NASA Education Express Message — May 25, 2017

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Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: May 25, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT

2017 Girls in STEM Event at NASA’s Glenn Research Center
Audience: Summer Camps and Out-of-School-Time Groups for Girls in Grades 6-8
Registration Deadline: June 2, 2017
Event Date: July 14, 2017

New Amendments, FAQs and Notice Posted — NASA Research Announcement: Competitive Program for Science Museums, Planetariums and NASA Visitor Centers (CP4SMPVC)
Audience: Formal and Informal Education Institutions
Proposal Deadline: June 19, 2017


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘Making STEM Magic’ Program
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: May 27, 2017, at 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. EDT

NASA Solar Eclipse Workshops at Marshall Space Flight Center
Audience: K-12 Educators
Next Workshop Date: June 1, 2017, 9-11 a.m. CDT

NASA History Program Office Internships — Fall 2017
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: June 1, 2017

2017 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education
Next Lecture Date: June 1, 2017, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)

2017 Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
DEADLINE EXTENDED — Abstract Submission Due: June 2, 2017
Workshop Dates: Aug. 21-25, 2017

Lloyd V. Berkner Space Policy Internships
Audience: Undergraduate and Graduate Students at U.S. Universities and Colleges
Application Deadline: June 2, 2017

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 12 to the International Space Station
Audience: School Districts Serving Grades 5-12, Informal Education Institutions, Colleges and Universities
Inquiry Deadline: June 15, 2017
Start Date: September 5, 2017

‘CineSpace’ Short Film Competition
Audience: All Educators and Students
Entry Submission Period: June 1 – July 31, 2017

Get Ready for the 2017 Solar Eclipse With NASA Resources
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Aug. 21, 2017

WGBH Education — The Solar Eclipse of 2017: Teacher Toolkit
Audience: K-12 Educators
Eclipse Date: Aug. 21, 2017

Earn STEM Digital Badges to Celebrate the Centennial of NASA’s Langley Research Center
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-9, Informal Educators
Deadline: Oct. 21, 2017

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

Search for Gravitational Waves With ‘Gravity Spy’ Citizen Science Project
Audience: All Educators and Students
Project Timeframe: Ongoing

NASA Seeks Creative Arts Inspired by Cassini’s Mission to Saturn
Audience: All Educators and Students Ages 13 and Older


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

 


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

International Space Station — Off the Earth, For the Earth: Space Food and Nutrition
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-8
Event Date: May 25, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT
Eat your way through math and science. This webinar will cover NASA STEM lessons that investigate space food and nutrition for astronauts. Participants will find out about NASA resources to research the caloric content and nutritional value of space foods, learn about nutritional needs of astronauts, and construct sample space food menus. Explore a menu of inquiry activities and other resources to satisfy your STEM appetite. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/235775

Mars — Here We Come! Guest: Dr. Pascal Lee, Author
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: May 30, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Dr. Pascal Lee is a planetary scientist at the SETI Institute. He is also chairman of the Mars Institute and director of the NASA Haughton-Mars Project at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. His research is on the history of water on Mars and planning the future human exploration of Mars. Dr. Lee has led over 30 expeditions to the Arctic and Antarctica to study Mars by comparison with the Earth. He also studies asteroids and the two moons of Mars. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/250710

NASA Digital Badge for Educators: A Way to Personalize Your Learning
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: May 31, 2017, at 4 p.m. EDT
Digital badges, or microcredentials, are online representation of online learning experiences. They offer educators an opportunity to personalize their professional development. NASA EPDC Digital Badging System offers various opportunities for educators to learn about NASA topics and classroom activities while earning hours of professional development. This webinar will offer a walkthrough of the Digital Badging System and will look through some current opportunities for all educators. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/242639

Journey to Mars: There and Back Again
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-12
Event Date: June 1, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT
Humans will one day travel to and explore Mars in person. How will we get there? What will we do when we get there? How will we get back? Explore the technology that will enable humans to travel to Mars. The webinar will showcase NASA’s Journey to Mars missions, online resources and STEM classroom lessons. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/241394

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


2017 Girls in STEM Event at NASA’s Glenn Research Center

NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, is hosting a “Girls in STEM” event for girls in grades 6 to 8 who participate in summer camps or other out-of-school-time summer groups and organizations! The event will take place on July 14, 2017, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. EDT.

This activity-filled event includes a career showcase, a panel of female scientists and engineers, an engineering design challenge, and facility tours to encourage future leaders to pursue careers in STEM.

Online registration for the event is open through Friday, June 2, 2017. Attending students and chaperones must be U.S. citizens. Each group must have 10 to 25 students.

For full event details and to register online, visit https://events.grc.nasa.gov/girlsinstem/Default.aspx.

Questions about this event should be directed to Stephanie Brown-Houston at sdbrown-houston@nasa.gov.


New Amendments, FAQs and Notice Posted — NASA Research Announcement: Competitive Program for Science Museums, Planetariums and NASA Visitor Centers (CP4SMPVC)

The NASA Office of Education has posted new information for its 2017 NASA Research Announcement: Competitive Program for Science Museums, Planetariums and NASA Visitor Centers (CP4SMPVC), Announcement Number NNH17ZHA002N. Proposals for this solicitation are due June 19, 2017.

To view the Amendments, FAQs and Notice, visit NSPIRES at https://go.nasa.gov/2oC4eCU.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NRA.


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘Making STEM Magic’ Program

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is presenting a series of free education events called “Making STEM Magic.” This new program introduces young visitors to engineering in a fun and creative way. Participants learn by doing. Each challenge involves designing, building and testing a prototype. Each month, a new theme will be introduced with a new problem to solve.

Events are scheduled each Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. ET at the National Air and Space Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia. The events are free and open to the public.

Blast Off!: Propulsion
Each Saturday in May 2017
It really is rocket science. Try your hand at designing a rocket and staying on target.

Red Rover: Mission to Mars
Each Saturday in June 2017
Did you know that rovers are robotic ambassadors? Learn more about NASA’s mobile labs and construct your own rolling rover.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s “Making STEM Magic” program, visit https://airandspace.si.edu/visit/events/stem-magic.

Please direct questions about this series of events to the Visitor Service line at 703-572-4118.


NASA Solar Eclipse Workshops at Marshall Space Flight Center

On Aug. 21, 2017, the United States will experience a solar eclipse. This celestial event will provide a golden opportunity to engage and educate diverse audiences, and NASA has the resources to help. Join the Educator Resource Center at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, for the final workshop in a series of grade-level specific educator workshops to learn about safety tips, hands-on activities, resources and more!

June 1, 2017, 9-11 a.m. CDT: Educators of Grades K-12

For full event details and registration information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/solar_eclipse_workshop2017.pdf.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Maria Chambers at maria.a.chambers@nasa.gov.


NASA History Program Office Internships — Fall 2017

The NASA History Program Office is seeking undergraduate and graduate students for summer 2017 internships. The History Program Office maintains archival materials to answer research questions from NASA personnel, journalists, scholars, students at all levels and others from around the world. The division also edits and publishes several books and monographs each year. It maintains a large number of websites on NASA history.

Students of all majors are welcome to apply. While detailed prior knowledge of the aeronautics and space fields is not necessary, a keen interest and some basic familiarity with these topics are needed. Strong research, writing and editing skills are essential. Experience with social media is a plus.

Intern projects are flexible. Typical projects include handling a variety of information requests, writing posts for the NASA history Twitter and Facebook pages, editing historical manuscripts, doing research and writing biographical sketches, and identifying and captioning photos.

Applications for fall 2017 internships are due June 1, 2017. Applications for spring 2018 internship applications are due June 1, 2017 and applications for summer 2018 internships are due Feb. 1, 2018.

For more information, visit http://history.nasa.gov/interncall.htm.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please contact Bill Barry at bill.barry@nasa.gov.


2017 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online

The Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, named after the founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and presented by JPL’s Office of Communication and Education, shares the excitement of the space program’s missions, instruments and other technologies.

Lectures take place twice per month, on consecutive Thursdays and Fridays. Thursday lectures take place in JPL’s Theodore von Kármán Auditorium, and Friday lectures take place at Pasadena City College’s Vosloh Forum. Both start at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT). Admission and parking are free for all lectures. No reservations are required, but seating is limited. The Thursday evening lectures are streamed live for viewing online. Archives of past lectures are also available online.

Next Lecture in the Series:

The Golden Age of Exploration
Event Date:
June 1 and June 2, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2017&month=6
Missions managed by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory have visited every planet in our solar system. Mars has been explored by rovers; samples from a comet’s tail and the solar wind have been returned to Earth; planets have been discovered around neighboring stars; and new insights into our planet’s environment have been acquired. Join Charles Elachi, recently retired director of JPL, for a discussion about this golden age of exploration.

For more information about the Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, including a complete list of upcoming lectures, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.php.

Questions about this series should be directed to http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php.


ABSTRACT DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2017 Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop

The annual Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop will be held Aug. 21-25, 2017, at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

The Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop encourages knowledge sharing, professional development, and networking throughout the thermal and fluids engineering community within NASA, academia and the aerospace community at large. STEM faculty and university students are encouraged to attend, submit a poster or paper on their thermal/fluids work, take free training, or do a combination thereof.

Registration to attend the workshop is free. Participants interested in presenting at the conference, via manuscript or technical poster, must submit an abstract by June 2, 2017.

For more information about the workshop and how to submit an abstract for consideration, visit https://tfaws.nasa.gov/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Ramona Cummings at ramona.o.cummings@nasa.gov.


Lloyd V. Berkner Space Policy Internships

The Space Studies Board is seeking applicants for the Lloyd V. Berkner Space Policy Internships for autumn 2017. The goal of the program is to provide promising undergraduate and graduate students with the opportunity to work in the area of civil space research policy in the nation’s capital.

Established in 1958, the Space Studies Board is the principal advisory group providing independent scientific and programmatic advice to NASA and other government agencies on all aspects of civil space research and associated ground-based activities. Interns typically undertake one or more short-term research projects designed to assist with or to enhance ongoing study projects.

Applicants must be registered students (undergraduate or graduate) at a U.S. university or college who have completed their junior year. Applicants should have long-term career goals in space science research, applications or policy.

Applications are due June 2, 2017.

For more information and a full list of eligibility requirements, visit http://sites.nationalacademies.org/SSB/SSB_052239.

Please direct questions about this internship to Dr. David H. Smith at dhsmith@nas.edu.


DEADLINE EXTENDED: Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 12 to the International Space Station

The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education and the Arthur C. Clarke Institute for Space Education announce a science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, opportunity for school districts across the U.S. and space station partner nations. The newest flight opportunity, Mission 12 to the International Space Station, gives students across a community the ability to design and propose real experiments to fly in low Earth orbit on the space station. This opportunity is part of the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program, or SSEP.

Each participating community will receive a microgravity research mini-laboratory capable of supporting a single microgravity experiment and all launch services to fly the minilab to the space station in spring/summer 2018 and return it to Earth. An experiment design competition in each community — engaging typically 300+ students — allows student teams to design and propose real experiments vying for their community′s reserved mini-lab.

Content resources for teachers and students support foundational instruction on science in microgravity and experimental design. Additional SSEP programming uses the experiment design competition to engage the community in embracing a learning-community model for STEM education.

This competition is open to students in grades 5-12 and college. Informal education groups and organizations also are encouraged to participate. Interested communities must inquire about the program no later than June 15, 2017. The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education is available to help interested communities in the U.S. secure the needed funding.

To learn more about this opportunity, visit the “SSEP Mission 12 to International Space Station” National Announcement of Opportunity at http://ssep.ncesse.org/2017/03/new-flight-opportunity-for-school-districts-announcing-student-spaceflight-experiments-program-ssep-mission-12-to-the-international-space-station-starting-september-2017/.

SSEP is enabled through a strategic partnership with DreamUp PBC and NanoRacks LLC working with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the use of the International Space Station as a national laboratory. The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (http://www.iss-casis.org/) is a national partner of SSEP. To view a list of all SSEP national partners, visit http://ssep.ncesse.org/national-partners/.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please email SSEP National Program Director Jeff Goldstein at jeffgoldstein@ncesse.org.


‘CineSpace’ Short Film Competition

NASA and the Houston Cinema Arts Society once again will offer filmmakers around the world a chance to share their works inspired by — and using — actual NASA imagery through “CineSpace,” a short-film competition.

Films featuring imagery captured by NASA and video collected throughout the agency’s 50-year history will be judged on creativity, innovation and attention to detail. Works submitted to “CineSpace” will compete for cash prizes and the opportunity to be shown to audiences both on and off Earth. In addition to being screened at the “CineSpace” awards ceremony during the Houston Cinema Arts Festival, winners and finalists may be screened at other film festivals across the country, as well as on NASA TV and even on the International Space Station.

“CineSpace” is open to all filmmakers, both professional and aspiring. The competition will accept submissions of all genres, including narrative, documentary, comedy, drama, animation, experimental and others, of up to 10 minutes running time. Entries must use at least 10 percent publicly available NASA imagery.

The submission period opens June 1, 2017, and closes July 31, 2017. Finalists and winners will be announced at a “CineSpace” event during the Houston Cinema Arts Festival in November. Entries will be competing for $26,000 in prizes with cash awards going to the top three submissions as well as the two films that best demonstrate the themes “Benefits of Space to Humanity” and “Future Space Exploration.”

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/cinespace-short-film-competition-returns-for-2017.

Please direct questions about this competition to cinespace@cinemartsociety.org.


Get Ready for the 2017 Solar Eclipse With NASA Resources

On Aug. 21, 2017, the United States will experience a solar eclipse! This celestial event will provide a golden opportunity to engage and educate diverse audiences, and NASA has the resources to help.

Along a path 60 to 70 miles wide stretching from Oregon to South Carolina, observers will be able to see a total solar eclipse. Others across North America will see a partial eclipse. The event will happen around lunch time across the country. For an interactive map with timing information along the path of the eclipse, visit http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEgoogle/SEgoogle2001/SE2017Aug21Tgoogle.html.

Visit the following websites to find additional information and resources, including:
— Tips for safely viewing the solar eclipse.
— Recorded interviews with NASA scientists, mission specialists and eclipse path communities.
— Topical online eclipse videos, featuring a variety of STEM and cultural topics.
— Social media community development and networking.
— Mobile educational eclipse applications.
— Public challenges and engagement activities.
— 2-D and 3-D printing exercises for K-16 students.
— Citizen science campaigns in partnership with NASA mission observations.
— Adjunct activities and educational resources.
— Live streaming of observations and programming.

Total Eclipse 2017 — Through the Eyes of NASA
http://eclipse2017.nasa.gov

Eclipses and Transits
http://www.nasa.gov/eclipse

Watch “The Solar Eclipse 2017 PREVIEW Show” with NASA EDGE.
https://youtu.be/UPPGxqqZug0


WGBH Education — The Solar Eclipse of 2017: Teacher Toolkit

Are you a K-12 teacher looking for ideas and information on what to do with your students, your school, or your community about the upcoming solar eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017? Boston-based PBS station WGBH, supported by a NASA cooperative agreement, has gathered information from trusted content partners into a “Solar Eclipse of 2017: Teacher Toolkit.”

Check out the toolkit to find maps, activities and more. Learn how to align your eclipse activities to national education standards. Watch an archived recording of a professional development webinar about the eclipse. And you can even find resources available in Spanish!

For all of this and more, visit http://bit.ly/EclipseToolkit.

Please direct questions about this toolkit to Rachel Connolly at rachel_connolly@wgbh.org.


Earn STEM Digital Badges to Celebrate the Centennial of NASA’s Langley Research Center

To celebrate NASA’s Langley Research Center’s Centennial, three STEM digital badges are now available for educators and students in grades 5-9. Discover the role of cloud types in the Earth’s Energy Budget; how drag is used to land the Mars2020 Rover on Mars; and the importance of composite materials for airplanes.

Educators may earn up to 15 hours of professional development. Student badges include up to six hours of content aligned to the educator badge.

The first 1,000 educators to complete all three badges by Oct. 21, 2017, will receive a NASA insignia iron-on patch.

For more information and to begin earning badges, visit https://nasatxstate-epdc.net/. After logging in to the site, click on the Explore icon and type “NASA Langley” in the search area to find and select the NASA Langley Centennial Mission.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Marilé Colón Robles at marile.colonrobles@nasa.gov.


Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design, or STEAMD; or activities culturally relevant to or focused on populations underrepresented in STEM careers, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or nonreimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA announcement.


Search for Gravitational Waves With ‘Gravity Spy’ Citizen Science Project

In 1916, Einstein predicted the existence of ripples in spacetime known as gravitational waves. A century later, on Sept. 14, 2015, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory, or LIGO, made the first direct detection of this elusive phenomenon. This discovery is the first of many that will give researchers a whole new way to explore the universe. However, LIGO needs your help!

Being the most sensitive and most complicated gravitational experiment ever created, LIGO is susceptible to many instrumental and environmental noise sources called “glitches.” These glitches are difficult to model using computers, can mimic true astrophysical signals, and generally make LIGO less sensitive to gravitational waves.

Classifying glitches using computers has proven to be an exceedingly difficult task. That’s where the Gravity Spy Zooniverse Citizen Science Project comes in! Human intuition has proven time and time again to be a useful tool in pattern recognition problems such as this. One of the innovations of this project is that citizen scientists and computer algorithms will work in a symbiotic relationship, helping one another to optimally classify and characterize glitches. By selecting the right classification for a given glitch, you will help computers learn to do this classification themselves on much larger datasets. That capability will help scientists determine and eliminate the sources of noise.

For more information and to learn how to participate, visit the “Gravity Spy” website at https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/zooniverse/gravity-spy.

To learn more about the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory and its mission to detect gravitational waves, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2016/nsf-s-ligo-has-detected-gravitational-waves.

Download the “Direct Observation of Gravitational Waves” Educator Guide for activities and background information designed for grades 5-12. https://dcc.ligo.org/LIGO-P1600015/public.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Tyson Littenberg at tyson.b.littenberg@nasa.gov.

“Gravity Spy” is a collaboration between the following entities:
–Northwestern University, led by Scott Coughlin and Michael Zevin with PI Vicky Kalogera and co-PI Aggelos Katsaggelos. Northwestern’s team is composed of a LIGO group in the CIERA astrophysics research center and a machine learning group in the Image and Video Processing Laboratory.
–The Adler Planetarium Zooniverse Team, led by co-PI Laura Trouille.
–Syracuse University, led by co-PI’s Kevin Crowston and Carsten Østerlund.
–California State University at Fullerton, led by co-PI Josh Smith.
–The LIGO Scientific Collaboration, of which NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center and Goddard Space Flight Center are member institutions.

The project is funded by the National Science Foundation.


NASA Seeks Creative Arts Inspired by Cassini’s Mission to Saturn

During nearly two decades in space, Cassini has inspired people on Earth. Cassini has sent home thousands of images of icy moons and resplendent rings. It helped discover erupting water geysers on Enceladus and seas of methane on Titan. It showed us a view of Earth as a blue dot.

Now the mission is moving toward its “Grand Finale,” and in September 2017 it will finally draw to a dramatic end. NASA’s Cassini team would like to know this: How has Cassini inspired you?

Visit the Cassini Inspires website to explore images and more from the mission. Then use inspiration to get creative. Write a poem. Paint a picture. Choreograph a dance. Tell a story. The possibilities are endless!

Share your creation with the NASA Cassini team on the social media platform of your choice, such as Instagram, YouTube, Facebook, Twitter or others. Tag it #CassiniInspires. Or send it directly to cassinimission@jpl.nasa.gov.

To learn more, visit https://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/cassiniinspires/.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Eduation: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express Message — May 18, 2017

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: May 18, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT

NASA Internships, Fellowships and Scholarships Virtual Career Summit
Audience: Higher Education Educators, Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Event Date: May 24, 2017, from 1 – 2:30 p.m. EDT

New From WGBH Education — The Solar Eclipse of 2017: Teacher Toolkit
Audience: K-12 Educators
Tweetchat Event: May 24, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT

New FAQs and Amendments Posted — NASA Research Announcement: Competitive Program for Science Museums, Planetariums and NASA Visitor Centers (CP4SMPVC)
Audience: Formal and Informal Education Institutions
Proposal Deadline: June 19, 2017

New Lesson Plans Available on NASA/4-H Expeditionary Skills Website
Audience: 6-12 and Informal Educators

New ‘Teachable Moment’ Educational Resources Available From JPL Education — A Moment You Won’t Want to Miss: Cassini’s Daring Mission Finale Between the Rings and Saturn
Audience: K-12 Educators


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

Take Your Students on a Series of Virtual Field Trips!
Audience: Grades 6-12 Students and Educators, Formal and Informal
Next Event Date: May 18, 2017, 9 a.m. CDT

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Special Event With Beth Nielsen Chapman and Rocky Alvey
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-12
Event Date: May 18, 2017, at 11 a.m. EDT

2017 Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Abstract Submission Deadline: May 19, 2017
Workshop Dates: Aug. 21-25, 2017

Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘Making STEM Magic’ Program
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: May 20, 2017, at 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. EDT

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

NASA Mars Science: MAVEN Outreach Webinar — Mars and Venus: Terrestrial Analogues for Exoplanets
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: May 24, 2017, 7 p.m. EDT

Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 12 to the International Space Station
Audience: School Districts Serving Grades 5-12, Informal Education Institutions, Colleges and Universities
Inquiry Deadline: May 31, 2017
Start Date: September 5, 2017

NASA Solar Eclipse Workshops at Marshall Space Flight Center
Audience: K-12 Educators
Next Workshop Date: June 1, 2017, 9-11 a.m. CDT

NASA History Program Office Internships — Fall 2017
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: June 1, 2017

Lloyd V. Berkner Space Policy Internships
Audience: Undergraduate and Graduate Students at U.S. Universities and Colleges
Application Deadline: June 2, 2017

Get Ready for the 2017 Solar Eclipse With NASA Resources
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Aug. 21, 2017

Grant Competition — USAID Development Innovation Ventures
Audience: Higher Education Faculty and Students
Application Deadline: Proposals Accepted Year-round

NASA’s Centennial Challenges: Vascular Tissue Challenge
Audience: All Interested U.S. Citizens, Including Higher Education Educators and Students
Deadline: No Later Than Sept. 30, 2019

Infiniscope Launches First Digital Learning Experience — Where are the small worlds?
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School, and Informal Educators of Grades 5-12

Create Art Inspired by NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope
Audience: All Educators and Students

Be a Citizen Earth Scientist With the ‘GLOBE Observer’ App
Audience: All Educators and Students

Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students and Higher Education Institutions


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

 


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

International Space Station — Off the Earth, For the Earth: Mass vs. Weight
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-8
Event Date: May 18, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT
“Mass” and “weight” have very different meanings and often are used incorrectly. Participants will explore mass and weight using NASA curriculum that incorporates education video filmed by astronauts on board the International Space Station. Newton’s Laws of Motion, NASA online resources and STEM inquiry activities will be integrated into this “heavy-duty” online program. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/248389

Train Like an Astronaut: Out of This World Activities for a Healthier Generation
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-10
Event Date: May 23, 2017, at 4 p.m. EDT
Developed in cooperation with NASA scientists and fitness professionals working directly with astronauts, the Train Like an Astronaut activities are a physical and inquiry-based approach to human health and fitness on Earth and in space. Students can participate in physical activities modeled after the real-life physical requirements of humans traveling in space. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/246973

International Space Station — Off the Earth, For the Earth: Sally Ride EarthKAM
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-9
Event Date: May 23, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Sally Ride EarthKAM (Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle school students) is a NASA educational outreach program that enables students, teachers and the public to learn about Earth from the unique perspective of space. During Sally Ride EarthKAM missions (periods when the Sally Ride EarthKAM camera is operational), middle school students around the world request images of specific locations on Earth. The entire collection of Sally Ride EarthKAM images is available in a searchable archive. This opportunity and accompanying activities are extraordinary resources to engage students in Earth and space science, geography, social studies, mathematics, communications and art. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/244255

International Space Station — Off the Earth, For the Earth: Space Food and Nutrition

Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-8
Event Date: May 25, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT
Eat your way through math and science. This webinar will cover NASA STEM lessons that investigate space food and nutrition for astronauts. Participants will find out about NASA resources to research the caloric content and nutritional value of space foods, learn about nutritional needs of astronauts, and construct sample space food menus. Explore a menu of inquiry activities and other resources to satisfy your STEM appetite. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/235775

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


NASA Internships, Fellowships and Scholarships Virtual Career Summit

The NASA Internships, Fellowships and Scholarships recruiting team is excited to announce the NIFS Virtual Career Summit. The 90-minute summit will stream live at 1 p.m. EDT on May 24, 2017. The event will showcase the NIFS programs as well as highlight each NASA center and its missions.

Students will learn about the current NASA opportunities, eligibility requirements and tips for the application process. Previous NIFS interns and fellows will share their experiences.

The session will allow students to ask questions and have some of them answered live by NASA professionals. To join, please register at http://bit.ly/2qSEcvQ.

For more information about NIFS, visit intern.nasa.gov or nspires.nasaprs.com.

Please direct questions about this event to Grace Ensminger at grace.k.ensminger@nasa.gov.


New From WGBH Education — The Solar Eclipse of 2017: Teacher Toolkit

Are you a K-12 teacher looking for ideas and information on what to do with your students, your school, or your community about the upcoming solar eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017? Boston-based PBS station WGBH, supported by a NASA cooperative agreement, has gathered information from trusted content partners into a “Solar Eclipse of 2017: Teacher Toolkit.”

Check out the toolkit to find maps, activities and more. Learn how to align your eclipse activities to national education standards. Watch an archived recording of a professional development webinar about the eclipse. And you can even find resources available in Spanish!

Get ideas and share your plans for bringing the eclipse to your classroom through the #TeachEclipse2017 tweetchat on Wednesday, May 24, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT.

For all of this and more, visit http://bit.ly/EclipseToolkit.

Please direct questions about this toolkit to Rachel Connolly at rachel_connolly@wgbh.org.


New FAQs and Amendments Posted — NASA Research Announcement: Competitive Program for Science Museums, Planetariums and NASA Visitor Centers (CP4SMPVC)

The NASA Office of Education has posted new information for its 2017 NASA Research Announcement: Competitive Program for Science Museums, Planetariums and NASA Visitor Centers (CP4SMPVC), Announcement Number NNH17ZHA002N. Proposals for this solicitation are due June 19, 2017.

To view the Amendments and FAQ Issue #3, which includes answers to questions received through May 12, visit NSPIRES at https://go.nasa.gov/2oC4eCU.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NRA.


New Lesson Plans Available on NASA/4-H Expeditionary Skills Website

Find out what astronaut Anne McClain says about leadership and followership. NASA Education’s STEM on Station and the 4-H program announce the fourth and final learning module release for Expeditionary Skills for Life, a curriculum modeled after the soft skills that astronauts train for as they prepare to work together on the International Station. Expeditionary skills include self-care/team-care, cultural competency, leadership/followership, teamwork and communication. Each skill-focused learning module includes STEM-based activities along with a video message from an astronaut or astronaut trainer explaining how the skill is used at NASA and why it is important to a successful STEM career. The leadership/followership video features Anne McClain as she shares a story to illustrate the often misunderstood roles of leadership and followership.

The release of Expeditionary Skills for Life aligns with the spaceflight of astronaut Peggy Whitson, a former 4-H member. Whitson helped develop the expeditionary skills courses used during astronaut candidate training.

The lesson plans and videos will be used in 4-H clubs and camps throughout the U.S. and are available publicly at www.nasa.gov/education/4H.

The 4-H Youth Development Program is the youth outreach program from the land-grant universities’ Cooperative Extension Services and the United States Department of Agriculture.

Please direct questions about these resources to Kelly McCormick at Kelly.McCormick-1@nasa.gov.


New ‘Teachable Moment’ Educational Resources Available From JPL Education

Are you looking for ways to bring the latest NASA science and mission news into your classroom? Education specialists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California have the resources to help you do just that! The “Teachable Moments” blog brings together news, activities and education tips on the latest happenings at NASA.

Check out the latest offering from JPL Education.

Teachable Moment —
A Moment You Won’t Want to Miss: Cassini’s Daring Mission Finale Between the Rings and Saturn — Grades K-12
After almost 20 years in space, NASA’s Cassini spacecraft has begun the final chapter of its remarkable story of exploration: its Grand Finale. This last phase of the mission will deliver unprecedented views of Saturn and its rings. On April 26, the spacecraft flew between the planet and its rings — a feat that had never been attempted. Cassini will complete 22 of these ring-gap orbits before making a grand finale dive into Saturn’s atmosphere. For more information and ways to bring Cassini’s exciting final phase into the classroom, visit https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/news/2017/4/25/a-moment-you-wont-want-to-miss-cassinis-daring-mission-finale-between-the-rings-and-saturn/.

Looking for more? Check out the “Teachable Moments” archives for more resources. http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/news/column/teachable-moments/

 


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


Take Your Students on a Series of Virtual Field Trips!

Bring your students along on a series of virtual field trips to NASA centers where students will go behind-the-scenes to see cool NASA places and visit with NASA professionals. Each session is 15-30 minutes long and includes an interactive question-and-answer session. Pre-registration is not required.

Upcoming virtual field trips include:

Adventures in Aeronautics — May 18, 2017, 9 a.m. CDT
Learn about high-flying careers with NASA Aircraft Operations. Join Mallory Yates, aerospace engineer, and Angela Bauer, deputy engineering branch chief of the Aircraft Operations Division, for a behind-the-scenes look at aviation at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas.

Fun With Technology — May 22, 2017, 10 a.m. CDT
Take a virtual field trip to NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. Go behind-the-scenes with NASA intern Kaitlin Lostroscio to learn about NASA robotics.

These virtual field trips are a series of events offered to students and teachers as a component of “The Search for STEMnauts” — a virtual scavenger hunt where student teams in grades 6-12 solve puzzles, unravel riddles, break codes and make weekly virtual field trips to exclusive NASA locations. Student teams can even check out where they stand among the competition by following real-time updates on “The Search for STEMnauts” website!

This interactive, technical twist on a traditional scavenger hunt is offered through a partnership between NASA’s STEM on Station and Texas Instruments to provide students with a fun way to learn important STEM skills including coding and problem solving.

All students and educators (grades 6-12) are invited to participate in any virtual field trip offered. Participation in “The Search for STEMnauts” competition is not required. To learn more about these virtual field trips, including links to join in, go to https://education.ti.com/NASAliveevents.

For more information about “The Search for STEMnauts,” including how to register, visit www.STEMnauts.com.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Kelly McCormick at Kelly.mccormick-1@nasa.gov.


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Special Event With Beth Nielsen Chapman and Rocky Alvey

Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network on May 18, 2017, from 11:00 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. EDT as Beth Nielsen Chapman and Rocky Alvey help elementary school students learn about the solar system and the universe around them through music and song. Chapman will perform three songs while Alvey explains the science behind them. This special STEM activity is being offered while Chapman is at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Virginia to participate in the NASA Langley Centennial Tribute.

In 2012, Chapman released “The Mighty Sky,” a Grammy-nominated astronomy CD for kids of all ages. This work was featured during NASA’s 2012 Summer of Innovation program to inspire students to learn about the universe and their place in it and to pursue STEM studies. Rocky Alvey is director of the Vanderbilt Dyer Observatory and is also a songwriter. His collaborations with Chapman on “The Mighty Sky” include writing lyrics and developing lesson plans based on the songs and their content.

Those connecting to the webcast will have an opportunity to participate by asking questions live during the event via email at dlinfochannel@gmail.com and via Twitter using #ASKDLN. To connect, click on the following link during the event: http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-dlinfo.

For information about other DLN events, visit http://www.nasa.gov/dln.

Please send any questions about this opportunity to dlinfochannel@gmail.com.


2017 Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop

The annual Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop will be held Aug. 21-25, 2017, at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

The Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop encourages knowledge sharing, professional development, and networking throughout the thermal and fluids engineering community within NASA, academia and the aerospace community at large. STEM faculty and university students are encouraged to attend, submit a poster or paper on their thermal/fluids work, take free training, or do a combination thereof.

Registration to attend the workshop is free. Participants interested in presenting at the conference, via manuscript or technical poster, must submit an abstract by May 19, 2017.

For more information about the workshop and how to submit an abstract for consideration, visit https://tfaws.nasa.gov/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Ramona Cummings at ramona.o.cummings@nasa.gov.


Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘Making STEM Magic’ Program

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is presenting a series of free education events called “Making STEM Magic.” This new program introduces young visitors to engineering in a fun and creative way. Participants learn by doing. Each challenge involves designing, building and testing a prototype. Each month, a new theme will be introduced with a new problem to solve.

Events are scheduled each Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. ET at the National Air and Space Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia. The events are free and open to the public.

Blast Off!: Propulsion
Each Saturday in May 2017
It really is rocket science. Try your hand at designing a rocket and staying on target.

Red Rover: Mission to Mars
Each Saturday in June 2017
Did you know that rovers are robotic ambassadors? Learn more about NASA’s mobile labs and construct your own rolling rover.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s “Making STEM Magic” program, visit https://airandspace.si.edu/visit/events/stem-magic.

Please direct questions about this series of events to the Visitor Service line at 703-572-4118.


Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites U.S. educational institutions to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets, and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

Nonprofit museums, libraries and planetariums (sponsored through their respective State Agency Surplus Property, or SASP, organization) are also eligible to make requests. Visit the link below for special instructions to request items. To find the contact information for the SASP representative for your area, visit http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/100851.

A nominal shipping fee must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.


NASA Mars Science: MAVEN Outreach Webinar — Mars and Venus: Terrestrial Analogues for Exoplanets

MAVEN Outreach Webinars are virtual gatherings of team members from the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution, or MAVEN, mission to offer professional development for formal and informal educators, troop leaders, museum docents, and others interested in MAVEN and Mars science.

Join the MAVEN team on May 24, 2017, at 7 p.m. EDT, for the Mars and Venus: Terrestrial Analogues for Exoplanets webinar. Learn about ways the MAVEN mission may help scientists understand how the atmospheres of other rocky worlds are also being eroded. Dr. Shannon Curry from the University of California Berkeley will discuss how planetary bodies such as Mars and Venus can be used to provide insight into how atmospheres evolve, as scientists model (and begin to observe directly) the atmospheres of exoplanets.

For more information, visit http://lasp.colorado.edu/home/maven/education-outreach/maven-outreach-webinars/.

Questions about this webinar should be directed to epomail@lasp.colorado.edu.


Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 12 to the International Space Station

The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education and the Arthur C. Clarke Institute for Space Education announce a science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, opportunity for school districts across the U.S. and space station partner nations. The newest flight opportunity, Mission 12 to the International Space Station, gives students across a community the ability to design and propose real experiments to fly in low Earth orbit on the space station. This opportunity is part of the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program, or SSEP.

Each participating community will receive a microgravity research mini-laboratory capable of supporting a single microgravity experiment and all launch services to fly the minilab to the space station in spring/summer 2018 and return it to Earth. An experiment design competition in each community — engaging typically 300+ students — allows student teams to design and propose real experiments vying for their community′s reserved mini-lab.

Content resources for teachers and students support foundational instruction on science in microgravity and experimental design. Additional SSEP programming uses the experiment design competition to engage the community in embracing a learning-community model for STEM education.

This competition is open to students in grades 5-12 and college. Informal education groups and organizations also are encouraged to participate. Interested communities must inquire about the program no later than May 31, 2017. The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education is available to help interested communities in the U.S. secure the needed funding.

To learn more about this opportunity, visit the “SSEP Mission 12 to International Space Station” National Announcement of Opportunity at http://ssep.ncesse.org/2017/03/new-flight-opportunity-for-school-districts-announcing-student-spaceflight-experiments-program-ssep-mission-12-to-the-international-space-station-starting-september-2017/.

SSEP is enabled through a strategic partnership with DreamUp PBC and NanoRacks LLC working with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the use of the International Space Station as a national laboratory. The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (http://www.iss-casis.org/) is a national partner of SSEP. To view a list of all SSEP national partners, visit http://ssep.ncesse.org/national-partners/.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please email SSEP National Program Director Jeff Goldstein at jeffgoldstein@ncesse.org.


NASA Solar Eclipse Workshops at Marshall Space Flight Center

On Aug. 21, 2017, the United States will experience a solar eclipse. This celestial event will provide a golden opportunity to engage and educate diverse audiences, and NASA has the resources to help. Join the Educator Resource Center at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, for the final workshop in a series of grade-level specific educator workshops to learn about safety tips, hands-on activities, resources and more!

June 1, 2017, 9-11 a.m. CDT: Educators of Grades K-12

For full event details and registration information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/solar_eclipse_workshop2017.pdf.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Maria Chambers at maria.a.chambers@nasa.gov.


NASA History Program Office Internships — Fall 2017

The NASA History Program Office is seeking undergraduate and graduate students for summer 2017 internships. The History Program Office maintains archival materials to answer research questions from NASA personnel, journalists, scholars, students at all levels and others from around the world. The division also edits and publishes several books and monographs each year. It maintains a large number of websites on NASA history.

Students of all majors are welcome to apply. While detailed prior knowledge of the aeronautics and space fields is not necessary, a keen interest and some basic familiarity with these topics are needed. Strong research, writing and editing skills are essential. Experience with social media is a plus.

Intern projects are flexible. Typical projects include handling a variety of information requests, writing posts for the NASA history Twitter and Facebook pages, editing historical manuscripts, doing research and writing biographical sketches, and identifying and captioning photos.

Applications for fall 2017 internships are due June 1, 2017. Applications for spring 2018 internship applications are due June 1, 2017 and applications for summer 2018 internships are due Feb. 1, 2018.

For more information, visit http://history.nasa.gov/interncall.htm.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please contact Bill Barry at bill.barry@nasa.gov.


Lloyd V. Berkner Space Policy Internships

The Space Studies Board is seeking applicants for the Lloyd V. Berkner Space Policy Internships for autumn 2017. The goal of the program is to provide promising undergraduate and graduate students with the opportunity to work in the area of civil space research policy in the nation’s capital.

Established in 1958, the Space Studies Board is the principal advisory group providing independent scientific and programmatic advice to NASA and other government agencies on all aspects of civil space research and associated ground-based activities. Interns typically undertake one or more short-term research projects designed to assist with or to enhance ongoing study projects.

Applicants must be registered students (undergraduate or graduate) at a U.S. university or college who have completed their junior year. Applicants should have long-term career goals in space science research, applications or policy.

Applications are due June 2, 2017.

For more information and a full list of eligibility requirements, visit http://sites.nationalacademies.org/SSB/SSB_052239.

Please direct questions about this internship to Dr. David H. Smith at dhsmith@nas.edu.


Get Ready for the 2017 Solar Eclipse With NASA Resources

On Aug. 21, 2017, the United States will experience a solar eclipse! This celestial event will provide a golden opportunity to engage and educate diverse audiences, and NASA has the resources to help.

Along a path 60 to 70 miles wide stretching from Oregon to South Carolina, observers will be able to see a total solar eclipse. Others across North America will see a partial eclipse. The event will happen around lunch time across the country. For an interactive map with timing information along the path of the eclipse, visit http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEgoogle/SEgoogle2001/SE2017Aug21Tgoogle.html.

Visit the following websites to find additional information and resources, including:
— Tips for safely viewing the solar eclipse.
— Recorded interviews with NASA scientists, mission specialists and eclipse path communities.
— Topical online eclipse videos, featuring a variety of STEM and cultural topics.
— Social media community development and networking.
— Mobile educational eclipse applications.
— Public challenges and engagement activities.
— 2-D and 3-D printing exercises for K-16 students.
— Citizen science campaigns in partnership with NASA mission observations.
— Adjunct activities and educational resources.
— Live streaming of observations and programming.

Total Eclipse 2017 — Through the Eyes of NASA
http://eclipse2017.nasa.gov

Eclipses and Transits
http://www.nasa.gov/eclipse

Watch “The Solar Eclipse 2017 PREVIEW Show” with NASA EDGE.
https://youtu.be/UPPGxqqZug0


Grant Competition — USAID Development Innovation Ventures

The U.S. Agency for International Development seeks proposals for Development Innovation Ventures grants. Development Innovation Ventures supports breakthrough solutions to the world’s most intractable development challenges by finding and testing bold ideas that could change millions of lives at a fraction of the usual cost.

DIV welcomes applications from U.S. and non-U.S. organizations, individuals, and nonprofit and for-profit entities, provided their work is in a country where USAID operates.

Examples of innovations that USAID/DIV is likely to support include:
— Behavior-change approaches drawing on insights from psychology and behavioral economics.
— Solutions that advance equality between females and males and that empower women and girls to participate fully in and benefit from the development of their societies.
— New methods to reduce absenteeism among frontline health and education workers.
— Testing proof of concept for a solar lighting system distributed by local entrepreneurs at a price/service point that induces wide adoption.

Proposals are accepted year-round.

For more information about this opportunity, visit https://www.usaid.gov/div.

Please email questions about this opportunity to div@usaid.gov.


NASA’s Centennial Challenges: Vascular Tissue Challenge

NASA, in partnership with the nonprofit Methuselah Foundation’s New Organ Alliance, is seeking ways to advance the field of bioengineering through a new prize competition. The Vascular Tissue Challenge offers a $500,000 prize to be divided among the first three teams that successfully create thick, metabolically functional, human vascularized organ tissue in a controlled laboratory environment.

Competitors must produce vascularized tissue that is more than .39 inches (1 centimeter) in thickness and maintains more than 85 percent survival of the required cells throughout a 30-day trial period. To win an award, teams must demonstrate three successful trials with at least a 75 percent success rate. In addition to the laboratory trials, teams must submit a proposal that details how they would further advance some aspect of their research through a microgravity experiment that could be conducted in the U.S. National Laboratory on the International Space Station.

The first registered team(s) to meet the required guidelines and complete their trials by Sept. 30, 2019, will win the awards.

The Vascular Tissue Challenge prize purse is provided by NASA’s Centennial Challenges Program, part of NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate. Centennial Challenges, managed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, is NASA’s citizen-inventor prize program. It invites the nation to help advance the technologies that will enable us to go to Mars and beyond, as well as improve life on Earth. The New Organ Alliance is administering the competition on behalf of NASA. The alliance is a nonprofit organization focused on regenerative medicine research and development to benefit human disease research and tissue engineering.

For information about the Methuselah Foundation’s New Organ Alliance, official challenge documents, rules and schedule of events, visit https://neworgan.org/vtc-prize.php.

For more information about the Vascular Tissue Challenge, visit http://www.nasa.gov/vtchallenge.


Infiniscope Launches First Digital Learning Experience — Where are the small worlds?

Join the growing group of formal and informal educators discovering Infiniscope’s first digital-by-design learning experience titled “Where are the small worlds?” Developed for NASA by Arizona State University, this learning experience is a standards-aligned, innovative, game-like exploration of the solar system using real NASA data and the relative motion of objects in the solar system.

In this experience, learners explore the view of our solar system from the perspective of the sun and collect data on small worlds. Learners observe the motion of different worlds to determine their location in the solar system, then launch probes to search these small worlds to find the hidden caches and collect astrocoins.

Go to https://infiniscope.education/lesson/where-are-the-small-worlds/ to explore this experience and the educator resources associated with it. See how you can use this interactive, Web-based learning experience to engage learners in the next generation of learning. Where are the small worlds? Can you find them all?

For more information, visit https://infiniscope.education/.

Questions should be directed to Jessica Swann at jlswann@asu.edu or Joe Tamer at Ajoseph.Tamer@asu.edu.


Create Art Inspired by NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope

In November 2016, a small group of artists visited NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, to see the James Webb Space Telescope in person for inspiration to create art. They have been busy ever since, producing amazing work that will be presented for exhibit during spring 2017 at the Goddard Visitor Center.

Their offerings include painting, poetry, sculpting, textiles, woodworking, music, silk screening, 3-D design, jewelry, posters, tattooing and letterpress printing.

Though only a few artists were able to physically visit the telescope, the team at GSFC was impressed by the number of talented people who were interested in participating and want to offer more artists a chance to participate virtually.

How can you participate? Browse through the collection of James Webb Space Telescope images and videos and see what inspires you. Create art! (Note: this is not limited to art you can hang on a wall.) Then, share it with NASA on social media with #JWSTArt, or email it to jwst@lists.nasa.gov.

There’s no deadline for submissions.

To find inspiration and learn the full details on how to participate, visit https://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/2017/nasa-invites-you-to-create-james-webb-space-telescope-inspired-art.

Email questions about this opportunity to jwst@lists.nasa.gov.


Be a Citizen Earth Scientist With the ‘GLOBE Observer’ App

Want to be a citizen Earth scientist? To contribute to NASA’s studies of our home planet, all you need is a smartphone, access to the outdoors, and the “GLOBE Observer” app.

Now available for Apple and Android phones, the app is an initiative of the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment program. For over two decades, GLOBE has enabled schools and students in over 110 countries to investigate their local environment and put their observations in a global context.

To learn more, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2016/nasa-launches-new-citizen-science-opportunity and http://observer.globe.gov.


Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Are you an undergraduate or graduate student seeking opportunities in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)? The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science — in collaboration with the participating agencies in the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on STEM Education (CoSTEM) and the Science.gov Alliance — has launched a search portal for both students and universities to discover federally sponsored STEM education training and funding opportunities.

Student users can search the site for opportunities they can apply to directly, such as research internships and fellowships. Likewise, universities can search the site for federal funding opportunities to establish innovative training programs for undergraduates or graduate students.

Users can search the site through faceted searching capabilities for characteristics such as program type, STEM discipline, institution location, federal sponsor, and eligibility. Or they can search through the open text option.

For programs and opportunities for undergraduates, visit http://stemundergrads.science.gov/.

For graduate programs and opportunities, visit http://stemgradstudents.science.gov/.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Eduation: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express Message — May 11, 2017

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: May 11, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT

Lloyd V. Berkner Space Policy Internships
Audience: Undergraduate and Graduate Students at U.S. Universities and Colleges
Application Deadline: June 2, 2017

New FAQs Posted — NASA Research Announcement: Competitive Program for Science Museums, Planetariums and NASA Visitor Centers (CP4SMPVC)
Audience: Formal and Informal Education Institutions
Proposal Deadline: June 19, 2017

New Episode Available — Space Launch System Video Series — “No Small Steps”
Audience: All Educators and Students


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities — 2017 All-Star Students Program
Audience: Higher Education Students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Application Deadline: May 12, 2017

Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘Making STEM Magic’ Program
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: May 13, 2017, at 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. EDT

Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues
Audience: Graduate Students
Application Deadline: May 15, 2017

NASA Fundamental Physics Workshop 2017
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Deadline: May 17, 2017
Workshop Dates: May 31-June 2, 2017

Take Your Students on a Series of Virtual Field Trips!
Audience: Grades 6-12 Students and Educators, Formal and Informal
Next Event Date: May 18, 2017, 9 a.m. CDT

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Special Event With Beth Nielsen Chapman and Rocky Alvey
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-12
Event Date: May 18, 2017, at 11 a.m. EDT

2017 Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Abstract Submission Deadline: May 19, 2017
Workshop Dates: Aug. 21-25, 2017

NASA Mars Science: MAVEN Outreach Webinar — Mars and Venus: Terrestrial Analogues for Exoplanets
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: May 24, 2017, 7 p.m. EDT

Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 12 to the International Space Station
Audience: School Districts Serving Grades 5-12, Informal Education Institutions, Colleges and Universities
Inquiry Deadline: May 31, 2017
Start Date: September 5, 2017

Free Tours of Facilities at NASA’s Glenn Research Center
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: June 3, 2017

Mars Survival Kit: Lessons and Activities to Guide Your Exploration of Mars!
Audience: K-12 Educators

Get Ready for the 2017 Solar Eclipse With NASA Resources

Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Aug. 21, 2017

Fly Your Exoplanet on the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite
Audience: All Educators and Students
Submission Deadline: Nov. 20, 2017

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

NASA Unveils Searchable Video, Audio and Imagery Library
Audience: All Educators and Students

Help NASA Search the Realm Beyond Neptune at Backyard Worlds: Planet 9
Audience: All Educators and Students
Project Timeframe: Ongoing


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

International Space Station — Off the Earth, For the Earth: Exploring the Extreme
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-8
Event Date: May 11, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT
Explore the over-50-year history of spacewalking. Investigate the critical role of spacewalks in human space exploration, the harsh space environment endured during spacewalks, and how spacesuits are designed to protect astronauts from the space environment. NASA STEM classroom lessons, online resources and teaching strategies will be integrated into this “walking with the stars” webinar. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/235769

International Space Station — Off the Earth, For the Earth: One-Year Crew
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: May 16, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Educators will explore the STEM on Station website and celebrate the “One-Year Crew” and their yearlong mission on board the International Space Station. Participants will receive NASA “STEM on Station” resources, lesson plans, videos and education news to help bring space into the classroom. Learn about astronaut Scott Kelly’s Year in Space mission, including the 10,944 sunrises and sunsets that transpired during his mission, his need for more than 700 hours of exercise to keep strong, and his drinking 730 liters of recycled urine and sweat. Educators will be presented with hands-on, standard-aligned activities that they can take back to the classroom to inspire their students. The activities will involve radiation, sleep restraints, solar energy and space food. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/244258

International Space Station — Off the Earth, For the Earth: Mass vs. Weight
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-8
Event Date: May 18, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT
“Mass” and “weight” have very different meanings and often are used incorrectly. Participants will explore mass and weight using NASA curriculum that incorporates education video filmed by astronauts on board the International Space Station. Newton’s Laws of Motion, NASA online resources and STEM inquiry activities will be integrated into this “heavy-duty” online program. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/248389

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


Lloyd V. Berkner Space Policy Internships

The Space Studies Board is seeking applicants for the Lloyd V. Berkner Space Policy Internships for autumn 2017. The goal of the program is to provide promising undergraduate and graduate students with the opportunity to work in the area of civil space research policy in the nation’s capital.

Established in 1958, the Space Studies Board is the principal advisory group providing independent scientific and programmatic advice to NASA and other government agencies on all aspects of civil space research and associated ground-based activities. Interns typically undertake one or more short-term research projects designed to assist with or to enhance ongoing study projects.

Applicants must be registered students (undergraduate or graduate) at a U.S. university or college who have completed their junior year. Applicants should have long-term career goals in space science research, applications or policy.

Applications are due June 2, 2017.

For more information and a full list of eligibility requirements, visit http://sites.nationalacademies.org/SSB/SSB_052239.

Please direct questions about this internship to Dr. David H. Smith at dhsmith@nas.edu.


New FAQs Posted — NASA Research Announcement: Competitive Program for Science Museums, Planetariums and NASA Visitor Centers (CP4SMPVC)

The NASA Office of Education has posted a new set of FAQs for its 2017 NASA Research Announcement: Competitive Program for Science Museums, Planetariums and NASA Visitor Centers (CP4SMPVC), Announcement Number NNH17ZHA002N. Proposals for this solicitation are due June 19, 2017.

To view FAQ Issue #2, which includes answers to questions received through May 9, visit NSPIRES at https://go.nasa.gov/2oC4eCU.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NRA.


New Episode Available — Space Launch System Video Series — “No Small Steps”

The challenge of going to Mars is monumental, and it’s going to take a monumental rocket to make it possible. NASA’s Space Launch System will be the most powerful rocket ever built and will help send humans to deep space destinations. SLS is an advanced, heavy-lift launch vehicle that will provide an entirely new capability for science and human exploration beyond Earth’s orbit.

Learn more about the Space Launch System with the “No Small Steps” video series. Hosted by Stephen Granade, the entertaining and informative series gets into the “how” of making a trip to Mars happen — taking rocket science and making it relatable.

Episode 1: “Getting to Mars”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TOYXa9jx-TI

Episode 2: “A Foundation for Mars”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DesBgDPR22Q

Episode 3: “Rocket Fuel”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zJXQQv9UZNg

Episode 4: “Working With Gravity”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4wlcFU1Le4U

**NEW** Episode 5: “Passing the Test”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f4XbHJTlNzw


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities — 2017 All-Star Students Program

The White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities works to promote HBCU excellence, innovation and sustainability. The initiative will recognize current HBCU students for their dedication to academics, leadership and civic engagement as 2017 HBCU All-Star Students.

The appointment period will last approximately one year. During this time, HBCU All-Stars will serve as ambassadors of the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities by providing outreach opportunities and information to their fellow students about the value of education and the initiative as a networking resource. Through social media and personal and professional relationships with community-based organizations, students will share promising and proven practices that support opportunities for all young people to realize their educational and career potential. The program will provide an opportunity to participate in regional and national events as well as webchats with initiative staff and other professionals from a wide range of disciplines that support a spirit of engagement and personal and professional development.

Nominees must be current undergraduate, graduate or professional students at an HBCU. Students must be enrolled for the 2017-2018 fall semester. Applications must be submitted by 11:59 p.m. EDT on May 12, 2017.

For more information and to download an application, visit http://sites.ed.gov/whhbcu/resources/hbcu-all-star-students/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to hbcuallstars@ed.gov.


Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘Making STEM Magic’ Program

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is presenting a series of free education events called “Making STEM Magic.” This new program introduces young visitors to engineering in a fun and creative way. Participants learn by doing. Each challenge involves designing, building and testing a prototype. Each month, a new theme will be introduced with a new problem to solve.

Events are scheduled each Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. ET at the National Air and Space Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia. The events are free and open to the public.

Blast Off!: Propulsion
Each Saturday in May 2017
It really is rocket science. Try your hand at designing a rocket and staying on target.

Red Rover: Mission to Mars
Each Saturday in June 2017
Did you know that rovers are robotic ambassadors? Learn more about NASA’s mobile labs and construct your own rolling rover.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s “Making STEM Magic” program, visit https://airandspace.si.edu/visit/events/stem-magic.

Please direct questions about this series of events to the Visitor Service line at 703-572-4118.


Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues

The Airport Cooperative Research Program is seeking applicants for its Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues. Through this program, the ACRP strives to encourage applied research on airport and related aviation system issues and to foster the next generation of aviation community leaders. The program is intended to stimulate thought, discussion and research by those who may become the future airport managers, operators, designers and policy makers in aviation. The focus of this research program is on applied research to help the public sector continue to improve the quality, reliability, safety and security of the U.S. civil aviation system well into the foreseeable future.

The Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues will award up to 10 highly qualified applicants, selected by an ACRP panel of experts, a stipend of $10,000 each for successful completion of a research paper on a subject chosen by the candidate within the framework of the program’s purpose.

Applicants must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States, or have a current student visa. Each applicant also must be officially enrolled as a full-time student at an accredited North American institution of higher learning for the academic year in a graduate course leading to a master’s or doctoral degree. Proof of both may be required.

Applications are due May 15, 2017. For more information, visit http://www.trb.org/ACRP/ACRPGraduateAwardProgram.aspx.

The ACRP Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues is sponsored by the Federal Aviation Administration. Creating a selection panel, monitoring research progress, organizing a forum for presentation, and publishing the research papers are the responsibility of the ACRP of the Transportation Research Board. The Virginia Space Grant Consortium will manage the Graduate Research Award program under the ACRP’s direction.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to acrp@odu.edu.


NASA Fundamental Physics Workshop 2017

The NASA Fundamental Physics Workshop 2017 will be held May 31-June 2, 2017, in Santa Barbara, California.

The workshop will provide a forum for NASA fundamental physics investigators to present results and discuss research ideas for future space experimentation with interested international and U.S. colleagues. Topic areas include atomic and molecular physics; fundamental forces and symmetries; dusty plasma physics; and condensed matter physics.

All interested scientists and researchers are invited to participate. The participation of the current NASA-funded investigators is strongly encouraged and kindly requested.

The deadline to register to attend the workshop is May 17, 2017. For more information and to register to attend, visit http://icpi.nasaprs.com/fpw2017.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Renee Atkins at ratkins@nasaprs.com.


Take Your Students on a Series of Virtual Field Trips!

Bring your students along on a series of virtual field trips to NASA centers where students will go behind-the-scenes to see cool NASA places and visit with NASA professionals. Each session is 15-30 minutes long and includes an interactive question-and-answer session. Pre-registration is not required.

Upcoming virtual field trips include:

Adventures in Aeronautics — May 18, 2017, 9 a.m. CDT
Learn about high-flying careers with NASA Aircraft Operations. Join Mallory Yates, aerospace engineer, and Angela Bauer, deputy engineering branch chief of the Aircraft Operations Division, for a behind-the-scenes look at aviation at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas.

Fun With Technology — May 22, 2017, 10 a.m. CDT
Take a virtual field trip to NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. Go behind-the-scenes with NASA intern Kaitlin Lostroscio to learn about NASA robotics.

These virtual field trips are a series of events offered to students and teachers as a component of “The Search for STEMnauts” — a virtual scavenger hunt where student teams in grades 6-12 solve puzzles, unravel riddles, break codes and make weekly virtual field trips to exclusive NASA locations. Student teams can even check out where they stand among the competition by following real-time updates on “The Search for STEMnauts” website!

This interactive, technical twist on a traditional scavenger hunt is offered through a partnership between NASA’s STEM on Station and Texas Instruments to provide students with a fun way to learn important STEM skills including coding and problem solving.

All students and educators (grades 6-12) are invited to participate in any virtual field trip offered. Participation in “The Search for STEMnauts” competition is not required. To learn more about these virtual field trips, including links to join in, go to https://education.ti.com/NASAliveevents.

For more information about “The Search for STEMnauts,” including how to register, visit www.STEMnauts.com.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Kelly McCormick at Kelly.mccormick-1@nasa.gov.


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Special Event With Beth Nielsen Chapman and Rocky Alvey

Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network on May 18, 2017, from 11:00 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. EDT as Beth Nielsen Chapman and Rocky Alvey help elementary school students learn about the solar system and the universe around them through music and song. Chapman will perform three songs while Alvey explains the science behind them. This special STEM activity is being offered while Chapman is at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Virginia to participate in the NASA Langley Centennial Tribute.

In 2012, Chapman released “The Mighty Sky,” a Grammy-nominated astronomy CD for kids of all ages. This work was featured during NASA’s 2012 Summer of Innovation program to inspire students to learn about the universe and their place in it and to pursue STEM studies. Rocky Alvey is director of the Vanderbilt Dyer Observatory and is also a songwriter. His collaborations with Chapman on “The Mighty Sky” include writing lyrics and developing lesson plans based on the songs and their content.

Those connecting to the webcast will have an opportunity to participate by asking questions live during the event via email at dlinfochannel@gmail.com and via Twitter using #ASKDLN. To connect, click on the following link during the event: http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-dlinfo.

For information about other DLN events, visit http://www.nasa.gov/dln.

Please send any questions about this opportunity to dlinfochannel@gmail.com.


2017 Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop

The annual Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop will be held Aug. 21-25, 2017, at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

The Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop encourages knowledge sharing, professional development, and networking throughout the thermal and fluids engineering community within NASA, academia and the aerospace community at large. STEM faculty and university students are encouraged to attend, submit a poster or paper on their thermal/fluids work, take free training, or do a combination thereof.

Registration to attend the workshop is free. Participants interested in presenting at the conference, via manuscript or technical poster, must submit an abstract by May 19, 2017.

For more information about the workshop and how to submit an abstract for consideration, visit https://tfaws.nasa.gov/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Ramona Cummings at ramona.o.cummings@nasa.gov.


NASA Mars Science: MAVEN Outreach Webinar — Mars and Venus: Terrestrial Analogues for Exoplanets

MAVEN Outreach Webinars are virtual gatherings of team members from the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution, or MAVEN, mission to offer professional development for formal and informal educators, troop leaders, museum docents, and others interested in MAVEN and Mars science.

Join the MAVEN team on May 24, 2017, at 7 p.m. EDT, for the Mars and Venus: Terrestrial Analogues for Exoplanets webinar. Learn about ways the MAVEN mission may help scientists understand how the atmospheres of other rocky worlds are also being eroded. Dr. Shannon Curry from the University of California Berkeley will discuss how planetary bodies such as Mars and Venus can be used to provide insight into how atmospheres evolve, as scientists model (and begin to observe directly) the atmospheres of exoplanets.

For more information, visit http://lasp.colorado.edu/home/maven/education-outreach/maven-outreach-webinars/.

Questions about this webinar should be directed to epomail@lasp.colorado.edu.


Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 12 to the International Space Station

The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education and the Arthur C. Clarke Institute for Space Education announce a science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, opportunity for school districts across the U.S. and space station partner nations. The newest flight opportunity, Mission 12 to the International Space Station, gives students across a community the ability to design and propose real experiments to fly in low Earth orbit on the space station. This opportunity is part of the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program, or SSEP.

Each participating community will receive a microgravity research mini-laboratory capable of supporting a single microgravity experiment and all launch services to fly the minilab to the space station in spring/summer 2018 and return it to Earth. An experiment design competition in each community — engaging typically 300+ students — allows student teams to design and propose real experiments vying for their community′s reserved mini-lab.

Content resources for teachers and students support foundational instruction on science in microgravity and experimental design. Additional SSEP programming uses the experiment design competition to engage the community in embracing a learning-community model for STEM education.

This competition is open to students in grades 5-12 and college. Informal education groups and organizations also are encouraged to participate. Interested communities must inquire about the program no later than May 31, 2017. The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education is available to help interested communities in the U.S. secure the needed funding.

To learn more about this opportunity, visit the “SSEP Mission 12 to International Space Station” National Announcement of Opportunity at http://ssep.ncesse.org/2017/03/new-flight-opportunity-for-school-districts-announcing-student-spaceflight-experiments-program-ssep-mission-12-to-the-international-space-station-starting-september-2017/.

SSEP is enabled through a strategic partnership with DreamUp PBC and NanoRacks LLC working with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the use of the International Space Station as a national laboratory. The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (http://www.iss-casis.org/) is a national partner of SSEP. To view a list of all SSEP national partners, visit http://ssep.ncesse.org/national-partners/.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please email SSEP National Program Director Jeff Goldstein at jeffgoldstein@ncesse.org.


Free Tours of Facilities at NASA’s Glenn Research Center

NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, is offering tours that take visitors behind the scenes and inside certain research facilities. Glenn scientists and engineers serve as guides. Tours and open house events will be held each month through October 2017. Tours are free for groups and individuals, but to guarantee admission, reservations are required. Visitor parking is also free.

On the days of the tours, a bus departs from Glenn’s main gate every hour, beginning at 10 a.m. The last tour departs at 1 p.m. Each tour lasts about 45 minutes and is followed by a stop at Glenn’s Gift Shop. (The historic district tours follow a different schedule. See tour schedule for details.)

Glenn’s 2017 Tour Schedule

June 3, 2017 — NASA Glenn Hangar: Get a behind-the-scenes look at the NASA Glenn Hangar. See how aircraft at NASA Glenn are used to monitor algae blooms on Lake Erie and other waterways.

July 8, 2017: SLOPE Laboratory: Explore locomotion on planets with a visit to the Simulated Lunar Operations, or SLOPE, Lab. See how rover components are tested for their ability to navigate and investigate planetary surfaces.

Aug. 5, 2017 — Photovoltaic Laboratory: See the light of solar cells with a behind-the-scenes tour of the Photovoltaic Laboratory. See how researchers are exploring ways to create energy from light in order to power everything from homes to spacecraft.

Sept. 9, 2017 — Zero-G Facility: Explore microgravity research of yesterday, today and tomorrow with a tour of Glenn’s Zero-G Facility. Learn how dropping payloads over 400 feet can give researchers a glimpse into microgravity conditions.

Oct. 7, 2017 — Historic District Tour Featuring the 8- by 6-Foot Wind Tunnel: Join us on a free tour of Glenn’s recently established historic district. The tours feature the 8- by 6-foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. Built in 1946, the wind tunnel has contributed to decades of aeronautics research.

Tours are open to U.S. citizens and legal permanent residents. To guarantee admission, reservations are required. For more information on tours and to make reservations, visit https://www.nasa.gov/centers/glenn/events/tours.html.

Please direct questions about the tours to grc-dl-tours@mail.nasa.gov.


Mars Survival Kit: Lessons and Activities to Guide Your Exploration of Mars!

NASA is embarking on a journey to Mars! Are your students ready to join in the adventure? Spark excitement in your classroom with the Mars Survival Kit.

The Mars Survival Kit is a collection of educational activities for students in grades K-12. Each educational activity includes a brief description, as well as information about how the activities and lessons align to the Next Generation Science Standards.

Start your classroom’s journey to Mars at http://go.nasa.gov/1NnZ0Rg.

To learn more about NASA’s Journey to Mars, visit http://www.nasa.gov/topics/journeytomars/index.html.


Get Ready for the 2017 Solar Eclipse With NASA Resources

On Aug. 21, 2017, the United States will experience a solar eclipse! This celestial event will provide a golden opportunity to engage and educate diverse audiences, and NASA has the resources to help.

Along a path 60 to 70 miles wide stretching from Oregon to South Carolina, observers will be able to see a total solar eclipse. Others across North America will see a partial eclipse. The event will happen around lunch time across the country. For an interactive map with timing information along the path of the eclipse, visit http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEgoogle/SEgoogle2001/SE2017Aug21Tgoogle.html.

Visit the following websites to find additional information and resources, including:
— Tips for safely viewing the solar eclipse.
— Recorded interviews with NASA scientists, mission specialists and eclipse path communities.
— Topical online eclipse videos, featuring a variety of STEM and cultural topics.
— Social media community development and networking.
— Mobile educational eclipse applications.
— Public challenges and engagement activities.
— 2-D and 3-D printing exercises for K-16 students.
— Citizen science campaigns in partnership with NASA mission observations.
— Adjunct activities and educational resources.
— Live streaming of observations and programming.

Total Eclipse 2017 — Through the Eyes of NASA
http://eclipse2017.nasa.gov

Eclipses and Transits
http://www.nasa.gov/eclipse

Watch “The Solar Eclipse 2017 PREVIEW Show” with NASA EDGE.
https://youtu.be/UPPGxqqZug0


Fly Your Exoplanet on the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite

Set to launch in June 2018, the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite is an explorer-class planet finder. In the first-ever spaceborne all-sky transit survey, TESS will identify planets ranging from Earth-sized to gas giants and will orbit a wide range of stellar types and orbital distances. As the TESS team prepares for launch, it invites the public to ponder what exoplanets might look like and share their ideas in the form of sketches and graphics.

