NASA Education Express — Jan. 3, 2013

Check out the followingNASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listedbelow.

Free Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series
Audience: All Educators and 9-Higher EducationStudents
Next Lecture Date: Jan. 5, 2013

Call for Abstracts: 64th International Astronautical Congress
Audience: Full-time Graduate Students
Submission Deadline: Feb. 21, 2013

Call for NEXT GEN Plenary: 64th International Astronautical Congress
Audience: Full-time Graduate Students
Submission Deadline: Jan. 6, 2013

2013 NASA and WorcesterPolytechnic Institute Sample Return Robot Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Educators andStudents
Early Bird Registration Deadline: Jan. 7, 2013

Registration Open forthe 20th Annual NASA Great Moonbuggy Race
Audience: 9-12 & Higher Education Educatorsand Students
Registration Deadline for International Teams:Jan. 7, 2013
Registration Deadline for U.S. Teams: Feb. 4,2013

Analyzing Solar Energy Graphs: MY NASADATA Web Seminar
Audience: 9-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Jan. 8, 2013

Teaching FromSpace Office Seeks Educators for MicroGravity eXperience
Audience: K-12 Educators
Proposal Deadline: Jan. 9, 2013

Properties ofLiving Things: Searching for Life on Mars Web Seminar
Audience: 4-8 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Jan. 10, 2013

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Womenin STEM High School Aerospace Scholars
Audience: Female High School Juniors
New Deadline: Jan.10, 2013

National Air and Space Museum SuperScience Saturday Events
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Dates: Monthly through 2013

International Space StationResearch Opportunity for Higher Education Organizations
Audience: Higher Education Community
Deadline to Submit White Papers: Jan. 23, 2013

What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website
Audience: K-6 Educators

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Free Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series

Curious about our nearest star, moon rocks, volcanoesand other wonders of the universe? Come to the Smithsonian’s Stars, a series of10 lectures by Smithsonian researchers who are exploring the sun, the moon,planets, stars, galaxies and the universe. These speakers will sharebehind-the-scenes details about how their research is done and technologiesthat advance new discoveries at the Smithsonian Institution.

Each lecture begins at 5:15 p.m. and is followedby a question-and-answer session. A Discovery Station activity will take placeat 4 p.m. prior to each lecture. Stay after the lecture to visit theobservatory, weather permitting.

Jan. 5, 2013 — Trees in the City
Tree cover is an important element of the urbanenvironment that plays an increasingly larger role in ecosystem processes.Geographer Andrew Johnston will discuss how satellite data is used to makereliable observations about urban tree cover variability, why it matters tourban residents and how these same data are used to map changes in tree cover.

Feb. 2, 2013 — VolcanoBreath
Join Global Volcanism Program Director LizCottrell for a lecture about volcanoes on a global scale. Learn how the gaseouscontents of volcanoes propel their explosions and impact our climate. Hear thelatest about volcanic gas research and explore the latest discoveries about howthe deep Earth is recycling the air we breathe.

Feb. 16, 2013 — Venus:50 Years After Mariner 2
Fifty years ago Mariner 2 flew past Venus, becoming the first space probeto explore another planet. But Venus, our nearest neighbor, still holds manymysteries. Geophysicist Bruce Campbell will discuss what is known about Venus,including how it differs from Earth, and how future explorers may providecrucial clues to understanding this hot, dry world.

For more information about the Smithsonian’sStars Lecture Series and to see a full schedule of upcoming lectures, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/lectures/stars/index.cfm.

Questions about this lecture series should bedirected to the visitor service line at 202-633-1000.

The Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series is madepossible by a grant from NASA.

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Call for Abstracts: 64th International AstronauticalCongress

NASA announces its intent to participate in the 64th InternationalAstronautical Congress, or IAC, and requests that full-time graduate studentsattending U.S. universities or colleges respond to this call for abstracts. TheIAC, which is organized by the International Astronautical Federation, or IAF,the International Academy of Astronautics and the International Institute ofSpace Law, is the largest space-related conference worldwide and selects anaverage of 1,000 scientific papers every year.

The upcoming IAC will be held Sept. 23-27, 2013, in Beijing, China. NASA’sparticipation in this event is an ongoing effort to continue to connect NASAwith the international astronautical and space communities.

The IAC has posted a “Call for Abstracts,” with a submission deadlineof Feb. 21, 2013. NASA plans to alsoannounce a “Call for Abstracts” inviting graduate students to submitabstracts (of no more than 400 words) to participate in the 64th InternationalAstronautical Congress. Abstracts must be submitted to NASA and to the IAF.Details on the NASA “Call for Abstracts” will be distributed by mid-January,with the same submission deadline of Feb.21, 2013. The selected NASA-sponsored students must also be selected by theIAF.

Please visit the IAC website (http://www.iac2013.org/) for additional information about the Congress and toobtain information about the “Call for Abstracts.”

Important IAC Deadlines:

— Abstract submission closes Feb. 21, 2013.
— Paper submission closes Sept. 4, 2013.
— Presentation submission closes Sept. 18, 2013.

Questions about this opportunity should be emailed to Carolyn Knowles at carolyn.knowles-1@nasa.gov.

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Call for NEXT GEN Plenary: 64th InternationalAstronautical Congress

Calling students and young professionals! If you could choose humanity’s nextdestination in space, where would you choose? We want to hear what you thinkshould be the next destination for humans to explore and why your destinationis the best. As today’s 21- to 35-year-olds, you will be the senior engineersand mission managers who will be carrying out and leading the next humanmissions to explore space, and we want your input. Why wait 10 years to beheard? We invite you to share your ideas with space leaders in government,industry and academia at the International Astronautical Congress, or IAC, inBeijing, China, on Sept. 23-27, 2013.

This is a wonderful opportunity for you to address and possiblyinfluence the international space community. We are proposing a plenary eventto hear concrete ideas from 21- to 35-year-olds on what the next destinationsfor human space exploration should be. If approved, this event will take placethe week of Sept. 23-27, 2013, in Beijing, China at the IAC (www.iafastro.com). The plenary participants will engage in a paneldiscussion and interact with the audience while sharing their ideas on thepossible future destinations for human space exploration, including discussingthe benefits, risks and challenges of each location. The plenary will bemoderated in a talk-show fashion, interweaving clips from the panelists’audition videos with questions and comments from the moderator, other panelistsand the audience. The video clips will be used to enhance the audience’sunderstanding of the ideas of the plenary participants. This is an excitingopportunity that you do not want to miss!

Thissounds great!  What do I need to do toparticipate?

Round One: 15 Seconds of Fame!
By Jan. 6, 2013, create a 15-secondvideo telling us why you should be chosen to address the IAC, and post it on https://www.youtube.com. We will only watch/listen for 15 seconds, so be sureto watch the time of your video! Then complete the application at this link.

Round Two: Three Minutes!
The International Astronautical Federation, or IAF, will select the secondround of candidates from those submitting the 15-second videos and notify allentrants by Jan. 22, 2013. Specific details of Round Two requirements will besent to the candidates in the notification. Selected candidates will be askedto create and post a three-minute video on a specified YouTube site by Feb. 22, 2013.

Video Details:
Please record your video in a high-quality audio and video format. If youare selected as a panelist, segments of your videos will be used to promote andduring the plenary. Please limit special effects, scene changes and music. Thevideo is about you, not your video editing skills.

Final Selection:
The IAF will select the finalists from these entries based on theircreativity, efficacy of messages and relevance to the plenary topics. We willbe looking for concrete ideas on what the next destinations for humans toexplore should be and why these destinations are important, as well as yourexpertise in this area.

The IAF will make the final selection of plenaries for the IAC in Beijing theweek of March 18, 2013, and will notify the finalists of its decision by March31, 2013.

Who Will Sponsor Me to Travel toBeijing?
Plenary participants will be responsible for finding a sponsor or sponsors fortheir travel to and accommodations at the IAC.
In addition to the obvioussources of sponsorship — your employer or school, and industry contacts — wewant to share with you some great programs for students and young professionalsthat occur in conjunction with the 2013 Beijing IAC. The following are alldistinct programs related to the IAC but are not directly related to thisplenary opportunity.

— IAF Emerging Space Leaders Grant Programme (Watch for the announcement thismonth at http://www.iafastro.org.)

— Candidates are encouraged to contact the Space Generation Advisory Committee,or SGAC, concerning the plans for the SGAC event prior to the IAC in Beijingand associated sponsorship opportunities. Visit www.spacegeneration.org for more information.

— Students in Europe, Japan and the United States are encouraged to contact theEuropean Space Agency, the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency and NASArespectively to apply to the space agencies’ student programs at the IAC inBeijing.

Questions about this opportunity should be emailed to Carolyn Knowles at carolyn.knowles-1@nasa.gov.

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2013 NASA andWorcester Polytechnic Institute Sample Return Robot Challenge

NASA and the Worcester Polytechnic Institute inWorcester, Mass., are seeking teams to compete in a robot technologydemonstration competition with a potential $1.5 million prize purse.

During the Sample Return Robot Challenge, teamswill compete to demonstrate a robot that can locate and retrieve geologicsamples from a wide and varied terrain without human control. The objective ofthe competition is to encourage innovations in automatic navigation and roboticmanipulator technologies. Innovations stemming from this challenge may improveNASA’s capability to explore a variety of destinations in space, as well asenhance the nation’s robotic technology for use in industries and applicationson Earth.

NASA provides the prize money to the winningteam as part of the agency’s Centennial Challenges competitions, which seekunconventional solutions to problems of interest to the agency and the nation.While NASA provides the prize purse, the competitions are managed by nonprofitorganizations that cover the cost of operations through commercial or privatesponsorships. The competition is planned for June 2013 in Worcester and isanticipated to attract hundreds of competitors from industry and academianationwide.

Early bird registration and fees for thecompetition are due by Jan.7, 2013. Teams wishing to register after this date are subjectto approval by the judging committee.

For more information about the Sample ReturnRobot Challenge and to register online for the competition, visit http://challenge.wpi.edu.

The Centennial Challenges program is part ofNASA’s Space Technology Program, which is innovating, developing, testing andflying hardware for use in NASA’s future missions. NASA’s Space TechnologyProgram and the Centennial Challenges are creating new technological solutionsfor NASA and our nation’s future. For more information about NASA’s CentennialChallenges and the Space
Technology Program, visit https://www.nasa.gov/challenges.

Questions about the Sample Return Robot Challengeshould be sent to challenge@wpi.edu.

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Registration Openfor the 20th Annual NASA Great Moonbuggy Race

Registration is open for the 20th Annual NASAGreat Moonbuggy Race. High school and college students are challenged to designand build a vehicle that addresses a series of engineering problems similar tothose faced by the original lunar-roving vehicle team. Each school may enter upto two teams. International teams are limited to 10 teams per country. The racewill take place April 25-27, 2013, in Huntsville, Ala., at the U.S. Space &Rocket Center.

International teams must register by Jan. 7, 2013. U.S.teams must register by Feb.4, 2013.

For more information about the competition andto register online, visit http://moonbuggy.msfc.nasa.gov/index.html.

International teams with questions about thisevent and registration should email Marilyn Lewis at Marilyn.H.Lewis@nasa.gov. U.S. teamswith questions should contact Diedra Williams at Diedra.A.Williams@nasa.gov.

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Analyzing Solar Energy Graphs: MYNASA DATA Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, theNASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association arehosting a 90-minute Web seminar for educators on Jan 8, 2013, at 6:30 p.m. EST.

Become familiar with the MY NASA DATA activity, “Solar Cell EnergyAvailability From Around the Country.” Compare monthly averages ofdownward radiation in locations around the U.S. and analyze areas whereconditions would be conducive to having solar panels. Access data on the NASALive Access Server as you “journey” around the U.S. to determine the amount ofsolar radiation and analyze overlay plots to compare data from NASA satellites.

This seminar is offered again on March 26, 2013.

For more information and to register online,visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES3/webseminar20.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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Teaching FromSpace Office Seeks Educators for MicroGravity eXperience

NASA’s Teaching From Space Office and the Reduced Gravity Education FlightProgram are seeking applications for teams of K-12 educators to participate inthe MicroGravity eXperience, or Micro GX, project. This project gives studentsand educators across the country the opportunity to work together on anexperiment to be tested aboard a microgravity aircraft. This incredibleopportunity is open to any current K-12 classroom educator in the UnitedStates. Educators must also be U.S. citizens.

Micro GX activities begins with students andeducators developing and proposing a reduced-gravity experiment. Selectededucator teams will receive online professional development on classroomresources for microgravity, collaboration with a NASA mentor and areduced-gravity flight. With combined input from their students and mentor,educator teams will design and fabricate their experiments to be tested andevaluated aboard an aircraft that flies approximately 30 roller-coaster-likeclimbs and dips to produce periods of microgravity and hypergravity, rangingfrom almost zero gravity to 2 g.

Seven teams of four to five educators from asingle school or school district will be selected from this application processto participate in Micro GX. This includes participation in an onlinemicrogravity course, which will begin on Feb. 11, 2013, with a series of Webseminars with NASA personnel to initiate experiment development. The highlightof the online course is to travel to NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston,Texas, and participate in the Reduced Gravity Education Flight Program duringthe week of July 12-20, 2013. During the flight week, educators will fly andperform custom experiments in a reduced-gravity environment. Selected teamsare responsible for all expenses associated with the travel and stay inHouston. The online course continues with activities beyond the flightexperience through Aug. 26, 2013.

Educator teams interested in participating inMicro GX may submit a proposal no later than Jan. 9, 2013. For more information, visithttp://microgravityuniversity.jsc.nasa.gov/tfsor send an email to jsc-rgeducator@nasa.gov.

