and applications for the Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching program. PAEMST is the highest recognition that a teacher of K-12 mathematics or science (including computer science) may receive for outstanding teaching in the United States. Since 1983, more than 4,400 teachers have been recognized for their contributions to mathematics and science education. Awardees serve as models for their colleagues, inspiration to their communities, and leaders in the improvement of mathematics and science education. Up to 108 awardees may be recognized each year.

Presidential awardees receive a certificate signed by the President of the United States; a trip for two to Washington, D.C., to attend a series of recognition events and professional development opportunities; and a $10,000 award from the National Science Foundation. The National Science Foundation administers PAEMST on the behalf of The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.

The PAEMST program is open to outstanding mathematics and science teachers in the 50 states and the four U.S. jurisdictions (Washington, D.C.; Puerto Rico; Department of Defense education activity schools; and the U.S. territories as a group). Anyone — principals, teachers, parents, students or members of the public — may nominate a teacher by completing the nomination form available on the PAEMST website. Teachers also may apply directly. Teachers from groups underrepresented in STEM teaching and learning are encouraged to apply.

Nominations for elementary school teachers (grades K-6) are due April 1, 2016. Secondary school teachers (grades 7-12) are eligible to apply in 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.paemst.org/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to info@paemst.org.

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Astrobiology Graduate Conference 2016

The next Astrobiology Graduate Conference, AbGradCon 2016, will be held at the University of Colorado in Boulder on July 24-27, 2016. This conference is run by graduate students for other graduate students and early career scientists with the purpose of having conference attendees share their astrobiology-related research, collaborate with their peers, and make new professional connections in a low-pressure setting.

Conference attendees share their research by presenting a 15-minute talk or presenting a poster (though talks are preferred). Topics to be covered include astrochemistry, exoplanet research, planetary science, geobiology, computer science, origins of life research, and aerospace engineering. The conference culminates with a field trip to a site relevant to astrobiology. This year’s conference attendees will visit Dinosaur Ridge in Morrison, Colorado. A Public Speaking Workshop will be held as an alternative for those who do not want to participate in the field trip.

Attendees also have the option of joining, separate from the conference, the Research Focus Group workshop that will take place July 22-24 in Estes Park, Colorado. The RFG is a proposal-writing workshop targeted at developing better fundable proposals for research.

Food and lodging for conference attendees will be covered by the conference. We also expect to be able to cover most travel costs for attendees.

Applications are due April 1, 2016.

For more information, visit http://astrobiology.nasa.gov/careers-employment/abgradcon-2016/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to abgradcon@gmail.com.

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Earth Observatory’s Tournament Earth 2016

Thirty-two of the best Earth Observatory images will compete in Tournament Earth 4.0, but only one can be the winner! From Feb. 29 through April 4, 2016, visitors to NASA’s Earth Observatory website can vote for their favorite images from 2015, whittling them down each week in a tournament of remote-sensing science. The competition is divided into four categories: data, art, event and photograph.

Voting takes place online, and a printable bracket is available to let you pick your favorites and track your selections as the competition progresses.

To get started, visit http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/TournamentEarth/.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Kevin Ward at kevin.a.ward@nasa.gov.

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Environmental Education Grants

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency seeks proposals for grants to support environmental education projects that promote environmental awareness and stewardship and help people develop the skills to take responsible actions to protect the environment. This grant program provides financial support for projects that design, demonstrate and/or disseminate environmental education practices, methods or techniques.

Entities that are eligible to apply include local education agencies, state education or environmental agencies, colleges and universities, nonprofit organizations, noncommercial educational broadcasting entities, and tribal education agencies (including schools and community colleges controlled by an Indian tribe, band or nation). Applicant organizations must be located in the United States or its territories, and the majority of the educational activities must take place in the U.S.; in the U.S. and Canada or Mexico; or in the territories of the U.S.

Applications are due April 8, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.epa.gov/education/environmental-education-ee-grants.

Please direct questions about this grant opportunity to eegrants@epa.gov.

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NASA TechPort Request for Information

NASA is conducting this Request for Information, or RFI, to better understand user needs and identify potential improvements for the NASA Technology Portfolio System (TechPort).

NASA developed TechPort as an agencywide tool to capture detailed information on technology investments that support missions across aeronautics, space exploration and scientific discovery. NASA has used TechPort internally since 2012. Through continuous updates, the system now contains information on more than 840 active projects and more than 7,600 historical records. In February 2015, NASA opened a beta version of TechPort to the public.

To help enhance the TechPort system, NASA is seeking feedback via a short, 18-question survey that takes an estimated 5 to 10 minutes to complete. Feedback may be submitted through April 14, 2016.

To provide feedback, visit https://techport.nasa.gov/rfi.

To visit the NASA TechPort, visit http://techport.nasa.gov/home.

Please direct questions about NASA TechPort and this RFI to hq-techport@mail.nasa.gov.

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Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions and museums to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

There will be a nominal shipping fee that must be paid online with a credit card.  To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.

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2016 Texas Space Grant Consortium Columbia Crew Memorial Undergraduate Scholarships

The Texas Space Grant Consortium and the Aviation and Space Foundation of Texas, in partnership with NASA, are offering undergraduate scholarships of $1,500 in memory of the Space Shuttle Columbia astronauts. These seven men and women paid the ultimate sacrifice to expand the exploration of space and our knowledge of the world that we live in.

These scholarships are intended to recognize high-quality students and encourage their consideration of graduate studies in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, ultimately leading to careers in STEM-related fields. The scholarships stress excellence in academics, participation in STEM education and research projects, and the exhibition of leadership qualities.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens and registered for at least a half-time course load at a Texas Space Grant Consortium institution. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 29, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/grants/2016/scholars_announcement.html.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to scholarships@tsgc.utexas.edu.

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2016 Texas Space Grant Consortium STEM Educator Scholarships

The Texas Space Grant Consortium has established a new Educator STEM Scholarship Program. These $1,500 scholarships are intended to recognize teachers enrolled in master’s programs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields at a TSGC member institution.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens who hold a bachelor’s degree and are enrolled in a master’s program at a Texas Space Grant Consortium institution. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 29, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/edu_stem/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to scholarships@tsgc.utexas.edu.

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2016-2017 Texas Space Grant Consortium Graduate Fellowships

Texas Space Grant Consortium Fellowships encourage graduate study in the fields of space science and engineering. Interdisciplinary and integrated work experience are emphasized.