This opportunity is open to all ages and skill levels. Submissions will be collected via email. To download the template for submitting your artwork, visit https://tess.gsfc.nasa.gov/fly_your_exoplanet.html.

The deadline for submissions is Nov. 20, 2017, or when capacity of the drive carrying the submissions to space is reached, whichever occurs first.

To learn more about the TESS mission, visit https://tess.gsfc.nasa.gov/.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to GSFC-TESS@mail.nasa.gov.


Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design, or STEAMD; or activities culturally relevant to or focused on populations underrepresented in STEM careers, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or nonreimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA announcement.


NASA Unveils Searchable Video, Audio and Imagery Library

NASA has launched a new resource to help the public search and download out-of-this-world images, videos and audio files. The NASA Image and Video Library website consolidates imagery spread across more than 60 collections into one searchable location.

The NASA Image and Video Library allows users to search, discover and download a treasure trove of more than 140,000 NASA images, videos and audio files from across the agency’s many missions. Users can browse the most recently uploaded files, as well as discover historic and the most popularly searched images, audio files and videos. Topic areas include aeronautics, astrophysics, Earth science, human spaceflight and more.

Users can embed content in their own sites and choose from multiple resolutions to download. The website also displays the metadata associated with images.

To learn more, visit https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-unveils-new-searchable-video-audio-and-imagery-library-for-the-public.

To browse or start your multimedia search, visit the NASA Image and Video Library at https://images.nasa.gov/#/.


Help NASA Search the Realm Beyond Neptune at Backyard Worlds: Planet 9

Is a large planet at the fringes of our solar system awaiting discovery, a world astronomers call Planet Nine? Using data from NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer mission, NASA scientists are looking for this planet and for new brown dwarfs in the backyard of the solar system. But they need your help! Finding these dim objects requires the human eye to comb through the images to distinguish moving celestial bodies from ghosts and other artifacts. Participants in this citizen science project will share the credit for their discoveries in any scientific publications that result from the project.

For more information and to learn how to participate, visit the “Backyard Worlds: Planet 9” website at http://backyardworlds.org.

To learn more about NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer and its mission to image the entire sky in the infrared, visit https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/WISE/main/index.html.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Marc Kuchner at marc.j.kuchner@nasa.gov.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Eduation: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express Message — May 4, 2017

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


NEW THIS WEEK!


Celebrate Star Wars Day With ‘Teachable Moment’ Educational Resources From JPL Education
Audience: 6-12 Educators
Event Date: May 4, 2017

Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: May 4, 2017, at 4 p.m. EDT

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Special Event With Beth Nielsen Chapman and Rocky Alvey
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-12
Event Date: May 18, 2017, at 11 a.m. EDT

University Student Research Challenge — A Pilot Project
Audience: Students at U.S. Colleges and Universities
Proposal Deadline: Oct. 16, 2017

New Video Series From the Virginia Space Grant Consortium — Breaking the Code on a Career in Cybersecurity
Audience: Grades 5-12, Higher Education — Educators and Students

What’s New at the NASA Space Place Website?
Audience: K-6 Educators


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

2017 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education
Next Lecture Date: May 4, 2017, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)

Take Your Students on a Series of Virtual Field Trips!
Audience: Grades 6-12 Students and Educators, Formal and Informal
Next Event Date: May 5, 2017, 2 p.m. CDT

NASA Solar Eclipse Workshops at Marshall Space Flight Center
Audience: K-12 Educators
Next Workshop Date: May 6, 2017, 9-11 a.m. CDT

Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘Making STEM Magic’ Program
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: May 6, 2017, at 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. EDT

Free Tours of Facilities at NASA’s Glenn Research Center
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: May 6, 2017

White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities — 2017 All-Star Students Program
Audience: Higher Education Students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Application Deadline: May 12, 2017

Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues
Audience: Graduate Students
Application Deadline: May 15, 2017

NASA Fundamental Physics Workshop 2017
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Deadline: May 17, 2017
Workshop Dates: May 31-June 2, 2017

2017 Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Abstract Submission Deadline: May 19, 2017
Workshop Dates: Aug. 21-25, 2017

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

NASA Mars Science: MAVEN Outreach Webinar — Mars and Venus: Terrestrial Analogues for Exoplanets
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: May 24, 2017, 7 p.m. EDT

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 12 to the International Space Station
Audience: School Districts Serving Grades 5-12, Informal Education Institutions, Colleges and Universities
Inquiry Deadline: May 31, 2017
Start Date: September 5, 2017

NASA History Program Office Internships — Fall 2017
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: June 1, 2017

Get Ready for the 2017 Solar Eclipse With NASA Resources
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Aug. 21, 2017

Free “NASA’s Journey to Mars” Planetarium/Dome Show
Audience: All Formal and Informal Educators

Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students and Higher Education Institutions


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html


NEW THIS WEEK!


Celebrate Star Wars Day With ‘Teachable Moment’ Educational Resources From JPL Education

Star Wars Day, May the Fourth, is today! And the education team at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California has a Teachable Moment that connects “Star Wars,” JPL’s Dawn Mission and Newton’s Laws of Motion. This article contains a primer on the physics behind the ion propulsion engines that drive the Dawn spacecraft, as well as a lesson that shows students how to calculate additive velocity on a hypothetical ion-propelled spacecraft. The spreadsheet model addresses both Next Generation Science and Common Core Math Standards for grades 6-12.

Teachable Moment: May the Force = Mass x Acceleration — Grades 6-12
https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/news/2016/05/03/may-the-force-equals-mass-x-acceleration/

Looking for more? Check out the “Teachable Moments” archives for more resources. http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/news/column/teachable-moments/


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

From ‘Hidden’ to ‘Modern Figures’: Bringing Katherine Johnson’s Story Into Your Classroom
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: May 4, 2017, at 4 p.m. EDT
The film “Hidden Figures,” based on the book by Margot Lee Shetterly, focuses on the stories of Katherine Johnson, Mary Jackson and Dorothy Vaughan, African-American women who were essential to the success of early spaceflight. This session will focus on K-12 classroom activities that are perfect for English, social studies, history, science, mathematics and engineering. These activities are related to what NASA is doing today. Additional resources and adaptation recommendations will be included for activities that tie directly to the work portrayed in the movie. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/242636

International Space Station — Off the Earth, For the Earth: BEST Satellite
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School, and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: May 9, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Participants will learn about the International Space Station as a satellite made by humans. Participants also will explore the BEST (Beginning Engineering Science & Technology) activities that focus on using the engineering design process. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/244194

Picking Up STEAM: Using Models to Understand the Solar Eclipse
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: May 10, 2017, at 5 p.m. EDT
Participants will be introduced to problem-based inquiry learning activities related to the solar eclipse. Learn how to bring STEM challenges and the adventure of space exploration to students in the classroom. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/237938

International Space Station — Off the Earth, For the Earth: Exploring the Extreme
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-8
Event Date: May 11, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT
Explore the over-50-year history of spacewalking. Investigate the critical role of spacewalks in human space exploration, the harsh space environment endured during spacewalks, and how spacesuits are designed to protect astronauts from the space environment. NASA STEM classroom lessons, online resources and teaching strategies will be integrated into this “walking with the stars” webinar. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/235769

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Special Event With Beth Nielsen Chapman and Rocky Alvey

Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network on May 18, 2017, at 11 a.m. EDT for a special live event to celebrate the 100th anniversary of NASA’s Langley Research Center. The event will feature Grammy-nominated songwriter Beth Nielsen Chapman and fellow songwriter Rocky Alvey.

Beth Nielsen Chapman has released nine solo albums and written seven #1 hits. Her songs have been recorded by many artists including Bonnie Raitt, Willie Nelson, Bette Midler, Elton John, Keb Mo’, Indigo Girls and Faith Hill. In 2012, Chapman released “The Mighty Sky,” a Grammy-nominated astronomy CD for kids of all ages. This work was featured during NASA’s 2012 Summer of Innovation program to inspire students to learn about the universe and their place in it and to pursue STEM studies.

Rocky Alvey is director of the Vanderbilt Dyer Observatory and is also a songwriter. His collaborations with Nielsen on “The Mighty Sky” album include writing lyrics and developing lesson plans based on the songs and their content.

Those tuning in to the webcast may ask questions via email at dlinfochannel@gmail.com and via social media using #askDLN.

To learn more about this event, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln/live.

For information about other DLN events, visit http://www.nasa.gov/dln.

Please send any questions about this opportunity to dlinfochannel@gmail.com.


University Student Research Challenge — A Pilot Project

NASA’s Transformative Aeronautics Concepts Program seeks to develop novel concepts with the potential to create new capabilities in aeronautics by stimulating aeronautics research in the student community. Through this solicitation, TACP will provide students from accredited U.S. colleges or universities with grants for aeronautics projects that also raise cost-sharing funds using crowdfunding platforms.

This challenge, which is being run as a pilot project, seeks students who have an aeronautics-related project idea and have the passion to develop that idea. The project must be relevant to the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate’s Strategic Implementation Plan.

The challenge is open to teams of students enrolled in accredited U.S. institutions of higher education. This category includes universities, four-year colleges, community colleges or other two-year institutions.

A notice of intent is not required for this opportunity. Proposals are due Oct. 16, 2017.

For more information, visit https://go.nasa.gov/2pZxwvf.

Questions about the challenge should be directed to nspires-help@nasaprs.com.


New Video Series From the Virginia Space Grant Consortium — Breaking the Code on a Career in Cybersecurity

As the Internet, computers, and smart devices become increasingly integral to our lives, the need for ensuring the security of our networks, devices and data has become more critical and the demand for cyber workers more pressing. The cybersecurity field offers high-paying, high-demand jobs with high worker satisfaction. A shortage of more than 1.5 million cybersecurity workers globally is predicted by the year 2020. (Global Information Security Workforce Study, 2015)

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium has developed a new free video series, Breaking the Code on a Career in Cybersecurity. Five short videos provide background on the importance of cybersecurity in our computer- and data-driven world. Practicing cyber professionals across many disciplines talk about their work and their career paths and offer tips on how to prepare for a cybersecurity career. Links to other key resources are noted. The programs showcase the wide range of cybersecurity jobs that involve the protection of vulnerable systems from hackers.

The series Breaking the Code on a Career in Cybersecurity can be accessed on YouTube at www.vsgc.odu.edu/cyber.

Funding for the video series was provided through a grant from the National Institute of Standards and Technology on behalf of the National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education. The series is one of a number of career development and educational projects funded by the National Institute of Standards and Technology that the Virginia Space Grant Consortium has undertaken as part of the Hampton Roads Cyber Alliance project led by Old Dominion University.

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium is a coalition of NASA centers, universities, state educational agencies and other institutions with a strong commitment to education, workforce development, and research in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Learn more about the Virginia Space Grant Consortium at www.vsgc.odu.edu.

Questions about this video series should be directed to Mary Sandy at msandy@odu.edu.


What’s New at the NASA Space Place Website?

NASA Space Place is a NASA website for elementary students, their teachers and their parents. Check it out at https://spaceplace.nasa.gov .

Don’t forget to subscribe to our monthly e-newsletter, the NASA Space Place Gazette! http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/subscribe

New and Newsworthy Resources

Voyager 1 and 2: The Interstellar Mission
— The Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft launched from Earth in 1977. Their mission was to explore Jupiter and Saturn –and beyond to the outer planets of our solar system. Learn more at https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/voyager-to-planets.

What Is Gravity? — Gravity is the force by which a planet or other body draws objects toward its center. The force of gravity keeps all the planets in orbit around the sun. What else does gravity do? Go here to find out! https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/what-is-gravity

Saturn’s Rings — Saturn’s rings are about 400,000 kilometers (240,000 miles) wide. That’s the distance from Earth to the moon! The rings are made up of material ranging from particles too tiny to see to “particles” the size of a bus. Scientists think the particles are icy snowballs or ice-covered rocks. Learn more at https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/saturn-rings.

“JunoQuest” — Jupiter is the largest planet in our solar system. But there is still a lot about this gas giant that we don’t know. NASA’s Juno spacecraft currently is helping scientists learn more. Play “JunoQuest,” and help Juno take us a giant step forward in our understanding of how giant planets form and what part they play in putting together the rest of the solar system. https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/junoquest.

Summer Activities
Are you looking for fun, educational activities for the summer? Check these out:

Make Sun Paper — Our sun is a burning ball of superheated gas. Even though it is 93 million miles (149.6 million kilometers) away, we can feel its heat and light on Earth. Make this marbled paper that looks just like our sun! https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/sun-paper

Bake Sunspot Cookies — Even when the sun may appear to be shining as brightly as ever, it sometimes has dark areas called sunspots. Learn more with this simple and delicious activity. https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/sunspot-cookies

Make Ultraviolet Handprint Art — In this activity, see how sunscreen can be used to block the sun’s ultraviolet light rays. https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/sunscreen-activity

Make a Pinwheel Galaxy — The Pinwheel Galaxy is a spiral-shaped galaxy about 21 million light years away from Earth. Scientists call this swirling galaxy M101. Make a Pinwheel Galaxy pinwheel! https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/pinwheel-galaxy

Special Days to Celebrate
Find out about noteworthy days in NASA and space history that you can observe in your classroom.

May 5 — Alan Shepard became the first American in space on this day in 1961.

See more astronauts in action in our gallery: https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/gallery-technology.

May 6: Today is peak viewing time for the Eta Aquarids meteor shower.
What’s the difference between an asteroid and meteor? https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/asteroid-or-meteor

May 26: Astronaut Sally Ride was born on this day in 1951.
She was the first American woman to fly in space! Learn more at https://go.nasa.gov/2jtoYHo.

June 8: Happy World Oceans Day!
Did you know that water covers 71 percent of Earth’s surface, and 96.5 percent of it is salt water? https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/ocean-currents

June 20: Today is the first day of summer.
Why does Earth have seasons? https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/seasons

June 22: Pluto’s moon Charon was discovered on this day in 1978.
Learn more about Pluto and its moons. https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/ice-dwarf

Share
Do you want some help spreading the word about NASA Space Place? We have a page with ready-to-use website descriptions, logos and links to all our social media. Check out http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/share.

Subscribe to Our Monthly E-newsletter!
Are you interested in keeping up with the latest and greatest news from NASA Space Place? Subscribe to the NASA Space Place Gazette. The NASA Space Place Gazette is for educators, parents and space enthusiasts of all ages. It includes special bulletins for noteworthy days and NASA events, such as a lunar eclipse, planet flyby or rover landing. It’s easy to subscribe — just click here.
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/subscribe

Send Feedback
Please share your ideas about ways to use NASA Space Place in your teaching. Send them to info@spaceplace.nasa.gov.


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


2017 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online

The Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, named after the founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and presented by JPL’s Office of Communication and Education, shares the excitement of the space program’s missions, instruments and other technologies.

Lectures take place twice per month, on consecutive Thursdays and Fridays. Thursday lectures take place in JPL’s Theodore von Kármán Auditorium, and Friday lectures take place at Pasadena City College’s Vosloh Forum. Both start at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT). Admission and parking are free for all lectures. No reservations are required, but seating is limited. The Thursday evening lectures are streamed live for viewing online. Archives of past lectures are also available online.

Next Lecture in the Series:

Cassini: The Grand Finale Begins
Event Date:
May 4 and May 5, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2017&month=5
NASA’s flagship outer planets mission, Cassini, enters the final phase of its historic mission of exploration and discovery in April 2017. The spacecraft will plunge 22 times through the narrow gap between Saturn and its innermost rings — a completely unexplored region around Saturn. Join Cassini’s project manager Dr. Earl Maize and project scientist Dr. Linda Spilker for a discussion about the final phase of the mission.

For more information about the Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, including a complete list of upcoming lectures, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.php.

Questions about this series should be directed to http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php.


Take Your Students on a Series of Virtual Field Trips!

Bring your students along on a series of virtual field trips to NASA centers where students will go behind-the-scenes to see cool NASA places and visit with NASA professionals. Each session is 15-30 minutes long and includes an interactive question-and-answer session. Pre-registration is not required.

Upcoming virtual field trips include:

Deep Space Patrol — May 5, 2017, 2 p.m. CDT
Go behind-the-scenes in NASA’s meteorite lab with Kevin Righter, planetary scientist at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas.

Mission to Mars — May 8, 2017, 10 a.m. CDT
Learn about driving on another planet with an inside look at NASA’s space exploration vehicles with Lucien Junkin, robotics engineer at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas.

Adventures in Aeronautics — May 18, 2017, 9 a.m. CDT
Learn about high-flying careers with NASA Aircraft Operations. Join Mallory Yates, aerospace engineer, and Angela Bauer, deputy engineering branch chief of the Aircraft Operations Division, for a behind-the-scenes look at aviation at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas.

Fun With Technology — May 22, 2017, 10 a.m. CDT
Take a virtual field trip to NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. Go behind-the-scenes with NASA intern Kaitlin Lostroscio to learn about NASA robotics.

These virtual field trips are a series of events offered to students and teachers as a component of “The Search for STEMnauts” — a virtual scavenger hunt where student teams in grades 6-12 solve puzzles, unravel riddles, break codes and make weekly virtual field trips to exclusive NASA locations. Student teams can even check out where they stand among the competition by following real-time updates on “The Search for STEMnauts” website!

This interactive, technical twist on a traditional scavenger hunt is offered through a partnership between NASA’s STEM on Station and Texas Instruments to provide students with a fun way to learn important STEM skills including coding and problem solving.

All students and educators (grades 6-12) are invited to participate in any virtual field trip offered. Participation in “The Search for STEMnauts” competition is not required. To learn more about these virtual field trips, including links to join in, go to https://education.ti.com/NASAliveevents.

For more information about “The Search for STEMnauts,” including how to register, visit www.STEMnauts.com.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Kelly McCormick at Kelly.mccormick-1@nasa.gov.


NASA Solar Eclipse Workshops at Marshall Space Flight Center

On Aug. 21, 2017, the United States will experience a solar eclipse. This celestial event will provide a golden opportunity to engage and educate diverse audiences, and NASA has the resources to help. Join the Educator Resource Center at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, for a series of grade-level specific educator workshops to learn about safety tips, hands-on activities, resources and more!

May 6, 2017, 9-11 a.m. CDT: Educators of Grades K-12
June 1, 2017, 9-11 a.m. CDT: Educators of Grades K-12

For full event details and registration information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/solar_eclipse_workshop2017.pdf.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Maria Chambers at maria.a.chambers@nasa.gov.


Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘Making STEM Magic’ Program

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is presenting a series of free education events called “Making STEM Magic.” This new program introduces young visitors to engineering in a fun and creative way. Participants learn by doing. Each challenge involves designing, building and testing a prototype. Each month, a new theme will be introduced with a new problem to solve.

Events are scheduled each Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. ET at the National Air and Space Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia. The events are free and open to the public.

Blast Off!: Propulsion
Each Saturday in May 2017
It really is rocket science. Try your hand at designing a rocket and staying on target.

Red Rover: Mission to Mars
Each Saturday in June 2017
Did you know that rovers are robotic ambassadors? Learn more about NASA’s mobile labs and construct your own rolling rover.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s “Making STEM Magic” program, visit https://airandspace.si.edu/visit/events/stem-magic.

Please direct questions about this series of events to the Visitor Service line at 703-572-4118.


Free Tours of Facilities at NASA’s Glenn Research Center

NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, is offering tours that take visitors behind the scenes and inside certain research facilities. Glenn scientists and engineers serve as guides. Tours and open house events will be held each month through October 2017. Tours are free for groups and individuals, but to guarantee admission, reservations are required. Visitor parking is also free.

On the days of the tours, a bus departs from Glenn’s main gate every hour, beginning at 10 a.m. The last tour departs at 1 p.m. Each tour lasts about 45 minutes and is followed by a stop at Glenn’s Gift Shop. (The historic district tours follow a different schedule. See tour schedule for details.)

Glenn’s 2017 Tour Schedule

May 6, 2017 — Historic District Tour Featuring the 10- by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel: Join us on a free tour of Glenn’s recently established historic district. The tours feature the 10- by 10-foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. For over 60 years, the wind tunnel has been used to conduct propulsion testing, including research for the Apollo program.

June 3, 2017 — NASA Glenn Hangar: Get a behind-the-scenes look at the NASA Glenn Hangar. See how aircraft at NASA Glenn are used to monitor algae blooms on Lake Erie and other waterways.

July 8, 2017: SLOPE Laboratory: Explore locomotion on planets with a visit to the Simulated Lunar Operations, or SLOPE, Lab. See how rover components are tested for their ability to navigate and investigate planetary surfaces.

Aug. 5, 2017 — Photovoltaic Laboratory: See the light of solar cells with a behind-the-scenes tour of the Photovoltaic Laboratory. See how researchers are exploring ways to create energy from light in order to power everything from homes to spacecraft.

Sept. 9, 2017 — Zero-G Facility: Explore microgravity research of yesterday, today and tomorrow with a tour of Glenn’s Zero-G Facility. Learn how dropping payloads over 400 feet can give researchers a glimpse into microgravity conditions.

Oct. 7, 2017 — Historic District Tour Featuring the 8- by 6-Foot Wind Tunnel: Join us on a free tour of Glenn’s recently established historic district. The tours feature the 8- by 6-foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. Built in 1946, the wind tunnel has contributed to decades of aeronautics research.

Tours are open to U.S. citizens and legal permanent residents. To guarantee admission, reservations are required. For more information on tours and to make reservations, visit https://www.nasa.gov/centers/glenn/events/tours.html.

Please direct questions about the tours to grc-dl-tours@mail.nasa.gov.


White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities — 2017 All-Star Students Program

The White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities works to promote HBCU excellence, innovation and sustainability. The initiative will recognize current HBCU students for their dedication to academics, leadership and civic engagement as 2017 HBCU All-Star Students.

The appointment period will last approximately one year. During this time, HBCU All-Stars will serve as ambassadors of the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities by providing outreach opportunities and information to their fellow students about the value of education and the initiative as a networking resource. Through social media and personal and professional relationships with community-based organizations, students will share promising and proven practices that support opportunities for all young people to realize their educational and career potential. The program will provide an opportunity to participate in regional and national events as well as webchats with initiative staff and other professionals from a wide range of disciplines that support a spirit of engagement and personal and professional development.

Nominees must be current undergraduate, graduate or professional students at an HBCU. Students must be enrolled for the 2017-2018 fall semester. Applications must be submitted by 11:59 p.m. EDT on May 12, 2017.

For more information and to download an application, visit http://sites.ed.gov/whhbcu/resources/hbcu-all-star-students/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to hbcuallstars@ed.gov.


Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues

The Airport Cooperative Research Program is seeking applicants for its Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues. Through this program, the ACRP strives to encourage applied research on airport and related aviation system issues and to foster the next generation of aviation community leaders. The program is intended to stimulate thought, discussion and research by those who may become the future airport managers, operators, designers and policy makers in aviation. The focus of this research program is on applied research to help the public sector continue to improve the quality, reliability, safety and security of the U.S. civil aviation system well into the foreseeable future.

The Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues will award up to 10 highly qualified applicants, selected by an ACRP panel of experts, a stipend of $10,000 each for successful completion of a research paper on a subject chosen by the candidate within the framework of the program’s purpose.

Applicants must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States, or have a current student visa. Each applicant also must be officially enrolled as a full-time student at an accredited North American institution of higher learning for the academic year in a graduate course leading to a master’s or doctoral degree. Proof of both may be required.

Applications are due May 15, 2017. For more information, visit http://www.trb.org/ACRP/ACRPGraduateAwardProgram.aspx.

The ACRP Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues is sponsored by the Federal Aviation Administration. Creating a selection panel, monitoring research progress, organizing a forum for presentation, and publishing the research papers are the responsibility of the ACRP of the Transportation Research Board. The Virginia Space Grant Consortium will manage the Graduate Research Award program under the ACRP’s direction.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to acrp@odu.edu.


NASA Fundamental Physics Workshop 2017

The NASA Fundamental Physics Workshop 2017 will be held May 31-June 2, 2017, in Santa Barbara, California.

The workshop will provide a forum for NASA fundamental physics investigators to present results and discuss research ideas for future space experimentation with interested international and U.S. colleagues. Topic areas include atomic and molecular physics; fundamental forces and symmetries; dusty plasma physics; and condensed matter physics.

All interested scientists and researchers are invited to participate. The participation of the current NASA-funded investigators is strongly encouraged and kindly requested.

The deadline to register to attend the workshop is May 17, 2017. For more information and to register to attend, visit http://icpi.nasaprs.com/fpw2017.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Renee Atkins at ratkins@nasaprs.com.


2017 Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop

The annual Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop will be held Aug. 21-25, 2017, at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

The Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop encourages knowledge sharing, professional development, and networking throughout the thermal and fluids engineering community within NASA, academia and the aerospace community at large. STEM faculty and university students are encouraged to attend, submit a poster or paper on their thermal/fluids work, take free training, or do a combination thereof.

Registration to attend the workshop is free. Participants interested in presenting at the conference, via manuscript or technical poster, must submit an abstract by May 19, 2017.

For more information about the workshop and how to submit an abstract for consideration, visit https://tfaws.nasa.gov/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Ramona Cummings at ramona.o.cummings@nasa.gov.


Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites U.S. educational institutions to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets, and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

Nonprofit museums, libraries and planetariums (sponsored through their respective State Agency Surplus Property, or SASP, organization) are also eligible to make requests. Visit the link below for special instructions to request items. To find the contact information for the SASP representative for your area, visit http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/100851.

A nominal shipping fee must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.


NASA Mars Science: MAVEN Outreach Webinar — Mars and Venus: Terrestrial Analogues for Exoplanets

MAVEN Outreach Webinars are virtual gatherings of team members from the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution, or MAVEN, mission to offer professional development for formal and informal educators, troop leaders, museum docents, and others interested in MAVEN and Mars science.

Join the MAVEN team on May 24, 2017, at 7 p.m. EDT, for the Mars and Venus: Terrestrial Analogues for Exoplanets webinar. Learn about ways the MAVEN mission may help scientists understand how the atmospheres of other rocky worlds are also being eroded. Dr. Shannon Curry from the University of California Berkeley will discuss how planetary bodies such as Mars and Venus can be used to provide insight into how atmospheres evolve, as scientists model (and begin to observe directly) the atmospheres of exoplanets.

For more information, visit http://lasp.colorado.edu/home/maven/education-outreach/maven-outreach-webinars/.

Questions about this webinar should be directed to epomail@lasp.colorado.edu.


DEADLINE EXTENDED: Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 12 to the International Space Station

The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education and the Arthur C. Clarke Institute for Space Education announce a science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, opportunity for school districts across the U.S. and space station partner nations. The newest flight opportunity, Mission 12 to the International Space Station, gives students across a community the ability to design and propose real experiments to fly in low Earth orbit on the space station. This opportunity is part of the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program, or SSEP.

Each participating community will receive a microgravity research mini-laboratory capable of supporting a single microgravity experiment and all launch services to fly the minilab to the space station in spring/summer 2018 and return it to Earth. An experiment design competition in each community — engaging typically 300+ students — allows student teams to design and propose real experiments vying for their community′s reserved mini-lab.

Content resources for teachers and students support foundational instruction on science in microgravity and experimental design. Additional SSEP programming uses the experiment design competition to engage the community in embracing a learning-community model for STEM education.

This competition is open to students in grades 5-12 and college. Informal education groups and organizations also are encouraged to participate. Interested communities must inquire about the program no later than May 31, 2017. The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education is available to help interested communities in the U.S. secure the needed funding.

To learn more about this opportunity, visit the “SSEP Mission 12 to International Space Station” National Announcement of Opportunity at http://ssep.ncesse.org/2017/03/new-flight-opportunity-for-school-districts-announcing-student-spaceflight-experiments-program-ssep-mission-12-to-the-international-space-station-starting-september-2017/.

SSEP is enabled through a strategic partnership with DreamUp PBC and NanoRacks LLC working with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the use of the International Space Station as a national laboratory. The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (http://www.iss-casis.org/) is a national partner of SSEP. To view a list of all SSEP national partners, visit http://ssep.ncesse.org/national-partners/.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please email SSEP National Program Director Jeff Goldstein at jeffgoldstein@ncesse.org.


NASA History Program Office Internships — Fall 2017

The NASA History Program Office is seeking undergraduate and graduate students for summer 2017 internships. The History Program Office maintains archival materials to answer research questions from NASA personnel, journalists, scholars, students at all levels and others from around the world. The division also edits and publishes several books and monographs each year. It maintains a large number of websites on NASA history.

Students of all majors are welcome to apply. While detailed prior knowledge of the aeronautics and space fields is not necessary, a keen interest and some basic familiarity with these topics are needed. Strong research, writing and editing skills are essential. Experience with social media is a plus.

Intern projects are flexible. Typical projects include handling a variety of information requests, writing posts for the NASA history Twitter and Facebook pages, editing historical manuscripts, doing research and writing biographical sketches, and identifying and captioning photos.

Applications for fall 2017 internships are due June 1, 2017. Applications for spring 2018 internship applications are due June 1, 2017 and applications for summer 2018 internships are due Feb. 1, 2018.

For more information, visit http://history.nasa.gov/interncall.htm.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please contact Bill Barry at bill.barry@nasa.gov.


Get Ready for the 2017 Solar Eclipse With NASA Resources

On Aug. 21, 2017, the United States will experience a solar eclipse! This celestial event will provide a golden opportunity to engage and educate diverse audiences, and NASA has the resources to help.

Along a path 60 to 70 miles wide stretching from Oregon to South Carolina, observers will be able to see a total solar eclipse. Others across North America will see a partial eclipse. The event will happen around lunch time across the country. For an interactive map with timing information along the path of the eclipse, visit http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEgoogle/SEgoogle2001/SE2017Aug21Tgoogle.html.

Visit the following websites to find additional information and resources, including:
— Tips for safely viewing the solar eclipse.
— Recorded interviews with NASA scientists, mission specialists and eclipse path communities.
— Topical online eclipse videos, featuring a variety of STEM and cultural topics.
— Social media community development and networking.
— Mobile educational eclipse applications.
— Public challenges and engagement activities.
— 2-D and 3-D printing exercises for K-16 students.
— Citizen science campaigns in partnership with NASA mission observations.
— Adjunct activities and educational resources.
— Live streaming of observations and programming.

Total Eclipse 2017 — Through the Eyes of NASA
http://eclipse2017.nasa.gov

Eclipses and Transits
http://www.nasa.gov/eclipse

Watch “The Solar Eclipse 2017 PREVIEW Show” with NASA EDGE.
https://youtu.be/UPPGxqqZug0


Free ‘NASA’s Journey to Mars’ Planetarium/Dome Show

Are you looking for ways to prepare your students for STEM-related career opportunities? Do you want to spark their interest in pushing the boundaries of technology and innovation? Right now, NASA’s fleet of Mars robotic explorers is paving the way for human exploration of the solar system in the coming decades. Have your students join NASA in preparing for a monumental journey of a lifetime — to Mars!

“NASA’s Journey to Mars” is a short planetarium presentation that can be used in the educational domes of your school district, as well as local planetariums, to inspire interest in STEM. To learn more, including how you can acquire the show for use in your area, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/journey-of-a-lifetime-mars-education-resources/.

Please direct questions about the “NASA’s Journey to Mars” planetarium/dome show to Elsie Weigel at elsie.weigel@nasa.gov.


Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Are you an undergraduate or graduate student seeking opportunities in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)? The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science — in collaboration with the participating agencies in the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on STEM Education (CoSTEM) and the Science.gov Alliance — has launched a search portal for both students and universities to discover federally sponsored STEM education training and funding opportunities.

Student users can search the site for opportunities they can apply to directly, such as research internships and fellowships. Likewise, universities can search the site for federal funding opportunities to establish innovative training programs for undergraduates or graduate students.

Users can search the site through faceted searching capabilities for characteristics such as program type, STEM discipline, institution location, federal sponsor, and eligibility. Or they can search through the open text option.

For programs and opportunities for undergraduates, visit http://stemundergrads.science.gov/.