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Propertiesof Living Things: Searching for Life on Mars Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, theNASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association arehosting a 90-minute Web seminar for educators on Jan. 10, 2013, at 6:30 p.m. EST. This web seminar featurestwo lessons: one on extremophiles and the other on searching for life. Review criteria for determining if something is alive andlearn how students apply the criteria in a hands-on activity. A video will beshown that connects the activity to a NASA mission. Collaborate with otherparticipants about ways of using and adapting the activity. Extensionactivities for students interested in the topic will be provided.

This seminar is offered again on April 18, 2013.

For more information and toregister online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES3/webseminar21.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to the NASA Explorer Schools helpdesk at NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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DEADLINEEXTENDED: Women in STEM High School Aerospace Scholars

Engineer your dream job! The adventure begins in2013. NASA wants you to become part of the workforce of tomorrow as we offerthe opportunity to dream, engineer and WISH. The Women in STEM High SchoolAerospace Scholars, or WISH, project offers a one-of-a-kind experience forfemale high school juniors to jump-start their future by engaging inopportunities relating to science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Participation starts in an online community andculminates with a summer experience at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston,Texas, during the summer of 2013. Get ready to collaborate with girls fromacross the country as you complete online activities, design unique projects,work with NASA personnel and present mission accomplishments. Start your dreamnow!

To be eligible, applicants must be:
— U.S. citizens.
— Female high school juniors during the2012-2013 school year.
— Interested and excited about science,technology, engineering and mathematics.
— Committed to a one-year relationship withNASA’s Johnson Space Center.
— Able to access the Internet and email (athome, school or public library).
— A scholar with a cumulative GPA of 3.25/4.0or higher.

The application deadline has been extended to Jan.10, 2013.

For more information and to download theapplication, visit http://wish.aerospacescholars.org/.

Questions should be directed to JSC-NHAS@mail.nasa.gov.

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National Air and Space MuseumSuper Science Saturday Events

Join the National Air and Space Museum on the second Saturday ofeach month during 2013 for Super Science Saturday at the Steven F. Udvar-HazyCenter in Chantilly, Va. Through demonstrations and hands-on activities,visitors of all ages will become immersed in science, technology, engineeringand mathematics topics related to aviation and space exploration. Each eventtakes place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Eastern Time. Admission is free, and parkingis $15.

Upcoming topics include:

Jan. 12, 2013 — From the Wright Brothers to the Right Stuff
Feb. 9, 2013 — Scientists and Inventors
March 9, 2013 — The Space Shuttle
April 13, 2013 — How Things Fly
May 11, 2013 — Astronomy
June 8, 2013 — Energy
July 13, 2013 — Weather
Aug. 10, 2013 — Helicopters
Sept. 14, 2013 — Living and Working in Space
Oct. 12, 2013 — Balloons and Blimps
Nov. 9, 2013 — The Moon and Beyond
Dec. 14, 2013 — The Wright Brothers

For more information, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/superscience/.

Questions about this series of lectures should be directed to nasmpubliclectures@si.edu.

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International Space StationResearch Opportunity for Higher Education Organizations

Conduct research in space and make new discoveries! The adventure begins in2013. The International Space Station NASA Education Projects Office hasreleased a solicitation for proposals of educational experiments relating toscience, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, that utilize theunique microgravity platform of the space station.

Proposals are being accepted from higher education institutions or consortia oforganizations serving the higher education community. Proposals must align withspace station program research priorities in technology, biology, biotechnologyand physical sciences. Experiment ideas also must address innovative,meaningful and enduring research and technology development activities with STEM-basedcontext.

Whitepapers must be submitted by 4 p.m. CST on Jan. 23, 2013. Full proposals aredue Feb. 20, 2013.

For more information, visit http://tinyurl.com/9wnhgj9.

Questions about this solicitation should be directed to Janejit T. Gensler at Janejit.t.gensler@nasa.gov.

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What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website

Earth is in the lucky position to have a love-hate relationship with its star.We say lucky, because obviously we couldn’t live without it, but at times it’sa little difficult to live with it as well. We call the conditions around ourplanet, outside of its own atmosphere and magnetosphere, space weather, but itdefinitely affects us on Earth, too. It’s a good thing we are learning tounderstand and predict the sun’s tantrums.

Let’s Start Here
“Space Place Live!” is a cartoon talk show where Space Place charactersinterview real NASA scientists and engineers. The latest episode stars MeravOpher, astrophysicist. She studies how stars work, including our star. In thisseven-minute video, we learn about the solar wind, solar flares, theheliosphere and the environment the sun creates for everything in the solarsystem. Dr. Opher also talks about how she got interested in physics and whatelse she likes to do for fun. Check it out at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/space-place-live/#opher.

Space Place en Español
La historia de una extraña noche de tormenta (solar)… tells the story of astrange and (solar) stormy night. Along with a story of the severe solar stormof August 1859, where the Northern Lights were seen as far south as CentralAmerica, “Shields Up!” (¡Escudos arriba!”) is a game in which the player has toprotect Earth-orbiting satellites from the wrath of bad space weather. The gameand article are available in Spanish and English. See http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/sp/shields-up.

Spotlight on All Things Sunny…
Heliophysics, or the physics of the sun, is one of the four major sciencethrusts of NASA’s Science Mission Directorate. (The others are astrophysics,Earth science and the solar system.) On The Space Place, these translate to themenu tabs Space, Sun, Earth, and Solar System.

The sun-Earth connection is so important in understanding our immediateenvironment. The Sun menu (http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/menu/sun)offers activities, games and fun facts about the sun and how it affects Earth.The most comprehensive treatment of this relationship is the animated, narratedstorybook “Super Star Meets the Plucky Planet: Or, how Earth and Sun come tomutual understanding and respect.” It is also available to print and read aloudor have the students read aloud (http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/story-superstar).

For the Classroom
The Gallery of Sun images (http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/gallery-sun)is just for teachers to print and post in the classroom. They have large,simple captions.

For Out of School Time
“Satellite Insight” is an absorbing game for all ages that runs on bothcomputer and iPhone or iPad. It is Tetris-like, where six tile colors representdifferent types of data measured and recorded by the GeostationaryOperational Environmental Satellite – R Series, or GOES-R, satellite.Bonus material explains what each of the tile colors stand for, such as clouds,lightning and solar energy. A lot of them stand for data related to spaceweather. See http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/satellite-insight.

Special Days

Jan. 7, 1610: Galileo discoveredJupiter’s four largest moons.
Explore Jupiter’s big moons in the “Solar System Explorer” game. http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/solar-system-explorer

Jan. 15, 2006: Stardust mission capsulereturned comet samples to Earth.
Learn about comets and how they are different from asteroidswith the Comet vs. Asteroids four-page color brochure. http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/posters/#asteroids

Jan. 31, 1958: Explorer 1 was the firstU.S. satellite launched into orbit.
How do orbits work, anyway? Find out by putting a cannonball into orbit! http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/how-orbits-work

Feb. 19, 1473: Nicolaus Copernicus born.
He thought the sun was the center of the universe. He was wrong. But just whereis the center? Dr. Marc answers in a short podcast. http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/podcasts/#center

Feb. 22: Thinking Day
The “Spitzer” memory game will make you think very hard. http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/spitzer-concentration

Send Feedback
Please let us know your ideas about ways to use The Space Place in yourteaching. Send to info@spaceplace.nasa.gov.

Don’t Forget…
You can find dozens of other ideas and rich resources for theclassroom and out-of-school time at our Parents & Educators page, http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/menu/parents-and-educators.

iPhone and iPad are registered trademarks of Apple Inc.
Tetris is a registered trademark of Tetris Company LLC.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA.For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — Dec. 20, 2012

Check out the followingNASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listedbelow.

National Space Biomedical Research InstituteSummer Internship Program
Audience: Higher Education Educators andStudents
Application Deadline: Dec. 31, 2012

Student Spaceflight Experiments Program –Mission 4 to the International Space Station
Audience: 5-Higher Education Educators and Students
Inquiry Deadline: Dec. 31, 2012

NASA Social Event at Next Landsat Launch
Audience: All Educators and Students 18+ Years Old
Registration Deadline: Noon EST on Jan. 2, 2013

Women in STEM HighSchool Aerospace Scholars
Audience: Female High School Juniors
Deadline: Jan. 3, 2013

Free Smithsonian’s StarsLecture Series
Audience: All Educators and 9-Higher Education Students
Next Lecture Date: Jan. 5, 2013

2013 NASA and WorcesterPolytechnic Institute Sample Return Robot Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Educators andStudents
Early Bird Registration Deadline: Jan. 7, 2013

Registration Open forthe 20th Annual NASA Great Moonbuggy Race
Audience: 9-12 & Higher Education Educatorsand Students
Registration Deadline for International Teams:Jan. 7, 2013
Registration Deadline for U.S. Teams: Feb. 4,2013

Analyzing Solar Energy Graphs: MY NASADATA Web Seminar
Audience: 9-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Jan. 8, 2013

Teaching FromSpace Office Seeks Educators for MicroGravity eXperience
Audience: K-12 Educators
Proposal Deadline: Jan. 9, 2013

International Space Station ResearchOpportunity for Higher Education Organizations
Audience: Higher Education Community
Deadline to Submit White Papers: Jan. 23, 2013

2013 Space Exploration Educators Conference
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Date: Feb. 7-9, 2013

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National Space Biomedical Research InstituteSummer Internship Program

Interns selected for the NSBRI’s summer programjoin ongoing project activities and gain hands-on experience in spacebiomedical research at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas; GlennResearch Center in Cleveland, Ohio; or Ames Research Center in Moffett Field,Calif. The program is open to graduate students, medical students andundergraduate students who have completed their second year of studies.

Applicants are asked to submit a curriculumvitae or resume, a letter of interest, two letters of recommendation, andcollege transcripts. Applicants must be available from May 27 through Aug. 2,2013.The program is open to U.S. citizens.

Applications for the 2013 program are due Dec. 31, 2012.

For more information and to apply online, visit http://www.nsbri.org/summerinternship/.Questions about this opportunity should be directed to info@nsbri.org.

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Student Spaceflight ExperimentsProgram — Mission 4 to the International Space Station

The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education and the ArthurC. Clarke Institute for Space Education, in partnership with NanoRacks LLC,announce a new opportunity for communities across the U.S. and space stationpartner nations. The newest Student Spaceflight Experiments Program, or SSEP,flight opportunity, Mission 4 to the International Space Station, or ISS, givesstudents across a community the ability to design and propose real experimentsto fly in low Earth orbit on the International Space Station.

Each participating community will be provided areal microgravity research mini-laboratory capable of supporting a singlemicrogravity experiment, and all launch services to fly the mini-lab to thespace station in fall 2013 and return it to Earth. An experiment designcompetition in each community — engaging 300+ students — allows student teamsto design and propose real experiments vying for theircommunity’s reserved mini-lab. Content resources for teachers and studentssupport foundational instruction on science in microgravity and experimentaldesign. Additional SSEP programming leverages the experiment design competitionto engage the community, embracing a learning community model for science,technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, education.

This competition is open to students in grades 5-12 and college. Informaleducation groups and organizations are also encouraged to participate.Interested communities must inquire about the program no later than Dec. 31, 2012. The National Center for Earth and SpaceScience Education is available to help interested communities in the U.S.secure the needed funding.

The first two SSEP flight opportunities saw experiments flown on the finalflights of space shuttles Endeavour and Atlantis. These missions engaged 27communities, providing a combined 30,700 students in grades 5-14 theopportunity to participate, 977 student team proposals were received and 27experiments were selected and flown on the shuttles. SSEP Missions 1, 2 and 3to the International Space Station engaged 32 communities, providing 69,100 studentsin grades 5-14 the opportunity to participate, 3,370 student team proposalswere received and 39 experiments were flown to space station on the SpaceXDragon vehicle. The Mission 3 payload of 17 experiments is expected to fly to thespace station in April 2013.

To learn more about this opportunity, visit the SSEP Mission 4 to InternationalSpace Station National Announcement of Opportunity at http://ssep.ncesse.org/2012/11/announcing-student-spaceflight-experiment-program-ssep-mission-4-to-the-international-space-station-for-2013/.

SSEP is a program of the National Center for Earth and Space Science Educationin the U.S., and the Arthur C. Clarke Institute for Space Educationinternationally. It is enabled through a strategic partnership with NanoRacksLLC working with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the utilization ofthe International Space Station as a national laboratory. The
Center for the Advancement of Science in Space  is a National Partner onSSEP.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please email SSEP NationalProgram Director Jeff Goldstein at jeffgoldstein@ncesse.org.

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NASASocial Event at Next Landsat Launch

NASA invites social media followers to a unique two-day NASA Social event onFeb. 10-11, 2013, at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. The event willbring 80 social media users together to witness the launch of the Landsat DataContinuity Mission, a satellite that continues a record-breaking 40 years ofEarth observations.

NASA Socials are in-person meetings with peoplewho engage with the agency through Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and other socialnetworks. Participants will get a behind-the-scenes tour of Vandenberg AirForce Base’s Western Range, including a rare look inside the launch controlcenter, tours of the launchpad and mission control and a visit to Vandenberg’son-base private museum. Participants will also hear first-hand accounts by theLandsat Mission science and engineering teams and meet fellow scienceenthusiasts who are active on social media.

On launch day, NASA Social participants and their friends and families areinvited to a special public viewing area to watch the Landsat launch.

Registration is open until noon EST on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2013. NASA will select 80participants at random from Web registrants. Additional applicants will beplaced on a waiting list. Because of space limitations, those selected will notbe permitted to bring a guest on tours. Each participant must be age 18 orolder.

For more NASA Social and sign up information,visit https://www.nasa.gov/social.