Each $5,000 award supplements half-time graduate support (or fellowship) provided by a Consortium institution. The fellowship award is good for one year. Each fellowship may be renewed for a maximum of three years, providing the recipient has spent no more than two of those years as a master’s candidate.

Applicants must be registered for full-time study in a graduate program at one or more of the Texas Space Grant Consortium institutions and must be promised financial support at that institution. Applicants must also be U.S. citizens. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 29, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/grants/2016/fellows_announcement.html.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to fellowships@tsgc.utexas.edu.

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Institute of Museum and Library Services Grants: STEM Expert Facilitation of Family Learning in Libraries and Museums

The Institute of Museum and Library Services seeks proposals for design-based research projects focused on inquiry-based STEM programs delivered by scientists, engineers, and related technical practitioners to children ages 6-10 and their families. Proposals should address the role of experts’ oral narratives (e.g., storytelling or personal histories) as part of object-based science inquiry and include information about how findings will be applicable in both museum and library settings.

Entities that are eligible to apply include libraries, agencies, institutions of higher education, museums, and other entities that advance the museum and library fields. Grant amounts up to $1,000,000 are available for a period of performance up to two years.

Applications are due May 1, 2016.

For more information, visit https://www.imls.gov/grants/available/stem-expert-facilitation-family-learning-libraries-and-museums-stemex.

Library representatives with questions about this opportunity should email Sandra Toro at storo@imls.gov. Museum representatives with questions should email Helen Wechsler at hwechsler@imls.gov or Sandra Narva at snarva@imls.gov.

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2016 NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge: Distributed Electric Propulsion

Distributed Electric Propulsion, or DEP, is an emerging aircraft design concept that has the potential to improve aircraft performance in a number of areas, including efficiency, takeoff and landing performance, emissions, noise abatement, safety, and ride quality. DEP also has the potential to enable new novel control systems. In this year’s NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge, student teams are challenged to design a commuter aircraft that applies DEP technology. The main source of thrust for the students’ concept may come from DEP or a combination of DEP and conventional propulsion devices (turboprops, turbofans, etc.). The challenge for the design team is to determine the most advantageous application of DEP for their aircraft and to justify their selection.

The contest is open to teams of full-time students enrolled in higher education institutions of the United States or its territories. This category includes universities, colleges, trade schools, community colleges, professional schools, etc. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

Final entries are due May 16, 2016.

For more information and a complete list of rules, visit http://aero.larc.nasa.gov/university-contest/.

Questions about the challenge should be directed to Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.

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Call for Papers: NASA in the ‘Long’ Civil Rights Movement Symposium

The History Office at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center and the Department of History at the University of Alabama Huntsville invite academics, graduate students and independent scholars to submit proposals for papers to be presented at a two-day symposium, March 16-17, 2017. The symposium will take place at the University of Alabama Huntsville and will address the role/relationship of NASA to the “Long” Civil Rights Movement, particularly in, but not limited to, the Deep South (Huntsville, Florida, Houston, Mississippi and New Orleans).

The conceptual framework for the symposium is provided by Jacquelyn Dowd Hall’s 2005 essay in the Journal of American History, “The Long Civil Rights Movement and the Political Uses of the Past,” which called upon historians to produce new “modes of writing and speaking that emphasize individual agency … while also dramatizing the hidden history of politics and institutions.” Along these lines, the conference welcomes papers addressing the Civil Rights experience across NASA that not only explore the experience of African Americans, but also of women, immigrants and other politically/legally marginalized groups. The intention is to publish a subset of the papers as an anthology.

Those interested in presenting a paper at the symposium should send an abstract of no more than 400 words and a short biography or curriculum vita, including affiliation, to Brian Odom at brian.c.odom@nasa.gov or Dr. Stephen Waring at warings@uah.edu by July 31, 2016.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/centers/marshall/history/call-for-papers-nasa-in-the-long-civil-rights-movement-symposium-university-of-alabama.html.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Brian Odom at brian.c.odom@nasa.gov.

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Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The Announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design (STEAMD); or activities culturally relevant to or focused on unrepresented in STEM careers populations, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or non-reimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA Announcement.

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Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at https://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express Message — May 14, 2015

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

“Where Over the World Is Astronaut Scott Kelly?” Geography From Space Trivia Contest
Audience: All Educators and Students
Deadline: Ongoing Through March 2016

Cast Your Vote in the Ceres “Bright Spot” Mystery Poll
Audience: All Educators and Students

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations
Available While Supplies Last

Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: May 14, 2015, at 5 p.m. EDT

Lunar and Planetary Institute Workshop: Mars Through Time
Audience: 9-12 Educators and Pre-service Teachers
Workshop Dates: July 13-16, 2015
Application Deadline: May 15, 2015

Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents Astronomy Chats
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Chat Date: May 17, 2015, at 12 p.m. EDT

2020 Electric General Aviation NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Students
Entry Deadline: May 18, 2015

NASA Robotic Mining Competition 2015
Audience: Higher Education Educators & Students
Event Date: May 20-22, 2015

2015 NASA MUREP Virtual MSI Symposium and Collaboration Videoconference
Audience: Minority Serving Institutions
Event Date: May 20, 2015, at 3:30 p.m. EDT

Museum Alliance Webcast — NASA’s Journey to Mars Begins Here
Audience: Informal Education Institutions
Event Date: May 21, 2015, at 1 p.m. EDT (10 a.m. PDT)

2015 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators and 9-Higher Education Students
Next Lecture Date: May 21, 2015, at 7 pm. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)

MAVEN Educator Ambassador Program
Audience: Middle School and High School Teachers
Workshop Dates: Aug. 3-7, 2015
Application Deadline: May 22, 2015

World Science Festival to Host Google+ Hangout With NASA Chief Scientist Ellen Stofan
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: May 28, 2015, at 10 a.m. EDT

Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 9 to the International Space Station
Audience: School Districts Serving Grades 5-12, Informal Education Institutions, Colleges and Universities
Inquiry Deadline: May 31, 2015

NASA History Program Office Fall 2015 Internships
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: June 1, 2015

2015 NSBRI First Award Fellowship Program
Audience: Postdoctoral Fellows
Application Deadline: June 5, 2015

Free Tours of Facilities at NASA’s Glenn Research Center
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: June 6, 2015

Smallsat Technology Partnerships Solicitation
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Proposal Deadline: June 8, 2015

2014 NASA EONS Solicitation — New MUREP Aerospace Academy Appendix
Audience: Minority Serving Institutions
Proposal Deadline: June 11, 2015