For graduate programs and opportunities, visit http://stemgradstudents.science.gov/.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Eduation: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express Message — April 27, 2017

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: April 27, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT

NASA Mars Science: MAVEN Outreach Webinar — Mars and Venus: Terrestrial Analogues for Exoplanets
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: May 24, 2017, 7 p.m. EDT


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

2018 eXploration Habitat Academic Innovation Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Faculty and Students
Proposal Deadline: April 28, 2017

2017 Columbia Crew Memorial Undergraduate Scholarships
Audience: Undergraduate Students at Texas Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: April 28, 2017

2017 Texas Space Grant Consortium STEM Educator Scholarships
Audience:  Educators Enrolled in Programs for a Master’s Degree in a STEM Field at Member Institutions of the Texas Space Grant Consortium
Application Deadline: April 28, 2017

2017-2018 Texas Space Grant Consortium Graduate Fellowships
Audience: Graduate Students at Member Institutions of the Texas Space Grant Consortium
Application Deadline: April 28, 2017

NASA’s International Space Apps Challenge
Audience: Problem Solvers of All Ages
Event Dates: April 28, 2017 (Boot Camp); April 29-30, 2017 (Hackathon)

Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘Making STEM Magic’ Program
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: April 29, 2017, at 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. EST

Take Your Students on a Series of Virtual Field Trips!
Audience: Grades 6-12 Students and Educators, Formal and Informal
Next Event Date: May 5, 2017, 2 p.m. CDT

NASA Solar Eclipse Workshops at Marshall Space Flight Center
Audience: K-12 Educators
Next Workshop Date: May 6, 2017, 9-11 a.m. CDT

Free Tours of Facilities at NASA’s Glenn Research Center
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: May 6, 2017

White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities — 2017 All-Star Students Program
Audience: Higher Education Students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Application Deadline: May 12, 2017

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 12 to the International Space Station
Audience: School Districts Serving Grades 5-12, Informal Education Institutions, Colleges and Universities
Inquiry Deadline: May 31, 2017
Start Date: September 5, 2017

‘CineSpace’ Short Film Competition
Audience: All Educators and Students
Entry Submission Period: June 1 – July 31, 2017

Get Ready for the 2017 Solar Eclipse With NASA Resources
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Aug. 21, 2017

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Earn STEM Digital Badges to Celebrate the Centennial of NASA’s Langley Research Center
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-9, Informal Educators
Deadline: Oct. 21, 2017

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

Search for Gravitational Waves With ‘Gravity Spy’ Citizen Science Project
Audience: All Educators and Students
Project Timeframe: Ongoing

NASA Seeks Creative Arts Inspired by Cassini’s Mission to Saturn
Audience: All Educators and Students Ages 13 and Older

Help NASA Study Mars — Planet Four: Terrains
Audience: All Educators and Students
Project Timeframe: Ongoing

NASA Invites You to #SpotHubble
Audience: All Educators and Students


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

So You Want to Be an Astronaut and Other NASA Careers
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: April 27, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT
Not just astronauts work at NASA. Explore the many NASA STEM careers needed to successfully accomplish the unique, exciting missions that explore and build a better understanding of our Earth and the universe beyond. NASA career education curriculum and resources will be integrated into this online learning session. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/243842

International Space Station: Off the Earth, For the Earth — The Brain in Space
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School, and Informal Educators of Grades 9-12
Event Date: May 1, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Participants will get an overview of resources related to the study of the effects of microgravity on the human brain. We will discuss classroom application and modification of resources as an integral part of this webinar. The activities presented in this webinar address the Next Generation Science Standard LS1. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/227783

Rocket Scientists Write?
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-8
Event Date: May 2, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Participants in this webinar will get an overview of language arts lessons and resources within NASA education materials. Discussion will include modification and customization of lessons. The activities presented in this webinar address Common Core Standards for Language Arts. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/227785

Exploring the Physics of Climate Change: Buoyancy
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: May 3, 2017, at 8 p.m. EDT
Participants will explore the basic physics of buoyancy as a function of density. Using easily accessible demonstrations, participants will learn ways to show how buoyancy relates to melting glaciers and ice caps. This activity will help clear up misconceptions about contributing factors to sea-level rise. The activities shared in this webinar address earth science and physics standards. For this and other activities, visit https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/243906

From ‘Hidden’ to ‘Modern Figures’: Bringing Katherine Johnson’s Story Into Your Classroom
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: May 4, 2017, at 4 p.m. EDT
The film “Hidden Figures,” based on the book by Margot Lee Shetterly, focuses on the stories of Katherine Johnson, Mary Jackson and Dorothy Vaughan, African-American women who were essential to the success of early spaceflight. This session will focus on K-12 classroom activities that are perfect for English, social studies, history, science, mathematics and engineering. These activities are related to what NASA is doing today. Additional resources and adaptation recommendations will be included for activities that tie directly to the work portrayed in the movie. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/242636

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


NASA Mars Science: MAVEN Outreach Webinar — Mars and Venus: Terrestrial Analogues for Exoplanets

MAVEN Outreach Webinars are virtual gatherings of team members from the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution, or MAVEN, mission to offer professional development for formal and informal educators, troop leaders, museum docents, and others interested in MAVEN and Mars science.

Join the MAVEN team on May 24, 2017, at 7 p.m. EDT, for the Mars and Venus: Terrestrial Analogues for Exoplanets webinar. Learn about ways the MAVEN mission may help scientists understand how the atmospheres of other rocky worlds are also being eroded. Dr. Shannon Curry from the University of California Berkeley will discuss how planetary bodies such as Mars and Venus can be used to provide insight into how atmospheres evolve, as scientists model (and begin to observe directly) the atmospheres of exoplanets.

For more information, visit http://lasp.colorado.edu/home/maven/education-outreach/maven-outreach-webinars/.

Questions about this webinar should be directed to epomail@lasp.colorado.edu.


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


2018 eXploration Habitat Academic Innovation Challenge

NASA is seeking university teams to develop innovative design solutions for deep-space human exploration systems in the 2018 eXploration Systems and Habitation Academic Innovation Challenge. NASA’s Advanced Exploration Systems Division sponsors the X-Hab Challenge as part of its core function to develop foundational technologies and high-priority capabilities that are the building blocks for future human space missions. Topic areas for this year’s challenge include 3-D printing of biologic materials, long-term hygiene, water condensation, replacement power systems and a Mars habitat commonality.

Working with the National Space Grant Foundation, NASA’s Advanced Exploration Systems Division and Space Life and Physical Sciences Division will offer multiple X-Hab 2018 awards of $20,000 to $30,000. These awards will allow winning teams to design and produce studies or functional products that will increase knowledge and foster risk reduction for space exploration capabilities. Awardees will follow a tailored systems-engineering process with projects being completed in the May 2018 timeframe.

Proposals will be accepted from university faculty who are U.S. citizens and who currently teach at an accredited university in the U.S. Eligible educators must be teaching a senior or graduate engineering design, industrial design or architecture curriculum that is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.

Proposals are due April 28, 2017.

For more information about the challenge and how to submit a proposal, visit http://spacegrant.org/xhab/.

To learn about past NASA X-Hab projects, visit https://www.nasa.gov/exploration/technology/deep_space_habitat/xhab/.

Please email questions about the X-Hab Challenge to xhab@spacegrant.org.


2017 Columbia Crew Memorial Undergraduate Scholarships

The Texas Space Grant Consortium and the Aviation and Space Foundation of Texas, in partnership with NASA, are offering undergraduate scholarships of $1,500 in memory of the Space Shuttle Columbia astronauts. These seven men and women made the ultimate sacrifice to expand the exploration of space and our knowledge of the world that we live in.

These scholarships are intended to recognize high-quality students and encourage their consideration of graduate studies in science, technology, engineering and mathematics that would ultimately lead to careers in STEM-related fields. The scholarships stress excellence in academics, participation in STEM education and research projects, and the exhibition of leadership qualities.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens and registered for at least a half-time course load at a Texas Space Grant Consortium institution. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 28, 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/grants/scholars_announcement.html. Please email any questions about this opportunity to scholarships@tsgc.utexas.edu.


2017 Texas Space Grant Consortium STEM Educator Scholarships

The Texas Space Grant Consortium’s Educator STEM Scholarship Program provides $1,500 scholarships to eligible teachers enrolled in master’s programs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens who hold a bachelor’s degree and are enrolled in a master’s program at a Texas Space Grant Consortium institution. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 28, 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/edu_stem/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to scholarships@tsgc.utexas.edu.


2017-2018 Texas Space Grant Consortium Graduate Fellowships

Texas Space Grant Consortium Fellowships encourage graduate study in the fields of space science and engineering. Interdisciplinary and integrated work experience are emphasized.

Each $5,000 award supplements half-time graduate support (or fellowship) provided by a consortium institution. The fellowship award is good for one year. Each fellowship may be renewed for a maximum of three years, provided the recipient has spent no more than two of those years as a master’s candidate.

Applicants must be registered for full-time study in a graduate program at one or more of the Texas Space Grant Consortium institutions and must be promised financial support at that institution. Applicants must also be U.S. citizens. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 28, 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/grants/fellows_announcement.html. Please email any questions about this opportunity to fellowships@tsgc.utexas.edu.


NASA’s International Space Apps Challenge

NASA is preparing for the sixth annual International Space Apps Challenge, which will be held April 29-30, 2017. The program invites participants to solve challenges using NASA data to develop mobile applications, software, hardware, data visualizations and platform solutions that can contribute to space exploration missions and help improve life on Earth.

The theme of this year’s challenge is “Earth!” Our planet is a complex and dynamic system that still holds many mysteries. Year-round, NASA helps shed light on Earth’s many components, including oceans, landscapes and living things. With unique vantage points in air and in space, NASA collects high-quality data covering all parts of the planet to tell us more about the world we live in and to predict future processes on Earth.

This year’s two-day Space Apps “hackathon” will bring tech-savvy citizens, scientists, entrepreneurs, designers, artists, educators and students together to be a part of this scientific exploration, as we challenge problem solvers across the globe to create innovative uses of NASA’s Earth science data.

Additionally, many locations are hosting a pre-hackathon boot camp event on April 28, 2017, to introduce participants to the latest trends in data and technology and to provide tutorials to first-time hackers and coders. The boot camps at our two Mainstage locations, New York City and Silicon Valley (Palo Alto), will be livestreamed on our website!

Registration for participation is now open at over 180 locations worldwide!

To learn more about the International Space Apps Challenge, get the latest updates, and register to attend an event, visit https://2017.spaceappschallenge.org/.

If you have questions about the challenge, please visit https://2017.spaceappschallenge.org/contact-us.


Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘Making STEM Magic’ Program

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is presenting a series of free education events called “Making STEM Magic.” This new program introduces young visitors to engineering in a fun and creative way. Participants learn by doing. Each challenge involves designing, building and testing a prototype. Each month, a new theme will be introduced with a new problem to solve.

Events are scheduled each Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. ET at the National Air and Space Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia. The events are free and open to the public.

In the Heat of the Moment: Space Capsules
Each Saturday in April 2017
Imagine an astronaut hurtling toward Earth in a space capsule at tremendous speeds. In this challenge, participants will design a heat shield to keep the astronaut cool from the heat of re-entry.

Blast Off!: Propulsion
Each Saturday in May 2017
It really is rocket science. Try your hand at designing a rocket and staying on target.

Red Rover: Mission to Mars
Each Saturday in June 2017
Did you know that rovers are robotic ambassadors? Learn more about NASA’s mobile labs and construct your own rolling rover.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s “Making STEM Magic” program, visit https://airandspace.si.edu/visit/events/stem-magic.

Please direct questions about this series of events to the Visitor Service line at 703-572-4118.


Take Your Students on a Series of Virtual Field Trips!

Bring your students along on a series of virtual field trips to NASA centers where students will go behind-the-scenes to see cool NASA places and visit with NASA professionals. Each session is 15-30 minutes long and includes an interactive question-and-answer session. Pre-registration is not required.

Upcoming virtual field trips include:

Deep Space Patrol — May 5, 2017, 2 p.m. CDT
Go behind-the-scenes in NASA’s meteorite lab with Kevin Righter, planetary scientist at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas.

Mission to Mars — May 8, 2017, 10 a.m. CDT
Learn about driving on another planet with an inside look at NASA’s space exploration vehicles with Lucien Junkin, robotics engineer at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas.

Adventures in Aeronautics — May 18, 2017, 9 a.m. CDT
Learn about high-flying careers with NASA Aircraft Operations. Join Mallory Yates, aerospace engineer, and Angela Bauer, deputy engineering branch chief of the Aircraft Operations Division, for a behind-the-scenes look at aviation at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas.

Fun With Technology — May 22, 2017, 10 a.m. CDT
Take a virtual field trip to NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. Go behind-the-scenes with NASA intern Kaitlin Lostroscio to learn about NASA robotics.

These virtual field trips are a series of events offered to students and teachers as a component of “The Search for STEMnauts” — a virtual scavenger hunt where student teams in grades 6-12 solve puzzles, unravel riddles, break codes and make weekly virtual field trips to exclusive NASA locations. Student teams can even check out where they stand among the competition by following real-time updates on “The Search for STEMnauts” website!

This interactive, technical twist on a traditional scavenger hunt is offered through a partnership between NASA’s STEM on Station and Texas Instruments to provide students with a fun way to learn important STEM skills including coding and problem solving.

All students and educators (grades 6-12) are invited to participate in any virtual field trip offered. Participation in “The Search for STEMnauts” competition is not required. To learn more about these virtual field trips, including links to join in, go to https://education.ti.com/NASAliveevents.

For more information about “The Search for STEMnauts,” including how to register, visit www.STEMnauts.com.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Kelly McCormick at Kelly.mccormick-1@nasa.gov.


NASA Solar Eclipse Workshops at Marshall Space Flight Center

On Aug. 21, 2017, the United States will experience a solar eclipse. This celestial event will provide a golden opportunity to engage and educate diverse audiences, and NASA has the resources to help. Join the Educator Resource Center at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, for a series of grade-level specific educator workshops to learn about safety tips, hands-on activities, resources and more!

May 6, 2017, 9-11 a.m. CDT: Educators of Grades K-12
June 1, 2017, 9-11 a.m. CDT: Educators of Grades K-12

For full event details and registration information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/solar_eclipse_workshop2017.pdf.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Maria Chambers at maria.a.chambers@nasa.gov.


Free Tours of Facilities at NASA’s Glenn Research Center

NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, is offering tours that take visitors behind the scenes and inside certain research facilities. Glenn scientists and engineers serve as guides. Tours and open house events will be held each month through October 2017. Tours are free for groups and individuals, but to guarantee admission, reservations are required. Visitor parking is also free.

On the days of the tours, a bus departs from Glenn’s main gate every hour, beginning at 10 a.m. The last tour departs at 1 p.m. Each tour lasts about 45 minutes and is followed by a stop at Glenn’s Gift Shop. (The historic district tours follow a different schedule. See tour schedule for details.)

Glenn’s 2017 Tour Schedule

May 6, 2017 — Historic District Tour Featuring the 10- by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel: Join us on a free tour of Glenn’s recently established historic district. The tours feature the 10- by 10-foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. For over 60 years, the wind tunnel has been used to conduct propulsion testing, including research for the Apollo program.

June 3, 2017 — NASA Glenn Hangar: Get a behind-the-scenes look at the NASA Glenn Hangar. See how aircraft at NASA Glenn are used to monitor algae blooms on Lake Erie and other waterways.

July 8, 2017: SLOPE Laboratory: Explore locomotion on planets with a visit to the Simulated Lunar Operations, or SLOPE, Lab. See how rover components are tested for their ability to navigate and investigate planetary surfaces.

Aug. 5, 2017 — Photovoltaic Laboratory: See the light of solar cells with a behind-the-scenes tour of the Photovoltaic Laboratory. See how researchers are exploring ways to create energy from light in order to power everything from homes to spacecraft.

Sept. 9, 2017 — Zero-G Facility: Explore microgravity research of yesterday, today and tomorrow with a tour of Glenn’s Zero-G Facility. Learn how dropping payloads over 400 feet can give researchers a glimpse into microgravity conditions.

Oct. 7, 2017 — Historic District Tour Featuring the 8- by 6-Foot Wind Tunnel: Join us on a free tour of Glenn’s recently established historic district. The tours feature the 8- by 6-foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. Built in 1946, the wind tunnel has contributed to decades of aeronautics research.

Tours are open to U.S. citizens and legal permanent residents. To guarantee admission, reservations are required. For more information on tours and to make reservations, visit https://www.nasa.gov/centers/glenn/events/tours.html.

Please direct questions about the tours to grc-dl-tours@mail.nasa.gov.


White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities — 2017 All-Star Students Program

The White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities works to promote HBCU excellence, innovation and sustainability. The initiative will recognize current HBCU students for their dedication to academics, leadership and civic engagement as 2017 HBCU All-Star Students.

The appointment period will last approximately one year. During this time, HBCU All-Stars will serve as ambassadors of the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities by providing outreach opportunities and information to their fellow students about the value of education and the initiative as a networking resource. Through social media and personal and professional relationships with community-based organizations, students will share promising and proven practices that support opportunities for all young people to realize their educational and career potential. The program will provide an opportunity to participate in regional and national events as well as webchats with initiative staff and other professionals from a wide range of disciplines that support a spirit of engagement and personal and professional development.

Nominees must be current undergraduate, graduate or professional students at an HBCU. Students must be enrolled for the 2017-2018 fall semester. Applications must be submitted by 11:59 p.m. EDT on May 12, 2017.

For more information and to download an application, visit http://sites.ed.gov/whhbcu/resources/hbcu-all-star-students/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to hbcuallstars@ed.gov.


DEADLINE EXTENDED: Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 12 to the International Space Station

The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education and the Arthur C. Clarke Institute for Space Education announce a science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, opportunity for school districts across the U.S. and space station partner nations. The newest flight opportunity, Mission 12 to the International Space Station, gives students across a community the ability to design and propose real experiments to fly in low Earth orbit on the space station. This opportunity is part of the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program, or SSEP.

Each participating community will receive a microgravity research mini-laboratory capable of supporting a single microgravity experiment and all launch services to fly the minilab to the space station in spring/summer 2018 and return it to Earth. An experiment design competition in each community — engaging typically 300+ students — allows student teams to design and propose real experiments vying for their community′s reserved mini-lab.

Content resources for teachers and students support foundational instruction on science in microgravity and experimental design. Additional SSEP programming uses the experiment design competition to engage the community in embracing a learning-community model for STEM education.

This competition is open to students in grades 5-12 and college. Informal education groups and organizations also are encouraged to participate. Interested communities must inquire about the program no later than May 31, 2017. The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education is available to help interested communities in the U.S. secure the needed funding.

To learn more about this opportunity, visit the “SSEP Mission 12 to International Space Station” National Announcement of Opportunity at http://ssep.ncesse.org/2017/03/new-flight-opportunity-for-school-districts-announcing-student-spaceflight-experiments-program-ssep-mission-12-to-the-international-space-station-starting-september-2017/.

SSEP is enabled through a strategic partnership with DreamUp PBC and NanoRacks LLC working with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the use of the International Space Station as a national laboratory. The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (http://www.iss-casis.org/) is a national partner of SSEP. To view a list of all SSEP national partners, visit http://ssep.ncesse.org/national-partners/.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please email SSEP National Program Director Jeff Goldstein at jeffgoldstein@ncesse.org.


‘CineSpace’ Short Film Competition

NASA and the Houston Cinema Arts Society once again will offer filmmakers around the world a chance to share their works inspired by — and using — actual NASA imagery through “CineSpace,” a short-film competition.

Films featuring imagery captured by NASA and video collected throughout the agency’s 50-year history will be judged on creativity, innovation and attention to detail. Works submitted to “CineSpace” will compete for cash prizes and the opportunity to be shown to audiences both on and off Earth. In addition to being screened at the “CineSpace” awards ceremony during the Houston Cinema Arts Festival, winners and finalists may be screened at other film festivals across the country, as well as on NASA TV and even on the International Space Station.

“CineSpace” is open to all filmmakers, both professional and aspiring. The competition will accept submissions of all genres, including narrative, documentary, comedy, drama, animation, experimental and others, of up to 10 minutes running time. Entries must use at least 10 percent publicly available NASA imagery.

The submission period opens June 1, 2017, and closes July 31, 2017. Finalists and winners will be announced at a “CineSpace” event during the Houston Cinema Arts Festival in November. Entries will be competing for $26,000 in prizes with cash awards going to the top three submissions as well as the two films that best demonstrate the themes “Benefits of Space to Humanity” and “Future Space Exploration.”

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/cinespace-short-film-competition-returns-for-2017.

Please direct questions about this competition to cinespace@cinemartsociety.org.


Get Ready for the 2017 Solar Eclipse With NASA Resources

On Aug. 21, 2017, the United States will experience a solar eclipse! This celestial event will provide a golden opportunity to engage and educate diverse audiences, and NASA has the resources to help.

Along a path 60 to 70 miles wide stretching from Oregon to South Carolina, observers will be able to see a total solar eclipse. Others across North America will see a partial eclipse. The event will happen around lunch time across the country. For an interactive map with timing information along the path of the eclipse, visit http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEgoogle/SEgoogle2001/SE2017Aug21Tgoogle.html.

Visit the following websites to find additional information and resources, including:
— Tips for safely viewing the solar eclipse.
— Recorded interviews with NASA scientists, mission specialists and eclipse path communities.
— Topical online eclipse videos, featuring a variety of STEM and cultural topics.
— Social media community development and networking.
— Mobile educational eclipse applications.
— Public challenges and engagement activities.
— 2-D and 3-D printing exercises for K-16 students.
— Citizen science campaigns in partnership with NASA mission observations.
— Adjunct activities and educational resources.
— Live streaming of observations and programming.

Total Eclipse 2017 — Through the Eyes of NASA
http://eclipse2017.nasa.gov

Eclipses and Transits
http://www.nasa.gov/eclipse

Watch “The Solar Eclipse 2017 PREVIEW Show” with NASA EDGE.
https://youtu.be/6DDICymjhg0


DEADLINE EXTENDED: Earn STEM Digital Badges to Celebrate the Centennial of NASA’s Langley Research Center

To celebrate NASA’s Langley Research Center’s Centennial, three STEM digital badges are now available for educators and students in grades 5-9. Discover the role of cloud types in the Earth’s Energy Budget; how drag is used to land the Mars2020 Rover on Mars; and the importance of composite materials for airplanes.

Educators may earn up to 15 hours of professional development. Student badges include up to six hours of content aligned to the educator badge.

The first 1,000 educators to complete all three badges by Oct. 21, 2017, will receive a NASA insignia iron-on patch.

For more information and to begin earning badges, visit https://nasatxstate-epdc.net/. After logging in to the site, click on the Explore icon and type “NASA Langley” in the search area to find and select the NASA Langley Centennial Mission.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Marilé Colón Robles at marile.colonrobles@nasa.gov.


Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design, or STEAMD; or activities culturally relevant to or focused on populations underrepresented in STEM careers, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or nonreimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA announcement.


Search for Gravitational Waves With ‘Gravity Spy’ Citizen Science Project

In 1916, Einstein predicted the existence of ripples in spacetime known as gravitational waves. A century later, on Sept. 14, 2015, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory, or LIGO, made the first direct detection of this elusive phenomenon. This discovery is the first of many that will give researchers a whole new way to explore the universe. However, LIGO needs your help!

Being the most sensitive and most complicated gravitational experiment ever created, LIGO is susceptible to many instrumental and environmental noise sources called “glitches.” These glitches are difficult to model using computers, can mimic true astrophysical signals, and generally make LIGO less sensitive to gravitational waves.

Classifying glitches using computers has proven to be an exceedingly difficult task. That’s where the Gravity Spy Zooniverse Citizen Science Project comes in! Human intuition has proven time and time again to be a useful tool in pattern recognition problems such as this. One of the innovations of this project is that citizen scientists and computer algorithms will work in a symbiotic relationship, helping one another to optimally classify and characterize glitches. By selecting the right classification for a given glitch, you will help computers learn to do this classification themselves on much larger datasets. That capability will help scientists determine and eliminate the sources of noise.

For more information and to learn how to participate, visit the “Gravity Spy” website at https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/zooniverse/gravity-spy.

To learn more about the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory and its mission to detect gravitational waves, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2016/nsf-s-ligo-has-detected-gravitational-waves.

Download the “Direct Observation of Gravitational Waves” Educator Guide for activities and background information designed for grades 5-12. https://dcc.ligo.org/LIGO-P1600015/public.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Tyson Littenberg at tyson.b.littenberg@nasa.gov.

“Gravity Spy” is a collaboration between the following entities:
–Northwestern University, led by Scott Coughlin and Michael Zevin with PI Vicky Kalogera and co-PI Aggelos Katsaggelos. Northwestern’s team is composed of a LIGO group in the CIERA astrophysics research center and a machine learning group in the Image and Video Processing Laboratory.
–The Adler Planetarium Zooniverse Team, led by co-PI Laura Trouille.
–Syracuse University, led by co-PI’s Kevin Crowston and Carsten Østerlund.
–California State University at Fullerton, led by co-PI Josh Smith.
–The LIGO Scientific Collaboration, of which NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center and Goddard Space Flight Center are member institutions.

The project is funded by the National Science Foundation.


NASA Seeks Creative Arts Inspired by Cassini’s Mission to Saturn

During nearly two decades in space, Cassini has inspired people on Earth. Cassini has sent home thousands of images of icy moons and resplendent rings. It helped discover erupting water geysers on Enceladus and seas of methane on Titan. It showed us a view of Earth as a blue dot.

Now the mission is moving toward its “Grand Finale,” and in September 2017 it will finally draw to a dramatic end. NASA’s Cassini team would like to know this: How has Cassini inspired you?

Visit the Cassini Inspires website to explore images and more from the mission. Then use inspiration to get creative. Write a poem. Paint a picture. Choreograph a dance. Tell a story. The possibilities are endless!

Share your creation with the NASA Cassini team on the social media platform of your choice, such as Instagram, YouTube, Facebook, Twitter or others. Tag it #CassiniInspires. Or send it directly to cassinimission@jpl.nasa.gov.

To learn more, visit https://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/cassiniinspires/.


Help NASA Study Mars — Planet Four: Terrains

Help NASA study exotic landscape features near the south pole of Mars! In this citizen science project, you will view images from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter’s Context Camera. Your input will help scientists identify possible areas for even more detailed examination with the orbiter’s High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment camera. HiRISE can reveal more detail than any other camera ever put into orbit around Mars.

Some of Mars resembles deserts on Earth, but seasonal freezing and thawing of carbon-dioxide ice (known on Earth as “dry ice”) at the Martian poles create some unusual landscape features. There’s a lot of territory to cover, so scientists need your help identifying what and where these features are.

For more information and to learn how to participate, visit the “Planet Four: Terrains” website at https://www.zooniverse.org/#/projects/mschwamb/planet-four-terrains.

To learn more about NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and its mission at the Red Planet, visit http://mars.nasa.gov/mro/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Michelle Viotti at michelle.a.viotti@jpl.nasa.gov.


NASA Invites You to #SpotHubble

Since its launch in 1990, the Hubble Space Telescope has sent back mind-blowing images that not only changed our understanding of our universe, but also changed where we see glimpses of our universe in everyday life.

Hubble is more than a science spacecraft; it’s a cultural phenomenon! Take a moment to think about where you’ve seen the Hubble Space Telescope or Hubble images in your daily life. Maybe you own a textbook with a picture of the telescope on the cover, or you walk by a mural inspired by Hubble images every day on your way to work. Perhaps you’ve even created art based on Hubble images. NASA wants to see the Hubble impact in your life! Share your photos with NASA on Instagram, Twitter, Flickr and Facebook.

Images may be submitted on the following social media platforms:

— Flickr:
Submit your photos to the Spot Hubble Flickr Group.
— Instagram: Use the Instagram app to upload your photo, and in the description include #SpotHubble and #NASAGoddard.
Twitter: Share your image on Twitter and include #SpotHubble in the tweet.
— Facebook: Share your image on Facebook and include #SpotHubble in the post.

Your #SpotHubble image may be shared on NASA Hubble social media accounts!

To learn more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/2016/spothubble.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Eduation: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express Message — April 20, 2017

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: April 20, 2017, at 7:30 p.m. EDT

Celebrate Earth Day 2017 — #AdoptThePlanet, Plus Earth Science Data Classroom Activity
Audience: All Educators and Students
Earth Day: April 22, 2017

New ‘Teachable Moment’ Educational Resources Available From JPL Education — Celebrate Earth Day With NASA Science Data
Audience: K-12 Educators

Earth Day Extravaganza Webinar for Educators
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Date: April 25, 2017, 8 p.m. EDT

Take Your Students on a Series of Virtual Field Trips!
Audience: Grades 6-12 Students and Educators, Formal and Informal
Event Dates: Multiple Dates and Times Between April 26 and May 22, 2017

NASA’s International Space Apps Challenge
Audience: Problem Solvers of All Ages
Event Dates: April 28, 2017 (Boot Camp); April 29-30, 2017 (Hackathon)

Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues
Audience: Graduate Students
Application Deadline: May 15, 2017

New FAQs Posted — NASA Research Announcement: Competitive Program for Science Museums, Planetariums and NASA Visitor Centers (CP4SMPVC)
Audience: Formal and Informal Education Institutions
Proposal Deadline: June 19, 2017

New ‘Ocean Worlds’ Student Slideshow and Infographic
Audience: All Educators and Students


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘Making STEM Magic’ Program
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: April 22, 2017, at 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. EST

2018 eXploration Habitat Academic Innovation Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Faculty and Students
Proposal Deadline: April 28, 2017

Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 12 to the International Space Station
Audience: School Districts Serving Grades 5-12, Informal Education Institutions, Colleges and Universities
Inquiry Deadline: April 28, 2017
Start Date: September 5, 2017

2017 Columbia Crew Memorial Undergraduate Scholarships
Audience: Undergraduate Students at Texas Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: April 28, 2017

2017 Texas Space Grant Consortium STEM Educator Scholarships
Audience:  Educators Enrolled in Programs for a Master’s Degree in a STEM Field at Member Institutions of the Texas Space Grant Consortium
Application Deadline: April 28, 2017

2017-2018 Texas Space Grant Consortium Graduate Fellowships
Audience: Graduate Students at Member Institutions of the Texas Space Grant Consortium
Application Deadline: April 28, 2017

Earn STEM Digital Badges to Celebrate the Centennial of NASA’s Langley Research Center
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-9, Informal Educators
Deadline: April 30, 2017

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

Get Ready for the 2017 Solar Eclipse With NASA Resources
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Aug. 21, 2017

NASA’s Centennial Challenges: Vascular Tissue Challenge
Audience: All Interested U.S. Citizens, Including Higher Education Educators and Students
Deadline: No Later Than Sept. 30, 2019

Bring the Story of “Hidden Figures” to the Classroom With the “Who Is Katherine Johnson?” Profiles and Modern Figures Toolkit
Audience: K-12 Educators

Infiniscope Launches First Digital Learning Experience — Where are the small worlds?
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School, and Informal Educators of Grades 5-12

Create Art Inspired by NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope
Audience: All Educators and Students

Be a Citizen Earth Scientist With the ‘GLOBE Observer’ App
Audience: All Educators and Students

Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students and Higher Education Institutions


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Solar System Exploration: Orion and Human Exploration in Space
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: April 20, 2017, at 7:30 p.m. EDT
Drawn from more than 50 years of NASA spaceflight research and development, the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle is designed to meet the needs of the U.S. space program for decades to come. From an engineering design challenge to decomposition of geometric shapes to find area, these activities address the Next Generation Science Standards. Targets include NGSS ETS-1, ETS-2, ETS-3 and Common Core standards for Number and Quantity, Algebra, and Geometry. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/223590

Teachers Connect: NASA’s Langley Research Center Centennial Badge
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School, and Informal Educators of Grades 6-8
Event Date: April 25, 2017, at 4 p.m. EDT
The first half of this webinar will focus on clouds and their role in Earth’s “energy budget” and on implementation ideas using GLOBE for different classroom settings as part of the “Earth Right Now: LaRC 100th” digital badge. Participants will talk about student badge implementations, extension ideas and extra resources. The second half-hour will center on the engineering design process using the “Drag Race to Mars Engineering Design Challenge” as part of the “Journey to Mars: LaRC 100th” digital badge. This portion of the webinar will focus on forces and motion and math calculations using paper airplanes and testing different materials as part of the “Aeronautics: LaRC 100th” digital badge.

This webinar meets requirements of teacher discussions within the NASA Langley 100th Educator Professional Development Collaborative digital badges. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/229367

To learn more about the Langley 100th digital badges, log in to https://nasatxstate-epdc.net/ and search for LaRC 100th.

So You Want to Be an Astronaut and Other NASA Careers
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: April 27, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT
Not just astronauts work at NASA. Explore the many NASA STEM careers needed to successfully accomplish the unique, exciting missions that explore and build a better understanding of our Earth and the universe beyond. NASA career education curriculum and resources will be integrated into this online learning session. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/243842

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


Celebrate Earth Day 2017 — #AdoptThePlanet, Plus Earth Science Data Classroom Activity

NASA invites people around the world to celebrate Earth Day 2017 by “adopting” one of 64,000 individual pieces of Earth as seen from space.

Participants will receive a personalized adoption certificate for their unique numbered piece of Earth (hexagon shape about 90 kilometers in diameter) to print and share on social media. The certificate features NASA Earth science data collected for that location. After adopting your piece of Earth, explore other locations using an interactive map!

To adopt your piece of Earth, visit go.nasa.gov/adopt. And be sure to share your adopted piece on social media with the hashtag #AdoptThePlanet.

Looking for a classroom activity to bring #AdoptThePlanet into your classroom? Check out the Earth Science Data Visualization: How to Read a Heat Map classroom activity from NASA JPL Education. This activity shows students how to read and interpret a heat map, like those presented on each of the #AdoptThePlanet adoption certificates. Find the lesson plan at https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/teach/activity/earth-science-data-visualizations-how-to-read-a-heat-map.


New ‘Teachable Moment’ Educational Resources Available From JPL Education — Celebrate Earth Day With NASA Science Data

Are you looking for ways to bring the latest NASA science and mission news into your classroom? Education specialists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California have the resources to help you do just that! The “Teachable Moments” blog brings together news, activities and education tips on the latest happenings at NASA.

Check out the latest offering from JPL Education.