To join and track the conversation online duringthe NASA Socials, follow the hashtags #NASASocial and #Landsat.

To learn more about the Landsat series ofEarth-observing satellites, visit https://www.nasa.gov/Landsat.

Questions about this NASA Social event should bedirected to HQ-Social@mail.nasa.gov.

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Women in STEMHigh School Aerospace Scholars

Engineer your dream job! The adventure begins in2013. NASA wants you to become part of the workforce of tomorrow as we offerthe opportunity to dream, engineer and WISH. The Women in STEM High SchoolAerospace Scholars, or WISH, project offers a one-of-a-kind experience forfemale high school juniors to jump-start their future by engaging inopportunities relating to science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Participation starts in an online community andculminates with a summer experience at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston,Texas, during the summer of 2013. Get ready to collaborate with girls fromacross the country as you complete online activities, design unique projects,work with NASA personnel and present mission accomplishments. Start your dreamnow!

To be eligible, applicants must be:
— U.S. citizens.
— Female high school juniors during the2012-2013 school year.
— Interested and excited about science,technology, engineering and mathematics.
— Committed to a one-year relationship withNASA’s Johnson Space Center.
— Able to access the Internet and email (athome, school or public library).
— A scholar with a cumulative GPA of 3.25/4.0or higher.

The application deadline has been extended to Jan.3, 2013.

For more information and to download theapplication, visit http://wish.aerospacescholars.org/.

Questions should be directed to JSC-NHAS@mail.nasa.gov.

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FreeSmithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series

Curious about our nearest star, moon rocks, volcanoes and other wonders ofthe universe? Come to the Smithsonian’s Stars, a series of 10 lectures bySmithsonian researchers who are exploring the sun, the moon, planets, stars,galaxies and the universe. These speakers will share behind-the-scenes detailsabout how their research is done and technologies that advance new discoveriesat the Smithsonian Institution.

Each lecture begins at 5:15 p.m. and is followedby a question-and-answer session. A Discovery Station activity will take placeat 4 p.m. prior to each lecture. Stay after the lecture to visit theobservatory, weather permitting.

Jan. 5, 2013 — Trees in the City
Tree cover is an important element of the urbanenvironment that plays an increasingly larger role in ecosystem processes.Geographer Andrew Johnston will discuss how satellite data is used to makereliable observations about urban tree cover variability, why it matters tourban residents and how these same data are used to map changes in tree cover.

Feb. 2, 2013 — VolcanoBreath
Join Global Volcanism Program Director LizCottrell for a lecture about volcanoes on a global scale. Learn how the gaseouscontents of volcanoes propel their explosions and impact our climate. Hear thelatest about volcanic gas research and explore the latest discoveries about howthe deep Earth is recycling the air we breathe.

Feb. 16, 2013 — Venus:50 Years After Mariner 2
Fifty years ago Mariner 2 flew past Venus, becoming the first space probeto explore another planet. But Venus, our nearest neighbor, still holds manymysteries. Geophysicist Bruce Campbell will discuss what is known about Venus,including how it differs from Earth, and how future explorers may providecrucial clues to understanding this hot, dry world.

For more information about the Smithsonian’sStars Lecture Series and to see a full schedule of upcoming lectures, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/lectures/stars/index.cfm.

Questions about this lecture series should bedirected to the visitor service line at 202-633-1000.

The Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series is madepossible by a grant from NASA.

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2013 NASA and Worcester Polytechnic InstituteSample Return Robot Challenge

NASA and the Worcester Polytechnic Institute inWorcester, Mass., are seeking teams to compete in a robot technologydemonstration competition with a potential $1.5 million prize purse.

During the Sample Return Robot Challenge, teamswill compete to demonstrate a robot that can locate and retrieve geologic samplesfrom a wide and varied terrain without human control. The objective of thecompetition is to encourage innovations in automatic navigation and roboticmanipulator technologies. Innovations stemming from this challenge may improveNASA’s capability to explore a variety of destinations in space, as well asenhance the nation’s robotic technology for use in industries and applicationson Earth.

NASA provides the prize money to the winningteam as part of the agency’s Centennial Challenges competitions, which seekunconventional solutions to problems of interest to the agency and the nation.While NASA provides the prize purse, the competitions are managed by nonprofitorganizations that cover the cost of operations through commercial or privatesponsorships. The competition is planned for June 2013 in Worcester and isanticipated to attract hundreds of competitors from industry and academianationwide.

Early bird registration and fees for thecompetition are due by Jan.7, 2013. Teams wishing to register after this date are subjectto approval by the judging committee.

For more information about the Sample ReturnRobot Challenge and to register online for the competition, visit http://challenge.wpi.edu.

The Centennial Challenges program is part ofNASA’s Space Technology Program, which is innovating, developing, testing andflying hardware for use in NASA’s future missions. NASA’s Space TechnologyProgram and the Centennial Challenges are creating new technological solutionsfor NASA and our nation’s future. For more information about NASA’s CentennialChallenges and the Space
Technology Program, visit https://www.nasa.gov/challenges.

Questions about the Sample Return RobotChallenge should be sent to challenge@wpi.edu.

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Registration Openfor the 20th Annual NASA Great Moonbuggy Race

Registration is open for the 20th Annual NASAGreat Moonbuggy Race. High school and college students are challenged to designand build a vehicle that addresses a series of engineering problems similar tothose faced by the original lunar-roving vehicle team. Each school may enter upto two teams. International teams are limited to 10 teams per country. The racewill take place April 25-27, 2013, in Huntsville, Ala., at the U.S. Space &Rocket Center.

International teams must register by Jan. 7, 2013. U.S.teams must register by Feb.4, 2013.

For more information about the competition andto register online, visit http://moonbuggy.msfc.nasa.gov/index.html.

International teams with questions about thisevent and registration should email Marilyn Lewis at Marilyn.H.Lewis@nasa.gov. U.S. teamswith questions should contact Diedra Williams at Diedra.A.Williams@nasa.gov.

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Analyzing Solar Energy Graphs: MYNASA DATA Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, theNASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association arehosting a 90-minute Web seminar for educators on Jan 8, 2013, at 6:30 p.m. EST.

Become familiar with the MY NASA DATA activity, “Solar Cell EnergyAvailability From Around the Country.” Compare monthly averages ofdownward radiation in locations around the U.S. and analyze areas whereconditions would be conducive to having solar panels. Access data on the NASALive Access Server as you “journey” around the U.S. to determine the amount ofsolar radiation and analyze overlay plots to compare data from NASA satellites.

This seminar is offered again on March 26, 2013.

For more information and to register online,visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES3/webseminar20.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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Teaching FromSpace Office Seeks Educators for MicroGravity eXperience

NASA’s Teaching From Space Office and the Reduced Gravity Education FlightProgram are seeking applications for teams of K-12 educators to participate inthe MicroGravity eXperience, or Micro GX, project. This project gives studentsand educators across the country the opportunity to work together on anexperiment to be tested aboard a microgravity aircraft. This incredibleopportunity is open to any current K-12 classroom educator in the UnitedStates. Educators must also be U.S. citizens.

Micro GX activities begins with students andeducators developing and proposing a reduced-gravity experiment. Selectededucator teams will receive online professional development on classroomresources for microgravity, collaboration with a NASA mentor and areduced-gravity flight. With combined input from their students and mentor,educator teams will design and fabricate their experiments to be tested andevaluated aboard an aircraft that flies approximately 30 roller-coaster-likeclimbs and dips to produce periods of microgravity and hypergravity, rangingfrom almost zero gravity to 2 g.

Seven teams of four to five educators from asingle school or school district will be selected from this application processto participate in Micro GX. This includes participation in an onlinemicrogravity course, which will begin on Feb. 11, 2013, with a series of Webseminars with NASA personnel to initiate experiment development. The highlightof the online course is to travel to NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston,Texas, and participate in the Reduced Gravity Education Flight Program duringthe week of July 12-20, 2013. During the flight week, educators will fly andperform custom experiments in a reduced-gravity environment. Selected teamsare responsible for all expenses associated with the travel and stay in Houston.The online course continues with activities beyond the flight experiencethrough Aug. 26, 2013.

Educator teams interested in participating inMicro GX may submit a proposal no later than Jan. 9, 2013. For more information, visithttp://microgravityuniversity.jsc.nasa.gov/tfsor send an email to jsc-rgeducator@nasa.gov.

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International Space StationResearch Opportunity for Higher Education Organizations

Conduct research in space and make new discoveries! The adventure begins in2013. The International Space Station NASA Education Projects Office hasreleased a solicitation for proposals of educational experiments relating toscience, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, that utilize theunique microgravity platform of the space station.

Proposals are being accepted from higher education institutions or consortia oforganizations serving the higher education community. Proposals must align withspace station program research priorities in technology, biology, biotechnologyand physical sciences. Experiment ideas also must address innovative,meaningful and enduring research and technology developmentactivities with STEM-based context.

Whitepapers must be submitted by 4 p.m. CST on Jan. 23, 2013. Full proposals aredue Feb. 20, 2013.

For more information, visit http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId={8626F554-923E-4797-DEE7-89CF3988FEE3}&path=open.

Questions about this solicitation should be directed to Janejit T. Gensler at Janejit.t.gensler@nasa.gov.

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2013 Space Exploration Educators Conference

Make plans to attend the 19th Annual Space Exploration Educators Conference, tobe held Feb. 7-9, 2013, at Space Center Houston. This conference is forall K-12 educators. Activities presented use space-related themes to teachacross the curriculum and can be used for science, language arts, mathematics,history and more.

Attend sessions hosted by scientists and engineers working on the InternationalSpace Station, Mars exploration and the planets beyond. Hear from astronautswho will be leading the charge in exploration. Attend sessions presented byeducators and receive ready-to-implement classroom ideas. Attendees can earn upto 24 hours of continuing professional education credit.

Keynote speakers scheduled to attend include astronaut Satoshi Furukawa andactor LeVar Burton.

For more information, visit http://spacecenter.org/TeachersSEEC.html.

If you have any questions about the conference, please call 281-244-2149 oremail seec@spacecenter.org.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA.For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — Dec. 13, 2012

Check out the followingNASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listedbelow.

Comet Quest Game Now Available in Spanish, French and German
Audience: All Educators and Students

Free Education Webinar Series from the Aerospace Education Services Project
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Dates: Various Dates During December 2012

Weatherand Climate: Satellite Meteorology Web Seminar
Audience: 5-8 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Dec. 13, 2012 at 6:30 p.m. EST

2013 NASA High-AltitudeStudent Platform Opportunity
Audience: Higher Education Educators andStudents
Application Deadline: Dec. 14, 2012

2012 OPTIMUS PRIMESpinoff Video Contest
Audience: Grade 3-12 Students
Registration Deadline: Dec. 15, 2012

Free Smithsonian’s StarsLecture Series
Audience: All Educators and 9-Higher Education Students
Next Lecture Date: Dec. 15, 2012

2013 Texas High SchoolAerospace Scholars
Audience: 9-12 Students
Deadline: Dec. 16, 2012

Chemistry ofWater: Mars Exploration — Is There Water on Mars? Web Seminar
Audience: 9-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Dec. 17, 2012 at 6:30 p.m. EST

Social Media Users Invited to Apply for Credentials to Attend NASA Social Media Event at TDRS-K Launch in Florida
Audience: All Educators and Students 18+ Years Old
Registration Deadline: 3 p.m. EST on Dec. 19, 2012

Engineering Design: Forces and Motion –Balloon Aerodynamics Challenge Web Seminar
Audience: 6-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Dec. 19, 2012 at 6:30 p.m. EST

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Womenin STEM High School Aerospace Scholars
Audience: Female High School Juniors
New Deadline: Jan. 3, 2013

DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2013RASC-AL Lunar Wheel Design Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Students
New Deadline: Jan. 19, 2013

NASA’s REEL Science Communication Contest
Audience: 9-12 Educators and Students
Deadline: Feb. 15, 2013

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Comet Quest Game Now Available in Spanish, French and German

NASA’s popular “Comet Quest” game fromNASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory is now available for free in three additionallanguages. The game can be downloaded from the iTunes Apps store in Spanish,French and German (as well as English).

Players of “Comet Quest” learn about comets and the European SpaceAgency’s international Rosetta mission. The game mimics the real Rosettamission, and enables you to control the spacecraft. Players drop a lander on acomet’s nucleus, then observe and record events (cracks in the comet, coma andtail getting brighter and more) as they occur. Players must avoid hazards andsuccessfully transmit data to Earth, earning points for each accomplishment.

The free “CometQuest” app is available for download for iPhone and iPad from theiTunes Store at http://bit.ly/xXhjI7.

To learn more about the Rosetta mission, visit http://rosetta.jpl.nasa.gov/.

iPhone, iPad and iTunes Store are registered trademarks of Apple Inc.registered in the U.S. and other countries.

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FreeEducation Webinar Series from the Aerospace Education Services Project

The Aerospace Education Services Project ispresenting a series of free webinars throughout December 2012. All webinars canbe accessed online. Join aerospace education specialists to learn aboutactivities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources to bring NASA into yourclassroom.

Ignite Learning Using the RealWorld-InWorld NASA Engineering DesignChallenge (Grades 8-12)
Dec. 13, 2012, 6 – 7 p.m. EST
Aerospace education specialist Sharon Bowers will introduce participants to theRealWorld-InWorld NASA Engineering Design Challenge, a free web-basedengineering design challenge that offers students a change to redesigncomponents of the James Webb Space Telescope.