2014 NASA EONS Solicitation — New MUREP Community College Curriculum
Improvement Appendix
Audience: Minority Serving Community College
Proposal Deadline: June 11, 2015

Center for Astronomy Education Teaching Excellence Workshops — Spring/Summer 2015
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Next Event Date: June 13, 2015

White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities — 2015 All-Star       Students
Audience: Higher Education Students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Application Deadline: June 17, 2015

2014 NASA EONS Solicitation — New MUREP American Indian and Alaskan Native STEM Partnership Appendix
Audience: American Indian and Alaskan Native Serving Institutions
Proposal Deadline: June 23, 2015

2014 NASA EONS Solicitation — New MUREP Other Opportunities Appendix
Audience: U.S. Organizations and Institutions
Proposal Deadline: June 26, 2015

2014 NASA EONS Solicitation — New MUREP Educator Institutes Appendix
Audience: Minority Serving Institutions
Proposal Deadline: June 30, 2015

NASA’s Journey to Mars Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Proposal Deadline: July 6, 2015

Future Engineers: 3-D Space Container Challenge
Audience: K-12 Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: Aug. 2, 2015

NOAA’s Climate Education Regional Workshop — Silver Spring, Maryland
Audience: K-12, Informal and Pre-Service Educators
Workshop Date: Aug. 5, 2015

Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current
Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

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“Where Over the World Is Astronaut Scott Kelly?” Geography From Space Trivia Contest

During his year-long stay on the International Space Station, astronaut Scott Kelly wants to test your knowledge of the world through a geography trivia game on Twitter. Traveling more than 220 miles above Earth, and at 17,500 miles per hour, he circumnavigates the globe more than a dozen times a day. This gives Kelly the opportunity to see and photograph various geographical locations on Earth. In fact, part of his job while in space is to capture images of Earth for
scientific observations.

Follow @StationCDRKelly on Twitter. Each Wednesday, Kelly will tweet a picture and ask the public to identify the place depicted in the photo. The first person to identify the place correctly will win an autographed copy of the picture. Kelly plans to continue posting weekly contest
photos until he returns from the space station in March 2016.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/where-over-the-world-is-astronaut-scott-kelly.

To learn more about the One-Year Mission, visit https://www.nasa.gov/content/one-year-crew.

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Cast Your Vote in the Ceres “Bright Spot” Mystery Poll

On March 6, 2015, NASA’s Dawn spacecraft began orbiting Ceres, the largest body in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. Even before the spacecraft arrived at the dwarf planet, images revealed mysterious bright spots that captivated scientists and observers alike.

Can you guess what’s creating those unusual bright spots on Ceres? Until Dawn gets a closer look over the next few months, it’s anyone’s guess what those spots could be.

To learn more and to cast your vote, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/dawn/world_ceres/.

For more information about the Dawn mission, visit http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/.

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Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles Available for Educational Use

NASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions and museums to request space shuttle
thermal protective tiles and other special items offered on a first-come, first-served basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an
additional three tiles.

There will be a nominal shipping fee that must be paid online with a credit card. To make a
request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.

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Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

NASA Educator Professional Development is presenting a series of free webinars open to all
educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to
participate. Simply click on the provided link to register.

Rockets 2 Racecars: Solar Energy / Training for Pocono Raceway
Audience:
Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 3-9
Event Date: May 14, 2015, at 5 p.m. EDT
Join NASA Educator Professional Development for a free 60-minute webinar to discover how to connect NASA solar and aerodynamic research and educational activities to the solar-powered Pocono Raceway Track in Pennsylvania. Select educators will have the opportunity to earn
professional development hours by supporting NASA experts at the Pocono Raceway Track in early June 2015!
Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/125122

Solar System and the Periodic Table
Audience:
Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 3-8
Event Date: May 14, 2015, at 7 p.m. EDT
Participants will color the periodic table as we travel through the solar system. It will be a fun
introduction to what the periodic table is and why it is important to us. The webinar includes a game and a short “writing for understanding” exercise.
Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/126710

Rockets 2 Racecars: Space Suits and Driver Suits / Training for Dover International
Speedway
Audience:
Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-10
Event Date: May 18, 2015, at 5 p.m. EDT
Get your students revved up about science, technology, engineering and mathematics with NASA’s Rockets 2 Racecars (R2R) STEM Education webinar series! Discover similarities in spacesuits used by NASA astronauts with those used by stock car race drivers. Learn about the
technologies developed by NASA that are used by the racing industry. Investigate how
technology development is linked to processes of the human body. Educators are invited to put their knowledge to the test as a representative of NASA content at Dover International Speedway on Sunday, May 31, 2015.
Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/127133

Chemistry and Climate Change
Audience:
Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 3-8
Event Date: May 18, 2015, at 7 p.m. EDT
By integrating NASA STEM resources, this webinar gives teachers an overview of climate change. Learn about simple chemistry activities, videos and games that can bring a
standards-based strategy to teaching students to think about our impact on the environment, economics and social change. Activities presented meet Next Generation Science Standards for Earth Systems and Earth and Human Activity.
Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/126723

Fly By Math
Audience:
Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-9
Event Date: May 19, 2015, at 6 p.m. EDT
Explore activities focusing on grades 5-9 mathematics skills where students apply
decision-making and proportional reasoning skills to resolve distance-rate-time problems in
realistic air traffic control situations. A Web-based interactive Air Traffic Control, or ATC,
Simulator, which represents an air traffic controller’s screen, will be used for solving real-life problems.
Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/125948

Magnetism in Microgravity and Beyond Earth Surface: Part 3
Audience:
Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: May 20, 2015, at 6:00 p.m. EDT
Join subject matter expert Craig Polluck from NASA’s Magnetosphere MultiScale mission team for a discussion about NASA’s MMS mission, its instrumentation, and some of the data NASA hopes to obtain from this complex mission. Please visit the MMS website http://mms.gsfc.nasa.gov/ and have your questions ready before the webinar.
Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/125780

NASA Mission Geography: Using Our Earth to Connect STEM, Geography and Language Arts
Audience:
Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-12
Event Date: May 21, 2015, at 6 p.m. EDT
NASA Mission Geography is a unique curriculum that integrates STEM, geography and the
language arts with Earth observations from space, remote sensing and maps. This distinctive
combination allows students to better investigate our Earth and the processes that shape it, both natural and human-influenced. Using the unique perspective from space, Mission
Geography brings Earth’s geography to life. The curriculum sparks active, exciting student learning by incorporating multidiscipline content and modeling the processes of research and investigation.
Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/126501

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at Stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.