Teachable Moment: Celebrate Earth Day With NASA Science Resources — Grades K-12
Earth Day, the day set aside each year to celebrate our planet and bring attention to the natural world, is April 22, 2017. More than one billion people are expected to participate in Earth Day events around the globe! Learn what NASA is doing to celebrate Earth Day and to help us learn more about our home planet. And discover ways to bring the latest findings into your classroom. Check it out at https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/news/2017/4/12/celebrate-earth-day-with-nasa-science-data.

Looking for more? Check out the “Teachable Moments” archives for more resources. http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/news/column/teachable-moments/


Earth Day Extravaganza Webinar for Educators

Every day can and should be Earth Day! This webinar will focus on the various ways all citizens can participate in NASA science and help make our home planet a better place. Participants will learn how this is possible through the K-12 GLOBE Program and the GLOBE Observer app for citizen scientists of all ages, as well as through other NASA resources.

Participants will learn about SciStarter from its founder, Darlene Cavalier. The webinar will provide information on a new collaboration by NASA@ My Library and GLOBE Observer to include libraries across the U.S. in taking cloud observations. And the session will discuss an upcoming effort by museums around the world to do citizen science programs with the GLOBE Observer Mosquito Habitat Mapper for the U.N.-sponsored “Global Experiment.”

The webinar is open to all educators; participation in the GLOBE Program is not required.

For more information and to register to attend, visit https://www.globe.gov/web/el-nino/el-nino-campaign/webinars. For those unable to attend during the set webinar time, a recording of the event will be posted online.

Please submit questions about this webinar opportunity to help@globe.gov.


Take Your Students on a Series of Virtual Field Trips!

Bring your students along on a series of virtual field trips to NASA centers where students will go behind-the-scenes to see cool NASA places and visit with NASA professionals. The virtual field trips take place on various dates and times between April 26 and May 22, 2017, and topics include NASA Robots, Driving on Other Planets, NASA’s Meteorite Lab, and more. Each session is 15-30 minutes long and includes an interactive question-and-answer session. Pre-registration is not required. Go to https://education.ti.com/nasaliveevents for more information on the field trips, including links to join each session.

These virtual field trips are a series of events offered to students and teachers as a component of “The Search for STEMnauts” — a virtual scavenger hunt where student teams in grades 6-12 solve puzzles, unravel riddles, break codes and experience weekly virtual field trips to exclusive NASA locations. Student teams can even check out where they stand among the competition by following real-time updates on “The Search for STEMnauts” website!

This interactive, technical twist on a traditional scavenger hunt is offered through a partnership between NASA’s STEM on Station and Texas Instruments to provide students with a fun way to learn important STEM skills including coding and problem solving.

All grades 6-12 students and educators are invited to participate in any virtual field trip offered. Come along on all five, or just drop in for one or two. Participation in “The Search for STEMnauts” competition is not required. To learn more about these virtual field trips, including links to join in, visit https://education.ti.com/nasaliveevents.

For more information about “The Search for STEMnauts,” including how to register, visit www.STEMnauts.com.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Kelly McCormick at Kelly.mccormick-1@nasa.gov.


NASA’s International Space Apps Challenge

NASA is preparing for the sixth annual International Space Apps Challenge, which will be held April 29-30, 2017. The program invites participants to solve challenges using NASA data to develop mobile applications, software, hardware, data visualizations and platform solutions that can contribute to space exploration missions and help improve life on Earth.

The theme of this year’s challenge is “Earth!” Our planet is a complex and dynamic system that still holds many mysteries. Year-round, NASA helps shed light on Earth’s many components, including oceans, landscapes and living things. With unique vantage points in air and in space, NASA collects high-quality data covering all parts of the planet to tell us more about the world we live in and to predict future processes on Earth.

This year’s two-day Space Apps “hackathon” will bring tech-savvy citizens, scientists, entrepreneurs, designers, artists, educators and students together to be a part of this scientific exploration, as we challenge problem solvers across the globe to create innovative uses of NASA’s Earth science data.

Additionally, many locations are hosting a pre-hackathon boot camp event on April 28, 2017, to introduce participants to the latest trends in data and technology and to provide tutorials to first-time hackers and coders. The boot camps at our two Mainstage locations, New York City and Silicon Valley (Palo Alto), will be livestreamed on our website!

Registration for participation is now open at over 180 locations worldwide!

To learn more about the International Space Apps Challenge, get the latest updates, and register to attend an event, visit https://2017.spaceappschallenge.org/.

If you have questions about the challenge, please visit https://2017.spaceappschallenge.org/contact-us.


Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues

The Airport Cooperative Research Program is seeking applicants for its Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues. Through this program, the ACRP strives to encourage applied research on airport and related aviation system issues and to foster the next generation of aviation community leaders. The program is intended to stimulate thought, discussion and research by those who may become the future airport managers, operators, designers and policy makers in aviation. The focus of this research program is on applied research to help the public sector continue to improve the quality, reliability, safety and security of the U.S. civil aviation system well into the foreseeable future.

The Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues will award up to 10 highly qualified applicants, selected by an ACRP panel of experts, a stipend of $10,000 each for successful completion of a research paper on a subject chosen by the candidate within the framework of the program’s purpose.

Applicants must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States, or have a current student visa. Each applicant also must be officially enrolled as a full-time student at an accredited North American institution of higher learning for the academic year in a graduate course leading to a master’s or doctoral degree. Proof of both may be required.

Applications are due May 15, 2017. For more information, visit http://www.trb.org/ACRP/ACRPGraduateAwardProgram.aspx.

The ACRP Graduate Research Award Program on Public Sector Aviation Issues is sponsored by the Federal Aviation Administration. Creating a selection panel, monitoring research progress, organizing a forum for presentation, and publishing the research papers are the responsibility of the ACRP of the Transportation Research Board. The Virginia Space Grant Consortium will manage the Graduate Research Award program under the ACRP’s direction.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to acrp@odu.edu.


New FAQs Posted — NASA Research Announcement: Competitive Program for Science Museums, Planetariums and NASA Visitor Centers (CP4SMPVC)

The NASA Office of Education has posted a new set of FAQs for its 2017 NASA Research Announcement: Competitive Program for Science Museums, Planetariums and NASA Visitor Centers (CP4SMPVC), Announcement Number NNH17ZHA002N. Proposals for this solicitation are due June 19, 2017.

To view FAQ Issue #1, which includes answers to questions submitted in advance or asked during the April 10 Pre-Proposal teleconference, visit NSPIRES at https://go.nasa.gov/2oC4eCU.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NRA.


New ‘Ocean Worlds’ Student Slideshow and Infographic

Oceans help make life on Earth possible. So, if there are oceans beyond Earth, do living things exist on those worlds too? NASA scientists are trying to answer this question. Right now, we know oceans do exist on moons and dwarf planets in our solar system. And there are more places where they could exist.

Check out the new “Ocean Worlds” slideshow and downloadable poster. Flip through the slideshow to learn about the best-known candidates in our search for life in the solar system. Which of these places do you think is most likely to have living things?

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/learn/slideshow/ocean-worlds/


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘Making STEM Magic’ Program

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is presenting a series of free education events called “Making STEM Magic.” This new program introduces young visitors to engineering in a fun and creative way. Participants learn by doing. Each challenge involves designing, building and testing a prototype. Each month, a new theme will be introduced with a new problem to solve.

Events are scheduled each Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. ET at the National Air and Space Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia. The events are free and open to the public.

In the Heat of the Moment: Space Capsules
Each Saturday in April 2017
Imagine an astronaut hurtling toward Earth in a space capsule at tremendous speeds. In this challenge, participants will design a heat shield to keep the astronaut cool from the heat of re-entry.

Blast Off!: Propulsion
Each Saturday in May 2017
It really is rocket science. Try your hand at designing a rocket and staying on target.

Red Rover: Mission to Mars
Each Saturday in June 2017
Did you know that rovers are robotic ambassadors? Learn more about NASA’s mobile labs and construct your own rolling rover.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s “Making STEM Magic” program, visit https://airandspace.si.edu/visit/events/stem-magic.

Please direct questions about this series of events to the Visitor Service line at 703-572-4118.


2018 eXploration Habitat Academic Innovation Challenge

NASA is seeking university teams to develop innovative design solutions for deep-space human exploration systems in the 2018 eXploration Systems and Habitation Academic Innovation Challenge. NASA’s Advanced Exploration Systems Division sponsors the X-Hab Challenge as part of its core function to develop foundational technologies and high-priority capabilities that are the building blocks for future human space missions. Topic areas for this year’s challenge include 3-D printing of biologic materials, long-term hygiene, water condensation, replacement power systems and a Mars habitat commonality.

Working with the National Space Grant Foundation, NASA’s Advanced Exploration Systems Division and Space Life and Physical Sciences Division will offer multiple X-Hab 2018 awards of $20,000 to $30,000. These awards will allow winning teams to design and produce studies or functional products that will increase knowledge and foster risk reduction for space exploration capabilities. Awardees will follow a tailored systems-engineering process with projects being completed in the May 2018 timeframe.

Proposals will be accepted from university faculty who are U.S. citizens and who currently teach at an accredited university in the U.S. Eligible educators must be teaching a senior or graduate engineering design, industrial design or architecture curriculum that is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.

Proposals are due April 28, 2017.

For more information about the challenge and how to submit a proposal, visit http://spacegrant.org/xhab/.

To learn about past NASA X-Hab projects, visit https://www.nasa.gov/exploration/technology/deep_space_habitat/xhab/.

Please email questions about the X-Hab Challenge to xhab@spacegrant.org.


Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 12 to the International Space Station

The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education and the Arthur C. Clarke Institute for Space Education announce a science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, opportunity for school districts across the U.S. and space station partner nations. The newest flight opportunity, Mission 12 to the International Space Station, gives students across a community the ability to design and propose real experiments to fly in low Earth orbit on the space station. This opportunity is part of the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program, or SSEP.

Each participating community will receive a microgravity research mini-laboratory capable of supporting a single microgravity experiment and all launch services to fly the minilab to the space station in spring/summer 2018 and return it to Earth. An experiment design competition in each community — engaging typically 300+ students — allows student teams to design and propose real experiments vying for their community′s reserved mini-lab.

Content resources for teachers and students support foundational instruction on science in microgravity and experimental design. Additional SSEP programming uses the experiment design competition to engage the community in embracing a learning-community model for STEM education.

This competition is open to students in grades 5-12 and college. Informal education groups and organizations also are encouraged to participate. Interested communities must inquire about the program no later than April 28, 2017. The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education is available to help interested communities in the U.S. secure the needed funding.

To learn more about this opportunity, visit the “SSEP Mission 12 to International Space Station” National Announcement of Opportunity at http://ssep.ncesse.org/2017/03/new-flight-opportunity-for-school-districts-announcing-student-spaceflight-experiments-program-ssep-mission-12-to-the-international-space-station-starting-september-2017/.

SSEP is enabled through a strategic partnership with DreamUp PBC and NanoRacks LLC working with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the use of the International Space Station as a national laboratory. The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (http://www.iss-casis.org/) is a national partner of SSEP. To view a list of all SSEP national partners, visit http://ssep.ncesse.org/national-partners/.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please email SSEP National Program Director Jeff Goldstein at jeffgoldstein@ncesse.org.


2017 Columbia Crew Memorial Undergraduate Scholarships

The Texas Space Grant Consortium and the Aviation and Space Foundation of Texas, in partnership with NASA, are offering undergraduate scholarships of $1,500 in memory of the Space Shuttle Columbia astronauts. These seven men and women made the ultimate sacrifice to expand the exploration of space and our knowledge of the world that we live in.

These scholarships are intended to recognize high-quality students and encourage their consideration of graduate studies in science, technology, engineering and mathematics that would ultimately lead to careers in STEM-related fields. The scholarships stress excellence in academics, participation in STEM education and research projects, and the exhibition of leadership qualities.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens and registered for at least a half-time course load at a Texas Space Grant Consortium institution. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 28, 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/grants/scholars_announcement.html. Please email any questions about this opportunity to scholarships@tsgc.utexas.edu.


2017 Texas Space Grant Consortium STEM Educator Scholarships

The Texas Space Grant Consortium’s Educator STEM Scholarship Program provides $1,500 scholarships to eligible teachers enrolled in master’s programs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens who hold a bachelor’s degree and are enrolled in a master’s program at a Texas Space Grant Consortium institution. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 28, 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/edu_stem/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to scholarships@tsgc.utexas.edu.


2017-2018 Texas Space Grant Consortium Graduate Fellowships

Texas Space Grant Consortium Fellowships encourage graduate study in the fields of space science and engineering. Interdisciplinary and integrated work experience are emphasized.

Each $5,000 award supplements half-time graduate support (or fellowship) provided by a consortium institution. The fellowship award is good for one year. Each fellowship may be renewed for a maximum of three years, provided the recipient has spent no more than two of those years as a master’s candidate.

Applicants must be registered for full-time study in a graduate program at one or more of the Texas Space Grant Consortium institutions and must be promised financial support at that institution. Applicants must also be U.S. citizens. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 28, 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/grants/fellows_announcement.html. Please email any questions about this opportunity to fellowships@tsgc.utexas.edu.


Earn STEM Digital Badges to Celebrate the Centennial of NASA’s Langley Research Center

To celebrate NASA’s Langley Research Center’s Centennial, three STEM digital badges are now available for educators and students in grades 5-9. Discover the role of cloud types in the Earth’s Energy Budget; how drag is used to land the Mars2020 Rover on Mars; and the importance of composite materials for airplanes.

Educators may earn up to 15 hours of professional development. Student badges include up to six hours of content aligned to the educator badge.

The first 1,000 educators to complete all three badges by April 30, 2017, will receive a NASA insignia iron-on patch.

For more information and to begin earning badges, visit https://nasatxstate-epdc.net/. After logging in to the site, click on the Explore icon and type “NASA Langley” in the search area to find and select the NASA Langley Centennial Mission.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Marilé Colón Robles at marile.colonrobles@nasa.gov.


Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites U.S. educational institutions to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets, and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

Nonprofit museums, libraries and planetariums (sponsored through their respective State Agency Surplus Property, or SASP, organization) are also eligible to make requests. Visit the link below for special instructions to request items. To find the contact information for the SASP representative for your area, visit http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/100851.

A nominal shipping fee must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.


Get Ready for the 2017 Solar Eclipse With NASA Resources

On Aug. 21, 2017, the United States will experience a solar eclipse! This celestial event will provide a golden opportunity to engage and educate diverse audiences, and NASA has the resources to help.

Along a path 60 to 70 miles wide stretching from Oregon to South Carolina, observers will be able to see a total solar eclipse. Others across North America will see a partial eclipse. The event will happen around lunch time across the country. For an interactive map with timing information along the path of the eclipse, visit http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEgoogle/SEgoogle2001/SE2017Aug21Tgoogle.html.

Visit the following websites to find additional information and resources, including:
— Tips for safely viewing the solar eclipse.
— Recorded interviews with NASA scientists, mission specialists and eclipse path communities.
— Topical online eclipse videos, featuring a variety of STEM and cultural topics.
— Social media community development and networking.
— Mobile educational eclipse applications.
— Public challenges and engagement activities.
— 2-D and 3-D printing exercises for K-16 students.
— Citizen science campaigns in partnership with NASA mission observations.
— Adjunct activities and educational resources.
— Live streaming of observations and programming.

Total Eclipse 2017 — Through the Eyes of NASA
http://eclipse2017.nasa.gov

Eclipses and Transits
http://www.nasa.gov/eclipse

Watch “The Solar Eclipse 2017 PREVIEW Show” with NASA EDGE.
https://youtu.be/6DDICymjhg0


NASA’s Centennial Challenges: Vascular Tissue Challenge

NASA, in partnership with the nonprofit Methuselah Foundation’s New Organ Alliance, is seeking ways to advance the field of bioengineering through a new prize competition. The Vascular Tissue Challenge offers a $500,000 prize to be divided among the first three teams that successfully create thick, metabolically functional, human vascularized organ tissue in a controlled laboratory environment.

Competitors must produce vascularized tissue that is more than .39 inches (1 centimeter) in thickness and maintains more than 85 percent survival of the required cells throughout a 30-day trial period. To win an award, teams must demonstrate three successful trials with at least a 75 percent success rate. In addition to the laboratory trials, teams must submit a proposal that details how they would further advance some aspect of their research through a microgravity experiment that could be conducted in the U.S. National Laboratory on the International Space Station.

The first registered team(s) to meet the required guidelines and complete their trials by Sept. 30, 2019, will win the awards.

The Vascular Tissue Challenge prize purse is provided by NASA’s Centennial Challenges Program, part of NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate. Centennial Challenges, managed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, is NASA’s citizen-inventor prize program. It invites the nation to help advance the technologies that will enable us to go to Mars and beyond, as well as improve life on Earth. The New Organ Alliance is administering the competition on behalf of NASA. The alliance is a nonprofit organization focused on regenerative medicine research and development to benefit human disease research and tissue engineering.

For information about the Methuselah Foundation’s New Organ Alliance, official challenge documents, rules and schedule of events, visit https://neworgan.org/vtc-prize.php.

For more information about the Vascular Tissue Challenge, visit http://www.nasa.gov/vtchallenge.


Bring the Story of “Hidden Figures” to the Classroom With the “Who Is Katherine Johnson?” Profiles and Modern Figures Toolkit

In the 1960s, the U.S. was on an ambitious journey to the moon, and Katherine Johnson and her fellow human computers helped get NASA there. Bring the excitement of their story to your classroom with new resources from NASA Education.

Learn more about Katherine Johnson with the “Who Is Katherine Johnson?” profiles written just for students. Versions written for K-4 and 5-8 students are available.

“Who Is Katherine Johnson?” — K-4 Students Version
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/k-4/stories/nasa-knows/who-is-katherine-johnson-k4

“Who Is Katherine Johnson?” — 5-8 Students Version
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/5-8/features/nasa-knows/who-is-katherine-johnson-5-8

Also available online, the Modern Figures Toolkit is a collection of resources and educational activities for students in grades K-12. Each educational activity and resource includes a brief description, as well as information about how the activities and lessons align to education standards. Resources highlighted include videos, historical references and STEM materials.

Bring Katherine Johnson’s inspiring story to your classroom by downloading the Modern Figures Toolkit at www.nasa.gov/modernfigures-education-toolkit.


Infiniscope Launches First Digital Learning Experience — Where are the small worlds?

Join the growing group of formal and informal educators discovering Infiniscope’s first digital-by-design learning experience titled “Where are the small worlds?” Developed for NASA by Arizona State University, this learning experience is a standards-aligned, innovative, game-like exploration of the solar system using real NASA data and the relative motion of objects in the solar system.

In this experience, learners explore the view of our solar system from the perspective of the sun and collect data on small worlds. Learners observe the motion of different worlds to determine their location in the solar system, then launch probes to search these small worlds to find the hidden caches and collect astrocoins.

Go to https://infiniscope.education/lesson/where-are-the-small-worlds/ to explore this experience and the educator resources associated with it. See how you can use this interactive, Web-based learning experience to engage learners in the next generation of learning. Where are the small worlds? Can you find them all?

For more information, visit https://infiniscope.education/.

Questions should be directed to Jessica Swann at jlswann@asu.edu or Joe Tamer at Ajoseph.Tamer@asu.edu.


Create Art Inspired by NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope

In November 2016, a small group of artists visited NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, to see the James Webb Space Telescope in person for inspiration to create art. They have been busy ever since, producing amazing work that will be presented for exhibit during spring 2017 at the Goddard Visitor Center.

Their offerings include painting, poetry, sculpting, textiles, woodworking, music, silk screening, 3-D design, jewelry, posters, tattooing and letterpress printing.

Though only a few artists were able to physically visit the telescope, the team at GSFC was impressed by the number of talented people who were interested in participating and want to offer more artists a chance to participate virtually.

How can you participate? Browse through the collection of James Webb Space Telescope images and videos and see what inspires you. Create art! (Note: this is not limited to art you can hang on a wall.) Then, share it with NASA on social media with #JWSTArt, or email it to jwst@lists.nasa.gov.

There’s no deadline for submissions.

To find inspiration and learn the full details on how to participate, visit https://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/2017/nasa-invites-you-to-create-james-webb-space-telescope-inspired-art.

Email questions about this opportunity to jwst@lists.nasa.gov.


Be a Citizen Earth Scientist With the ‘GLOBE Observer’ App

Want to be a citizen Earth scientist? To contribute to NASA’s studies of our home planet, all you need is a smartphone, access to the outdoors, and the “GLOBE Observer” app.

Now available for Apple and Android phones, the app is an initiative of the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment program. For over two decades, GLOBE has enabled schools and students in over 110 countries to investigate their local environment and put their observations in a global context.

To learn more, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2016/nasa-launches-new-citizen-science-opportunity and http://observer.globe.gov.


Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Are you an undergraduate or graduate student seeking opportunities in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)? The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science — in collaboration with the participating agencies in the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on STEM Education (CoSTEM) and the Science.gov Alliance — has launched a search portal for both students and universities to discover federally sponsored STEM education training and funding opportunities.

Student users can search the site for opportunities they can apply to directly, such as research internships and fellowships. Likewise, universities can search the site for federal funding opportunities to establish innovative training programs for undergraduates or graduate students.

Users can search the site through faceted searching capabilities for characteristics such as program type, STEM discipline, institution location, federal sponsor, and eligibility. Or they can search through the open text option.

For programs and opportunities for undergraduates, visit http://stemundergrads.science.gov/.

For graduate programs and opportunities, visit http://stemgradstudents.science.gov/.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Eduation: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express Message — April 13, 2017

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: April 13, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Virtual Visit — Meet Abigail Harrison
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-12
Event Date: April 19, 2017, at 10:30 a.m. EDT

STEM @ NASA Goddard Webcast Event: Earth Day 2017
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: April 19, 2017, Noon-12:30 p.m. EDT

White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities — 2017 All-Star Students Program
Audience: Higher Education Students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Application Deadline: May 12, 2017

NASA Unveils New Searchable Video, Audio and Imagery Library
Audience: All Educators and Students


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

NASA Solar Eclipse Workshops at Marshall Space Flight Center
Audience: K-12 Educators
Next Workshop Date: April 13, 2017, 4-6 p.m. CDT

Summer Institute — Liftoff 2017: Starry Night
Audience: Educators of Grades 4-12
Application Deadline: April 14, 2017
Institute Dates: June 26-30, 2017

Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘Making STEM Magic’ Program
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: April 15, 2017, at 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. EST

Host a Real-Time Conversation With Astronauts Aboard the International Space Station
Audience: All Educators
Proposal Deadline: Apr. 15, 2017

2018 eXploration Habitat Academic Innovation Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Faculty and Students
Proposal Deadline: April 28, 2017

Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 12 to the International Space Station
Audience: School Districts Serving Grades 5-12, Informal Education Institutions, Colleges and Universities
Inquiry Deadline: April 28, 2017
Start Date: September 5, 2017

Earn STEM Digital Badges to Celebrate the Centennial of NASA’s Langley Research Center
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-9, Informal Educators
Deadline: April 30, 2017

NASA Fundamental Physics Workshop 2017
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Deadline: May 17, 2017
Workshop Dates: May 31-June 2, 2017

2017 Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Abstract Submission Deadline: May 19, 2017
Workshop Dates: Aug. 21-25, 2017

Get Ready for the 2017 Solar Eclipse With NASA Resources
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Aug. 21, 2017

Fly Your Exoplanet on the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite
Audience: All Educators and Students
Submission Deadline: Nov. 20, 2017

Grant Competition — USAID Development Innovation Ventures
Audience: Higher Education Faculty and Students
Application Deadline: Proposals Accepted Year-round

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Solar System Exploration: Exploring New Worlds
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: April 13, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT
Is there another Earth beyond our solar system? Is anybody else out there? This webinar will try to answer these questions using real NASA data to explore how space-based telescopes, especially the Kepler Space Telescope, search for planets orbiting stars beyond our sun. The NASA STEM activities presented will investigate how to use Kepler Space Telescope data and Kepler’s Third Law to construct graphs and interpret data that determines if a planet beyond our solar system is Earth-like and a candidate to support “life.” Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/232492

Solar System Exploration: BEST Mars Rover
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School, and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: April 17, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Participants will learn what it takes to move around on Mars and how gravity on the Red Planet is different from gravity on Earth. Participants will be introduced to the Beginning Engineering Science & Technology, or BEST, curriculum and use the engineering design process to create a rover for Mars. The activities discussed in this webinar are aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/233997

Solar System Exploration: Cassini — Reading, Writing and Rings
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-4
Event Date: April 18, 2017, at 7:30 p.m. EDT
Explore the mysteries of Saturn and Cassini with a blend of science and language arts. The webinar will present an activity for students to learn about Saturn just as the first observers of Saturn did — by observing and wondering. Students look at pictures of Saturn, the Cassini spacecraft, and the Huygens probe, and write what they know, notice and wonder. This activity invites students to observe carefully and learn from each other, while giving educators an idea of students may have already known about this topic. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/223585

Solar System Exploration: Orion and Human Exploration in Space
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: April 20, 2017, at 7:30 p.m. EDT
Drawn from more than 50 years of NASA spaceflight research and development, the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle is designed to meet the needs of the U.S. space program for decades to come. From an engineering design challenge to decomposition of geometric shapes to find area, these activities address the Next Generation Science Standards. Targets include NGSS ETS-1, ETS-2, ETS-3 and Common Core standards for Number and Quantity, Algebra, and Geometry. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/223590

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Virtual Visit — Meet Abigail Harrison

College student Abigail Harrison is on a journey to become the first astronaut to walk on Mars! Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network on Wednesday, April 19, 2017, at 10:30 a.m. EDT, for a virtual visit with Harrison as she shares her passion for space and her dream to become a scientist and NASA astronaut.

In 2011, at the age of 13, Harrison began to speak publicly about her dream of being the first astronaut to walk on Mars. Her work over the years as an international STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics) and space ambassador has led to a following of over 700,000 people on social media. In 2015, at the age of 18, Harrison founded The Mars Generation, a 501c3 nonprofit with the support of an advisory board of astronauts, engineers, scientists and online followers. She currently is attending Wellesley College where she is studying astrobiology and Russian.

This 45-minute program will be streamed live at http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-dlinfo. Questions may be submitted by email to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com or via Twitter using #askDLN.

If your school would like to be a direct participant with this program, please send an email to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com. The email should include your name; school email address; school name and city/state/zip; the approximate number of teachers and students who will be participating; and the grade level of participants.

Schools that are not selected to be a part of the interactive audience will be able to view the webcast event live.

For more information about this and other DLN events, visit http://www.nasa.gov/dln.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please send them to dlinfochannel@gmail.com.


STEM @ NASA Goddard Webcast Event: Earth Day 2017

Join NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center on Wednesday, April 19, at Noon EDT for the “STEM @ NASA Goddard: Earth Day 2017” event. Every day is Earth Day at NASA, and in this 30-minute program viewers will learn how and why NASA studies Earth from space. In addition, participants will learn how they can become citizen scientists through the GLOBE Program.

The 30-minute event will be streamed live on UStream, and participants will be able to interact with the guest speaker by submitting questions through email and Twitter.

To view the programs on Ustream, visit http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-gsfc.

For more information or to express interest in participating, please contact Erin McKinley at erin.e.mckinley@nasa.gov.


White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities — 2017 All-Star Students Program

The White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities works to promote HBCU excellence, innovation and sustainability. The initiative will recognize current HBCU students for their dedication to academics, leadership and civic engagement as 2017 HBCU All-Star Students.

The appointment period will last approximately one year. During this time, HBCU All-Stars will serve as ambassadors of the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities by providing outreach opportunities and information to their fellow students about the value of education and the initiative as a networking resource. Through social media and personal and professional relationships with community-based organizations, students will share promising and proven practices that support opportunities for all young people to realize their educational and career potential. The program will provide an opportunity to participate in regional and national events as well as webchats with initiative staff and other professionals from a wide range of disciplines that support a spirit of engagement and personal and professional development.

Nominees must be current undergraduate, graduate or professional students at an HBCU. Students must be enrolled for the 2017-2018 fall semester. Applications must be submitted by 11:59 p.m. EDT on May 12, 2017.

For more information and to download an application, visit http://sites.ed.gov/whhbcu/resources/hbcu-all-star-students/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to hbcuallstars@ed.gov.


NASA Unveils New Searchable Video, Audio and Imagery Library

NASA has launched a new resource to help the public search and download out-of-this-world images, videos and audio files. The NASA Image and Video Library website consolidates imagery spread across more than 60 collections into one searchable location.

The NASA Image and Video Library allows users to search, discover and download a treasure trove of more than 140,000 NASA images, videos and audio files from across the agency’s many missions. Users can browse the most recently uploaded files, as well as discover historic and the most popularly searched images, audio files and videos. Topic areas include aeronautics, astrophysics, Earth science, human spaceflight and more.

Users can embed content in their own sites and choose from multiple resolutions to download. The website also displays the metadata associated with images.

To learn more, visit https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-unveils-new-searchable-video-audio-and-imagery-library-for-the-public.

To browse or start your multimedia search, visit the NASA Image and Video Library at https://images.nasa.gov/#/.


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


NASA Solar Eclipse Workshops at Marshall Space Flight Center

On Aug. 21, 2017, the United States will experience a solar eclipse. This celestial event will provide a golden opportunity to engage and educate diverse audiences, and NASA has the resources to help. Join the Educator Resource Center at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, for a series of grade-level specific educator workshops to learn about safety tips, hands-on activities, resources and more!

April 13, 2017, 4-6 p.m. CDT: Educators of Grades 3-5
April 18, 2017, 4-6 p.m. CDT: Educators of Grades 6-8
May 6, 2017, 9-11 a.m. CDT: Educators of Grades K-12
June 1, 2017, 9-11 a.m. CDT: Educators of Grades K-12

For full event details and registration information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/solar_eclipse_workshop2017.pdf.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Maria Chambers at maria.a.chambers@nasa.gov.


Summer Institute — Liftoff 2017: Starry Night

Registration is now open for the 2017 LiftOff Summer Institute, sponsored by NASA’s Texas Space Grant Consortium. This weeklong professional development training for teachers will be held June 26-30, 2017, at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. This competitive aerospace workshop emphasizes STEM learning experiences through speakers, hands-on activities and field investigations.

The theme for this year’s institute is “Starry Night.” The event will focus on NASA missions studying our sun and the solar system to unravel mysteries about their origin and evolution. The total solar eclipse of 2017 will be highlighted.

Attendees must be U.S. citizens currently employed as classroom teachers of grades 4-12 with at least one year teaching experience prior to the institute. Texas Space Grant pays all expenses for any selected Texas teacher. Other Space Grant Consortia fund teachers from their states.

Applications are due April 14, 2017.

For more information and to access the online application, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/liftoff/.

If you have questions about the 2017 LiftOff Summer Institute, please email your inquiries to Margaret Baguio at baguio@tsgc.utexas.edu.


Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘Making STEM Magic’ Program

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is presenting a series of free education events called “Making STEM Magic.” This new program introduces young visitors to engineering in a fun and creative way. Participants learn by doing. Each challenge involves designing, building and testing a prototype. Each month, a new theme will be introduced with a new problem to solve.

Events are scheduled each Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. ET at the National Air and Space Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia. The events are free and open to the public.

In the Heat of the Moment: Space Capsules
Each Saturday in April 2017
Imagine an astronaut hurtling toward Earth in a space capsule at tremendous speeds. In this challenge, participants will design a heat shield to keep the astronaut cool from the heat of re-entry.

Blast Off!: Propulsion
Each Saturday in May 2017
It really is rocket science. Try your hand at designing a rocket and staying on target.

Red Rover: Mission to Mars
Each Saturday in June 2017
Did you know that rovers are robotic ambassadors? Learn more about NASA’s mobile labs and construct your own rolling rover.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s “Making STEM Magic” program, visit https://airandspace.si.edu/visit/events/stem-magic.

Please direct questions about this series of events to the Visitor Service line at 703-572-4118.


Host a Real-Time Conversation With Astronauts Aboard the International Space Station

ARISS-US is accepting proposals from U.S. schools, museums, science centers and community youth organizations (working individually or together) to host an Amateur Radio on the International Space Station, or ARISS, radio contact with an orbiting space station crew member between Jan. 1 and June 30, 2018. Proposals are due April 15, 2017.

ARISS is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed education plan. Students can learn about satellite communications, wireless technology, science research conducted on the space station, working conditions in space, radio science, and any related STEM subject. Students learn to use amateur radio to talk directly to an astronaut to ask their STEM-related questions. ARISS will help educational organizations locate amateur radio groups who can assist with equipment for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for students. Exact dates for the 10-minute radio contact are determined by crew scheduling and space station orbits.

For proposal information and more details such as expectations, proposal guidelines and proposal forms, visit http://www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.

Please email questions about this opportunity to ariss@arrl.org.

ARISS-US is offered through a partnership between NASA, the American Radio Relay League, and the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation. ARISS was created and is managed by an international working group.


2018 eXploration Habitat Academic Innovation Challenge

NASA is seeking university teams to develop innovative design solutions for deep-space human exploration systems in the 2018 eXploration Systems and Habitation Academic Innovation Challenge. NASA’s Advanced Exploration Systems Division sponsors the X-Hab Challenge as part of its core function to develop foundational technologies and high-priority capabilities that are the building blocks for future human space missions. Topic areas for this year’s challenge include 3-D printing of biologic materials, long-term hygiene, water condensation, replacement power systems and a Mars habitat commonality.