How Do We Know the Climate Is Changing? NASA Climate Kids (Grades 2-8)
Dec. 18, 2012, 4 – 5 p.m. EST
Aerospace education specialist Susan Kohler will lead participants on anexploration of the “Climate Kids” and “Eyes on the Earth” educator materials.Participants will also learn how to use real-time data to explain the effectsof climate change on the arctic ice caps.

Chipmunk Cheeks and Chicken Legs: Body Systems and Life in Space (GradesK-12)
Dec. 19, 2012, 4 – 6 p.m. EST
Aerospace education specialist Rachelle Oblack will lead participants on anexploration of the circulatory, nervous, vestibular and musculoskeletal systemswith hands-on activities and demonstrations. A full downloadable educator guidewill be shared. This webinar is part of the Department of Education GreenStrides webinar series.

For more information about these webinars, visit http://neon.psu.edu/webinars/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to KatieHayden at Katie.S.Hayden@nasa.gov.

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Weather and Climate: Satellite Meteorology Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, theNASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association arehosting a 90-minute professional development Web seminar for educators on Dec. 13, 2012, at 6:30 p.m. EST.

Participants will learn to use the data from NASA’s research satellite programin their meteorology lessons. This Web seminar features “Monitoring theGlobal Environment,” one of eight modules within the satellite meteorologycourse. The activities within this module incorporate the use of authentic dataacquired by NASA’s Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites and PolarOperational Environmental Satellites. Attendees will learn how to locate anddownload satellite data then use the data to create graphs.

For more informationand to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES3/webseminar17.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to John Entwistle at NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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2013 NASA High-Altitude Student PlatformOpportunity

NASA is accepting applications from students atU.S. colleges and universities who want to send experiments to the edge ofspace on a high-flying scientific balloon.

The annual NASA project provides near-spaceaccess for 12 undergraduate and graduate student experiments to be carried by aNASA high-altitude research balloon. The flights typically last 15 to 20 hoursand reach an altitude of 23 miles. Experiments may include compact satellitesor prototypes.

The experiments are flown aboard theHigh-Altitude Student Platform, or HASP, a balloon-born instrument stacklaunched from the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility’s remote site in FortSumner, N.M. The goals of the project are to provide a space test platform toencourage student research and stimulate the development of student satellitepayloads and other space-engineering products.

HASP seeks to enhance the technical skills andresearch abilities of students in critical science, technology, engineering andmathematics disciplines. The project is a joint effort between NASA and theLouisiana Space Grant Consortium.

The deadline for applications is Dec. 14, 2012.

For application information and technicaldetails about the program, visit http://laspace.lsu.edu/hasp.

Questions about the High-Altitude Student Platformopportunity should be directed to T. Gregory Guzik at guzik@phunds.phys.lsu.edu.

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2012 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Video Contest

NASA has opened registration for the 2012OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Video Contest. Featuring OPTIMUS PRIME, the leader fromthe popular TRANSFORMERS brand, the contest highlights spinoffs from NASAtechnologies that are used on Earth. The goal is to help students understandthe benefits of NASA technology to their daily lives.

Each student, or group of students, will submita three- to five-minute video on a selected NASA spinoff technology listed inNASA’s 2011 “Spinoff” publication. Videos must demonstrate an understanding ofthe NASA spinoff technology and the associated NASA mission, as well as thecommercial application and public benefit associated with the spinofftechnology.

Participants must register for the contest by Dec. 15, 2012.

Video entries will be posted on the NASA YouTubechannel, and the public will be responsible for the first round of judging. Thetop five submissions from each of the three grade groups (elementary [3rd-5th],middle [6th-8th] and high school [9th-12th]) will advance for final judging. ANASA panel will select a winning entry from each group. The students submittingthe winning entries will be the guests of honor at the OPTIMUS PRIME SpinoffContest awards ceremony in May 2013. While there, the winners will receive theOPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Contest trophy and have the opportunity to meet NASAVIPs, astronauts and actor Peter Cullen, who voices the character OPTIMUSPRIME.

TRANSFORMERS and OPTIMUS PRIME are trademarks ofHasbro and are used with permission. © 2012 Hasbro. All Rights Reserved.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/news/releases/2012/12-077.html.

Questions about this contest should be directedto Darryl Mitchell at Darryl.R.Mitchell@nasa.gov.

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FreeSmithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series

Curious about our nearest star, moon rocks, volcanoes and other wonders ofthe universe? Come to the Smithsonian’s Stars, a series of 10 lectures bySmithsonian researchers who are exploring the sun, the moon, planets, stars,galaxies and the universe. These speakers will share behind-the-scenes detailsabout how their research is done and technologies that advance new discoveriesat the Smithsonian Institution.

Each lecture begins at 5:15 p.m. and is followedby a question-and-answer session. A Discovery Station activity will take placeat 4 p.m. prior to each lecture. Stay after the lecture to visit theobservatory, weather permitting.

Dec. 15, 2012 — The Mission of the Mars ScienceLaboratory, Curiosity
Since landing on Mars in early August 2012, theMars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover has returned an array of stunning datathat is being used to evaluate whether Mars may have harbored habitableenvironments. Geologist John Grant will delve into the recent findings fromCuriosity.

Jan. 5, 2013 — Trees in the City
Tree cover is an important element of the urbanenvironment that plays an increasingly larger role in ecosystem processes.Geographer Andrew Johnston will discuss how satellite data is used to makereliable observations about urban tree cover variability, why it matters tourban residents and how these same data are used to map changes in tree cover.

Feb. 2, 2013 — VolcanoBreath
Join Global Volcanism Program Director LizCottrell for a lecture about volcanoes on a global scale. Learn how the gaseouscontents of volcanoes propel their explosions and impact our climate. Hear thelatest about volcanic gas research and explore the latest discoveries about howthe deep Earth is recycling the air we breathe.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s StarsLecture Series and to see a full schedule of upcoming lectures, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/lectures/stars/index.cfm.

Questions about this lecture series should bedirected to the visitor service line at 202-633-1000.

The Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series is madepossible by a grant from NASA.

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2013 Texas High School Aerospace Scholars

The Texas High School Aerospace Scholars projectis an interactive, online learning experience. It is highlighted by a six-dayinternship where selected students are encouraged to study mathematics,science, engineering or computer science by interacting with engineers atNASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston.

The Texas High School Aerospace Scholars projectis open to high school juniors throughout Texas. Applicants must be U.S.citizens and have access to the Internet.

The application deadline has been extended to Dec. 16, 2012.

For additional information on the project and toapply online, visit http://has.aerospacescholars.org/.

Questions about this opportunity should bedirected to jsc-aeroscho@mail.nasa.gov.

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Chemistryof Water: Mars Exploration — Is There Water on Mars? Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators,the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Associationare hosting a 90-minute Web seminar on Dec.17, 2012, at 6:30 p.m. EST. “Chemistry of Water: Mars Exploration –Is There Water on Mars?” is an inquiry-based lesson on how atmosphericpressure and vapor pressure affect the boiling point of water. See why theboiling point of water is pressure-dependent, rather thantemperature-dependent. Then, by extension, you will deduce if there could beliquid water on Mars.

This seminar will be repeated on March 12, 2013.

For more information and toregister online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES3/webseminar18.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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Social Media Users Invited to Apply for Credentials to Attend NASA Social Media Event at TDRS-K Launch in Florida

NASA will give 70 of its social media followers an
insider’s look at America’s space program and the opportunity to see
a launch in-person. The NASA Social, scheduled for Jan. 28-29 to
coincide with the launch of NASA’s Tracking and Data Relay
Satellite-K (TDRS-K), will be held at the agency’s Kennedy Space
Center in Florida.

NASA Socials are in-person meetings with people who engage with the
agency through Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and other social networks.

TDRS-K is targeted to launch at 8:52 p.m. EST Jan. 29 on a United
Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket.

Registration for the NASA Social opens at 3 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 13,
and closes at 3 p.m. Wednesday, Dec.19. Participants will be selected
from online registrations. Because portions of this event may take
place in restricted areas, registration is limited to U.S. citizens.
Participants will have unique behind the scenes experiences with NASA,
which they are encouraged to share with others through their favorite
social networks. Guests will view the launch, tour facilities at
Kennedy, speak with representatives from NASA and the Space
Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Office, visit the Atlas V launch
pad, and meet fellow space enthusiasts who are active on social media
and members of NASA’s social media team.

The Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System is a space-based
communication system used to provide tracking, telemetry, command,
and high bandwidth data return services to its many customers. A
major component of the system is the spacecraft itself, TDRS.
Currently, there are 7 operational satellites that provide in-flight
communications with spacecraft operating in low-Earth orbit. Aboard
each satellite are multiple antennae that send and receive signals
both to and from the ground to multiple satellites simultaneously. As
a result, TDRS provides a wide variety of services to meet customers’
needs and demands.

For more information on the NASA Social and to register, visit:
https://www.nasa.gov/social

To find all the ways to connect and collaborate with NASA, visit:
https://www.nasa.gov/connect

To learn more about TDRS, visit:
https://www.nasa.gov/tdrs

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EngineeringDesign: Forces and Motion — Balloon Aerodynamics Challenge Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences foreducators, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science TeachersAssociation are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminarfor educators on Dec. 19, 2012, at 6:30p.m. EST. This Web seminar will introduce the Forces and Motion: BalloonAerodynamics Challenge for students. This activity provides firsthandinformation about density, neutral buoyancy and drag, which is then used tosolve a problem. The activity provides many opportunities for incorporatingnational mathematics, science and technology learning standards into yourcurriculum.

This seminar will be repeated on Apr. 17, 2013.

For more information and to registeronline, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES3/webseminar19.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to the NES Help Desk at NASA.Explorer.Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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DEADLINEEXTENDED: Women in STEM High School Aerospace Scholars

Engineer your dream job! The adventure begins in2013. NASA wants you to become part of the workforce of tomorrow as we offerthe opportunity to dream, engineer and WISH. The Women in STEM High SchoolAerospace Scholars, or WISH, project offers a one-of-a-kind experience forfemale high school juniors to jump-start their future by engaging inopportunities relating to science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Participation starts in an online community andculminates with a summer experience at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston,Texas, during the summer of 2013. Get ready to collaborate with girls fromacross the country as you complete online activities, design unique projects,work with NASA personnel and present mission accomplishments. Start your dreamnow!

To be eligible, applicants must be:
— U.S. citizens.
— Female high school juniors during the2012-2013 school year.
— Interested and excited about science,technology, engineering and mathematics.
— Committed to a one-year relationship withNASA’s Johnson Space Center.
— Able to access the Internet and email (athome, school or public library).
— A scholar with a cumulative GPA of 3.25/4.0or higher.

The application deadline has been extended to Jan.3, 2013.

For more information and to download theapplication, visit http://wish.aerospacescholars.org/.

Questions should be directed to JSC-NHAS@mail.nasa.gov.

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DEADLINEEXTENDED: 2013 RASC-AL Lunar Wheel Design Challenge

Due to an initially aggressive schedule that resulted from a delayed launch ofthe 2013 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts – Academic Linkage, orRASC-AL, Lunar Wheel Design Challenge, the new deadline to submit projectplans has been extended to Sunday, Jan. 19, 2013, at midnight EST.

The RASC-AL Lunar WheelDesign Challenge invites student teams to design and build a lunar wheelprototype and demonstrate its capabilities while mounted on a utility vehicleduring the “Roll-Off” (field tests at NASA’s Johnson Space Center’s Rock Yard)in July 2013. Teams are challenged with developing a wheel that needs littlemaintenance, can travel at higher speeds needed for human rovers and canwithstand several years of harsh temperature swings, abrasive regolith, intensesun radiation and lack of an Earth-like atmosphere.

In addition to the fieldtests, teams will present their wheel concepts to a design review panelcomprising Space Exploration Vehicle, or SEV, engineers. Presentations will bebased on each team’s technical paper that details the wheel concept’spath-to-flight (i.e., how the design can be applied to actual planetaryexploration on an SEV).

Based on a review of eachteam’s proposal, up to eight teams will be selected to compete at the“Roll-Off” in July 2013. Qualifying teams will receive a minimum of $9,000 todevelop and test their wheel designs. Winning teams will receive cash prizes.

The challenge is open to full-time undergraduate or graduate students majoringin engineering or science at an accredited university. University design teamsmust include one faculty or industry advisor with a university affiliation andtwo or more undergraduate or graduate students.

Student teams and their faculty advisors are invited to submit an onlineNotice of Intent (NOI)and a projectplanof their proposed wheelconcepts by Jan. 19, 2013. Multi-disciplinary teams and internationalcollaborations are encouraged.

For more information about this competition, visit https://www.nianet.org/RASCAL-wheeldesign2012/index.aspx.

If you have questions aboutthis competition, please contact Shannon Verstynen at shannon.verstynen@nianet.org orShelley Spears at shelley.spears@nianet.org.

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NASA’s REEL Science Communication Contest

So you want to be a NASA producer? NASA islooking for talented high school students to create videos that engage studentsin earth science.

Students are consuming over 10 hours of media each day, and video isincreasingly important to reach and engage this audience about science. NASAearth science missions are kicking off a new video contest challenging highschool students to produce a two-minute video for middle school students. Thevideos should focus on one of three topics: Ozone in the Stratosphere, ShipTracks and Our Environment, or The Water of the Water Planet.

Winning videos will be posted on NASA’s website. Winners will also get theopportunity to be a NASA producer working with NASA scientists andcommunication experts in July 2013 to produce an earth science feature video.

The deadline for submitting videos is Feb.15, 2013.

 — NEW! Director’s CutVideo from NASA Producer Ali Ogden —

NASA producer Ali Ogden created a video, whichshares her insight about producing a video feature for NASA. In this director’scut version of her Montreal Protocol story, Ali providespractical advice about audience, thinking visually, story and post-production.These practical tips for video production will help students with the REELScience Contest. To view Ogden’s video, visit http://aura.gsfc.nasa.gov/reelscience-video.html.