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Lunar and Planetary Institute Workshop: Mars Through Time

The Lunar and Planetary Institute and the ChemCam instrument team invite high school
educators, both in-service and pre-service, to attend the “Mars Through Time” workshop. This four-day workshop will take place at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston, Texas, July 13-16, 2015.

Attendees will discover the relationship between technology and science as it relates to our
understanding of Mars. Attendees also will discuss the nature and process of science with invited Mars scientists. Classroom resources will be provided.

Workshop registration is free. This workshop is limited to 20 participants. Interested educators are encouraged to apply early to secure a spot. Qualified applicants will be accepted in the
order they apply. Travel stipends are available. The application closes May 15, 2015.

For more information and to apply for the workshop, visit http://www.lpi.usra.edu/education/workshops/mars/.

Questions about the workshop should be directed to Andy Shaner at shaner@lpi.usra.edu.

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Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents Astronomy Chats

Have you ever talked to an astronomer? To participate in an informal conversation with an
astronomy researcher, join the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum for a series of Astronomy Chats. The researchers work at a variety of institutions, including the Smithsonian, NASA, Harvard University and the U.S. Naval Research Lab. If they cannot come in person, they join by video chat.

The conversation may be on any topic of interest to you. Visitors frequently ask questions like, “What’s an average day like for you?” or “What kind of telescopes have you used?”

Astronomy Chats take place at the Phoebe Waterman Haas Public Observatory at the
Smithsonian Institution in the District of Columbia. During inclement weather, the chats may be moved indoors, usually to the Explore the Universe gallery. Both locations are accessible. There is no admission fee.

The next Astronomy Chat is scheduled for May 17, 2015 at 12 p.m. EDT.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s Astronomy Chat Series, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/astronomy-chats/index.cfm.

Questions about this series should be directed to the visitor service line at 202-633-2214.

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2020 Electric General Aviation NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge

Electric-powered aircraft have the potential to revolutionize the way we travel. NASA invites college teams to take part in the 2015 NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate’s 2020
Electric General Aviation Design Challenge. Student teams are invited to design an electric (i.e., no combustion) general aviation aircraft that meets performance requirements and is operational by 2020.

The contest is open to teams of full-time students enrolled in higher education institutions of the United States or its territories. This category includes universities, colleges, trade schools, community colleges, professional schools, etc. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

Final entries are due May 18, 2015.

For more information and a complete list of rules, visit http://aero.larc.nasa.gov/university-contest/.

Questions about the challenge should be directed to Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.

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NASA Robotic Mining Competition 2015

The Sixth Annual NASA Robotic Mining Competition will be streamed live from the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center on May 20-22, 2015.

The NASA Robotic Mining Competition challenges university-level students to design and build a mining robot that can traverse the simulated Martian chaotic terrain, excavate Martian regolith and deposit the regolith into a collector bin within 10 minutes. The technology concepts
developed by the university teams for this competition conceivably could be used to robotically mine regolith resources on Mars.

To learn more about the competition, visit https://www.facebook.com/RoboticMiningCompetition.

To watch the competition live online, visit http://www.ustream.tv/NASAEDGE.

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2015 NASA MUREP Virtual MSI Symposium and Collaboration Videoconference

NASA’s Office of Education is hosting a virtual symposium on Wednesday, May 20, 2015, at 3:30 p.m. EDT to provide an opportunity for Minority Serving Institutions to receive in-depth
information about current Education Opportunities in NASA STEM, or EONS, solicitations.

This discussion is offered in an effort to help strengthen collaborations between MSIs and NASA centers in support of open solicitations in EONS. MSIs will have an opportunity to listen to
presentations from each NASA center on center strengths, core competencies and education interests. This virtual session will serve as a platform to connect MSIs with appropriate center POCs and raise awareness of the unique strengths of each center.

During the event, audience members may submit typed questions via chat box. After the presentation, there will be a brief Q&A via teleconference to provide real-time answers to
participant questions. To address as many participants as possible, questions should be clear, concise and limited to general topics only.

This event will begin promptly at 3:30 p.m., so participants are encouraged to connect 10-15 minutes before start time to address any possible technical difficulties.

To join this symposium, follow these instructions and connect to both videoconference and teleconference number.

To connect to the videoconference (for slide presentations and presenter introductions) log in at https://paragon-tec.adobeconnect.com/msi-symposium/.

To connect to the teleconference call number:
Dial toll free:
1-844-467-6272
Enter participant passcode: 529064

This call will be recorded and transcribed. For the sake of accuracy, be sure to speak slowly and clearly, and please spell anything that might be recorded incorrectly. Please keep all phones muted at all times until it is your turn to speak.

Cell phones are not recommended for use for this call because of the possibility of
disconnection and static.

Subsequently, a written transcript of this symposium will be posted to the NSPIRES website. Questions asked during the call also will be posted.

Any questions regarding this session should be sent to Clarence.F.Jones@nasa.gov.

Technical/system requirements:
— High-speed Internet connection
— A nearby landline
— Updated browser (preferably Firefox)
— Updated Adobe Flash Player

At any time, you may test your system and Internet connection at http://admin.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm.

This diagnostic test will ensure your computer and network connections are properly
configured to provide you with the best possible Adobe Connect meeting experience. The diagnostic test checks for the following:
— Clear connection to Adobe Connect
— Bandwidth availability
— Latest Adobe Connect Add-in

If all tests pass successfully, you are prepared for logging in to this symposium 10 minutes
before scheduled start time. If you should experience any difficulties during the diagnostic test, the site also includes troubleshooting tips and procedures as well as a few detailed instructions if this is your first time using Adobe Connect.

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Museum Alliance Webcast — NASA’s Journey to Mars Begins Here

Imagine a spaceport of the future, where a variety of space vehicles are preparing for launch or departing Earth on missions to expand humanity’s reach into space. At NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Ground Systems Development and Operations, or GSDO, program is
propelling this vision forward by leading the center’s transformation from a historically government-only launch complex to a spaceport bustling with activity involving government and commercial vehicles alike.

NASA’s Digital Learning Network and the GSDO team at Kennedy Space Center invite you to participate in an interactive webcast featuring Jason Hopkins, the Integration Engineer/Multi-Use Manager for GSDO. Hopkins is responsible for supporting the Orion Production Operations and for developing partnerships with others in the space industry to enable commercial space
activities at Kennedy.