Working with the National Space Grant Foundation, NASA’s Advanced Exploration Systems Division and Space Life and Physical Sciences Division will offer multiple X-Hab 2018 awards of $20,000 to $30,000. These awards will allow winning teams to design and produce studies or functional products that will increase knowledge and foster risk reduction for space exploration capabilities. Awardees will follow a tailored systems-engineering process with projects being completed in the May 2018 timeframe.

Proposals will be accepted from university faculty who are U.S. citizens and who currently teach at an accredited university in the U.S. Eligible educators must be teaching a senior or graduate engineering design, industrial design or architecture curriculum that is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.

Proposals are due April 28, 2017.

For more information about the challenge and how to submit a proposal, visit http://spacegrant.org/xhab/.

To learn about past NASA X-Hab projects, visit https://www.nasa.gov/exploration/technology/deep_space_habitat/xhab/.

Please email questions about the X-Hab Challenge to xhab@spacegrant.org.


Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 12 to the International Space Station

The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education and the Arthur C. Clarke Institute for Space Education announce a science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, opportunity for school districts across the U.S. and space station partner nations. The newest flight opportunity, Mission 12 to the International Space Station, gives students across a community the ability to design and propose real experiments to fly in low Earth orbit on the space station. This opportunity is part of the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program, or SSEP.

Each participating community will receive a microgravity research mini-laboratory capable of supporting a single microgravity experiment and all launch services to fly the minilab to the space station in spring/summer 2018 and return it to Earth. An experiment design competition in each community — engaging typically 300+ students — allows student teams to design and propose real experiments vying for their community′s reserved mini-lab.

Content resources for teachers and students support foundational instruction on science in microgravity and experimental design. Additional SSEP programming uses the experiment design competition to engage the community in embracing a learning-community model for STEM education.

This competition is open to students in grades 5-12 and college. Informal education groups and organizations also are encouraged to participate. Interested communities must inquire about the program no later than April 28, 2017. The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education is available to help interested communities in the U.S. secure the needed funding.

To learn more about this opportunity, visit the “SSEP Mission 12 to International Space Station” National Announcement of Opportunity at http://ssep.ncesse.org/2017/03/new-flight-opportunity-for-school-districts-announcing-student-spaceflight-experiments-program-ssep-mission-12-to-the-international-space-station-starting-september-2017/.

SSEP is enabled through a strategic partnership with DreamUp PBC and NanoRacks LLC working with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the use of the International Space Station as a national laboratory. The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (http://www.iss-casis.org/) is a national partner of SSEP. To view a list of all SSEP national partners, visit http://ssep.ncesse.org/national-partners/.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please email SSEP National Program Director Jeff Goldstein at jeffgoldstein@ncesse.org.


Earn STEM Digital Badges to Celebrate the Centennial of NASA’s Langley Research Center

To celebrate NASA’s Langley Research Center’s Centennial, three STEM digital badges are now available for educators and students in grades 5-9. Discover the role of cloud types in the Earth’s Energy Budget; how drag is used to land the Mars2020 Rover on Mars; and the importance of composite materials for airplanes.

Educators may earn up to 15 hours of professional development. Student badges include up to six hours of content aligned to the educator badge.

The first 1,000 educators to complete all three badges by April 30, 2017, will receive a NASA insignia iron-on patch.

For more information and to begin earning badges, visit https://nasatxstate-epdc.net/. After logging in to the site, click on the Explore icon and type “NASA Langley” in the search area to find and select the NASA Langley Centennial Mission.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Marilé Colón Robles at marile.colonrobles@nasa.gov.


NASA Fundamental Physics Workshop 2017

The NASA Fundamental Physics Workshop 2017 will be held May 31-June 2, 2017, in Santa Barbara, California.

The workshop will provide a forum for NASA fundamental physics investigators to present results and discuss research ideas for future space experimentation with interested international and U.S. colleagues. Topic areas include atomic and molecular physics; fundamental forces and symmetries; dusty plasma physics; and condensed matter physics.

All interested scientists and researchers are invited to participate. The participation of the current NASA-funded investigators is strongly encouraged and kindly requested.

The deadline to register to attend the workshop is May 17, 2017. For more information and to register to attend, visit http://icpi.nasaprs.com/fpw2017.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Renee Atkins at ratkins@nasaprs.com.


2017 Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop

The annual Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop will be held Aug. 21-25, 2017, at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

The Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop encourages knowledge sharing, professional development, and networking throughout the thermal and fluids engineering community within NASA, academia and the aerospace community at large. STEM faculty and university students are encouraged to attend, submit a poster or paper on their thermal/fluids work, take free training, or do a combination thereof.

Registration to attend the workshop is free. Participants interested in presenting at the conference, via manuscript or technical poster, must submit an abstract by May 19, 2017.

For more information about the workshop and how to submit an abstract for consideration, visit https://tfaws.nasa.gov/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Ramona Cummings at ramona.o.cummings@nasa.gov.


Get Ready for the 2017 Solar Eclipse With NASA Resources

On Aug. 21, 2017, the United States will experience a solar eclipse! This celestial event will provide a golden opportunity to engage and educate diverse audiences, and NASA has the resources to help.

Along a path 60 to 70 miles wide stretching from Oregon to South Carolina, observers will be able to see a total solar eclipse. Others across North America will see a partial eclipse. The event will happen around lunch time across the country. For an interactive map with timing information along the path of the eclipse, visit http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEgoogle/SEgoogle2001/SE2017Aug21Tgoogle.html.

Visit the following websites to find additional information and resources, including:
— Tips for safely viewing the solar eclipse.
— Recorded interviews with NASA scientists, mission specialists and eclipse path communities.
— Topical online eclipse videos, featuring a variety of STEM and cultural topics.
— Social media community development and networking.
— Mobile educational eclipse applications.
— Public challenges and engagement activities.
— 2-D and 3-D printing exercises for K-16 students.
— Citizen science campaigns in partnership with NASA mission observations.
— Adjunct activities and educational resources.
— Live streaming of observations and programming.

Total Eclipse 2017 — Through the Eyes of NASA
http://eclipse2017.nasa.gov

Eclipses and Transits
http://www.nasa.gov/eclipse

Watch “The Solar Eclipse 2017 PREVIEW Show” with NASA EDGE.
https://youtu.be/6DDICymjhg0


Fly Your Exoplanet on the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite

Set to launch in June 2018, the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite is an explorer-class planet finder. In the first-ever spaceborne all-sky transit survey, TESS will identify planets ranging from Earth-sized to gas giants and will orbit a wide range of stellar types and orbital distances. As the TESS team prepares for launch, it invites the public to ponder what exoplanets might look like and share their ideas in the form of sketches and graphics.

This opportunity is open to all ages and skill levels. Submissions will be collected via email. To download the template for submitting your artwork, visit https://tess.gsfc.nasa.gov/fly_your_exoplanet.html.

The deadline for submissions is Nov. 20, 2017, or when capacity of the drive carrying the submissions to space is reached, whichever occurs first.

To learn more about the TESS mission, visit https://tess.gsfc.nasa.gov/.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to GSFC-TESS@mail.nasa.gov.


Grant Competition — USAID Development Innovation Ventures

The U.S. Agency for International Development seeks proposals for Development Innovation Ventures grants. Development Innovation Ventures supports breakthrough solutions to the world’s most intractable development challenges by finding and testing bold ideas that could change millions of lives at a fraction of the usual cost.

DIV welcomes applications from U.S. and non-U.S. organizations, individuals, and nonprofit and for-profit entities, provided their work is in a country where USAID operates.

Examples of innovations that USAID/DIV is likely to support include:
— Behavior-change approaches drawing on insights from psychology and behavioral economics.
— Solutions that advance equality between females and males and that empower women and girls to participate fully in and benefit from the development of their societies.
— New methods to reduce absenteeism among frontline health and education workers.
— Testing proof of concept for a solar lighting system distributed by local entrepreneurs at a price/service point that induces wide adoption.

Proposals are accepted year-round.

For more information about this opportunity, visit https://www.usaid.gov/div.

Please email questions about this opportunity to div@usaid.gov.


Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design, or STEAMD; or activities culturally relevant to or focused on populations underrepresented in STEM careers, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or nonreimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA announcement.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Eduation: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express Message — April 6, 2017

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: April 6, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT

Call for Proposals — NASA Research Announcement for Competitive Program for Science Museums, Planetariums and NASA Visitor Centers (CP4SMPVC)
Audience: Formal and Informal Education Institutions
Optional Notice of Intent Deadline: April 19, 2017
Proposal Deadline: June 19, 2017


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


2017 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education
Next Lecture Date: April 6, 2017, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)

Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘Making STEM Magic’ Program
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: April 8, 2017, at 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. EST

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — NASA’s Kennedy Space Center Engineering Career Panel Webcast
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 9-College
Event Date: April 10, 2017, 10 – 11 a.m. EDT

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Call for Papers: 2017 International Space Station Research and Development Conference
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Abstract Submission Deadline: April 10, 2017

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Online Solar Eclipse Workshop
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Date: April 11, 2017, 5-6 p.m. EDT

Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘STEM in 30’ Webcast Series
Audience: Grades 6-8 Educators and Students
Next Webcast Date: April 12, 2017, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EDT

NASA Solar Eclipse Workshops at Marshall Space Flight Center
Audience: K-12 Educators
Next Workshop Date: April 13, 2017, 4-6 p.m. CDT

Host a Real-Time Conversation With Astronauts Aboard the International Space Station
Audience: All Educators
Proposal Deadline: Apr. 15, 2017

2018 eXploration Habitat Academic Innovation Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Faculty and Students
Proposal Deadline: April 28, 2017

Earn STEM Digital Badges to Celebrate the Centennial of NASA’s Langley Research Center
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-9, Informal Educators
Deadline: April 30, 2017

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

‘RockOn! 2017’ University Rocket Science Workshop
Audience: Higher Education Faculty and Students
Registration Deadline: May 1, 2017
Workshop Dates: June 17-22, 2017

Mars Survival Kit: Lessons and Activities to Guide Your Exploration of Mars!
Audience: K-12 Educators

NASA History Program Office Internships — Fall 2017

Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: June 1, 2017

‘CineSpace’ Short Film Competition
Audience: All Educators and Students
Entry Submission Period: June 1 – July 31, 2017

Get Ready for the 2017 Solar Eclipse With NASA Resources
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Aug. 21, 2017

Help NASA Search the Realm Beyond Neptune at Backyard Worlds: Planet 9
Audience: All Educators and Students
Project Timeframe: Ongoing

Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students and Higher Education Institutions


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

 


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Solar System Exploration: Life on Mars?
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-8
Event Date: April 6, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT
Is there life beyond our Earth? Using NASA STEM lessons, participants will explore the possibility of life on Mars using the definition of “life” to determine whether anything is alive in three different simulated Mars soil samples. The lessons have students experiment, record observations, and draw pictures as they collect data from the samples to determine if life may exist in any of them. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/232490

Solar System Exploration: Hubble Space Telescope
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School, and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: April 10, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
How did it all start? Who is Edwin Hubble? Why do we need a space telescope? Relive the realization of a dream as the Hubble Space Telescope was launched on board Space Shuttle Discovery. Learn how fuzzy photos required a spectacular repair mission. See examples from deep space such as stars, planets, galaxies and beyond. Make real-world connections with everyday technologies as you learn about NASA STEM resources to build and launch satellites using the engineering design process. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/233994

Viewing Your Content Through a NASA Context
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-16
Event Date: April 11, 2017, at 4:30 p.m. EDT
Participants will work through two simple NASA activities: “Exploring Ultraviolet (UV) Light From the Sun” and “Engineer a Satellite.” As a group, we will introduce different content using the highlighted activities while emphasizing various engaging contexts and different real-world circumstances that can be easily implemented or recreated in the classroom. Examples of applications include production of scatter plots, weather and clouds, atmospheres and solar system exploration, material composition, radiation safety, and the upcoming solar eclipse. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/233547

Solar System Exploration: Exploring New Worlds
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: April 13, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT
Is there another Earth beyond our solar system? Is anybody else out there? This webinar will try to answer these questions using real NASA data to explore how space-based telescopes, especially the Kepler Space Telescope, search for planets orbiting stars beyond our sun. The NASA STEM activities presented will investigate how to use Kepler Space Telescope data and Kepler’s Third Law to construct graphs and interpret data that determines if a planet beyond our solar system is Earth-like and a candidate to support “life.” Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/232492

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


Call for Proposals — NASA Research Announcement for Competitive Program for Science Museums, Planetariums and NASA Visitor Centers (CP4SMPVC)

The NASA Office of Education invites proposals from museums, science centers, planetariums, NASA Visitor Centers, youth-serving organizations, libraries and other eligible nonprofit institutions via this 2017 NASA Research Announcement: Competitive Program for Science Museums, Planetariums and NASA Visitor Centers (CP4SMPVC), Announcement Number NNH17ZHA002N. Proposals must be submitted electronically via the NASA proposal data system NSPIRES or Grants.gov.

Proposers may request a grant or cooperative agreement to support NASA-themed science, technology, engineering or mathematics education, including exhibits, within these congressionally directed topics: space exploration, aeronautics, space science, Earth science or microgravity. CP4SMPVC is a competitive, high-quality, national program. The basic goal of the CP4SMPVC solicitation is to further NASA Strategic Objective 2.4: “Advance the Nation’s STEM education and workforce pipeline by working collaboratively with other agencies to engage students, teachers, and faculty in NASA’s missions and unique assets.”

Eligible institutions do not need to have the words “museum,” “visitor center,” “science,” “planetarium,” “youth”, or “library” in their official name, but they must be located in the United States or its Territories. See the NASA Research Announcement, or NRA, for full eligibility requirements and other limitations. Check the NSPIRES website once a week to learn if amendments or frequently asked questions have been added. Amendments and FAQs also will be announced via the NASA Education EXPRESS listserv.

Pre-proposal telecon (optional): April 10, 2017
Notices of Intent Due (optional but strongly encouraged): April 19, 2017
Full proposals are due June 19, 2017.

NASA FY2017 funds may be available for awards under this opportunity.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at: https://go.nasa.gov/2oC4eCU.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the points of contact listed within the NRA.

 


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


2017 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online

The Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, named after the founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and presented by JPL’s Office of Communication and Education, shares the excitement of the space program’s missions, instruments and other technologies.

Lectures take place twice per month, on consecutive Thursdays and Fridays. The Thursday lectures take place in JPL’s Theodore von Kármán Auditorium, and Friday lectures take place at Pasadena City College’s Vosloh Forum. Both start at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT). Admission and parking are free for all lectures. No reservations are required, but seating is limited. The Thursday evening lectures are streamed live for viewing online. Archives of past lectures are also available online.

Next Lecture in the Series:

Harnessing the Sun’s Light to Explore Our Planet and Universe
Event Date:
April 6 and April 7, 2017, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2017&month=4
Spectral mapping, a type of remote sensing that uses reflected sunlight to produce imagery of the chemical composition of planetary surfaces, is useful when studying Earth and other planetary bodies. Join research systems engineer Mark Helminger for a discussion about the science behind measuring spectra of reflected sunlight and the phenomena that make spectral remote sensing possible.

For more information about the Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, including a complete list of upcoming lectures, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.php.

Questions about this series should be directed to http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php.


Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘Making STEM Magic’ Program

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is presenting a series of free education events called “Making STEM Magic.” This new program introduces young visitors to engineering in a fun and creative way. Participants learn by doing. Each challenge involves designing, building and testing a prototype. Each month, a new theme will be introduced with a new problem to solve.

Events are scheduled each Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. ET at the National Air and Space Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia. The events are free and open to the public.

In the Heat of the Moment: Space Capsules
Each Saturday in April 2017
Imagine an astronaut hurtling toward Earth in a space capsule at tremendous speeds. In this challenge, participants will design a heat shield to keep the astronaut cool from the heat of re-entry.

Blast Off!: Propulsion
Each Saturday in May 2017
It really is rocket science. Try your hand at designing a rocket and staying on target.

Red Rover: Mission to Mars
Each Saturday in June 2017
Did you know that rovers are robotic ambassadors? Learn more about NASA’s mobile labs and construct your own rolling rover.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s “Making STEM Magic” program, visit https://airandspace.si.edu/visit/events/stem-magic.

Please direct questions about this series of events to the Visitor Service line at 703-572-4118.


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — NASA’s Kennedy Space Center Engineering Career Panel Webcast

Tune in on Monday, April 10, 2017, at 10 a.m. EDT, to #askDLN questions about engineering and working at NASA.

Kennedy Space Center will host an hourlong live question-and-answer session with three engineers to discuss their different careers paths and current work experiences. Watch the live event on the NASA DLiNfo Channel and tweet questions with #askDLN or email questions to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com.

Speakers (subject to change):
Adam Ayala – Systems Integration and Test Engineering Manager
Melissa Jones – Director of Landing and Recovery, Exploration Mission-1
Steve Sullivan – Chief Engineer, Commercial Crew Program

For information about current internship opportunities, please visit https://intern.nasa.gov/ossi/ and https://nasajobs.nasa.gov/studentopps/Pathways.htm.

Please direct questions about this event to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com, with “Kennedy Space Center Engineering Career Panel” in the subject line of your message.

For more information about this and other DLN events, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln/special-events.


DEADLINE EXTENDED: Call for Papers: 2017 International Space Station Research and Development Conference

The sixth annual International Space Station Research and Development Conference will be held July 17-20, 2017, in Washington, D.C.

NASA, the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space, and the American Astronomical Society are seeking abstracts under the categories of Biology and Medicine; Human Health in Space; Commercialization and Nongovernment Utilization; Physical Sciences and Materials Development; Plant Science; Earth Science and Remote Sensing; Technology Development and Demonstration; Finances, and STEM Education (science, technology, engineering and mathematics). Topics should relate to science, exploration and technology activities (past, present, planned or under development) on the International Space Station.

Both the conference and abstract submittal are open to entrepreneurial, commercial, academic and government agency attendees, both from and outside the United States. Eligible attendees include professionals, young professionals, students and interested parties. The working language for the conference is English. The conference will include plenaries for topics of general interest and technical sessions for focused discussions.

Because of the large number of expected submissions, presenters are encouraged to submit abstracts early. The deadline has been extended to April 10, 2017.

For more information about the conference and how to submit an abstract for consideration, visit http://www.issconference.org/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to ISSTechChair@atdl-inc.com.


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Online Solar Eclipse Workshop

Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network for an online Solar Eclipse Workshop on April 11, 2017, at 5 p.m. EDT. This hourlong live-streamed educator workshop will showcase solar eclipse education resources for K-12 educators. Learn how NASA education resources can help you bring the excitement and science of the total eclipse of Aug. 21, 2017, to your classroom. Several hands-on activities will be demonstrated during the workshop, and subject matter experts will explain why the eclipse is a unique event for scientists and the public.

This is the first total eclipse to cross the United States since the 1970s, and the next one will not occur until 2024. Make plans to attend and learn how to engage your students in “Total Eclipse 2017.”

For more information, visit https://www.facebook.com/events/185598385279098/.

Please direct questions about this event to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com.

For information about other DLN events, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln/special-events.


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘STEM in 30’ Webcast Series

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is presenting a series of free education webcast events called “STEM in 30.” This program consists of live, fast-paced 30-minute webcasts designed to increase interest and engagement in science, technology, engineering and mathematics for students. To enhance the learning experience, students can get involved with the content through the interactive “Cover It Live” feature, which includes poll questions and classroom activities. The webcasts are available live on the National Air and Space Museum website and NASA TV, and they will be archived for on-demand viewing.

The Women Paving the Way to Mars
April 12, 2017, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EDT
“Boldly go where no man has gone before.” Iconic gender-specific phrases like this don’t tell the entire story. Women have been and continue to be an important part of the aerospace industry — from the first woman in space, Valentina Tereshkova, to human computer Katherine Johnson, who helped send humans to the moon, to Christina Koch, one of NASA’s newest astronauts. Join the webcast to learn about the women who are helping pave the way to Mars.

African-American Contributions to Aviation and Spaceflight
May 17, 2017, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EDT
African-Americans have made contributions to aviation since its inception but found themselves routinely denied access to training as pilots and mechanics. “Brave” Bessie Coleman had to learn another language and travel across the ocean to earn her pilot’s license. The Tuskegee Airmen battled against discrimination to serve in World War II. NASA engineer Kobie Boykins helped design every rover that has gone to Mars. Join the webcast to explore the integral part African-Americans have played in shaping America’s aerospace industry.

“STEM in 30” webcasts are online learning experiences but are filmed in front of a live audience. If you are interested in bringing your school group to a live filming of “STEM in 30,” please email STEMin30@si.edu for details.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s “STEM in 30” Webcast Series, visit https://airandspace.si.edu/connect/stem-30.

Questions about this series should be directed to STEMin30@si.edu.


NASA Solar Eclipse Workshops at Marshall Space Flight Center

On Aug. 21, 2017, the United States will experience a solar eclipse. This celestial event will provide a golden opportunity to engage and educate diverse audiences, and NASA has the resources to help. Join the Educator Resource Center at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, for a series of grade-level specific educator workshops to learn about safety tips, hands-on activities, resources and more!

April 13, 2017, 4-6 p.m. CDT: Educators of Grades 3-5
April 18, 2017, 4-6 p.m. CDT: Educators of Grades 6-8
May 6, 2017, 9-11 a.m. CDT: Educators of Grades K-12
June 1, 2017, 9-11 a.m. CDT: Educators of Grades K-12

For full event details and registration information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/solar_eclipse_workshop2017.pdf.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Maria Chambers at maria.a.chambers@nasa.gov.


Host a Real-Time Conversation With Astronauts Aboard the International Space Station

ARISS-US is accepting proposals from U.S. schools, museums, science centers and community youth organizations (working individually or together) to host an Amateur Radio on the International Space Station, or ARISS, radio contact with an orbiting space station crew member between Jan. 1 and June 30, 2018. Proposals are due April 15, 2017.

ARISS is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed education plan. Students can learn about satellite communications, wireless technology, science research conducted on the space station, working conditions in space, radio science, and any related STEM subject. Students learn to use amateur radio to talk directly to an astronaut to ask their STEM-related questions. ARISS will help educational organizations locate amateur radio groups who can assist with equipment for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for students. Exact dates for the 10-minute radio contact are determined by crew scheduling and space station orbits.

For proposal information and more details such as expectations, proposal guidelines and proposal forms, visit http://www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.

Please email questions about this opportunity to ariss@arrl.org.

ARISS-US is offered through a partnership between NASA, the American Radio Relay League, and the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation. ARISS was created and is managed by an international working group.


2018 eXploration Habitat Academic Innovation Challenge

NASA is seeking university teams to develop innovative design solutions for deep-space human exploration systems in the 2018 eXploration Systems and Habitation Academic Innovation Challenge. NASA’s Advanced Exploration Systems Division sponsors the X-Hab Challenge as part of its core function to develop foundational technologies and high-priority capabilities that are the building blocks for future human space missions. Topic areas for this year’s challenge include 3-D printing of biologic materials, long-term hygiene, water condensation, replacement power systems and a Mars habitat commonality.

Working with the National Space Grant Foundation, NASA’s Advanced Exploration Systems Division and Space Life and Physical Sciences Division will offer multiple X-Hab 2018 awards of $20,000 to $30,000. These awards will allow winning teams to design and produce studies or functional products that will increase knowledge and foster risk reduction for space exploration capabilities. Awardees will follow a tailored systems-engineering process with projects being completed in the May 2018 timeframe.

Proposals will be accepted from university faculty who are U.S. citizens and who currently teach at an accredited university in the U.S. Eligible educators must be teaching a senior or graduate engineering design, industrial design or architecture curriculum that is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.

Proposals are due April 28, 2017.

For more information about the challenge and how to submit a proposal, visit http://spacegrant.org/xhab/.

To learn about past NASA X-Hab projects, visit https://www.nasa.gov/exploration/technology/deep_space_habitat/xhab/.

Please email questions about the X-Hab Challenge to xhab@spacegrant.org.


Earn STEM Digital Badges to Celebrate the Centennial of NASA’s Langley Research Center

To celebrate NASA’s Langley Research Center’s Centennial, three STEM digital badges are now available for educators and students in grades 5-9. Discover the role of cloud types in the Earth’s Energy Budget; how drag is used to land the Mars2020 Rover on Mars; and the importance of composite materials for airplanes.

Educators may earn up to 15 hours of professional development. Student badges include up to six hours of content aligned to the educator badge.

The first 1,000 educators to complete all three badges by April 30, 2017, will receive a NASA insignia iron-on patch.

For more information and to begin earning badges, visit https://nasatxstate-epdc.net/. After logging in to the site, click on the Explore icon and type “NASA Langley” in the search area to find and select the NASA Langley Centennial Mission.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Marilé Colón Robles at marile.colonrobles@nasa.gov.


Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites U.S. educational institutions to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets, and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

Nonprofit museums, libraries and planetariums (sponsored through their respective State Agency Surplus Property, or SASP, organization) are also eligible to make requests. Visit the link below for special instructions to request items. To find the contact information for the SASP representative for your area, visit http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/100851.

A nominal shipping fee must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.


‘RockOn! 2017’ University Rocket Science Workshop

University and community college faculty and students are invited to a weeklong workshop to learn how to build and launch a scientific experiment into space. NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia is hosting the “RockOn! 2017” workshop June 17-22, 2017, in partnership with the Colorado and Virginia Space Grant Consortia. Workshop participants must be U.S. citizens. The registration deadline for the workshop is May 1, 2017.

The hands-on workshop teaches participants to build experiments that fly on sounding rockets. During the week, participants will work in teams of three to construct and integrate a sounding rocket payload from a kit. On the fifth day of the workshop, the experiments will fly on a sounding rocket expected to reach an altitude of more than 70 miles.

Each experiment will provide valuable scientific data, analyzed as part of the student-led science and engineering research. The program encourages faculty and students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics to develop skills critical to NASA’s future engineering, scientific and technical missions.

For more information about “RockOn!” and to register online, visit http://spacegrant.colorado.edu/national-programs/rockon-2017-home.

Since 2008, more than 448 people have participated in the “RockOn!” workshops and successfully built and launched 146 payloads to space. Images and information from past years’ workshops can be found at the “RockOn!” website.

Questions about the workshop or the registration process should be directed to Chris Koehler by email at koehler@colorado.edu or by telephone at 303-492-4750.


Mars Survival Kit: Lessons and Activities to Guide Your Exploration of Mars!

NASA is embarking on a journey to Mars! Are your students ready to join in the adventure? Spark excitement in your classroom with the Mars Survival Kit.

The Mars Survival Kit is a collection of educational activities for students in grades K-12. Each educational activity includes a brief description, as well as information about how the activities and lessons align to the Next Generation Science Standards.

Start your classroom’s journey to Mars at http://go.nasa.gov/1NnZ0Rg.

To learn more about NASA’s Journey to Mars, visit http://www.nasa.gov/topics/journeytomars/index.html.


NASA History Program Office Internships — Fall 2017

The NASA History Program Office is seeking undergraduate and graduate students for summer 2017 internships. The History Program Office maintains archival materials to answer research questions from NASA personnel, journalists, scholars, students at all levels and others from around the world. The division also edits and publishes several books and monographs each year. It maintains a large number of websites on NASA history.

Students of all majors are welcome to apply. While detailed prior knowledge of the aeronautics and space fields is not necessary, a keen interest and some basic familiarity with these topics are needed. Strong research, writing and editing skills are essential. Experience with social media is a plus.

Intern projects are flexible. Typical projects include handling a variety of information requests, writing posts for the NASA history Twitter and Facebook pages, editing historical manuscripts, doing research and writing biographical sketches, and identifying and captioning photos.

Applications for fall 2017 internships are due June 1, 2017. Applications for spring 2018 internship applications are due June 1, 2017 and applications for summer 2018 internships are due Feb. 1, 2018.

For more information, visit http://history.nasa.gov/interncall.htm.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please contact Bill Barry at bill.barry@nasa.gov.


‘CineSpace’ Short Film Competition

NASA and the Houston Cinema Arts Society once again will offer filmmakers around the world a chance to share their works inspired by — and using — actual NASA imagery through “CineSpace,” a short-film competition.

Films featuring imagery captured by NASA and video collected throughout the agency’s 50-year history will be judged on creativity, innovation and attention to detail. Works submitted to “CineSpace” will compete for cash prizes and the opportunity to be shown to audiences both on and off Earth. In addition to being screened at the “CineSpace” awards ceremony during the Houston Cinema Arts Festival, winners and finalists may be screened at other film festivals across the country, as well as on NASA TV and even on the International Space Station.

“CineSpace” is open to all filmmakers, both professional and aspiring. The competition will accept submissions of all genres, including narrative, documentary, comedy, drama, animation, experimental and others, of up to 10 minutes running time. Entries must use at least 10 percent publicly available NASA imagery.

The submission period opens June 1, 2017, and closes July 31, 2017. Finalists and winners will be announced at a “CineSpace” event during the Houston Cinema Arts Festival in November. Entries will be competing for $26,000 in prizes with cash awards going to the top three submissions as well as the two films that best demonstrate the themes “Benefits of Space to Humanity” and “Future Space Exploration.”

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/cinespace-short-film-competition-returns-for-2017.

Please direct questions about this competition to cinespace@cinemartsociety.org.


Get Ready for the 2017 Solar Eclipse With NASA Resources

On Aug. 21, 2017, the United States will experience a solar eclipse! This celestial event will provide a golden opportunity to engage and educate diverse audiences, and NASA has the resources to help.

Along a path 60 to 70 miles wide stretching from Oregon to South Carolina, observers will be able to see a total solar eclipse. Others across North America will see a partial eclipse. The event will happen around lunch time across the country. For an interactive map with timing information along the path of the eclipse, visit http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEgoogle/SEgoogle2001/SE2017Aug21Tgoogle.html.

Visit the following websites to find additional information and resources, including:
— Tips for safely viewing the solar eclipse.
— Recorded interviews with NASA scientists, mission specialists and eclipse path communities.
— Topical online eclipse videos, featuring a variety of STEM and cultural topics.
— Social media community development and networking.
— Mobile educational eclipse applications.
— Public challenges and engagement activities.
— 2-D and 3-D printing exercises for K-16 students.
— Citizen science campaigns in partnership with NASA mission observations.
— Adjunct activities and educational resources.
— Live streaming of observations and programming.

Total Eclipse 2017 — Through the Eyes of NASA
http://eclipse2017.nasa.gov

Eclipses and Transits
http://www.nasa.gov/eclipse

Watch “The Solar Eclipse 2017 PREVIEW Show” with NASA EDGE.
https://youtu.be/6DDICymjhg0


Help NASA Search the Realm Beyond Neptune at Backyard Worlds: Planet 9

Is a large planet at the fringes of our solar system awaiting discovery, a world astronomers call Planet Nine? Using data from NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer mission, NASA scientists are looking for this planet and for new brown dwarfs in the backyard of the solar system. But they need your help! Finding these dim objects requires the human eye to comb through the images to distinguish moving celestial bodies from ghosts and other artifacts. Participants in this citizen science project will share the credit for their discoveries in any scientific publications that result from the project.

For more information and to learn how to participate, visit the “Backyard Worlds: Planet 9” website at http://backyardworlds.org.

To learn more about NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer and its mission to image the entire sky in the infrared, visit https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/WISE/main/index.html.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Marc Kuchner at marc.j.kuchner@nasa.gov.


Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Are you an undergraduate or graduate student seeking opportunities in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)? The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science — in collaboration with the participating agencies in the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on STEM Education (CoSTEM) and the Science.gov Alliance — has launched a search portal for both students and universities to discover federally sponsored STEM education training and funding opportunities.

Student users can search the site for opportunities they can apply to directly, such as research internships and fellowships. Likewise, universities can search the site for federal funding opportunities to establish innovative training programs for undergraduates or graduate students.

Users can search the site through faceted searching capabilities for characteristics such as program type, STEM discipline, institution location, federal sponsor, and eligibility. Or they can search through the open text option.

For programs and opportunities for undergraduates, visit http://stemundergrads.science.gov/.

For graduate programs and opportunities, visit http://stemgradstudents.science.gov/.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Eduation: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express Message — March 30, 2017

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


NEW THIS WEEK!