For more information and instructions for submitting a video, visit http://aura.gsfc.nasa.gov/reelscience.

Questions about this contest should be emailed to Ginger Butcher at ginger.butcher-1@nasa.gov.

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Don’t miss out on education-relatedopportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities,visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — Dec. 6, 2012

Check out the followingNASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listedbelow.

New DIY Podcast Module Available — Exploration Careers
Audience: 5-12 Educators and Students

Engineering Design Challenge: Thermal Protection System Web Seminar
Audience: 8-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Dec. 6, 2012 at 6:30 p.m. EST

2013 RASC-AL Robo-OpsCompetition
Audience: Higher Education Students
Deadline: Dec. 9, 2012

Social Media Users Invited to Apply forCredentials to Attend NASA Airborne Earth Science Event
Audience: All Educators and Students 18+ YearsOld
Registration Deadline: 7 p.m. EST on Dec. 10, 2012

Free Education Webinar Series from the AerospaceEducation Services Project
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Dates: Various Dates During December 2012

Online Professional Development Workshop: Big Answers From SmallBodies
Audience: 5-12 Educators
Event Date: Dec. 12, 2012

Weather andClimate: Satellite Meteorology Web Seminar
Audience: 5-8 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Dec. 13, 2012

2013 NASA High-AltitudeStudent Platform Opportunity
Audience: Higher Education Educators andStudents
Application Deadline: Dec. 14, 2012

2012 OPTIMUS PRIMESpinoff Video Contest
Audience: Grade 3-12 Students
Registration Deadline: Dec. 15, 2012

Student Spaceflight Experiments Program –Mission 4 to the International Space Station
Audience: 5-Higher Education Educators and Students
Inquiry Deadline: Dec. 31, 2012

NASA Social Event at Next Landsat Launch
Audience: All Educators and Students 18+ Years Old
Registration Deadline: Noon EST on Jan. 2, 2013

2013 NASA UnmannedAerial Systems Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Students and Faculty
Notice of Intent Deadline: Jan. 15, 2013

2012-2013 Game Changing Engineering DesignChallenge
Audience: Higher Education Students and Faculty
Notice of Intent Deadline: Jan. 15, 2013

Expeditions 35 and 36 In-flightEducation Downlink Opportunities
Audience: All Educators
Proposal Deadline: Jan. 18, 2013

Host a Real-Time Conversation With Crewmembers Aboard the InternationalSpace Station
Audience: All Educators
Proposal Deadline: Jan. 28, 2013

Electronic Professional DevelopmentNetwork Courses
Audience: K-12 Educators
Using Robotics to Enhance STEM Learning: Jan. 16 – Feb. 26, 2013
Project-Based Inquiry Learning: March 13 – April 16, 2013

2013 Thacher Environmental ResearchContest
Audience: 9-12 Students
Entry Deadline: April 15, 2013

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New DIY Podcast Module Available — Exploration Careers

NASA’s Do-It-YourselfPodcast’s newest module, Exploration Careers, provides students with videoclips, audio clips, and resources featuring various scientists, engineers andhuman resource specialists to offer insightful tips and information on variousNASA career fields.

Even though the Space Shuttle Program has ended, NASA is still developing newtechnology and spacecraft to continue the mission to explore. Developing newspacecraft systems, improving life-support systems for long-term space travel,and studying the effects of extended visits in space on the human body requirestrong workforce knowledge and skill.

NASA depends on its workforce to fulfill its missions. Soon, many employeeswill be retiring, so NASA has another mission to complete. NASA will need tohire people with degrees in science, technology, engineering and mathematics toreach its goals. In fact, numerous federal agencies and private companies needworkers with STEM skills. Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show thatjobs in STEM fields are expected to grow faster than those in non-STEM fieldsfrom 2010-2020.

So, how do we get students interested in STEM careers? Sharing information onthe vast array of STEM careers is important. And having students conducthands-on STEM activities is crucial to developing problem-solving and other21st-century skills that will be demanded by employers. Exposure toprofessionals working in STEM fields is a key element. According to the U.S.Government Accountability Office, having a mentor significantly influencesstudents’ decisions to pursue STEM degrees and jobs, especially for women andminorities.

Using the video and audio clips, students can create their own podcasts as theylearn about STEM careers at NASA. Teachers can access the DIY Podcast blog togather resources and information to supplement the Careers module.

Come on! It’s time to integrate technology into your classrooms. And NASA’s DIYPodcast has the tools and information to help you and your students succeed.

NASA’s DIY Podcast: Exploration Careers
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/diypodcast/exploration-careers-index-diy.html

NASA’s DIY Podcast Blog https://blogs.nasa.gov/cm/newui/blog/viewpostlist.jsp?blogname=diyPodcastBlog

If you have questions or comments about NASA’s DIY Podcast, please email educationpodcast@nasa.gov.

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EngineeringDesign Challenge: Thermal Protection System Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences foreducators, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science TeachersAssociation are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminar foreducators on Dec. 6, 2012, at 6:30 p.m. EST. Learn about the science ofheat transfer and heat dissipation related to NASA vehicles, and receive anintroduction to the associated engineering design challenge, Thermal ProtectionSystem. In this activity, students are challenged to design a thermalprotection system and test it using a propane torch.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES3/webseminar16.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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2013 RASC-AL Robo-OpsCompetition

NASA and the National Institute of Aerospaceannounce the 2013 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts Academic LinkageExploration Robo-Ops, also known as RASC-AL Robo-Ops, competition. This designcompetition is aimed at university-level engineering students.

The RASC-AL Robo-Ops contest challenges participantsto build a planetary rover prototype and demonstrate its capabilities in fieldtests at NASA’s Johnson Space Center’s, or JSC’s, Rock Yard. Up to threemembers of the team (plus the faculty advisor) may travel to JSC for the onsitetesting. The remaining team members will stay behind at the local university toconduct mission control tasks. The prototype rovers will be tele-operated bythe university-based team members and must negotiate a series of obstacleswhile accomplishing a variety of tasks. The only information available to therover controller to perform the required tasks will be information transmittedthrough onboard rover video camera(s) or other onboard sensors.

Teams will be required to do an education andoutreach activity for their rovers that demonstrates participatory explorationapproaches for future NASA missions.

Teams must submit a project plan for theirproposed project by Dec.9, 2012. The RASC-AL Robo-Ops Steering Committee of NASAexperts will evaluate the project plans and select as many as eight teams tocompete against each other at the Rock Yard in June 2013.

The RASC-AL competition is open to full-timeundergraduate or graduate students majoring in engineering or science at anaccredited university. University design teams must include one faculty orindustry advisor with a university affiliation and two or more undergraduate orgraduate students. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

For more information about this competition,visit http://www.nianet.org/RoboOps-2013/index.aspx.

If you have questions about this competition,please contact Stacy Dees at stacy.dees@nianet.orgor Shelley Spears at shelley.spears@nianet.org.

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Social Media Users Invited to Apply for Credentials to Attend NASA AirborneEarth Science Event


NASA is inviting social media followers for abehind-the-scenes look at several airborne Earth science missions during anevent on Jan. 25, 2013, at NASA’s Dryden Flight Research Center in Edwards,Calif.

Social media users may apply for credentials to meet scientists and learn howthey study the Earth using specialized science instruments on a unique fleet ofaircraft.

Three major Earth science missions that will be airborne studying air pollutionand climate change next month will be featured.

— NASA’s high-altitude unmanned Global Hawk aircraft will fly six miles abovethe surface to a region of the atmosphere that controls the entry of pollutantsand other gases into the stratosphere. NASA’s Airborne Tropical TropopauseExperiment (ATTREX) will look at how these gases influence Earth’s climate,ozone layer and energy budget.

— Two NASA planes will fly over the San Joaquin Valley to measure airpollution this winter. They are part of a five-year NASA science campaigncalled DISCOVER-AQ, which is working to improve the ability of satellites toobserve air quality in the lowest part of the atmosphere. The goal is to bettermonitor pollution from satellites, so scientists can make better air qualityforecasts and more accurately determine the source of pollution.

— NASA’s high-altitude ER-2 will fly three state-of-the-art instruments todevelop new orbiting sensors to better measure aerosol and cloud physicalproperties around the world. These new instruments, part of the PolarDefinition Experiment, show great promise for advancing aerosol measurementsfrom space. Tiny aerosol particles can be found over oceans, deserts, mountainsand forests. Despite their small size, aerosols have major impacts on ourclimate and our health.

Social media users selected to attend the event will be given the same accessas news media. Individuals who actively collect, report, analyze anddisseminate news on social networking platforms are encouraged to apply forcredentials. Selection is not random. Those chosen must demonstrate through theregistration process they meet specific engagement criteria. All social mediaaccreditation applications will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Amaximum of 50 participants will be chosen from online registrations.

NASA social media accreditation opens at noon EST (9 a.m. PST), Wednesday, Dec.5, 2012. Foreign national and U.S. social media users must apply forcredentials by 7 p.m. EST (4 p.m. PST),Monday, Dec.10, 2012.

For more information about NASA social media accreditation requirements and toregister for the event, visit https://www.nasa.gov/social.

For more information about NASA’s Airborne Science Program, visit http://airbornescience.nasa.gov/.

For more information about NASA’s Earth Science Program, visit https://www.nasa.gov/earth.

Questions about this NASA Social event should bedirected to HQ-Social@mail.nasa.gov.

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Free Education Webinar Series from the Aerospace Education Services Project

The Aerospace Education Services Project is presenting a series of freewebinars throughout December 2012. All webinars can be accessed online. Joinaerospace education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans,educator guides and resources to bring NASA into your classroom.

Planetary Modeling Dough: Solar System Scale Model (Grades 3-8)
Dec. 11, 2012, 5 – 6 p.m. EST
Aerospace education specialist Rick Varner will lead participants throughactivities that use simple clay materials to create a scale model of therelative masses and sizes of the planets (including the dwarf planet, Pluto).This activity will help educators dispel some of the common misconceptionsabout the solar system.

Solar Energy: Power for Earth, the Space Station and Exploring Other Worlds!(Grades 6-12)
Dec. 12, 2012, 4 – 5 p.m. EST and 7 – 8p.m. EST
Aerospace education specialist Brandon Hargis will introduce participants to aproblem-based learning activity that requires students to propose and defend adesign to provide power to a lunar or Martian research habitat for sixexplorers. This webinar is part of the Department of Education Green Strideswebinar series.

Ignite Learning Using the RealWorld-InWorld NASA Engineering DesignChallenge (Grades 8-12)
Dec. 13, 2012, 6 – 7 p.m. EST
Aerospace education specialist Sharon Bowers will introduce participants to theRealWorld-InWorld NASA Engineering Design Challenge, a free web-basedengineering design challenge that offers students a change to redesigncomponents of the James Webb Space Telescope.

How Do We Know the Climate Is Changing? NASA Climate Kids (Grades 2-8)
Dec. 18, 2012, 4 – 5 p.m. EST
Aerospace education specialist Susan Kohler will lead participants on anexploration of the “Climate Kids” and “Eyes on the Earth” educator materials.Participants will also learn how to use real-time data to explain the effectsof climate change on the arctic ice caps.

Chipmunk Cheeks and Chicken Legs: Body Systems and Life in Space (GradesK-12)
Dec. 19, 2012, 4 – 6 p.m. EST
Aerospace education specialist Rachelle Oblack will lead participants on anexploration of the circulatory, nervous, vestibular and musculoskeletal systemswith hands-on activities and demonstrations. A full downloadable educator guidewill be shared. This webinar is part of the Department of Education GreenStrides webinar series.

For more information about these webinars, visit http://neon.psu.edu/webinars/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to KatieHayden at Katie.S.Hayden@nasa.gov.

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Online Professional Development Workshop: BigAnswers From Small Bodies

John Ensworth at the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies and the NASAScience Mission Directorate invite you to attend an upcoming onlineprofessional development workshop.

Big Answers From Small Bodies: What theMain Asteroid Belt Is Telling Us About the Early Solar System

This online workshop will feature Dr.Carol Raymond, the deputy principal investigator for the Dawn mission. The goalof the Dawn mission is to characterize the conditions and processes of thesolar system’s earliest epoch by investigating in detail two of the largestprotoplanets remaining intact since their formations, Vesta and Ceres. Raymond’sother research interests include solar system evolution, sun-Earth magneticinteractions, and quantifying post-glacial rebound in Antarctica.

Dr. Raymond will discuss the recent progress in modeling of early solar systemdynamics during the planet-forming era (including the “Nice” modeland related work), as well as the chemical and physical characteristics of themain asteroid belt (including a brief description of all the asteroids forcontext). She will place this in the context of what we knew pre-Dawn and whatwe have learned from Dawn’s Vesta data. Dr. Raymond will then look forward toCeres and what may be learned from that encounter.

Date: Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2012

Time: 1:00 p.m., EST (Greenwich Mean Time -05:00, New York)

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To join the online meeting (Now from iPhones and other Smartphones too!)

1. Go to https://nasa.webex.com/nasa/j.php?ED=191386442&UID=0&PW=NYTI2NTMyYTUw&RT=MiMxMQ%3D%3D.
2. Enter your name and email address.
3. Enter the meeting password: iges*123.
4. Click “Join Now”.

To view in other time zones or languages, go to https://nasa.webex.com/nasa/j.php?ED=191386442&UID=0&PW=NYTI2NTMyYTUw&ORT=MiMxMQ%3D%3D.