Hopkins will webcast live from the Digital Learning Network studio at Kennedy Space Center on May 21, 2015, at 1 p.m. EDT to share information on America’s spaceport of the future and take questions from webcast viewers from around the country.

To view the webcast from your computer, visit http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-dlinfo.
Participants may submit questions for Hopkins before and during the event via email at dlinfochannel@gmail.com or via Twitter using @NASADLN and #askDLN.

To learn more about the Ground Systems Development and Operations program, visit https://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/ground/index.html.

After the webcast, presentation materials will be posted on the Museum Alliance member site at https://informal.jpl.nasa.gov/museum/Conversations. A downloadable copy of the webcast and transcript will be posted a week or so later at the same location. Username and password are required to access the member site.

To learn how to become a Museum Alliance member, visit https://informal.jpl.nasa.gov/museum/About.

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2015 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online

The Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, named after the founder of the Jet Propulsion
Laboratory, and presented by JPL’s Office of Communication and Education, share the excitement of the space program’s missions, instruments and other technologies.

Lectures take place twice per month, on consecutive Thursdays and Fridays. The Thursday lectures take place in JPL’s Theodore von Kármán Auditorium, and Friday lectures take place at Pasadena City College’s Vosloh Forum. Both start at 7 pm. PDT (10 p.m. EDT). Admission and parking are free for all lectures. No reservations are required, but seating is limited. The Thursday evening lectures are also streamed live for viewing online. Archives of past lectures are also available online.

The next lecture in the series is:

The Search for Planets, Habitability, and Life in Our Galaxy
Event Date:
May 21 and May 22, 2015, at 7 pm. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2015&month=5
What will the first evidence of life outside our own solar system look like? And what
future technologies are required to discover that evidence? Exoplanet-hunting telescopes must suppress the bright glare from stars in order to look for tell-tale signatures of life. Dr. Nick Siegler from the NASA Exoplanet Exploration Program will discuss starlight suppression technologies, and how they must evolve.

For more information about the Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, including a complete list of upcoming lectures, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.php.

Questions about this series should be directed to the http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php.

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MAVEN Educator Ambassador Program

In September 2014, the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN, or MAVEN, mission began
exploring Mars’ upper atmosphere, ionosphere and interactions with the sun and solar wind. The MAVEN Educator Ambassador, or MEA, program will focus on in-depth learning experiences around Earth, space and physical science topics for educators teaching middle- and high-school grades.

During this weeklong, NASA-funded program, participants will receive training to become a MAVEN Educator Ambassador. The goal of the MEA program is to develop the capacity and provide the opportunity for educators to train other teachers on NASA heliophysics and planetary science educational resources. Follow-up support will be provided via teleconference calls and other electronic communications. Participants involved in the MEA program will be expected to implement the lesson plans and education resources in their own classrooms, as well as train other teachers at local and regional professional development conferences or meetings.

The program will take place Aug. 3-7, 2015, at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Participants will receive a travel stipend of $700. Free housing and meals will be provided.

Applications are due May 22, 2015.

For more information about the workshop and to apply online, visit http://lasp.colorado.edu/home/maven/education-outreach/for-educators/mea/2015mea/.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to epomail@lasp.colorado.edu.

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World Science Festival to Host Google+ Hangout With NASA Chief Scientist Ellen Stofan

The World Science Festival invites educators and students to participate in an inspiring virtual classroom event. One of this year’s Pioneers in Science events is a Google+ Hangout with NASA’s Chief Scientist and leading planetary geologist Ellen Stofan. Stofan is one of the premier experts on the terrain of Titan, Venus, Mars and Earth. During this intimate gathering, students will have the opportunity to ask Stofan about her career, her inspirations and NASA’s science programs.

The 75-minute event will take place on Thursday, May 28, 2015, at 10 a.m. EDT.

To watch the event live online, visit www.worldsciencefestival.com/pioneers at the specified time. Participants are encouraged to log on 30 minutes before the event start time.

Before and during the event, students and educators are encouraged to use social media to submit questions for Stofan using the hastags #AskWSF and #WSFLive.
Twitter: @WorldSciFest
Snapchat: WorldSciFest
Instagram: WorldSciFest

To learn more about Ellen Stofan, visit https://www.nasa.gov/offices/ocs/stofan_bio.html or follow her on Twitter at https://twitter.com/ellenstofan.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to fnajar@worldsciencefestival.com.

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Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 9 to the International Space Station

The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education and the Arthur C. Clarke Institute for Space Education, in partnership with NanoRacks LLC, announce an authentic science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, opportunity for school districts across the U.S. and space station partner nations. The newest flight opportunity, Mission 9 to the International Space Station, or ISS, gives students across a community the ability to design and propose real experiments to fly in low-Earth orbit on the ISS. This opportunity is part of the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program, or SSEP.

Each participating community will receive a real microgravity research minilaboratory capable of supporting a single microgravity experiment and all launch services to fly the minilab to the space station in spring 2016 and return it to Earth. An experiment design competition in each community — engaging typically 300+ students — allows student teams to design and propose real experiments vying for their community′s reserved minilab. Content resources for teachers and students support foundational instruction on science in microgravity and experimental design. Additional SSEP programming leverages the experiment design competition to engage the community, embracing a learning community model for STEM education.

This competition is open to students in grades 5-12 and college. Informal education groups and organizations are also encouraged to participate. The deadline for interested communities to inquire about the program has been extended to May 31, 2015. The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education is available to help interested communities in the U.S. secure the needed funding.

To learn more about this opportunity, visit the SSEP Mission 9 to International Space Station National Announcement of Opportunity at http://ssep.ncesse.org/2015/03/new-flight-opportunity-for-school-districts-announcing-student-spaceflight-experiments-program-ssep-mission-9-to-the-international-space-station-for-2015-16-academic-year/.

SSEP is enabled through a strategic partnership with NanoRacks LLC working with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the utilization of the International Space Station as a national laboratory. The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (http://www.iss-casis.org/) is a national partner on SSEP. To view a list of all SSEP national partners, visit http://ssep.ncesse.org/national-partners/.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please email SSEP National Program Director Jeff Goldstein at jeffgoldstein@ncesse.org.

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NASA History Program Office Fall 2015 Internships

The NASA History Program Office is seeking undergraduate and graduate students for fall 2015 internships. The History Program Office maintains archival materials to answer research
questions from NASA personnel, journalists, scholars, students at all levels and others from around the world. The division also edits and publishes several books and monographs each year. It maintains a large number of websites on NASA history.