Funding Opportunities for Out-of-School Time Programs in NASA Glenn Region
Audience: Formal and Informal Education Institutions and Organizations in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio and Wisconsin
Application Deadline: March 31, 2017

Free Tours of Facilities at NASA’s Glenn Research Center
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: April 1, 2017

Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: April 3, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT

Free Educator Workshop — Journey to Mars: Developing Crosscutting Breakthrough Technologies
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Event Dates: April 5, 2017, 4:30-6 p.m. PDT

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — NASA’s Kennedy Space Center Engineering Career Panel Webcast
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 9-College
Event Date: April 10, 2017, 10 – 11 a.m. EDT

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Online Solar Eclipse Workshop
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Date: April 11, 2017, 5-6 p.m. EDT

Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘STEM in 30’ Webcast Series
Audience: Grades 6-8 Educators and Students
Next Webcast Date: April 12, 2017, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EDT

Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 12 to the International Space Station
Audience: School Districts Serving Grades 5-12, Informal Education Institutions, Colleges and Universities
Inquiry Deadline: April 28, 2017
Start Date: September 5, 2017

NASA Fundamental Physics Workshop 2017
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Deadline: May 17, 2017
Workshop Dates: May 31-June 2, 2017

Educator Workshop: The Little Blue Dot — Earth Science for Middle School Teachers
Audience: Educators of Grades 6-8
Workshop Dates: June 12-15, 2017

New Lesson Plans Available on NASA/4-H Expeditionary Skills Website
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate — Early Career Faculty Opportunity
Audience: Early Career Faculty Members at Accredited U.S. Universities
Proposal Deadline: March 31, 2017

Exploration of the Moon and Asteroids by Secondary Students (ExMASS) High School Research Program
Audience: Educators of Grades 9-12
Application Deadline: March 31, 2017
Program Dates: September 2017 – April 2018

Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘Making STEM Magic’ Program
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: April 1, 2017, at 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. EST

NASA and the American Historical Society Seek Applicants for Fellowships in Aerospace History
Audience: Recent Recipients of the Ph.D. in History or a Closely Related Field, and Students Pursuing Doctoral Degrees in Those Fields
Application Deadline: April 1, 2017

2017 Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching
Audience: 7-12 Educators
Nomination Deadline: April 1, 2017

2017 NASA STEM Enhancement in Earth and Space Science Internship
Audience: Current High School Sophomores and Juniors
Application Deadline: April 4, 2017

NASA Solar Eclipse Workshops at Marshall Space Flight Center
Audience: K-12 Educators
Next Workshop Date: April 4, 2017, 4-6 p.m. CDT

2017 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education
Next Lecture Date: April 6, 2017, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)

Summer Institute — Liftoff 2017: Starry Night
Audience: Educators of Grades 4-12
Application Deadline: April 14, 2017
Institute Dates: June 26-30, 2017

Launch Opportunity: RockSat-XN Program
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Notice of Intent to Fly Deadline: April 14, 2017

Host a Real-Time Conversation With Astronauts Aboard the International Space Station
Audience: All Educators
Proposal Deadline: Apr. 15, 2017

2018 eXploration Habitat Academic Innovation Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Faculty and Students
Proposal Deadline: April 28, 2017

2017 Columbia Crew Memorial Undergraduate Scholarships
Audience: Undergraduate Students at Texas Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: April 28, 2017

2017 Texas Space Grant Consortium STEM Educator Scholarships
Audience:  Educators Enrolled in Programs for a Master’s Degree in a STEM Field at Member Institutions of the Texas Space Grant Consortium
Application Deadline: April 28, 2017

2017-2018 Texas Space Grant Consortium Graduate Fellowships
Audience: Graduate Students at Member Institutions of the Texas Space Grant Consortium
Application Deadline: April 28, 2017

Mars Survival Kit: Lessons and Activities to Guide Your Exploration of Mars!
Audience: K-12 Educators

Get Ready for the 2017 Solar Eclipse With NASA Resources

Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Aug. 21, 2017

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

 


NEW THIS WEEK!


Funding Opportunities for Out-of-School Time Programs in NASA Glenn Region

The Office of Education at NASA’s Glenn Research Center is seeking applications from youth-serving organizations and formal/informal education institutions that serve students in grades 4-9 in the Glenn six-state region. This region includes Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio and Wisconsin.

Awards must be used to implement out-of-school time content, specifically Glenn’s Engineering Design Challenge: “Let It Glide” or activity modules from the NASA Out-of-School Learning Network. These resources provide educational content through which students have the opportunity to work on real-world challenges in a collaborative, team-based environment. Students apply lessons learned to problems faced by STEM professionals while gaining a deeper knowledge of how NASA is a part of their everyday lives. These resources must be implemented between May 1, 2017, and Aug. 31, 2017.

Applications are due March 31, 2017.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/GRC_NOSL_EDC_Solicitation.

Please direct questions about these resources to GRC-Ed-Opportunities@mail.nasa.gov.


Free Tours of Facilities at NASA’s Glenn Research Center

NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, is offering tours that take visitors behind the scenes and inside certain research facilities. Glenn scientists and engineers serve as guides. Tours and open house events will be held each month through October 2017. Tours are free for groups and individuals, but to guarantee admission, reservations are required. Visitor parking is also free.

On the days of the tours, a bus departs from Glenn’s main gate every hour, beginning at 10 a.m. The last tour departs at 1 p.m. Each tour lasts about 45 minutes and is followed by a stop at Glenn’s Gift Shop. (The historic district tours follow a different schedule. See tour schedule for details.)

Glenn’s 2017 Tour Schedule

April 1, 2017 — Electric Propulsion Laboratory: Enter the proving grounds for deep space exploration! Visitors will get a behind the scenes tour of the Electric Propulsion Laboratory, which houses two huge vacuum chambers that simulate the space environment.

May 6, 2017 — Historic District Tour Featuring the 10- by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel: Join us on a free tour of Glenn’s recently established historic district. The tours feature the 10- by 10-foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. For over 60 years, the wind tunnel has been used to conduct propulsion testing, including research for the Apollo program.

June 3, 2017 — NASA Glenn Hangar: Get a behind-the-scenes look at the NASA Glenn Hangar. See how aircraft at NASA Glenn are used to monitor algae blooms on Lake Erie and other waterways.

July 8, 2017: SLOPE Laboratory: Explore locomotion on planets with a visit to the Simulated Lunar Operations, or SLOPE, Lab. See how rover components are tested for their ability to navigate and investigate planetary surfaces.

Aug. 5, 2017 — Photovoltaic Laboratory: See the light of solar cells with a behind-the-scenes tour of the Photovoltaic Laboratory. See how researchers are exploring ways to create energy from light in order to power everything from homes to spacecraft.

Sept. 9, 2017 — Zero-G Facility: Explore microgravity research of yesterday, today and tomorrow with a tour of Glenn’s Zero-G Facility. Learn how dropping payloads over 400 feet can give researchers a glimpse into microgravity conditions.

Oct. 7, 2017 — Historic District Tour Featuring the 8- by 6-Foot Wind Tunnel: Join us on a free tour of Glenn’s recently established historic district. The tours feature the 8- by 6-foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. Built in 1946, the wind tunnel has contributed to decades of aeronautics research.

Tours are open to U.S. citizens and legal permanent residents. To guarantee admission, reservations are required. For more information on tours and to make reservations, visit https://www.nasa.gov/centers/glenn/events/tours.html.

Please direct questions about the tours to grc-dl-tours@mail.nasa.gov.


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Solar System Exploration: Dwarf Planets
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School, and Informal Educators of Grades 5-9
Event Date: April 3, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Participants will get an overview of the story behind the creation of the Dwarf Planet classification. Learn about currently identified dwarf planets in our solar system and NASA resources for teaching about dwarf planets. Activities discussed in this webinar address the Next Generation Science Standards PS2 and ESS1. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/227777

Solar System Exploration: Juno to Jupiter
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: April 4, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Participants will learn about the solar system and beyond with NASA’s Juno mission to Jupiter. Learn about the Juno mission, which began in August 2011, while also learning about hands-on activities related to the solar system. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/233990

Technology in the Classroom: Tools for Diverse Learners
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 2-8
Event Date: April 4, 2017, at 8 p.m. EDT
Participants will explore how technology can be used to amplify student design and reflection pieces in science activities. With these readily available tools and practices, we can give students meaningful opportunities to revise and improve their projects to demonstrate their own learning and to share artifacts of their work. We will explore examples provided from elementary SPED classrooms and shared by special guest speaker Nick Giacobbe. Nick Giacobbe is a Harvard-educated SPED teacher named Innovator the Year for his work bringing technology into the classroom. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/236299

Solar System Exploration: Hubble — A History
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-8
Event Date: April 5, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Participants will get a historical overview of NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. Discussion will focus on using the telescope as a platform for teaching science concepts. Activities discussed in this webinar address the Next Generation Science Standards ESS1 and PS4. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/227779

Solar System Exploration: Life on Mars?
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-8
Event Date: April 6, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT
Is there life beyond our Earth? Using NASA STEM lessons, participants will explore the possibility of life on Mars using the definition of “life” to determine whether anything is alive in three different simulated Mars soil samples. The lessons have students experiment, record observations, and draw pictures as they collect data from the samples to determine if life may exist in any of them. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/232490

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


Free Educator Workshop — Journey to Mars: Developing Crosscutting Breakthrough Technologies

Future robotic missions to Mars and human exploration of the Red Planet will require massive payloads to be delivered to the surface. NASA is developing large, sturdy and lightweight systems to deliver the next generation of rovers and landers to Mars. These systems, called Low Density Supersonic Decelerators, aim to solve the complicated problem of slowing spacecraft entry vehicles down to deliver large payloads safely to the surface of a planetary body without bringing along massive amounts of extra rocket propellant or carrying a large and heavy atmospheric entry shield.

Join the Office of Education at NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center for an educator professional development workshop where participants will learn about this exciting new technology. Using NASA’S BEST Engineering Design Process, attendees will design a prototype of new drag devices to potentially land humans, habitats, and their return rockets safely on Mars.

The workshop will take place Wednesday, April 5, 2017, 4:30-6 p.m. PDT at NASA’s Armstrong Educator Resource Center at the AERO Institute in Palmdale, California.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/ldsd_workshop_flyer.pdf.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Sondra Geddes at sondra.l.geddes@nasa.gov.


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — NASA’s Kennedy Space Center Engineering Career Panel Webcast

Tune in on Monday, April 10, 2017, at 10 a.m. EDT, to #askDLN questions about engineering and working at NASA.

Kennedy Space Center will host an hourlong live question-and-answer session with three engineers to discuss their different careers paths and current work experiences. Watch the live event on the NASA DLiNfo Channel and tweet questions with #askDLN or email questions to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com.

Speakers (subject to change):
Adam Ayala – Systems Integration and Test Engineering Manager
Melissa Jones – Director of Landing and Recovery, Exploration Mission-1
Steve Sullivan – Chief Engineer, Commercial Crew Program

For information about current internship opportunities, please visit https://intern.nasa.gov/ossi/ and https://nasajobs.nasa.gov/studentopps/Pathways.htm.

Please direct questions about this event to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com, with “Kennedy Space Center Engineering Career Panel” in the subject line of your message.

For more information about this and other DLN events, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln/special-events.


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Online Solar Eclipse Workshop

Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network for an online Solar Eclipse Workshop on April 11, 2017, at 5 p.m. EDT. This hourlong live-streamed educator workshop will showcase solar eclipse education resources for K-12 educators. Learn how NASA education resources can help you bring the excitement and science of the total eclipse of Aug. 21, 2017, to your classroom. Several hands-on activities will be demonstrated during the workshop, and subject matter experts will explain why the eclipse is a unique event for scientists and the public.

This is the first total eclipse to cross the United States since the 1970s, and the next one will not occur until 2024. Make plans to attend and learn how to engage your students in “Total Eclipse 2017.”

For more information, visit https://www.facebook.com/events/185598385279098/.

Please direct questions about this event to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com.

For information about other DLN events, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln/special-events.


Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘STEM in 30’ Webcast Series

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is presenting a series of free education webcast events called “STEM in 30.” This program consists of live, fast-paced 30-minute webcasts designed to increase interest and engagement in science, technology, engineering and mathematics for students. To enhance the learning experience, students can get involved with the content through the interactive “Cover It Live” feature, which includes poll questions and classroom activities. The webcasts are available live on the National Air and Space Museum website and NASA TV, and they will be archived for on-demand viewing.

The Women Paving the Way to Mars
April 12, 2017, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EDT
“Boldly go where no man has gone before.” Iconic gender-specific phrases like this don’t tell the entire story. Women have been and continue to be an important part of the aerospace industry — from the first woman in space, Valentina Tereshkova, to human computer Katherine Johnson, who helped send humans to the moon, to Christina Koch, one of NASA’s newest astronauts. Join the webcast to learn about the women who are helping pave the way to Mars.

African-American Contributions to Aviation and Spaceflight
May 17, 2017, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EDT
African-Americans have made contributions to aviation since its inception but found themselves routinely denied access to training as pilots and mechanics. “Brave” Bessie Coleman had to learn another language and travel across the ocean to earn her pilot’s license. The Tuskegee Airmen battled against discrimination to serve in World War II. NASA engineer Kobie Boykins helped design every rover that has gone to Mars. Join the webcast to explore the integral part African-Americans have played in shaping America’s aerospace industry.

“STEM in 30” webcasts are online learning experiences but are filmed in front of a live audience. If you are interested in bringing your school group to a live filming of “STEM in 30,” please email STEMin30@si.edu for details.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s “STEM in 30” Webcast Series, visit https://airandspace.si.edu/connect/stem-30.

Questions about this series should be directed to STEMin30@si.edu.


Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 12 to the International Space Station

The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education and the Arthur C. Clarke Institute for Space Education announce a science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, opportunity for school districts across the U.S. and space station partner nations. The newest flight opportunity, Mission 12 to the International Space Station, gives students across a community the ability to design and propose real experiments to fly in low Earth orbit on the space station. This opportunity is part of the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program, or SSEP.

Each participating community will receive a microgravity research mini-laboratory capable of supporting a single microgravity experiment and all launch services to fly the minilab to the space station in spring/summer 2018 and return it to Earth. An experiment design competition in each community — engaging typically 300+ students — allows student teams to design and propose real experiments vying for their community′s reserved mini-lab.

Content resources for teachers and students support foundational instruction on science in microgravity and experimental design. Additional SSEP programming uses the experiment design competition to engage the community in embracing a learning-community model for STEM education.

This competition is open to students in grades 5-12 and college. Informal education groups and organizations also are encouraged to participate. Interested communities must inquire about the program no later than April 28, 2017. The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education is available to help interested communities in the U.S. secure the needed funding.

To learn more about this opportunity, visit the “SSEP Mission 12 to International Space Station” National Announcement of Opportunity at http://ssep.ncesse.org/2017/03/new-flight-opportunity-for-school-districts-announcing-student-spaceflight-experiments-program-ssep-mission-12-to-the-international-space-station-starting-september-2017/.

SSEP is enabled through a strategic partnership with DreamUp PBC and NanoRacks LLC working with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the use of the International Space Station as a national laboratory. The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (http://www.iss-casis.org/) is a national partner of SSEP. To view a list of all SSEP national partners, visit http://ssep.ncesse.org/national-partners/.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please email SSEP National Program Director Jeff Goldstein at jeffgoldstein@ncesse.org.


NASA Fundamental Physics Workshop 2017

The NASA Fundamental Physics Workshop 2017 will be held May 31-June 2, 2017, in Santa Barbara, California.

The workshop will provide a forum for NASA fundamental physics investigators to present results and discuss research ideas for future space experimentation with interested international and U.S. colleagues. Topic areas include atomic and molecular physics; fundamental forces and symmetries; dusty plasma physics; and condensed matter physics.

All interested scientists and researchers are invited to participate. The participation of the current NASA-funded investigators is strongly encouraged and kindly requested.

The deadline to register to attend the workshop is May 17, 2017. For more information and to register to attend, visit http://icpi.nasaprs.com/fpw2017.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Renee Atkins at ratkins@nasaprs.com.


Educator Workshop: The Little Blue Dot — Earth Science for Middle School Teachers

Are you a highly motivated middle school teacher who wants to increase your knowledge of Earth science? Sign up today to attend “The Little Blue Dot — Earth Science for Middle School Teachers” workshop. Sponsored by the Texas Space Grant Consortium, this workshop will take place June 12-15, 2017, at the University of Texas in Austin.

Workshop attendees will learn about hands-on activities designed to support the Earth science standards in grades 6-8. NASA scientists and engineers will share their expertise and Earth science research. Participants will earn 24 hours of professional development credit in Earth science.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/earth-science-workshop/.

Please direct questions about the workshop to Margaret Baguio at baguio@csr.utexas.edu.


New Lesson Plans Available on NASA/4-H Expeditionary Skills Website

Find out what astronaut Victor Glover has to say about self-care and team-care. NASA Education’s STEM on Station and 4-H announce the third learning module release for Expeditionary Skills for Life, a curriculum modeled after the soft skills astronauts work to develop as they prepare to live and work together on the International Space Station. Expeditionary skills include self-care and team-care; cultural competency; leadership and followership; teamwork; and communication. Each skill-focused learning module includes STEM-based activities along with a video message from an astronaut or astronaut trainer explaining how the skill is used at NASA and why it is important to a successful STEM career. The self-care/team-care video features Victor Glover as he shares a personal story.

The release of Expeditionary Skills for Life aligns with the spaceflight of astronaut Peggy Whitson, a former 4-H member. Whitson helped develop the expeditionary skills courses used during astronaut candidate training.

The lesson plans and videos will be used in 4-H clubs and camps throughout the U.S. and are available publicly at www.nasa.gov/education/4H.

The 4-H Youth Development Program is the youth outreach program from the land-grant universities’ Cooperative Extension Services and the United States Department of Agriculture.

Please direct questions about these resources to Kelly McCormick at Kelly.McCormick-1@nasa.gov.

 


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate — Early Career Faculty Opportunity

NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate seeks proposals from accredited U.S. universities on behalf of faculty members early in their careers to conduct space technology research of high priority to NASA. NASA is seeking proposals that plan to pursue innovative, early-stage space technology research in the topic areas specifically enumerated in the solicitation.

Only accredited U.S. universities are eligible to submit proposals on behalf of their outstanding new faculty members who intend to develop academic careers related to space technology. The proposed research must be led by a single, eligible principal investigator. The PI must be an untenured assistant professor on the tenure track at the sponsoring U.S. university at the time of award. The PI must be a U.S. citizen or have lawful status of permanent residency. The PI must be the primary researcher on the effort; co-investigators are not permitted. Collaborators (other than NASA civil servants/JPL) are permitted. See the solicitation for complete requirements regarding eligibility and for definitions and restrictions regarding collaborators.

Proposals are due on or before March 31, 2017.

For complete details and proposal procedures, visit http://go.nasa.gov/2l86ywA.

Questions concerning this opportunity may be directed to hq-ecf-call@mail.nasa.gov.


Exploration of the Moon and Asteroids by Secondary Students (ExMASS) High School Research Program

NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, and the Center for Lunar Science and Exploration at the Lunar and Planetary Institute are looking for 10 teams of motivated high school students and their teachers to participate in a national standards-based lunar/asteroid research program for the 2017-2018 academic year.

Supervised by their teacher and aided by a scientist advisor, participants undertake student-led open-inquiry research projects that engage them in the process of science and support the goals of the NASA Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute. At the end of the year, four teams compete for a chance to present their research at the Exploration Science Forum held at NASA’s Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, California, in July 2018.

Participation in the ExMASS program is free. Interested teachers must submit an application. Applications are due March 31, 2017.

For more information and to apply for the ExMASS program, visit http://www.lpi.usra.edu/exploration/education/hsResearch/.

Please direct questions about the ExMASS program to Andy Shaner at shaner@lpi.usra.edu.


Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘Making STEM Magic’ Program

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is presenting a series of free education events called “Making STEM Magic.” This new program introduces young visitors to engineering in a fun and creative way. Participants learn by doing. Each challenge involves designing, building and testing a prototype. Each month, a new theme will be introduced with a new problem to solve.

Events are scheduled each Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. ET at the National Air and Space Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia. The events are free and open to the public.

In the Heat of the Moment: Space Capsules
Each Saturday in April 2017
Imagine an astronaut hurtling toward Earth in a space capsule at tremendous speeds. In this challenge, participants will design a heat shield to keep the astronaut cool from the heat of re-entry.

Blast Off!: Propulsion
Each Saturday in May 2017
It really is rocket science. Try your hand at designing a rocket and staying on target.

Red Rover: Mission to Mars
Each Saturday in June 2017
Did you know that rovers are robotic ambassadors? Learn more about NASA’s mobile labs and construct your own rolling rover.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s “Making STEM Magic” program, visit https://airandspace.si.edu/visit/events/stem-magic.

Please direct questions about this series of events to the Visitor Service line at 703-572-4118.


NASA and the American Historical Society Seek Applicants for Fellowships in Aerospace History

The Fellowships in Aerospace History are offered annually by NASA to support significant scholarly research projects in aerospace history. These fellowships grant the opportunity to engage in significant and sustained advanced research in all aspects of the history of aerospace from the earliest human interest in flight to the present, including cultural and intellectual history, economic history, history of law and public policy, and the history of science, engineering, and management.

NASA provides funds to the American Historical Association, the History of Science Society, and the Society for the History of Technology to allow each association to award a fellowship. These include the Fellowship in Aerospace History, the Fellowship in the History of Space Technology and the Fellowship in the History of Space Science.

The fellowship term is for a period of at least six months, but not more than nine months, and should commence no later than Nov. 15, 2017. The fellow will be expected to devote the term entirely to the proposed research project. Each fellowship carries a stipend of $21,250, which includes travel expenses.

Applicants must possess a PhD in history or in a closely related field, or be enrolled as a student (having completed all coursework) in a doctoral degree-granting program.

Application materials are due April 1, 2017. Applications will be entered into consideration for all three fellowships.

For more information and complete application process details, visit https://apply.interfolio.com/40406.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to awards@historians.org.


2017 Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching

The National Science Foundation currently is accepting nominations and applications for the Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching program. PAEMST is the highest recognition that a teacher of K-12 mathematics or science (including computer science) may receive for outstanding teaching in the United States. Since 1983, more than 4,500 teachers have been recognized for their contributions to mathematics and science education. Awardees serve as models for their colleagues, inspiration to their communities, and leaders in the improvement of mathematics and science education. Up to 108 awardees may be recognized each year.

Presidential awardees receive a certificate signed by the President of the United States; a trip to Washington, D.C., to attend a series of recognition events and professional development opportunities; and a $10,000 award from the National Science Foundation. The National Science Foundation administers PAEMST on the behalf of The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.

The PAEMST program is open to outstanding mathematics and science teachers (including computer science teachers) in the 50 states and the four U.S. jurisdictions (Washington, D.C.; Puerto Rico; Department of Defense education activity schools; and the U.S. territories as a group). Anyone — principals, teachers, parents, students or members of the public — may nominate a teacher by completing the nomination form available on the PAEMST website. Teachers also may apply directly. Teachers from groups underrepresented in STEM teaching and learning are encouraged to apply.

The nomination deadline for secondary school teachers (grades 7-12) is April 1, 2017. Primary school teachers (grades K-6) are eligible to apply in 2018.

For more information, visit http://www.paemst.org/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to info@paemst.org.


2017 NASA STEM Enhancement in Earth and Space Science Internship

STEM Enhancement in Earth and Space Science, or SEES, is a nationally competitive summer intern program for students in grades 10 and 11. NASA, the Texas Space Grant Consortium and The University of Texas at Austin Center for Space Research, or UT/CSR, have joined forces to provide this opportunity for high school students to increase their understanding of and interest in STEM careers.

Scientists and engineers at UT/CSR are conducting NASA-supported research in astronomy, remote sensing and space geodetic techniques to help understand Earth systems, natural hazards and climate science. The SEES project provides selected students with exposure to Earth and space research. Participants will learn how to interpret NASA satellite data while working with scientists and engineers in their chosen area of work.

The summer 2017 internship requires students to complete distance learning activities by July 15 in preparation for the on-site in Austin, Texas, July 17-29. Housing, transportation and meals will be provided. Students are selected on the basis of their academic records, written application that includes essay questions, and interest in STEM.

Applications are due April 4, 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.csr.utexas.edu/internship/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to Margaret Baguio at baguio@csr.utexas.edu.


NASA Solar Eclipse Workshops at Marshall Space Flight Center

On Aug. 21, 2017, the United States will experience a solar eclipse. This celestial event will provide a golden opportunity to engage and educate diverse audiences, and NASA has the resources to help. Join the Educator Resource Center at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, for a series of grade-level specific educator workshops to learn about safety tips, hands-on activities, resources and more!

April 4, 2017, 4-6 p.m. CDT: Educators of Grades K-2
April 13, 2017, 4-6 p.m. CDT: Educators of Grades 3-5
April 18, 2017, 4-6 p.m. CDT: Educators of Grades 6-8
May 6, 2017, 9-11 a.m. CDT: Educators of Grades K-12
June 1, 2017, 9-11 a.m. CDT: Educators of Grades K-12

For full event details and registration information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/solar_eclipse_workshop2017.pdf.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Maria Chambers at maria.a.chambers@nasa.gov.


2017 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online

The Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, named after the founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and presented by JPL’s Office of Communication and Education, shares the excitement of the space program’s missions, instruments and other technologies.

Lectures take place twice per month, on consecutive Thursdays and Fridays. The Thursday lectures take place in JPL’s Theodore von Kármán Auditorium, and Friday lectures take place at Pasadena City College’s Vosloh Forum. Both start at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT). Admission and parking are free for all lectures. No reservations are required, but seating is limited. The Thursday evening lectures are streamed live for viewing online. Archives of past lectures are also available online.

Next Lecture in the Series:

Harnessing the Sun’s Light to Explore Our Planet and Universe
Event Date:
April 6 and April 7, 2017, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2017&month=4
Spectral mapping, a type of remote sensing that uses reflected sunlight to produce imagery of the chemical composition of planetary surfaces, is useful when studying Earth and other planetary bodies. Join research systems engineer Mark Helminger for a discussion about the science behind measuring spectra of reflected sunlight and the phenomena that make spectral remote sensing possible.

For more information about the Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, including a complete list of upcoming lectures, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.php.

Questions about this series should be directed to http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php.


Summer Institute — Liftoff 2017: Starry Night

Registration is now open for the 2017 LiftOff Summer Institute, sponsored by NASA’s Texas Space Grant Consortium. This weeklong professional development training for teachers will be held June 26-30, 2017, at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. This competitive aerospace workshop emphasizes STEM learning experiences through speakers, hands-on activities and field investigations.

The theme for this year’s institute is “Starry Night.” The event will focus on NASA missions studying our sun and the solar system to unravel mysteries about their origin and evolution. The total solar eclipse of 2017 will be highlighted.

Attendees must be U.S. citizens currently employed as classroom teachers of grades 4-12 with at least one year teaching experience prior to the institute. Texas Space Grant pays all expenses for any selected Texas teacher. Other Space Grant Consortia fund teachers from their states.

Applications are due April 14, 2017.

For more information and to access the online application, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/liftoff/.

If you have questions about the 2017 LiftOff Summer Institute, please email your inquiries to Margaret Baguio at baguio@tsgc.utexas.edu.


Launch Opportunity: RockSat-XN Program

The RockSat-XN program is a new partnership between NASA and Andoya Space Center designed to give students access to space at a new launch site as part of the Grand Challenge Initiative. The internationally organized Grand Challenge Initiative is composed of seven rockets that will launch in December 2018 and January 2019 to conduct research on cusp space physics. One of these rockets is the G-CHASER student rocket, which will be flown as part of a new RockSat program called RockSat-XN (RockSat-X Norway). The G-CHASER rocket will launch in early January 2019 from Andoya Space Center in Norway.

(The original March 14 deadline to submit a notice of intent to fly has been extended. Also, a project workshop to be held in May 2017 in Norway has been canceled. Attendance at the workshop is no longer a requirement for participation.)

The RockSat-XN program provides hands-on experiences to students and faculty advisors to equip them to support the future technical workforce of the United States and other participating countries. The program also can help students and faculty advisors become principal investigators on future science missions of NASA or other institutions.

Student teams are invited to submit an intent-to-fly form before April 14, 2017.

To learn more about RockSat-XN, visit http://spacegrant.colorado.edu/national-programs/rocksat-xn.

Questions about the RockSat-XN program should be directed to rocksatx@gmail.com.


Host a Real-Time Conversation With Astronauts Aboard the International Space Station

ARISS-US is accepting proposals from U.S. schools, museums, science centers and community youth organizations (working individually or together) to host an Amateur Radio on the International Space Station, or ARISS, radio contact with an orbiting space station crew member between Jan. 1 and June 30, 2018. Proposals are due April 15, 2017.

ARISS is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed education plan. Students can learn about satellite communications, wireless technology, science research conducted on the space station, working conditions in space, radio science, and any related STEM subject. Students learn to use amateur radio to talk directly to an astronaut to ask their STEM-related questions. ARISS will help educational organizations locate amateur radio groups who can assist with equipment for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for students. Exact dates for the 10-minute radio contact are determined by crew scheduling and space station orbits.

For proposal information and more details such as expectations, proposal guidelines and proposal forms, visit http://www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.

Please email questions about this opportunity to ariss@arrl.org.

ARISS-US is offered through a partnership between NASA, the American Radio Relay League, and the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation. ARISS was created and is managed by an international working group.


2018 eXploration Habitat Academic Innovation Challenge

NASA is seeking university teams to develop innovative design solutions for deep-space human exploration systems in the 2018 eXploration Systems and Habitation Academic Innovation Challenge. NASA’s Advanced Exploration Systems Division sponsors the X-Hab Challenge as part of its core function to develop foundational technologies and high-priority capabilities that are the building blocks for future human space missions. Topic areas for this year’s challenge include 3-D printing of biologic materials, long-term hygiene, water condensation, replacement power systems and a Mars habitat commonality.

Working with the National Space Grant Foundation, NASA’s Advanced Exploration Systems Division and Space Life and Physical Sciences Division will offer multiple X-Hab 2018 awards of $20,000 to $30,000. These awards will allow winning teams to design and produce studies or functional products that will increase knowledge and foster risk reduction for space exploration capabilities. Awardees will follow a tailored systems-engineering process with projects being completed in the May 2018 timeframe.

Proposals will be accepted from university faculty who are U.S. citizens and who currently teach at an accredited university in the U.S. Eligible educators must be teaching a senior or graduate engineering design, industrial design or architecture curriculum that is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.

Proposals are due April 28, 2017.

For more information about the challenge and how to submit a proposal, visit http://spacegrant.org/xhab/.

To learn about past NASA X-Hab projects, visit https://www.nasa.gov/exploration/technology/deep_space_habitat/xhab/.

Please email questions about the X-Hab Challenge to xhab@spacegrant.org.


2017 Columbia Crew Memorial Undergraduate Scholarships

The Texas Space Grant Consortium and the Aviation and Space Foundation of Texas, in partnership with NASA, are offering undergraduate scholarships of $1,500 in memory of the Space Shuttle Columbia astronauts. These seven men and women made the ultimate sacrifice to expand the exploration of space and our knowledge of the world that we live in.

These scholarships are intended to recognize high-quality students and encourage their consideration of graduate studies in science, technology, engineering and mathematics that would ultimately lead to careers in STEM-related fields. The scholarships stress excellence in academics, participation in STEM education and research projects, and the exhibition of leadership qualities.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens and registered for at least a half-time course load at a Texas Space Grant Consortium institution. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 28, 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/grants/scholars_announcement.html. Please email any questions about this opportunity to scholarships@tsgc.utexas.edu.


2017 Texas Space Grant Consortium STEM Educator Scholarships

The Texas Space Grant Consortium’s Educator STEM Scholarship Program provides $1,500 scholarships to eligible teachers enrolled in master’s programs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens who hold a bachelor’s degree and are enrolled in a master’s program at a Texas Space Grant Consortium institution. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 28, 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/edu_stem/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to scholarships@tsgc.utexas.edu.


2017-2018 Texas Space Grant Consortium Graduate Fellowships

Texas Space Grant Consortium Fellowships encourage graduate study in the fields of space science and engineering. Interdisciplinary and integrated work experience are emphasized.

Each $5,000 award supplements half-time graduate support (or fellowship) provided by a consortium institution. The fellowship award is good for one year. Each fellowship may be renewed for a maximum of three years, provided the recipient has spent no more than two of those years as a master’s candidate.

Applicants must be registered for full-time study in a graduate program at one or more of the Texas Space Grant Consortium institutions and must be promised financial support at that institution. Applicants must also be U.S. citizens. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

The deadline for submitting applications is April 28, 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/grants/fellows_announcement.html. Please email any questions about this opportunity to fellowships@tsgc.utexas.edu.


Mars Survival Kit: Lessons and Activities to Guide Your Exploration of Mars!

NASA is embarking on a journey to Mars! Are your students ready to join in the adventure? Spark excitement in your classroom with the Mars Survival Kit.

The Mars Survival Kit is a collection of educational activities for students in grades K-12. Each educational activity includes a brief description, as well as information about how the activities and lessons align to the Next Generation Science Standards.

Start your classroom’s journey to Mars at http://go.nasa.gov/1NnZ0Rg.

To learn more about NASA’s Journey to Mars, visit http://www.nasa.gov/topics/journeytomars/index.html.


Get Ready for the 2017 Solar Eclipse With NASA Resources

On Aug. 21, 2017, the United States will experience a solar eclipse! This celestial event will provide a golden opportunity to engage and educate diverse audiences, and NASA has the resources to help.

Along a path 60 to 70 miles wide stretching from Oregon to South Carolina, observers will be able to see a total solar eclipse. Others across North America will see a partial eclipse. The event will happen around lunch time across the country. For an interactive map with timing information along the path of the eclipse, visit http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEgoogle/SEgoogle2001/SE2017Aug21Tgoogle.html.