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Closed Captions will be made available:

At the start time of the event, please log in to your event by clicking on thelink below.
http://www.fedrcc.us//Enter.aspx?EventID=2066099&CustomerID=321
Alternately, you can visit http://www.fedrcc.us/and input your event confirmation number, 2066099.

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To join the audio conference only:

For the audio portion of the meeting, please dial:
877-633-9743
And use passcode: 8226297

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An archive of this video will be available within a few weeks of this date at http://video.strategies.org/.
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For assistance:

1. Go to https://nasa.webex.com/nasa/mc.
2. On the left navigation bar, click “Support.”

Questions about this event can be directed to John Ensworth by email at john.d.ensworth@nasa.gov or by phoneat 1-703-312-0563.

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To check the setup of your computer and preinstall the plug-in software, usethe following links:

Downloads

The host requests that you check for compatibility of rich media players forUniversal Communications Format, or UCF, before you join the session. UCFallows you to view multimedia during the session. To check now, click thefollowing link: https://nasa.webex.com/nasa/systemdiagnosis.php.

Meeting Manager for Microsoft® Windows® – MSI Installer

— Meeting Center automatically downloads, installs and configures MeetingManager for Windows the first time you start or join a WebEx meeting. However,you may choose to download and run the Meeting Manager Installer beforestarting or joining a meeting. You must have administrator privileges on yourcomputer to use this installer.
–Download Meeting Manager Installer for Internet Explorer https://nasa.webex.com/client/T25L/atmcie.msi
— Download Meeting Manager Installer for Mozilla Firefox/Netscape Navigator https://nasa.webex.com/client/T25L/atmcns.msi

Meeting Manager for Mac® OS X (PowerPC)

— Meeting Manager for Mac OS X (PowerPC) is set up automatically the firsttime you start or join a meeting. The Installer for Mac OS X (PowerPC) can beused to manually install or uninstall Meeting Manager for Mac OS X (PowerPC).

Download Meeting Manager Installer for Mac OS X (PowerPC) https://nasa.webex.com/client/T25L/mac/powerpc/webexinstaller.hqx.

iPhone and Mac are registered trademarks of Apple Inc.

Microsoft and Windows are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.

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Weather and Climate: Satellite Meteorology Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, theNASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association arehosting a 90-minute professional development Web seminar for educators on Dec. 13, 2012, at 6:30 p.m. EST.

Participants will learn to use the data from NASA’s research satellite programin their meteorology lessons. This Web seminar features “Monitoring theGlobal Environment,” one of eight modules within the satellite meteorologycourse. The activities within this module incorporate the use of authentic dataacquired by NASA’s Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites and PolarOperational Environmental Satellites. Attendees will learn how to locate anddownload satellite data then use the data to create graphs.

For more informationand to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES3/webseminar17.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to John Entwistle at NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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2013 NASA High-Altitude Student PlatformOpportunity

NASA is accepting applications from students atU.S. colleges and universities who want to send experiments to the edge ofspace on a high-flying scientific balloon.

The annual NASA project provides near-space accessfor 12 undergraduate and graduate student experiments to be carried by a NASAhigh-altitude research balloon. The flights typically last 15 to 20 hours andreach an altitude of 23 miles. Experiments may include compact satellites orprototypes.

The experiments are flown aboard theHigh-Altitude Student Platform, or HASP, a balloon-born instrument stacklaunched from the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility’s remote site in FortSumner, N.M. The goals of the project are to provide a space test platform toencourage student research and stimulate the development of student satellitepayloads and other space-engineering products.

HASP seeks to enhance the technical skills andresearch abilities of students in critical science, technology, engineering andmathematics disciplines. The project is a joint effort between NASA and theLouisiana Space Grant Consortium.

The deadline for applications is Dec. 14, 2012.

For application information and technicaldetails about the program, visit http://laspace.lsu.edu/hasp.

Questions about the High-Altitude StudentPlatform opportunity should be directed to T. Gregory Guzik at guzik@phunds.phys.lsu.edu.

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2012 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Video Contest

NASA has opened registration for the 2012OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Video Contest. Featuring OPTIMUS PRIME, the leader fromthe popular TRANSFORMERS brand, the contest highlights spinoffs from NASAtechnologies that are used on Earth. The goal is to help students understandthe benefits of NASA technology to their daily lives.

Each student, or group of students, will submita three- to five-minute video on a selected NASA spinoff technology listed inNASA’s 2011 “Spinoff” publication. Videos must demonstrate an understanding ofthe NASA spinoff technology and the associated NASA mission, as well as thecommercial application and public benefit associated with the spinoff technology.

Participants must register for the contest by Dec. 15, 2012.

Video entries will be posted on the NASA YouTubechannel, and the public will be responsible for the first round of judging. Thetop five submissions from each of the three grade groups (elementary [3rd-5th],middle [6th-8th] and high school [9th-12th]) will advance for final judging. ANASA panel will select a winning entry from each group. The students submittingthe winning entries will be the guests of honor at the OPTIMUS PRIME SpinoffContest awards ceremony in May 2013. While there, the winners will receive theOPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Contest trophy and have the opportunity to meet NASAVIPs, astronauts and actor Peter Cullen, who voices the character OPTIMUSPRIME.

TRANSFORMERS and OPTIMUS PRIME are trademarks ofHasbro and are used with permission. © 2012 Hasbro. All Rights Reserved.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/news/releases/2012/12-077.html.

Questions about this contest should be directedto Darryl Mitchell at Darryl.R.Mitchell@nasa.gov.

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StudentSpaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 4 to the International Space Station

The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education and the ArthurC. Clarke Institute for Space Education, in partnership with NanoRacks LLC,announce a new opportunity for communities across the U.S. and space stationpartner nations. The newest Student Spaceflight Experiments Program, or SSEP,flight opportunity, Mission 4 to the International Space Station, or ISS, givesstudents across a community the ability to design and propose real experimentsto fly in low Earth orbit on the International Space Station.

Each participating community will be provided areal microgravity research mini-laboratory capable of supporting a singlemicrogravity experiment, and all launch services to fly the mini-lab to thespace station in fall 2013 and return it to Earth. An experiment designcompetition in each community — engaging 300+ students — allows student teamsto design and propose real experiments vying for their community’sreserved mini-lab. Content resources for teachers and students supportfoundational instruction on science in microgravity and experimental design.Additional SSEP programming leverages the experiment design competition toengage the community, embracing a learning community model for science,technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, education.

This competition is open to students in grades 5-12 and college. Informaleducation groups and organizations are also encouraged to participate. Interestedcommunities must inquire about the program no later than Dec. 31, 2012. The National Center for Earth and SpaceScience Education is available to help interested communities in the U.S.secure the needed funding.

The first two SSEP flight opportunities saw experiments flown on the finalflights of space shuttles Endeavour and Atlantis. These missions engaged 27communities, providing a combined 30,700 students in grades 5-14 theopportunity to participate, 977 student team proposals were received and 27experiments were selected and flown on the shuttles. SSEP Missions 1, 2 and 3to the International Space Station engaged 32 communities, providing 69,100 studentsin grades 5-14 the opportunity to participate, 3,370 student team proposalswere received and 39 experiments were flown to space station on the SpaceXDragon vehicle. The Mission 3 payload of 17 experiments is expected to fly to thespace station in April 2013.

To learn more about this opportunity, visit the SSEP Mission 4 to InternationalSpace Station National Announcement of Opportunity at http://ssep.ncesse.org/2012/11/announcing-student-spaceflight-experiment-program-ssep-mission-4-to-the-international-space-station-for-2013/.

SSEP is a program of the National Center for Earth and Space Science Educationin the U.S., and the Arthur C. Clarke Institute for Space Educationinternationally. It is enabled through a strategic partnership with NanoRacksLLC working with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the utilization ofthe International Space Station as a national laboratory. The
Center for the Advancement of Science in Space  is a National Partner onSSEP.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please email SSEP NationalProgram Director Jeff Goldstein at jeffgoldstein@ncesse.org.

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NASASocial Event at Next Landsat Launch

NASA invites social media followers to a unique two-day NASA Social event onFeb. 10-11, 2013, at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. The event willbring 80 social media users together to witness the launch of the Landsat DataContinuity Mission, a satellite that continues a record-breaking 40 years ofEarth observations.

NASA Socials are in-person meetings with peoplewho engage with the agency through Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and other socialnetworks. Participants will get a behind-the-scenes tour of Vandenberg AirForce Base’s Western Range, including a rare look inside the launch controlcenter, tours of the launchpad and mission control and a visit to Vandenberg’son-base private museum. Participants will also hear first-hand accounts by theLandsat Mission science and engineering teams and meet fellow scienceenthusiasts who are active on social media.

On launch day, NASA Social participants and their friends and families areinvited to a special public viewing area to watch the Landsat launch.

Registration is open until noon EST on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2013. NASA will select 80 participantsat random from Web registrants. Additional applicants will be placed on awaiting list. Because of space limitations, those selected will not bepermitted to bring a guest on tours. Each participant must be age 18 or older.

For more NASA Social and sign up information,visit https://www.nasa.gov/social.

To join and track the conversation online duringthe NASA Socials, follow the hashtags #NASASocial and #Landsat.

To learn more about the Landsat series of Earth-observingsatellites, visit https://www.nasa.gov/Landsat.

Questions about this NASA Social event should bedirected to HQ-Social@mail.nasa.gov.

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2013 NASAUnmanned Aerial Systems Challenge

NASA invites college teams to take part in the2013 NASA Aeronautics Mission Directorate’s Unmanned Aerial Systems Challenge.Students are invited to propose an unmanned aerial firefighting system tobattle a wildfire raging in a drought-stricken area. Design assessment will bebased on projected effectiveness, cost, innovation, and ease of use andoperation inside the National Air Space.

The contest is open to teams of full-timestudents enrolled in higher education institutions of the United States or itsterritories. This category includes universities, colleges, trade schools,community colleges, professional schools, etc. Multidisciplinary teams areencouraged.

A notice of intent is due Jan. 15, 2013. Finalentries are due May 3, 2013.

For more information and a complete list ofrules, visit https://aero.larc.nasa.gov/competitions_univ.htm.

Questions about the challenge should be directedto Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.

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2012-2013 Game Changing Engineering DesignChallenge

NASA invites college student teams to enter the2013 Game Changing Engineering Design Challenge. Student teams are asked todesign a thermal control system for a manned space station in low lunar orbit.Designs must accommodate a six-person crew, maintain acceptable temperaturesfor avionics components, and provide a healthy environment for the crew.Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

The contest is open to student teams frompost-secondary institutions in the United States or its territories. Thiscategory includes universities, colleges, trade schools, community colleges,professional schools, etc.

Finalists will be invited to present their workto NASA engineers and tour a NASA center.

A notice of intent is due Jan. 15, 2013. Finalentries are due on April 29, 2013.

For more information and a complete list ofrules, visit http://spacetech.larc.nasa.gov.

Questions about the challenge should be directedto Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.

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Expeditions35 and 36 In-flight Education Downlink Opportunities

NASA is seeking formal and informal educational organizations, individually orworking together, to host live, in-flight education downlinks during Expeditions35 and 36 (approximately from March 2013 to September 2013). To maximize thesedownlink opportunities, NASA is looking for organizations that will draw large numbersof participants and integrate the downlinks into well-developed education plans.

The deadline to submit a proposal is Jan.18, 2013.

During Expeditions 35 and 36, crew members aboard the International SpaceStation will participate in downlinks. Downlinks take approximately 20 minutesand allow students and educators to interact with astronauts through a question-and-answersession. Downlinks afford education audiences the opportunity to learnfirsthand from astronauts what it is like to live and work in space. Downlinksare broadcast live on NASA TV and are streamed on the NASA website. Because ofthe nature of human spaceflight, organizations must demonstrate the flexibilityto accommodate changes in downlink dates and times.

Interested organizations should visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/tfs/downlinksto learn more or contact Teaching From Space at JSC-Teaching-From-Space@mail.nasa.gov.

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Host a Real-Time Conversation With Crewmembers Aboard theInternational Space Station

NASA is now accepting proposals from U.S. schools, museums, science centers andcommunity youth organizations to host an Amateur Radio on the InternationalSpace Station, or ARISS, contact between May 1, 2013, and Nov 1, 2013. Tomaximize these radio contact opportunities, NASA is looking for organizationsthat will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the contact into awell-developed education plan. Proposals are due Jan. 28, 2013.

Using amateur radio, students can ask astronauts questions about life inspace and other space-related topics. Students fully engage in the ARISS contactby helping set up an amateur radio ground station at the school and then usingthat station to talk directly with a crew member on the International SpaceStation for approximately 10 minutes. The technology is easier to acquire thanever before. ARISS has a network of mentors to help organizations obtain thetechnology required to host this once in a lifetime opportunity for students.

Interested parties should visit www.nasa.gov/education/tfs/ariss to obtain complete information including how thetechnology works, what is expected of the host organization and how to submitthe proposal form.

Questions about this opportunity should be emailed to JSC-TFS-ARISS@mail.nasa.gov.

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Electronic ProfessionalDevelopment Network Courses

NASA’s Learning Environments and Research Network and the Georgia Institute ofTechnology have teamed up to create the Electronic Professional DevelopmentNetwork, or e-PDN, an initiative dedicated to preparing K-12 teachers to engagetheir students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM,through the use of NASA-developed learning materials and resources.

If you are looking for a way to enhance your instructional skills, meet yourprofessional development goals or find new and exciting resources to use inyour learning environments, apply to one of our free courses today!

Applications are now open for the following courses:

Using Robotics toEnhance STEM Learning Jan. 16 -Feb. 26, 2013
Learn how to build and program LEGO Mindstorm robots and use them topromote student engagement and conceptual understanding of mathematics, scienceand engineering. Explore robotic manipulators and end effectors like NASA useson the International Space Station, and integrate multiple sensors into yourrobot to allow for systematic control. Join your colleagues in the GrandChallenge to design, build and program a robot to explore an environment andreturn with a sample for investigation.