Students of all majors are welcome to apply. While detailed prior knowledge of the aeronautics and space fields is not necessary, a keen interest and some basic familiarity with these topics are needed. Strong research, writing and editing skills are essential. Experience with social
media is a plus.

Intern projects are flexible. Typical projects include handling a variety of information requests, writing posts for the NASA history Twitter and Facebook pages, editing historical manuscripts, doing research and writing biographical sketches, and identifying and captioning photos.

Fall 2015 internship applications are due June 1, 2015.

For more information, visit http://history.nasa.gov/interncall.htm.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please contact Bill Barry at bill.barry@nasa.gov.

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2015 NSBRI First Award Fellowship Program

The National Space Biomedical Research Institute, or NSBRI, is accepting fellowship applications for the First Award Fellowship Program. The one-year fellowships are available in any U.S.
laboratory carrying out space-related biomedical or biotechnological research.

Applicants are required to submit proposals with the support of a mentor and an institution, and all proposals will be evaluated by a peer-review committee. Selected applicants receive a stipend, allowance for health insurance and travel funds for related scientific meetings.

This year’s applicants also can request to be considered to spend part of the fellowship in
Russia, via a program involving NSBRI and the Institute of Biomedical Problems in Moscow.

Detailed program and application submission information is available at http://www.nsbri.org/firstaward/.

The application deadline is June 5, 2015.

Questions may be directed to Dr. Amanda Smith Hackler at hackler@bcm.edu.

NSBRI, funded by NASA, is a consortia of institutions studying the health risks related to long-duration spaceflight and developing the medical technologies needed for long missions. The institute’s science, technology and education projects take place at more than 60
institutions across the United States.

For more information about NSBRI’s First Award Program, please visit http://www.nsbri.org/firstaward/.

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Free Tours of Facilities at NASA’s Glenn Research Center

NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, is offering tours that take visitors behind the scenes and inside certain research facilities. Glenn scientists and engineers serve as guides. Tours will be offered each month through October 2015. Tours are free of charge for groups and individuals on an advance reservation basis. Visitor parking is also available free of charge.

A tour bus departs from Glenn’s main gate every hour beginning at 10 a.m. The last tour
departs at 1 p.m. Each tour lasts about 45 minutes and is followed by a stop at Glenn’s Gift Shop.

Glenn’s 2015 Tour Schedule

June 6, 2015 — Glenn’s Portal to the Space Station: Take a journey through the Telescience Support Center. This secure, multipurpose facility is designed to provide dedicated support for simultaneous training, simulations and real-time operations of space experiments on the International Space Station. Principal investigators, project scientists and payload operators can send commands and receive telemetry and science data from their payload hardware operating on board the station.

July 11, 2015 — Breeze by a Wind Tunnel: Tour the Abe Silverstein Supersonic Wind Tunnel. This facility has conducted supersonic propulsion testing on aircraft components such as inlets, nozzles and engines. It is ideally suited for launch vehicle tests and other fuel-burning applications.

Aug. 1, 2015 — See Things a Different Way: Check out Glenn’s Graphics and Visualization, or GVIS, and the Reconfigurable User-interface and Virtual Reality Exploration, or GRUVE, Laboratories. The GVIS Lab uses advanced computer input and output devices paired with a variety of natural user interface devices and 3-D displays. The GRUVE lab is used to analyze data obtained either by computer simulation or from research test facilities.

Sept. 12, 2015 — Go to the Extreme: Join us on a tour through Glenn’s Extreme Environments Rig, or GEER. As NASA ventures through the solar system and beyond, spacecraft will experience hostile environments of Venus and other planetary bodies. Temperatures can reach hundreds of degrees. Air pressure is crushing, and the toxic atmosphere is thick. GEER is designed to simulate those temperatures and pressure extremes and accurately reproduce the atmospheric compositions of bodies in the solar system. GEER is currently in its commissioning phase for operations simulating Venus’ surface temperature, pressure and chemistry.

Oct. 3, 2015 — Explore Locomotion on Planets: Come explore the Simulated Lunar Operations facility, which is home to a 60-foot-long, 20-foot-wide sandpit filled with simulated lunar soil and a lunar rover test bed. Other areas simulate Martian soil conditions. Research in this facility will help NASA develop the components of rovers capable of traveling long distances and investigating planetary surfaces during future human and robotic missions to keep NASA’s journey to Mars moving forward.

Tours are open to U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents. To guarantee admission, reservations are required. For more information on tours and how to make reservations, visit https://www.nasa.gov/centers/glenn/events/tours.html.

Questions about the tours should be directed to Sheila Reese at sheila.d.reese@nasa.gov.

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Smallsat Technology Partnerships Solicitation

NASA is extending an opportunity to college and university teams to propose small spacecraft technology projects that they can conduct in collaboration with NASA researchers. The Smallsat Technology Partnerships solicitation is being issued by the Small Spacecraft Technology Program as an appendix to the Space Technology Mission Directorate’s NASA Research Announcement for 2015.

NASA expects to competitively select about eight projects from among those proposed by university teams, which can form proposal partnerships with researchers from any of NASA’s 10 field centers. Awards for each project will include up to $100,000 to each university team per year. In addition, NASA will fund the time for one NASA employee to work with each selected team. Project funding is for one year with the potential to continue for a second year.

Proposed projects could involve laboratory work to advance a particular spacecraft technology or the development of a new smallsat. NASA will be accepting proposals in four topic areas: 1) precise attitude control and pointing systems for cubesats, 2) power generation, energy storage and thermal management systems for small spacecraft, 3) simple low-cost deorbit systems, and 4) communications and tracking systems and networks.

Proposals are due June 8, 2015.

The appendix document is available through the NASA Solicitation and Proposal Integrated Review and Evaluation System website at http://go.nasa.gov/1HsPKb7.

Questions about this solicitation may be directed to Rachel Khattab at rachel.khattab@nasa.gov.

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2014 NASA EONS Solicitation — New MUREP Aerospace Academy Appendix

NASA’s Office of Education is accepting new proposals under the Education Opportunities in NASA STEM, or EONS, 2014 NASA Research Announcement. Proposals are being solicited from Minority Serving Institutions, or MSIs, to create and implement a NASA MUREP Aerospace Academy to increase participation and retention of historically underserved and underrepresented K-12 youth in the areas of STEM.

Proposals are due June 11, 2015.

For more information, visit http://go.nasa.gov/1AdfCjo.

Questions about this solicitation may be directed to NASAMAA@nasaprs.com.