Visit the following websites to find additional information and resources, including:
— Tips for safely viewing the solar eclipse.
— Recorded interviews with NASA scientists, mission specialists and eclipse path communities.
— Topical online eclipse videos, featuring a variety of STEM and cultural topics.
— Social media community development and networking.
— Mobile educational eclipse applications.
— Public challenges and engagement activities.
— 2-D and 3-D printing exercises for K-16 students.
— Citizen science campaigns in partnership with NASA mission observations.
— Adjunct activities and educational resources.
— Live streaming of observations and programming.

Total Eclipse 2017 — Through the Eyes of NASA
http://eclipse2017.nasa.gov

Eclipses and Transits
http://www.nasa.gov/eclipse

Watch “The Solar Eclipse 2017 PREVIEW Show” with NASA EDGE.
https://youtu.be/6DDICymjhg0


Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design, or STEAMD; or activities culturally relevant to or focused on populations underrepresented in STEM careers, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or nonreimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA announcement.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Eduation: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express Message — March 23, 2017

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: March 23, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT

Mars Education Symposium and Field Trip — NASA’s Search for Habitable Environments: Instilling Curiosity Into Student Learning Through Observation and Critical Thinking
Audience: Educators of Grades 5 through College; Informal Educators
Application Deadline: June 1, 2017 (Please Note: This trip may fill before the deadline.)
Symposium Dates: June 19-23, 2017

New NASA eClips™ Videos Available
Audience: All Educators and Students

Infiniscope Launches First Digital Learning Experience — Where are the small worlds?
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School, and Informal Educators of Grades 5-12


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Celebrate Women’s History Month With a Series of Webcast Events From NASA’s Digital Learning Network
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: March 23, 2017, 2 p.m. EDT

Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

Celebrate Women’s History Month: Download New NASA Women of Color Lithograph
Audience: All Educators and Students

Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘Making STEM Magic’ Program
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: March 25, 2017, at 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. EST

Education Webcast Series — STEM @ NASA Goddard: Women’s History Month
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: March 29, 2017, at 1 p.m. EST

Call for Papers: 2017 International Space Station Research and Development Conference
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Abstract Submission Deadline: March 24, 2017

NASA/Applied Physics Laboratory Summer Internship 2017
Audience: Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Application Deadline: March 26, 2017

Celebrate Solar Week — Spring 2017
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-9, Informal Educators
Event Dates: March 27-31, 2017

NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate — Early Career Faculty Opportunity
Audience: Early Career Faculty Members at Accredited U.S. Universities
Proposal Deadline: March 31, 2017

Exploration of the Moon and Asteroids by Secondary Students (ExMASS) High School Research Program
Audience: Educators of Grades 9-12
Application Deadline: March 31, 2017
Program Dates: September 2017 – April 2018

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

NASA and the American Historical Society Seek Applicants for Fellowships in Aerospace History
Audience: Recent Recipients of the Ph.D. in History or a Closely Related Field, and Students Pursuing Doctoral Degrees in Those Fields
Application Deadline: April 1, 2017

2017 Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching
Audience: 7-12 Educators
Nomination Deadline: April 1, 2017

2017 NASA STEM Enhancement in Earth and Space Science Internship
Audience: Current High School Sophomores and Juniors
Application Deadline: April 4, 2017

NASA Solar Eclipse Workshops at Marshall Space Flight Center
Audience: K-12 Educators
Next Workshop Date: April 4, 2017, 4-6 p.m. CDT

Summer Institute — Liftoff 2017: Starry Night
Audience: Educators of Grades 4-12
Application Deadline: April 14, 2017
Institute Dates: June 26-30, 2017

Get Ready for the 2017 Solar Eclipse With NASA Resources
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Aug. 21, 2017

Search for Gravitational Waves With ‘Gravity Spy’ Citizen Science Project
Audience: All Educators and Students
Project Timeframe: Ongoing

NASA Seeks Creative Arts Inspired by Cassini’s Mission to Saturn
Audience: All Educators and Students Ages 13 and Older

Create Art Inspired by NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope
Audience: All Educators and Students

Be a Citizen Scientist With the ‘Aurorasaurus’ Project
Audience: All Educators and Students
Project Timeframe: Ongoing

Help NASA Study Mars — Planet Four: Terrains
Audience: All Educators and Students
Project Timeframe: Ongoing

Free “NASA’s Journey to Mars” Planetarium/Dome Show
Audience: All Formal and Informal Educators

Be a Citizen Earth Scientist With the ‘GLOBE Observer’ App
Audience: All Educators and Students

NASA Invites You to #SpotHubble
Audience: All Educators and Students

Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students and Higher Education Institutions


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Earth Right Now: From Earth to the Moon
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-12
Event Date: March 23, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT
Earth is influenced by our moon. Humankind has always observed and asked questions about the moon. NASA has studied our moon for almost 60 years and has sent humans there. Explore that technological accomplishment and the Earth/moon relationship by integrating NASA missions, online resources and STEM classroom lessons. Experience some real “classroom lunacy.” Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/229609

Earth Right Now: NASA Satellite Missions GPM and SMAP
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School, and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: March 27, 2017, at 4 p.m. EDT
Join our special guest speakers at NASA to learn about the Global Precipitation Mission, or GPM, and Soil Moisture Active Passive, or SMAP, mission. Participants will explore science content, teachable activities, and resource suggestions for use within educational programs. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/209359

Earth Right Now: Elementary GLOBE — Using Picture Books to Initiate STEAM PBL
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-5
Event Date: March 27, 2017, at 5 p.m. EDT
Explore science-based storybooks that introduce students to key concepts in water, soil, clouds, seasons, aerosols, climate and Earth system studies. The Elementary GLOBE program explores classroom learning activities complementing the science content covered in each storybook. The activities are designed to further engage students in GLOBE’s seven investigation areas. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/218043

Earth Right Now: Looking at Satellite Images
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-10
Event Date: March 28, 2017, at 4 p.m. EDT
Use NASA resources to practice exploring the world in spatial terms. This webinar will explore how to use maps and other imagery to acquire, process and report information from a spatial perspective. Students will examine maps at different scales and make observations about the amount of detail they can see. Students then can learn to compare satellite images with maps and use satellite images to measure and map changing land use. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/218054

Earth Right Now: Space Weather
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: March 28, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Participants will learn about ways space weather and radiation impact Earth, as well their effects on planning for space travel and the journey to Mars. Participants also will learn about current research taking place at NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/229952

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


Mars Education Symposium and Field Trip — NASA’s Search for Habitable Environments: Instilling Curiosity Into Student Learning Through Observation and Critical Thinking

How do scientists search for habitable environments beyond Earth? What makes an environment habitable? Are the criteria for life the same or different beyond Earth? The science of astrobiology is at the forefront addressing these types of challenging questions, including “Where can life exist?”

Currently, NASA’s Curiosity rover is exploring Gale Crater on Mars to investigate a site with an interesting history that could include habitability! Join Mars rover scientists as they lead a five-day interdisciplinary, immersive field trip for educators to explore areas on Earth similar to environments on Mars. Participants will learn how to teach students about how essential biology, geology and chemistry are to the fascinating search for life elsewhere.

Hosted by NASA and Arizona State University, the symposium will take place June 19-23, 2017. The experience will start and finish at the Arizona State University campus in Tempe, Arizona. Participants will be responsible for lodging, meals, and transportation to and from Arizona State University. Transportation between campus and the field trip sites will be provided. Some hiking will be required.

Participants will be trained using lessons designed and aligned to Next-Generation Science Standards and will receive a certificate after completing 45 professional development hours.

Space is limited to 30 participants. Applications are due June 1, 2017. (Please Note: This trip may fill before the deadline.)

For more information, visit https://marsed.mars.asu.edu/FT2017.

Please direct questions about the symposium to Sheri Klug Boonstra at sklug@asu.edu or call 480-215-0410.


New NASA eClips™ Videos Available

Two new NASA eClips™ videos have been released! NASA eClips™ are short, relevant educational video segments. These videos inspire and engage students, helping them see real-world connections.

Launchpad: Engineering Design to Support Scientific Discovery (Grades 9-12)
Engineering design and technology development support scientific discovery. Learn about the roles engineers and scientists play when working together on NASA missions like the James Webb Space Telescope. See how science and engineering take turns pushing each other to move exploration forward.
https://nasaeclips.arc.nasa.gov/playlists/launchpad?v=launchpad-engineering-design-to-support-scientific-discovery

Real World: Citizen Science (Grades 6-8)
What are citizen scientists? Why is their work so important to NASA? Join Dr. Michelle Thaller as she explains how the public, using scientific protocols, careful observations and accurate measurements, can help NASA make exciting new discoveries. Find out how you can be a citizen scientist today.
https://nasaeclips.arc.nasa.gov/playlists/realworld?v=real-world-citizen-science

To learn more about NASA eClips, visit https://nasaeclips.arc.nasa.gov/.

Follow NASA eClips on Facebook and Twitter!


Infiniscope Launches First Digital Learning Experience — Where are the small worlds?

Join the growing group of formal and informal educators discovering Infiniscope’s first digital-by-design learning experience titled “Where are the small worlds?” Developed for NASA by Arizona State University, this learning experience is a standards-aligned, innovative, game-like exploration of the solar system using real NASA data and the relative motion of objects in the solar system.

In this experience, learners explore the view of our solar system from the perspective of the sun and collect data on small worlds. Learners observe the motion of different worlds to determine their location in the solar system, then launch probes to search these small worlds to find the hidden caches and collect astrocoins.

Go to https://infiniscope.education/lesson/where-are-the-small-worlds/ to explore this experience and the educator resources associated with it. See how you can use this interactive, Web-based learning experience to engage learners in the next generation of learning. Where are the small worlds? Can you find them all?

For more information, visit https://infiniscope.education/.

Questions should be directed to Jessica Swann at jlswann@asu.edu or Joe Tamer at Ajoseph.Tamer@asu.edu.

 


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Celebrate Women’s History Month With a Series of Webcast Events From NASA’s Digital Learning Network

NASA’s Digital Learning Network will be celebrating Women’s History Month all throughout the month of March by featuring some of the amazing women that work at NASA. Each 45-minute program will feature a different female lead at the agency and how they started their career with NASA.

March 23, 2017, at 2 p.m. EDT — Erica Alston — Atmospheric Scientist from NASA’s Langley Research Center
March 28, 2017, at 2 p.m. EDT — Kaitlin Liles — Thermal Engineer from NASA’s Langley Research Center

The events will be livestreamed for all schools to watch. For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln/virtual-visit.

To learn about other Digital Learning Network events, visit http://www.nasa.gov/dln.


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


Celebrate Women’s History Month: Download New NASA Women of Color Lithograph

Through their accomplishments and dedication to their jobs, women at NASA embody the essence of Women’s History Month. They serve as role models to young women in their pursuit of careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

The new “Women of Color: Pioneers and Innovators” lithograph features administrators, astronauts, pilots and mathematicians who have been or are currently pioneers and innovators in the fields of aeronautics and astronautics. To download this lithograph, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/Women_of_Color_Lithograph.html.

Are you looking for more insight into the innovative work being done by women across NASA? Visit the NASA Women of STEM website to read career profiles, watch videos and more! Check it out at http://www.nasa.gov/education/womenstem.


Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘Making STEM Magic’ Program

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is presenting a series of free education events called “Making STEM Magic.” This new program introduces young visitors to engineering in a fun and creative way. Participants learn by doing. Each challenge involves designing, building and testing a prototype. Each month, a new theme will be introduced with a new problem to solve.

Events are scheduled each Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. ET at the National Air and Space Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia. The events are free and open to the public.

Suit Up!: Working in Space
Each Saturday in March 2017
Space: It is the final frontier, and the most dangerous. Do you want to be an astronaut? Learn how to suit up and protect yourself from the dangers of space.

In the Heat of the Moment: Space Capsules
Each Saturday in April 2017
Imagine an astronaut hurtling toward Earth in a space capsule at tremendous speeds. In this challenge, participants will design a heat shield to keep the astronaut cool from the heat of re-entry.

Blast Off!: Propulsion
Each Saturday in May 2017
It really is rocket science. Try your hand at designing a rocket and staying on target.

Red Rover: Mission to Mars
Each Saturday in June 2017
Did you know that rovers are robotic ambassadors? Learn more about NASA’s mobile labs and construct your own rolling rover.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s “Making STEM Magic” program, visit https://airandspace.si.edu/visit/events/stem-magic.

Please direct questions about this series of events to the Visitor Service line at 703-572-4118.


Education Webcast Series — STEM @ NASA Goddard: Women’s History Month

Join NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in March for “STEM @ NASA Goddard: Women’s History Month.” On Wednesdays at 1 p.m. ET (March 29), the Goddard Office of Education will celebrate Women’s History Month by highlighting women in STEM. Women from GSFC in Greenbelt, Maryland, and Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia will share how they practice science, technology, engineering and mathematics through their research, missions, careers, etc.

The 30-minute programs will be streamed live on UStream, and participants will be able to interact with the guest speakers by submitting questions through email and Twitter.

To view the programs on Ustream, visit http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-gsfc.

For more information or to express interest in participating, please contact Erin McKinley at erin.e.mckinley@nasa.gov.


Call for Papers: 2017 International Space Station Research and Development Conference

The sixth annual International Space Station Research and Development Conference will be held July 17-20, 2017, in Washington, D.C.

NASA, the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space, and the American Astronomical Society are seeking abstracts under the categories of Biology and Medicine; Human Health in Space; Commercialization and Nongovernment Utilization; Physical Sciences and Materials Development; Plant Science; Earth Science and Remote Sensing; Technology Development and Demonstration; Finances, and STEM Education (science, technology, engineering and mathematics). Topics should relate to science, exploration and technology activities (past, present, planned or under development) on the International Space Station.

Both the conference and abstract submittal are open to entrepreneurial, commercial, academic and government agency attendees, both from and outside the United States. Eligible attendees include professionals, young professionals, students and interested parties. The working language for the conference is English. The conference will include plenaries for topics of general interest and technical sessions for focused discussions.

Because of the large number of expected submissions, presenters are encouraged to submit abstracts early. The deadline is March 24, 2017.

For more information about the conference and how to submit an abstract for consideration, visit http://www.issconference.org/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to ISSTechChair@atdl-inc.com.


NASA/Applied Physics Laboratory Summer Internship 2017

The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, or APL, is offering summer projects for students interested in working on NASA missions or space-related research opportunities.

Students participating in the 2017 NASA/APL Internship Program will work at the APL facility in Laurel, Maryland. Students will receive a stipend for the 10-week program, and housing will be provided.

Eligible students include undergraduate rising sophomores through Ph.D. students as of fall 2017. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and have a minimum GPA of 3.0.

Applications are due March 26, 2017.

For more information about the internship and to apply online, visit http://jhuapl.edu/nasaintern/.

Questions about the NASA/APL Internships Program should be emailed to aplnasaintern-web@jhuapl.edu.


Celebrate Solar Week — Spring 2017

Solar Week provides a weeklong series of web-based educational classroom activities and games with a focus on the sun-Earth connection. This spring’s Solar Week activities will take place March 27-31, 2017, and will highlight safe solar viewing and the total solar eclipse happening on Aug. 21, 2017.

Solar Week is ideal for young teens or groups wanting to know more about the solar system, the stars or astronomy in general. Students can learn about solar careers, sunspots, solar energy and solar storms through a series of activities, games and lessons. Many activities are suitable for fun in the computer lab as well. Participants can interact on the online bulletin board with leading scientists at the forefront of sun-Earth research.

To learn more and to register to participate, visit http://www.solarweek.org.

Questions about Solar Week may be emailed to solarweek@solarweek.org.


NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate — Early Career Faculty Opportunity

NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate seeks proposals from accredited U.S. universities on behalf of faculty members early in their careers to conduct space technology research of high priority to NASA. NASA is seeking proposals that plan to pursue innovative, early-stage space technology research in the topic areas specifically enumerated in the solicitation.

Only accredited U.S. universities are eligible to submit proposals on behalf of their outstanding new faculty members who intend to develop academic careers related to space technology. The proposed research must be led by a single, eligible principal investigator. The PI must be an untenured assistant professor on the tenure track at the sponsoring U.S. university at the time of award. The PI must be a U.S. citizen or have lawful status of permanent residency. The PI must be the primary researcher on the effort; co-investigators are not permitted. Collaborators (other than NASA civil servants/JPL) are permitted. See the solicitation for complete requirements regarding eligibility and for definitions and restrictions regarding collaborators.

Proposals are due on or before March 31, 2017.

For complete details and proposal procedures, visit http://go.nasa.gov/2l86ywA.

Questions concerning this opportunity may be directed to hq-ecf-call@mail.nasa.gov.


Exploration of the Moon and Asteroids by Secondary Students (ExMASS) High School Research Program

NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, and the Center for Lunar Science and Exploration at the Lunar and Planetary Institute are looking for 10 teams of motivated high school students and their teachers to participate in a national standards-based lunar/asteroid research program for the 2017-2018 academic year.

Supervised by their teacher and aided by a scientist advisor, participants undertake student-led open-inquiry research projects that engage them in the process of science and support the goals of the NASA Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute. At the end of the year, four teams compete for a chance to present their research at the Exploration Science Forum held at NASA’s Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, California, in July 2018.

Participation in the ExMASS program is free. Interested teachers must submit an application. Applications are due March 31, 2017.

For more information and to apply for the ExMASS program, visit http://www.lpi.usra.edu/exploration/education/hsResearch/.

Please direct questions about the ExMASS program to Andy Shaner at shaner@lpi.usra.edu.


Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites U.S. educational institutions to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets, and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

Nonprofit museums, libraries and planetariums (sponsored through their respective State Agency Surplus Property, or SASP, organization) are also eligible to make requests. Visit the link below for special instructions to request items. To find the contact information for the SASP representative for your area, visit http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/100851.

A nominal shipping fee must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.


NASA and the American Historical Society Seek Applicants for Fellowships in Aerospace History

The Fellowships in Aerospace History are offered annually by NASA to support significant scholarly research projects in aerospace history. These fellowships grant the opportunity to engage in significant and sustained advanced research in all aspects of the history of aerospace from the earliest human interest in flight to the present, including cultural and intellectual history, economic history, history of law and public policy, and the history of science, engineering, and management.

NASA provides funds to the American Historical Association, the History of Science Society, and the Society for the History of Technology to allow each association to award a fellowship. These include the Fellowship in Aerospace History, the Fellowship in the History of Space Technology and the Fellowship in the History of Space Science.

The fellowship term is for a period of at least six months, but not more than nine months, and should commence no later than Nov. 15, 2017. The fellow will be expected to devote the term entirely to the proposed research project. Each fellowship carries a stipend of $21,250, which includes travel expenses.

Applicants must possess a PhD in history or in a closely related field, or be enrolled as a student (having completed all coursework) in a doctoral degree-granting program.

Application materials are due April 1, 2017. Applications will be entered into consideration for all three fellowships.

For more information and complete application process details, visit https://apply.interfolio.com/40406.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to awards@historians.org.


2017 Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching

The National Science Foundation currently is accepting nominations and applications for the Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching program. PAEMST is the highest recognition that a teacher of K-12 mathematics or science (including computer science) may receive for outstanding teaching in the United States. Since 1983, more than 4,500 teachers have been recognized for their contributions to mathematics and science education. Awardees serve as models for their colleagues, inspiration to their communities, and leaders in the improvement of mathematics and science education. Up to 108 awardees may be recognized each year.

Presidential awardees receive a certificate signed by the President of the United States; a trip to Washington, D.C., to attend a series of recognition events and professional development opportunities; and a $10,000 award from the National Science Foundation. The National Science Foundation administers PAEMST on the behalf of The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.

The PAEMST program is open to outstanding mathematics and science teachers (including computer science teachers) in the 50 states and the four U.S. jurisdictions (Washington, D.C.; Puerto Rico; Department of Defense education activity schools; and the U.S. territories as a group). Anyone — principals, teachers, parents, students or members of the public — may nominate a teacher by completing the nomination form available on the PAEMST website. Teachers also may apply directly. Teachers from groups underrepresented in STEM teaching and learning are encouraged to apply.

The nomination deadline for secondary school teachers (grades 7-12) is April 1, 2017. Primary school teachers (grades K-6) are eligible to apply in 2018.

For more information, visit http://www.paemst.org/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to info@paemst.org.


2017 NASA STEM Enhancement in Earth and Space Science Internship

STEM Enhancement in Earth and Space Science, or SEES, is a nationally competitive summer intern program for students in grades 10 and 11. NASA, the Texas Space Grant Consortium and The University of Texas at Austin Center for Space Research, or UT/CSR, have joined forces to provide this opportunity for high school students to increase their understanding of and interest in STEM careers.

Scientists and engineers at UT/CSR are conducting NASA-supported research in astronomy, remote sensing and space geodetic techniques to help understand Earth systems, natural hazards and climate science. The SEES project provides selected students with exposure to Earth and space research. Participants will learn how to interpret NASA satellite data while working with scientists and engineers in their chosen area of work.

The summer 2017 internship requires students to complete distance learning activities by July 15 in preparation for the on-site in Austin, Texas, July 17-29. Housing, transportation and meals will be provided. Students are selected on the basis of their academic records, written application that includes essay questions, and interest in STEM.

Applications are due April 4, 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.csr.utexas.edu/internship/.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to Margaret Baguio at baguio@csr.utexas.edu.


NASA Solar Eclipse Workshops at Marshall Space Flight Center

On Aug. 21, 2017, the United States will experience a solar eclipse. This celestial event will provide a golden opportunity to engage and educate diverse audiences, and NASA has the resources to help. Join the Educator Resource Center at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, for a series of grade-level specific educator workshops to learn about safety tips, hands-on activities, resources and more!

April 4, 2017, 4-6 p.m. CDT: Educators of Grades K-2
April 13, 2017, 4-6 p.m. CDT: Educators of Grades 3-5
April 18, 2017, 4-6 p.m. CDT: Educators of Grades 6-8
May 6, 2017, 9-11 a.m. CDT: Educators of Grades K-12
June 1, 2017, 9-11 a.m. CDT: Educators of Grades K-12

For full event details and registration information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/solar_eclipse_workshop2017.pdf.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Maria Chambers at maria.a.chambers@nasa.gov.


Summer Institute — Liftoff 2017: Starry Night

Registration is now open for the 2017 LiftOff Summer Institute, sponsored by NASA’s Texas Space Grant Consortium. This weeklong professional development training for teachers will be held June 26-30, 2017, at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. This competitive aerospace workshop emphasizes STEM learning experiences through speakers, hands-on activities and field investigations.

The theme for this year’s institute is “Starry Night.” The event will focus on NASA missions studying our sun and the solar system to unravel mysteries about their origin and evolution. The total solar eclipse of 2017 will be highlighted.

Attendees must be U.S. citizens currently employed as classroom teachers of grades 4-12 with at least one year teaching experience prior to the institute. Texas Space Grant pays all expenses for any selected Texas teacher. Other Space Grant Consortia fund teachers from their states.

Applications are due April 14, 2017.

For more information and to access the online application, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/liftoff/.

If you have questions about the 2017 LiftOff Summer Institute, please email your inquiries to Margaret Baguio at baguio@tsgc.utexas.edu.


Get Ready for the 2017 Solar Eclipse With NASA Resources

On Aug. 21, 2017, the United States will experience a solar eclipse! This celestial event will provide a golden opportunity to engage and educate diverse audiences, and NASA has the resources to help.

Along a path 60 to 70 miles wide stretching from Oregon to South Carolina, observers will be able to see a total solar eclipse. Others across North America will see a partial eclipse. The event will happen around lunch time across the country. For an interactive map with timing information along the path of the eclipse, visit http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEgoogle/SEgoogle2001/SE2017Aug21Tgoogle.html.

Visit the following websites to find additional information and resources, including:
— Tips for safely viewing the solar eclipse.
— Recorded interviews with NASA scientists, mission specialists and eclipse path communities.
— Topical online eclipse videos, featuring a variety of STEM and cultural topics.
— Social media community development and networking.
— Mobile educational eclipse applications.
— Public challenges and engagement activities.
— 2-D and 3-D printing exercises for K-16 students.
— Citizen science campaigns in partnership with NASA mission observations.
— Adjunct activities and educational resources.
— Live streaming of observations and programming.

Total Eclipse 2017 — Through the Eyes of NASA
http://eclipse2017.nasa.gov

Eclipses and Transits
http://www.nasa.gov/eclipse

Watch “The Solar Eclipse 2017 PREVIEW Show” with NASA EDGE.
https://youtu.be/6DDICymjhg0


Search for Gravitational Waves With ‘Gravity Spy’ Citizen Science Project

In 1916, Einstein predicted the existence of ripples in spacetime known as gravitational waves. A century later, on Sept. 14, 2015, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory, or LIGO, made the first direct detection of this elusive phenomenon. This discovery is the first of many that will give researchers a whole new way to explore the universe. However, LIGO needs your help!

Being the most sensitive and most complicated gravitational experiment ever created, LIGO is susceptible to many instrumental and environmental noise sources called “glitches.” These glitches are difficult to model using computers, can mimic true astrophysical signals, and generally make LIGO less sensitive to gravitational waves.

Classifying glitches using computers has proven to be an exceedingly difficult task. That’s where the Gravity Spy Zooniverse Citizen Science Project comes in! Human intuition has proven time and time again to be a useful tool in pattern recognition problems such as this. One of the innovations of this project is that citizen scientists and computer algorithms will work in a symbiotic relationship, helping one another to optimally classify and characterize glitches. By selecting the right classification for a given glitch, you will help computers learn to do this classification themselves on much larger datasets. That capability will help scientists determine and eliminate the sources of noise.

For more information and to learn how to participate, visit the “Gravity Spy” website at https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/zooniverse/gravity-spy.

To learn more about the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory and its mission to detect gravitational waves, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2016/nsf-s-ligo-has-detected-gravitational-waves.

Download the “Direct Observation of Gravitational Waves” Educator Guide for activities and background information designed for grades 5-12. https://dcc.ligo.org/LIGO-P1600015/public.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Tyson Littenberg at tyson.b.littenberg@nasa.gov.

“Gravity Spy” is a collaboration between the following entities:
–Northwestern University, led by Scott Coughlin and Michael Zevin with PI Vicky Kalogera and co-PI Aggelos Katsaggelos. Northwestern’s team is composed of a LIGO group in the CIERA astrophysics research center and a machine learning group in the Image and Video Processing Laboratory.
–The Adler Planetarium Zooniverse Team, led by co-PI Laura Trouille.
–Syracuse University, led by co-PI’s Kevin Crowston and Carsten Østerlund.
–California State University at Fullerton, led by co-PI Josh Smith.
–The LIGO Scientific Collaboration, of which NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center and Goddard Space Flight Center are member institutions.

The project is funded by the National Science Foundation.


NASA Seeks Creative Arts Inspired by Cassini’s Mission to Saturn

During nearly two decades in space, Cassini has inspired people on Earth. Cassini has sent home thousands of images of icy moons and resplendent rings. It helped discover erupting water geysers on Enceladus and seas of methane on Titan. It showed us a view of Earth as a blue dot.

Now the mission is moving toward its “Grand Finale,” and in September 2017 it will finally draw to a dramatic end. NASA’s Cassini team would like to know this: How has Cassini inspired you?

Visit the Cassini Inspires website to explore images and more from the mission. Then use inspiration to get creative. Write a poem. Paint a picture. Choreograph a dance. Tell a story. The possibilities are endless!

Share your creation with the NASA Cassini team on the social media platform of your choice, such as Instagram, YouTube, Facebook, Twitter or others. Tag it #CassiniInspires. Or send it directly to cassinimission@jpl.nasa.gov.

To learn more, visit https://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/cassiniinspires/.


Create Art Inspired by NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope

In November 2016, a small group of artists visited NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, to see the James Webb Space Telescope in person for inspiration to create art. They have been busy ever since, producing amazing work that will be presented for exhibit during spring 2017 at the Goddard Visitor Center.

Their offerings include painting, poetry, sculpting, textiles, woodworking, music, silk screening, 3-D design, jewelry, posters, tattooing and letterpress printing.

Though only a few artists were able to physically visit the telescope, the team at GSFC was impressed by the number of talented people who were interested in participating and want to offer more artists a chance to participate virtually.

How can you participate? Browse through the collection of James Webb Space Telescope images and videos and see what inspires you. Create art! (Note: this is not limited to art you can hang on a wall.) Then, share it with NASA on social media with #JWSTArt, or email it to jwst@lists.nasa.gov.

There’s no deadline for submissions.

To find inspiration and learn the full details on how to participate, visit https://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/2017/nasa-invites-you-to-create-james-webb-space-telescope-inspired-art.

Email questions about this opportunity to jwst@lists.nasa.gov.


Be a Citizen Scientist With the ‘Aurorasaurus’ Project

Aurorasaurus is the first and only citizen science project that tracks auroras around the world via online reports, mobile apps and social media.

Aurorasaurus is a citizen science project that gathers real-time data about aurora sightings and sends out notifications to users when the northern or southern lights are likely visible in their area. Registered users get location-based notifications and a real-time monitor of space weather activity. The project also allows users to help verify tweets and search for real sightings. Plus, the website features answers to science and aurora questions.

To learn more, visit http://www.aurorasaurus.org/.

Please direct questions about this project to aurorasaurus.info@gmail.com.

This project receives support from the National Science Foundation and NASA’s Science Mission Directorate.


Help NASA Study Mars — Planet Four: Terrains

Help NASA study exotic landscape features near the south pole of Mars! In this citizen science project, you will view images from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter’s Context Camera. Your input will help scientists identify possible areas for even more detailed examination with the orbiter’s High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment camera. HiRISE can reveal more detail than any other camera ever put into orbit around Mars.

Some of Mars resembles deserts on Earth, but seasonal freezing and thawing of carbon-dioxide ice (known on Earth as “dry ice”) at the Martian poles create some unusual landscape features. There’s a lot of territory to cover, so scientists need your help identifying what and where these features are.

For more information and to learn how to participate, visit the “Planet Four: Terrains” website at https://www.zooniverse.org/#/projects/mschwamb/planet-four-terrains.

To learn more about NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and its mission at the Red Planet, visit http://mars.nasa.gov/mro/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Michelle Viotti at michelle.a.viotti@jpl.nasa.gov.


Free ‘NASA’s Journey to Mars’ Planetarium/Dome Show

Are you looking for ways to prepare your students for STEM-related career opportunities? Do you want to spark their interest in pushing the boundaries of technology and innovation? Right now, NASA’s fleet of Mars robotic explorers is paving the way for human exploration of the solar system in the coming decades. Have your students join NASA in preparing for a monumental journey of a lifetime — to Mars!

“NASA’s Journey to Mars” is a short planetarium presentation that can be used in the educational domes of your school district, as well as local planetariums, to inspire interest in STEM. To learn more, including how you can acquire the show for use in your area, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/journey-of-a-lifetime-mars-education-resources/.

Please direct questions about the “NASA’s Journey to Mars” planetarium/dome show to Elsie Weigel at elsie.weigel@nasa.gov.


Be a Citizen Earth Scientist With the ‘GLOBE Observer’ App

Want to be a citizen Earth scientist? To contribute to NASA’s studies of our home planet, all you need is a smartphone, access to the outdoors, and the “GLOBE Observer” app.

Now available for Apple and Android phones, the app is an initiative of the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment program. For over two decades, GLOBE has enabled schools and students in over 110 countries to investigate their local environment and put their observations in a global context.

To learn more, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2016/nasa-launches-new-citizen-science-opportunity and http://observer.globe.gov.


NASA Invites You to #SpotHubble

Since its launch in 1990, the Hubble Space Telescope has sent back mind-blowing images that not only changed our understanding of our universe, but also changed where we see glimpses of our universe in everyday life.

Hubble is more than a science spacecraft; it’s a cultural phenomenon! Take a moment to think about where you’ve seen the Hubble Space Telescope or Hubble images in your daily life. Maybe you own a textbook with a picture of the telescope on the cover, or you walk by a mural inspired by Hubble images every day on your way to work. Perhaps you’ve even created art based on Hubble images. NASA wants to see the Hubble impact in your life! Share your photos with NASA on Instagram, Twitter, Flickr and Facebook.

Images may be submitted on the following social media platforms:

— Flickr:
Submit your photos to the Spot Hubble Flickr Group.
— Instagram: Use the Instagram app to upload your photo, and in the description include #SpotHubble and #NASAGoddard.
Twitter: Share your image on Twitter and include #SpotHubble in the tweet.
— Facebook: Share your image on Facebook and include #SpotHubble in the post.

Your #SpotHubble image may be shared on NASA Hubble social media accounts!

To learn more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/2016/spothubble.


Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Are you an undergraduate or graduate student seeking opportunities in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)? The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science — in collaboration with the participating agencies in the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on STEM Education (CoSTEM) and the Science.gov Alliance — has launched a search portal for both students and universities to discover federally sponsored STEM education training and funding opportunities.

Student users can search the site for opportunities they can apply to directly, such as research internships and fellowships. Likewise, universities can search the site for federal funding opportunities to establish innovative training programs for undergraduates or graduate students.

Users can search the site through faceted searching capabilities for characteristics such as program type, STEM discipline, institution location, federal sponsor, and eligibility. Or they can search through the open text option.

For programs and opportunities for undergraduates, visit http://stemundergrads.science.gov/.

For graduate programs and opportunities, visit http://stemgradstudents.science.gov/.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Eduation: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

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