Project-Based Inquiry Learning: ScienceTeaching and Learning for the 21st Century — March 13 – April 16, 2013
Develop your skills in designing and using project-based inquiry learning, or PBIL,to enhance conceptual understanding, critical thinking, scientific reasoningand problem solving in standards-based classrooms. Experience and analyze twoNASA-oriented PBIL projects firsthand; learn PBIL curriculum design strategiesand methods; and design a PBIL unit for use in your classroom. Use e-PDN’ssuite of online tools to collaborate, connect and create with other courseparticipants.

To learn more about these free courses and to apply online, visit https://nasaepdn.gatech.edu/certificates/course-schedule.

For more information on the ePDN and the resources it offers to K-12 teachers,visit www.nasaepdn.gatech.edu.

Questions about these courses should be directed to Kristen Anderson at kristen.anderson@pe.gatech.edu.

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2013 Thacher EnvironmentalResearch Contest

The Institute for Global Environmental Strategies is currently acceptingentries for the 2013 Thacher Environmental Research Contest. The contest isopen to U.S. students in grades 9-12. Entries should demonstrate the best useof geospatial tools or data to study our home planet. Eligible geospatial toolsand data include satellite remote sensing, aerial photography, geographicinformation systems and the Global Positioning System. The main focus of theproject must be on the application of the geospatial tool(s) or data to study aproblem related to Earth’s environment.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens. Students in public, private, parochial,Native American reservation and home schools are eligible. Entries may be submitted by individuals or teams. Cash awards will begiven to students in the top three places. Awards will also be given to thewinning students’ teachers.

Entries must be postmarked by April 15,2013. Entries may also be submitted electronically.

For more information, visit http://strategies.org/education/student-contests/thacher-contest/2013-thacher-environmental-research-contest/.

Questions about this contest should be emailed to ThacherScholars@strategies.org.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA.For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — Nov. 29, 2012

Check out the followingNASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listedbelow.

2013 CanSat Competition
Audience: Higher Education Educators andStudents
Application Deadline: Nov. 30, 2012

Opportunity to Publish Student Climate Researchin Harvard University’s Journal of Emerging Investigators
Audience: 5-12 Educators and Students
Notice of Intent Deadline: Nov. 30, 2012

Free Smithsonian’s StarsLecture Series
Audience: All Educators and 9-Higher Education Students
Next Lecture Date: Dec. 1, 2012

Free Education Webinar Series from the AerospaceEducation Services Project
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Dates: Various Dates During December 2012

What’s New in Planetary Science: A Tourof Recent Discoveries in Our Solar System Web Seminar
Audience: 4-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Dec. 3, 2012

2013 NASA SpaceTechnology Research Fellowships
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Dec. 4, 2012

2013-14 Albert EinsteinDistinguished Educator Fellowship
Audience: K-12 STEM Educators
Application Deadline: Dec. 5, 2012

Engineering Design Challenge: ThermalProtection System Web Seminar
Audience: 8-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Dec. 6, 2012

2013 RASC-AL Robo-OpsCompetition
Audience: Higher Education Students
Deadline: Dec. 9, 2012

2012 OPTIMUS PRIMESpinoff Video Contest
Audience: Grade 3-12 Students
Registration Deadline: Dec. 15, 2012

2013 Texas High SchoolAerospace Scholars
Audience: 9-12 Students
New Extended Deadline: Dec. 16, 2012

Women in STEM High School AerospaceScholars
Audience: Female High School Juniors
Deadline: Dec. 28, 2012

Teaching From Space Office Seeks Educators for MicroGravity eXperience
Audience: K-12 Educators
Proposal Deadline: Jan. 9, 2013

2013 NASA Student Airborne ResearchProgram
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 8, 2013

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2013 CanSat Competition

Applications currently are being accepted forthe 2013 CanSat Competition.

This annual competition is open to universityand college students from the United States, Canada, Mexico and othercountries. Teams of three to 10 students must design, build and launch a sensorpayload called a CanSat. Each CanSat is slightly larger than a soda can andmust be built according to the specifications released by the competitionorganizing committee.

All teams entering the CanSat competition arerequired to have a faculty adviser. The faculty adviser will oversee and beresponsible for the conduct of the team at all times during the competition.The advisor is strongly encouraged to accompany the team to the competition.

Applications are due Nov. 30, 2012.

For more information about the competition andto download the application, visit http://www.cansatcompetition.com/.

Questions about this competition should bedirected to questions@juno.nrl.navy.mil.

________________________________________________________________

Opportunity toPublish Student Climate Research in Harvard University’s Journal of EmergingInvestigators

Harvard University’s Journal of EmergingInvestigators, or JEI, has formed a collaboration with theInstitute for Earth Science Research and Education to publish a series ofpeer-reviewed, climate-related research papers authored by middle- andsecondary-school students.

JEI isan open-access peer-reviewed online journal whose mission is to encourage andpublish authentic student research. In addition to standalone research papers, JEIalso encourages students who are developing science fair projects to submitjournal articles based on those projects. Guidelines for articles, includingsome practical suggestions for converting a science fair project into a journalarticle submission, can be found at www.instesre.org.

The initial deadline for an intent to submit amanuscript email is Nov.30, 2012. For more information, including submissioninstructions and other deadlines, please contact David Brooks at brooksdr@instesre.org.

________________________________________________________________

FreeSmithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series

Curious about our nearest star, moon rocks, volcanoes and other wonders ofthe universe? Come to the Smithsonian’s Stars, a series of 10 lectures bySmithsonian researchers who are exploring the sun, the moon, planets, stars,galaxies and the universe. These speakers will share behind-the-scenes detailsabout how their research is done and technologies that advance new discoveriesat the Smithsonian Institution.

Each lecture begins at 5:15 p.m. and is followedby a question-and-answer session. A Discovery Station activity will take placeat 4 p.m. prior to each lecture. Stay after the lecture to visit theobservatory, weather permitting.

Dec. 1, 2012 — A Universe of Data
This century has seen stunning cosmicdiscoveries. The digital age has given everyone free access to space data; thetrick is to turn that data into quantitative science and pictures that tell astory. Astrophysicist Jonathan McDowell will use images from the Chandra SpaceTelescope to help explain how astronomers study space in the computer age.

Dec. 15, 2012 — TheMission of the Mars Science Laboratory, Curiosity
Since landing on Mars in early August 2012, the Mars Science LaboratoryCuriosity rover has returned an array of stunning data that is being used toevaluate whether Mars may have harbored habitable environments. Geologist JohnGrant will delve into the recent findings from Curiosity.

Jan. 5, 2013 — Trees inthe City
Tree cover is an important element of the urbanenvironment that plays an increasingly larger role in ecosystem processes.Geographer Andrew Johnston will discuss how satellite data is used to makereliable observations about urban tree cover variability, why it matters tourban residents and how these same data are used to map changes in tree cover.

For more information about the Smithsonian’sStars Lecture Series and to see a full schedule of upcoming lectures, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/lectures/stars/index.cfm.

Questions about this lecture series should bedirected to the visitor service line at 202-633-1000.

The Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series is madepossible by a grant from NASA.

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Free Education Webinar Series fromthe Aerospace Education Services Project

The Aerospace Education Services Project is presenting a series of freewebinars throughout December 2012. All webinars can be accessed online. Joinaerospace education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans,educator guides and resources to bring NASA into your classroom.

Exploration Then and Now: Science and the Historical Perspective (Grades4-8)
Dec. 3, 2012, 5 – 6 p.m. EST
Aerospace education specialist Brandon Hargis will compare the experiencesof settlers of Jamestown in 1607 and space-faring explorers discovering newworlds and building settlements in extraterrestrial environments. Participantswill be introduced to the “Exploration: Then and Now” educator guideand discuss the connections to science and social studies standards.

Amusement Park Physics (Grades 6-12)
Dec. 3, 2012, 7 – 8 p.m. EST
Aerospace education specialist John Weis will provide participants with anintroduction to the “Amusement Park Physics With a NASA Twist”educator guide and classroom activities. These activities cover multiplephysics concepts including energy, describing motion, collisions and simple harmonicmotion.

Mars and Earth Compared: Life on Other Worlds? (Grades 4-12)
Dec. 4, 2012, 5 – 6 p.m. EST
Aerospace education specialist Steve Culivan will explore the possibilityof finding evidence of life on Mars and how Earth compares to the Red Planet.Participants will learn about education resources relating to NASA’s Curiosityrover and activities to help develop a better understanding of life on Earthand the possibilities of life on Mars.

Planetary Modeling Dough: Solar System Scale Model (Grades 3-8)
Dec. 11, 2012, 5 – 6 p.m. EST
Aerospace education specialist Rick Varner will lead participants throughactivities that use simple clay materials to create a scale model of therelative masses and sizes of the planets (including the dwarf planet, Pluto).This activity will help educators dispel some of the common misconceptionsabout the solar system.

Solar Energy: Power for Earth, the Space Station and Exploring Other Worlds!(Grades 6-12)
Dec. 12, 2012, 4 – 5 p.m. EST and 7 – 8p.m. EST
Aerospace education specialist Brandon Hargis will introduce participants to aproblem-based learning activity that requires students to propose and defend adesign to provide power to a lunar or Martian research habitat for sixexplorers. This webinar is part of the Department of Education Green Strideswebinar series.

Ignite Learning Using the RealWorld-InWorld NASA Engineering DesignChallenge (Grades 8-12)
Dec. 13, 2012, 6 – 7 p.m. EST
Aerospace education specialist Sharon Bowers will introduce participants to theRealWorld-InWorld NASA Engineering Design Challenge, a free web-basedengineering design challenge that offers students a change to redesigncomponents of the James Webb Space Telescope.

How Do We Know the Climate Is Changing? NASA Climate Kids (Grades 2-8)
Dec. 18, 2012, 4 – 5 p.m. EST
Aerospace education specialist Susan Kohler will lead participants on anexploration of the “Climate Kids” and “Eyes on the Earth” educator materials.Participants will also learn how to use real-time data to explain the effectsof climate change on the arctic ice caps.

Chipmunk Cheeks and Chicken Legs: Body Systems and Life in Space (GradesK-12)
Dec. 19, 2012, 4 – 6 p.m. EST
Aerospace education specialist Rachelle Oblack will lead participants on anexploration of the circulatory, nervous, vestibular and musculoskeletal systemswith hands-on activities and demonstrations. A full downloadable educator guidewill be shared. This webinar is part of the Department of Education GreenStrides webinar series.

For more information about these webinars, visit http://neon.psu.edu/webinars/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to KatieHayden at Katie.S.Hayden@nasa.gov.

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What’s New in Planetary Science:A Tour of Recent Discoveries in Our Solar System WebSeminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences foreducators, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science TeachersAssociation are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminarfor educators on Dec. 3, 2012, at 6:15 p.m. EST. In the five decadessince Mariner 2 flew by Venus,NASA has explored our solar system from one end to the other. It is almostimpossible to keep up with all the latest discoveries in our solar system. Inthis Web seminar, NASA expert Sarah Noble will be your tour guide on a strollthrough the solar system to find out what’s new with each of our planetaryneighbors.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES3/webseminar26.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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2013 NASA SpaceTechnology Research Fellowships

NASA is seeking applications from current andprospective graduate students for the agency’s third class of Space TechnologyResearch Fellows. Applications will be accepted from accredited U.S.universities on behalf of individuals pursuing or planning to pursue master’sor doctoral degrees in relevant space technology disciplines at theirrespective institutions beginning in fall 2013.

The fellowships will sponsor U.S. graduatestudent researchers who show significant potential to contribute to NASA’sstrategic goals and mission in the area of space technology. NASA’s Office ofthe Chief Technologist and the Space Technology Program sponsor the fellowshipswith the goal of providing the nation a pipeline of highly skilled engineersand technologists to improve America’s technological competitiveness. Fellowswill perform innovative space technology research today while building theskills necessary to become future technological leaders.

The deadline for submitting applications is Dec. 4, 2012.

For more information on the fellowships, visit https://www.nasa.gov/offices/oct/stp/strg/nstrf13.htmland https://www.nasa.gov/offices/oct/stp/strg/nstrf13_video.html.

All material related to this fellowshipopportunity, including eligibility requirements and detailed instructions onhow to submit an application, may be accessed from http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId=%7b67565659-36F8-8888-A19E-6DC271DA6ED5%7d&path=open.

Please email any questions about thisopportunity to Claudia Meyer at hq-nstrf-call@mail.nasa.gov.

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2013-14 AlbertEinstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship

Applications are currently available for the2013-14 Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program. This programis open to current public or private elementary and secondary mathematics,technology, engineering and science classroom teachers with demonstratedexcellence in teaching. Applications are due Dec. 5, 2012.

Selected teachers spend a school year inWashington, D.C., sharing their expertise with policy makers. Einstein Fellowsmay serve with one of several government agency sponsors, such as theDepartment of Energy, NASA or the National Science Foundation.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens and becurrently employed full time in a public or private elementary or secondaryschool or school district. Applicants must have been teaching full time for atleast five of the last seven years.

For more information about this opportunity andto apply online, visit www.einsteinfellows.org.

Inquiries about the Albert EinsteinDistinguished Educator Fellowship Program should be directed to Brian O’Donnellat Brian.O’Donnell@science.doe.gov.