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2014 NASA EONS Solicitation — New MUREP Community College Curriculum Improvement Appendix

NASA’s Office of Education Minority University Research and Education Project, or MUREP, is seeking proposals from Minority Serving Community Colleges to strengthen curriculum and curricular pathways in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, and attract, retain and support the success of underrepresented students in STEM degree programs.

Proposals for the NASA MUREP Community College Curriculum Improvement, or MC3I, solicitation must contain plans for and be guided by curricula improvements, and address one of the following as a primary focus: (1) improving curriculum in STEM vocational certificate programs, associate of arts/science degree programs, and/or transfer programs; (2) strengthening and diversifying the STEM pipeline through high school partnerships; or (3) expanding opportunities in engineering. Proposers are required to partner with a NASA center or facility, and are highly encouraged to partner with other institutions, such as K-12 school districts and four-year colleges/universities. Successful proposals will be funded as multiyear cooperative agreements.

Institutions planning to prepare a proposal package for NASA MC3I are required to submit a Notice of Intent, or NOIs, to propose. NOIs assist NASA in assessing the response to this cooperative agreement notice and to determine the expertise required for the proposal review panel. NOIs should be submitted by the authorized organization representative in the NASA Solicitation and Proposal Integrated Review and Evaluation System, or NSPIRES, by April 14, 2015, at 11:59 p.m. EDT. Interested proposers must register with NSPIRES before it can be accessed for use.

Since NOIs submitted after the deadline may still be useful to NASA, late NOIs may be submitted and will be accepted.

Proposals are due on June 11, 2015 by 11:59 p.m. in NSPIRES.

For more information, visit http://go.nasa.gov/1AP8WqY.

Questions about this solicitation may be directed to Roslyn Soto at roslyn.soto@jpl.nasa.gov.

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Center for Astronomy Education Teaching Excellence Workshops — Spring/Summer 2015

NASA’s Center for Astronomy Education, or CAE, announces a series of educator workshops for astronomy and space science educators.

These workshops provide participants with experiences needed to create effective and productive active-learning classroom environments. Workshop leaders model best practices in implementing many different classroom-tested instructional strategies. But more importantly, workshop participants will gain first-hand experience implementing these proven strategies. During many microteaching events, you will have the opportunity to role-play the parts of student and instructor. You will assess and critique each other’s implementation in real time as part of a supportive learning community. You will have the opportunity to use unfamiliar teaching techniques in collaboration with mentors before using them with your students. CAE is funded through NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s Exoplanet Exploration Program.

June 13-14, 2015 — South Carolina State University in Orangeburg, South Carolina
CAE Tier I Teaching Excellence Workshop for Current and Future Astronomy and Space Science Instructors

June 22-25, 2015 — American Center for Physics in College Park, Maryland
New Faculty Workshop for Physics and Astronomy

August 4-6, 2015 — Honolulu Convention Center in Honolulu, Hawaii
CAE Teaching Excellence Short-Courses on Active Learning in the STEM Classroom

August 2015 — American Museum of Natural History in New York, New York
CAE Northeast Regional Teaching Exchange

For more information and to register for workshops online, visit http://astronomy101.jpl.nasa.gov/workshops/index.cfm.

Inquiries about this series of workshops should be directed to Gina Brissenden at gbrissenden@as.arizona.edu.

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White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities — 2015 All-Star Students

The White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities works to promote HBCU excellence, innovation and sustainability. The Initiative will recognize current HBCU
students for their dedication to academics, leadership and civic engagement as 2015 HBCU All-Star Students.

The appointment period will last approximately one year. During this time, HBCU All-Stars will serve as ambassadors of the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities by providing outreach opportunities and communications to their fellow students about the value of education and the Initiative as a networking resource. Through social media and personal and professional relationships with community-based organizations, students will share promising and proven practices that support opportunities for all young people to realize their educational and career potential. The program will provide an opportunity to participate in regional and national events as well as webchats with Initiative staff and other professionals from a wide range of disciplines that support a spirit of engagement and personal and professional development.

Nominees must be current undergraduate or graduate students at an HBCU. Applications must be submitted by 11:59 p.m. EDT on June 17, 2015.

For more information and to download an application, visit http://www.ed.gov/edblogs/whhbcu/files/2015/05/2015-HBCU-All-Star-Application-Form.pdf .

Please email any questions about this opportunity to hbcuallstars@ed.gov.

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2014 NASA EONS Solicitation — New MUREP American Indian and Alaskan Native STEM Partnership Appendix

NASA’s Office of Education Minority University Research and Education Project, or MUREP, is seeking proposals from American Indian and Alaskan Native Serving Institutions to develop and implement an evidence-driven recruitment method/model to address the shortage of computer science graduates in historically underrepresented and underserved populations.

Proposals for the NASA MUREP American Indian and Alaskan Native STEM Partnership, or MAIANSP, solicitation must address one of the following as a primary focus: (1) developing the American Indian and Alaskan Native STEM workforce; (2) strengthening STEM curricula at American Indian and Alaskan Native Serving Institutions; or (3) increasing the pool of underrepresented and underserved students in computer sciences. Successful proposals will be funded as multiyear cooperative agreements.

Institutions planning to prepare a proposal package for NASA MAIANSP are required to submit a Notice of Intent, or NOIs, to propose. NOIs assist NASA in assessing the response to this cooperative agreement notice and determining the expertise required for the proposal review panel. NOIs should be submitted by the authorized organization representative in the NASA Solicitation and Proposal Integrated Review and Evaluation System, or NSPIRES, by April 24, 2015, at 11:59 p.m. EDT. Interested proposers must register with NSPIRES before it can be accessed for use.

Since NOIs submitted after the deadline may still be useful to NASA, late NOIs may be submitted and will be accepted.

Proposals are due on June 23, 2015.

For more information, visit http://go.nasa.gov/1CMqyJz .

Questions about this solicitation may be directed to Torry Johnson at NASAMAIANSP@nasaprs.com.

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2014 NASA EONS Solicitation — New MUREP Other Opportunities Appendix

NASA’s Office of Education Minority University Research and Education Project, or MUREP, is seeking proposals from U.S organizations and institutions that align with the four White House Executive Orders for Minority Institutions to strengthen curriculum and curricular pathways in STEM and to attract, retain and support the success of underrepresented students in STEM degree programs.

Proposals for the NASA MUREP Other Opportunities solicitation must address one of the following as a primary focus: (1) increasing the number of minorities in STEM education areas relevant to NASA (2) effectively implementing NASA’s educational goals and objectives using NASA’s unique assets and capabilities (3) increasing the number of available STEM courses and curricular pathways (4) attracting, retaining and supporting the success of students in STEM degree programs and subsequently in NASA-related careers, or (5) increasing the number of students who complete STEM certificates/degrees from backgrounds that are historically underrepresented in STEM. Successful proposals will be funded as multiyear cooperative agreements.

Institutions planning to prepare a proposal package for the NASA MUREP Other Opportunities solicitation are asked to submit a Notice of Intent to propose. NOIs assist NASA in assessing the response to this cooperative agreement notice and determining the expertise required for the proposal review panel. NOIs should be submitted by the authorized organization representative into the NASA Solicitation and Proposal Integrated Review and Evaluation System, or NSPIRES, by April 24, 2015, at 11:59 p.m. EDT. Those interested in submitting a proposal must register with NSPIRES before it can be accessed for use.

Since NOIs submitted after the deadline may still be useful to NASA, late NOIs may be submitted and will be accepted.

Proposals are due on June 26, 2015.

For more information, visit http://go.nasa.gov/1FhzSof.

Questions about this solicitation may be directed to Misti Moore at Misti.M.Moore@nasa.gov.

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2014 NASA EONS Solicitation — New MUREP Educator Institutes Appendix

NASA’s Office of Education is accepting new proposals under the Education Opportunities in NASA STEM, or EONS, 2014 NASA Research Announcement. Proposals are being solicited from Minority Serving Institutions to plan, coordinate and evaluate MUREP Educator Institutes that will bring pre-service and alternative-route STEM educators from Minority Serving Institutions across the U.S. to NASA centers annually for a one-week professional development session.

Institutions planning to prepare a proposal package for the NASA MUREP Other Opportunities solicitation are asked to submit a Notice of Intent to propose. NOIs assist NASA in assessing the response to this cooperative agreement notice and in determining the expertise required for the proposal review panel. NOIs should be submitted by the authorized organization representative into the NASA Solicitation and Proposal Integrated Review and Evaluation System, or NSPIRES, by April 24, 2015, at 11:59 p.m. EDT. Those interested in submitting a proposal must register with NSPIRES before it can be accessed for use.

Since NOIs submitted after the deadline may still be useful to NASA, late NOIs may be submitted and will be accepted.

Proposals are due on June 30, 2015.

For more information, visit http://go.nasa.go v/1F2H2tO.

Questions about this solicitation may be directed to Chris Copelan at NASAMEI@nasaprs.com.

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NASA’s Journey to Mars Challenge

As NASA embarks on an ambitious journey to Mars, the agency is looking for your innovative and creative ideas to help make the journey possible! The public is invited to share their ideas, in detail, for developing the elements of space pioneering necessary to establish a continuous human presence on the Red Planet. These ideas could include shelter, food, water, breathable air, communication, exercise, social interactions and medicine, but NASA encourages participants to consider elements beyond these examples.

NASA’s efforts for sending humans to Mars are well underway, with rovers exploring the planet’s surface and spacecraft monitoring Mars from orbit. The International Space Station is testing systems and serving as a lab to learn more about the health impacts of extended space travel. NASA is testing and developing its next generation of launch and crew vehicles — the Space Launch System rocket and Orion crewed spacecraft.

Given spacecraft limitations on weight and volume — and a minimum 500 days between resupply opportunities — a mission to Mars that is not dependent on Earth for resources requires innovative solutions.

NASA seeks technical submissions that describe the development of capabilities and operations necessary, in both the near- and long-term, to advance this bold journey. Submissions may consist of proposed approaches, capabilities, systems, or a set of integrated systems that enable or enhance a sustained human presence on Mars. Solutions should include the assumptions, analysis and data that justify their value. Submissions should include a process to develop, test, implement, and operate the system or capability.

NASA will judge submissions on relevance, creativity, simplicity, resource efficiency, feasibility, comprehensiveness and scalability. NASA expects to make up to three awards at a minimum of $5,000 each from a total award pool of $15,000.

Entries are due July 6, 2015.

For more information about the challenge, visit https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-announces-journey-to-mars-challenge-seeks-public-input-on-establishing-sustained.

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Future Engineers: 3-D Space Container Challenge

NASA and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Foundation are challenging K-12 students to create a model of a container for space using 3-D modeling software. Astronauts need containers of all kinds — from advanced containers for studying fruit flies to simple containers for collecting Mars rocks or storing an astronaut’s food. The ability to 3-D print containers in space — on demand — will let humans venture farther into space. That’s why we are challenging students to start designing for space now.

Design entries could be for a container designed for microgravity on the International Space Station or a container designed for future astronauts on Mars! Space is a big place, but your imagination is even bigger. Multiple prizes, based on age groups, are available.

Entries must be submitted by Aug. 2, 2015.

The Design a Space Tool Challenge is the second in a series of challenges where students in grades K-12 create and submit a digital 3-D model of a container that they think astronauts might need in space. Future Engineers is a multiyear education initiative that consists of 3-D space challenges and curriculum videos that parents and educators can use to get kids designing today.

For more information about the challenge and to watch an introductory video, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/nasa-challenges-students-to-design-3-d-space-containers.

If you have any questions about the 3-D Space Container Challenge, please email info@futureengineers.org.

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NOAA’s Climate Education Regional Workshop — Silver Spring, Maryland

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Climate Stewards Education Project is hosting a free climate-science workshop for formal and informal educators on Aug. 5, 2015, at the NOAA Science Center in Silver Spring, Maryland. Participants will hear from and interact with climate science, education and communication experts.

The workshop will focus on an introduction to global climate models exploring the subject of climate change in the same way that research scientists do. Simulations and activities for modeling regional and/or topical impacts of climate change will be shared with a goal of connecting educators and their students/audiences to the best-available, science-based information and resources about climate change.

Attendance is limited and availability will be on a first come, first serve basis, so register early. Participation is free, but attendees are responsible for arranging their own transportation, lodging and meals unless otherwise indicated in workshop details.

All attendees will receive a certificate acknowledging their participation in the workshop as well as the number of professional development hours they have engaged in.

For more information and to register to attend, visit http://climate.gov/teaching/professional-development/climate-education-regional-workshop-silver-spring-md.

For more information about NOAA’s Climate Stewards Project, visit http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/climate-stewards/.

Questions about this workshop should be directed to Peg Steffen at Peg.Steffen@noaa.gov.

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