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Engineering Design Challenge:Thermal Protection System Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences foreducators, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science TeachersAssociation are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminarfor educators on Dec. 6, 2012, at 6:30 p.m. EST. Learn about the scienceof heat transfer and heat dissipation related to NASA vehicles, and receive anintroduction to the associated engineering design challenge, Thermal ProtectionSystem. In this activity, students are challenged to design a thermalprotection system and test it using a propane torch.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES3/webseminar16.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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2013 RASC-ALRobo-Ops Competition

NASA and the National Institute of Aerospaceannounce the 2013 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts Academic LinkageExploration Robo-Ops, also known as RASC-AL Robo-Ops, competition. This designcompetition is aimed at university-level engineering students.

The RASC-AL Robo-Ops contest challengesparticipants to build a planetary rover prototype and demonstrate itscapabilities in field tests at NASA’s Johnson Space Center’s, or JSC’s, RockYard. Up to three members of the team (plus the faculty advisor) may travel toJSC for the onsite testing. The remaining team members will stay behind at thelocal university to conduct mission control tasks. The prototype rovers will betele-operated by the university-based team members and must negotiate a seriesof obstacles while accomplishing a variety of tasks. The only informationavailable to the rover controller to perform the required tasks will beinformation transmitted through onboard rover video camera(s) or other onboardsensors.

Teams will be required to do an education and outreachactivity for their rovers that demonstrates participatory explorationapproaches for future NASA missions.

Interested teams are encouraged to submit anotice of intent by Nov.18, 2012, and teams must submit a project plan for theirproposed project by Dec.19, 2012. The RASC-AL Robo-Ops Steering Committee of NASAexperts will evaluate the project plans and select as many as eight teams tocompete against each other at the Rock Yard in June 2013.

The RASC-AL competition is open to full-timeundergraduate or graduate students majoring in engineering or science at anaccredited university. University design teams must include one faculty orindustry advisor with a university affiliation and two or more undergraduate orgraduate students. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

For more information about this competition,visit http://www.nianet.org/RoboOps-2013/index.aspx.

If you have questions about this competition,please contact Stacy Dees at stacy.dees@nianet.orgor Shelley Spears at shelley.spears@nianet.org.

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2012 OPTIMUS PRIMESpinoff Video Contest

NASA has opened registration for the 2012OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Video Contest. Featuring OPTIMUS PRIME, the leader fromthe popular TRANSFORMERS brand, the contest highlights spinoffs from NASAtechnologies that are used on Earth. The goal is to help students understandthe benefits of NASA technology to their daily lives.

Each student, or group of students, will submita three- to five-minute video on a selected NASA spinoff technology listed inNASA’s 2011 “Spinoff” publication. Videos must demonstrate an understanding ofthe NASA spinoff technology and the associated NASA mission, as well as thecommercial application and public benefit associated with the spinofftechnology.

Participants must register for the contest by Dec. 15, 2012.

Video entries will be posted on the NASA YouTubechannel, and the public will be responsible for the first round of judging. Thetop five submissions from each of the three grade groups (elementary [3rd-5th],middle [6th-8th] and high school [9th-12th]) will advance for final judging. ANASA panel will select a winning entry from each group. The students submittingthe winning entries will be the guests of honor at the OPTIMUS PRIME SpinoffContest awards ceremony in May 2013. While there, the winners will receive theOPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Contest trophy and have the opportunity to meet NASAVIPs, astronauts and actor Peter Cullen, who voices the character OPTIMUSPRIME.

TRANSFORMERS and OPTIMUS PRIME are trademarks ofHasbro and are used with permission. © 2012 Hasbro. All Rights Reserved.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/news/releases/2012/12-077.html.

Questions about this contest should be directedto Darryl Mitchell at Darryl.R.Mitchell@nasa.gov.

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2013 Texas HighSchool Aerospace Scholars

The Texas High School Aerospace Scholars projectis an interactive, online learning experience. It is highlighted by a six-dayinternship where selected students are encouraged to study mathematics,science, engineering or computer science by interacting with engineers atNASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston.

The Texas High School Aerospace Scholars projectis open to high school juniors throughout Texas. Applicants must be U.S.citizens and have access to the Internet.

The application deadline has been extended to Dec. 16, 2012.

For additional information on the project and toapply online, visit http://has.aerospacescholars.org/.

Questions about this opportunity should bedirected to jsc-aeroscho@mail.nasa.gov.

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Women in STEM High SchoolAerospace Scholars

Engineer your dream job! The adventure begins in 2013. NASA wants you to becomepart of the workforce of tomorrow as we offer the opportunity to dream,engineer and WISH. The Women in STEM High School Aerospace Scholars, or WISH, projectoffers a one-of-a-kind experience for female high school juniors to jump-starttheir future by engaging in opportunities relating to science, technology,engineering and mathematics.

Participation starts in an online community and culminates with a summerexperience at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, during the summer of2013. Get ready to collaborate with girls from across the country as youcomplete online activities, design unique projects, work with NASA personneland present mission accomplishments. Start your dream now!

To be eligible, applicants must be:
— U.S. citizens.
— Female high school juniors during the 2012-2013 school year.
— Interested and excited about science, technology, engineering and mathematics.
— Committed to a one-year relationship with NASA’s Johnson Space Center.
— Able to access the Internet and email (at home, school or public library).
— A scholar with a cumulative GPA of 3.25/4.0 or higher.

Applications and all supporting documents are being accepted until 11:59 p.m. CSTon Dec. 28, 2012.

For more information and to download the application, visit http://wish.aerospacescholars.org/.

Questions should be directed to JSC-NHAS@mail.nasa.gov.

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Teaching From Space Office Seeks Educators forMicroGravity eXperience

NASA’s Teaching From Space Office and theReduced Gravity Education Flight Program are seeking applications for teams ofK-12 educators to participate in the MicroGravity eXperience, or Micro GX,project. This project gives students and educators across the country theopportunity to work together on an experiment to be tested aboard amicrogravity aircraft. This incredible opportunity is open to any current K-12classroom educator in the United States. Educators must also be U.S. citizens.

Micro GX activities begins with students and educators developing and proposinga reduced-gravity experiment. Selected educator teams will receive onlineprofessional development on classroom resources for microgravity, collaborationwith a NASA mentor and a reduced-gravity flight. With combined input from theirstudents and mentor, educator teams will design and fabricate their experimentsto be tested and evaluated aboard an aircraft that flies approximately 30roller-coaster-like climbs and dips to produce periods of microgravity andhypergravity, ranging from almost zero gravity to 2 g.

Seven teams of four to five educators from a single school or school district willbe selected from this application process to participate in Micro GX. Thisincludes participation in an online microgravity course, which will begin onFeb. 11, 2013, with a series of Web seminars with NASA personnel to initiateexperiment development. The highlight of the online course is to travel toNASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, and participate in the ReducedGravity Education Flight Program during the week of July 12-20, 2013. Duringthe flight week, educators will fly and perform custom experiments in areduced-gravity environment. Selected teams are responsible for all expensesassociated with the travel and stay in Houston. The online course continueswith activities beyond the flight experience through Aug. 26, 2013.

Educator teams interested in participating in Micro GX may submit a proposal nolater than Jan. 9, 2013. For more information, visit http://microgravityuniversity.jsc.nasa.gov/tfs or send an email to jsc-rgeducator@nasa.gov.


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2013 NASA Student AirborneResearch Program

The NASA Airborne Science Program invites highly motivated junior and seniorundergraduate students to apply for the NASA Student Airborne Research Program,also known as SARP, 2013. The program provides students with hands-on researchexperience in all aspects of a major scientific campaign, from detailedplanning on how to achieve mission objectives to formal presentation of resultsand conclusions to peers and others. Students will assist in the operation ofairborne instruments onboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft.

The program takes place in summer 2013. Instrument and flight preparations, andthe research flights themselves, will occur at NASA’s Dryden AircraftOperations Facility in Palmdale, Calif. Data analysis will take place at theUniversity of California, Irvine.

Successful applicants will be awarded a stipend and meals allowance for eightweeks of participation in the program. Round-trip travel to California, housingand transportation will be provided.

The deadline for applications is Feb. 8,2013.

For more information and to download the program application, visit http://www.nserc.und.edu/learning/SARP2013.html.

Specific questions about the program should be directed to SARP2013@nserc.und.edu.

________________________________________________________________

Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA.For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — Nov. 20, 2012

Check out the followingNASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listedbelow.

FreeEducation Webinar Series from the Aerospace Education Services Project
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Dates: Various Dates Through December 2012

Distance/Rate/Time Problems: Smart Skies Web Seminar
Audience: 5-9 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Nov. 28, 2012

2013 CanSat Competition
Audience: Higher Education Educators andStudents
Application Deadline: Nov. 30, 2012

2013 Texas High School Aerospace Scholars
Audience: 9-12 Students
New Extended Deadline: Nov. 30, 2012

Opportunity to PublishStudent Climate Research in Harvard University’s Journal of EmergingInvestigators
Audience: 5-12 Educators and Students
Notice of Intent Deadline: Nov. 30, 2012

2012 OPTIMUS PRIMESpinoff Video Contest
Audience: Grade 3-12 Students
Registration Deadline: Dec. 15, 2012

________________________________________________________________

Free Education Webinar Series fromthe Aerospace Education Services Project

The Aerospace Education Services Project is presenting a series of freewebinars throughout November 2012. All webinars can be accessed online. Join aerospaceeducation specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guidesand resources to bring NASA into your classroom.

Robotics on a Budget (Grades 5-12)
Nov. 28, 2012, 4:30 – 5:30 p.m. EST
Aerospace education specialist Steve Culivan will explore how to use robotics toenhance your students’ understanding of science, technology, engineering andmathematics, or STEM. Participants will also learn about NASA STEM roboticsmissions, curriculum and activities that are available.

For more information about this webinar, and to see a full list of webinarstaking place through December 2012, visithttp://neon.psu.edu/webinars/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Katie Haydenat Katie.S.Hayden@nasa.gov.

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Distance/Rate/Time Problems: Smart Skies Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, theNASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association arehosting a 90-minute professional development Web seminar for educators on Nov. 28, 2012, at 6:30 p.m. EST. Learnhow to use an innovative air traffic control simulator to engage your studentsas they explore the mathematics involved in the role of an air trafficcontroller. In the three-plane problem featured in this lesson, the challengeis to change routes and speeds to line up the planes safely, with properspacing, at a given route intersection.

This seminar will be repeated on Apr. 3, 2013.

For more information and toregister online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES3/webseminar15.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

E-mail any questions about this opportunity to the NES Help Desk at NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

________________________________________________________________

2013 CanSat Competition

Applications currently are being accepted forthe 2013 CanSat Competition.

This annual competition is open to universityand college students from the United States, Canada, Mexico and othercountries. Teams of three to 10 students must design, build and launch a sensorpayload called a CanSat. Each CanSat is slightly larger than a soda can andmust be built according to the specifications released by the competitionorganizing committee.

All teams entering the CanSat competition arerequired to have a faculty adviser. The faculty adviser will oversee and beresponsible for the conduct of the team at all times during the competition.The advisor is strongly encouraged to accompany the team to the competition.

Applications are due Nov. 30, 2012.

For more information about the competition andto download the application, visit http://www.cansatcompetition.com/.

Questions about this competition should bedirected to questions@juno.nrl.navy.mil.

________________________________________________________________

2013 Texas HighSchool Aerospace Scholars

The Texas High School Aerospace Scholars projectis an interactive, online learning experience. It is highlighted by a six-dayinternship where selected students are encouraged to study mathematics,science, engineering or computer science by interacting with engineers atNASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston.

The Texas High School Aerospace Scholars projectis open to high school juniors throughout Texas. Applicants must be U.S.citizens and have access to the Internet.

The application deadline has been extended to Nov. 30, 2012.

For additional information on the project and toapply online, visit http://has.aerospacescholars.org/.

Questions about this opportunity should bedirected to jsc-aeroscho@mail.nasa.gov.

________________________________________________________________

Opportunity toPublish Student Climate Research in Harvard University’s Journal of EmergingInvestigators

Harvard University’s Journal of EmergingInvestigators, or JEI, has formed a collaboration with theInstitute for Earth Science Research and Education to publish a series ofpeer-reviewed, climate-related research papers authored by middle- andsecondary-school students.

JEI isan open-access peer-reviewed online journal whose mission is to encourage andpublish authentic student research. In addition to standalone research papers, JEIalso encourages students who are developing science fair projects to submitjournal articles based on those projects. Guidelines for articles, includingsome practical suggestions for converting a science fair project into a journalarticle submission, can be found at www.instesre.org.

The initial deadline for an intent to submit amanuscript email is Nov.30, 2012. For more information, including submissioninstructions and other deadlines, please contact David Brooks at brooksdr@instesre.org.

________________________________________________________________

2012 OPTIMUSPRIME Spinoff Video Contest

NASA has opened registration for the 2012 OPTIMUSPRIME Spinoff Video Contest. Featuring OPTIMUS PRIME, the leader from thepopular TRANSFORMERS brand, the contest highlights spinoffs from NASAtechnologies that are used on Earth. The goal is to help students understandthe benefits of NASA technology to their daily lives.

Each student, or group of students, will submita three- to five-minute video on a selected NASA spinoff technology listed inNASA’s 2011 “Spinoff” publication. Videos must demonstrate an understanding ofthe NASA spinoff technology and the associated NASA mission, as well as thecommercial application and public benefit associated with the spinofftechnology.

Participants must register for the contest by Dec. 15, 2012.

Video entries will be posted on the NASA YouTubechannel, and the public will be responsible for the first round of judging. Thetop five submissions from each of the three grade groups (elementary [3rd-5th],middle [6th-8th] and high school [9th-12th]) will advance for final judging. ANASA panel will select a winning entry from each group. The students submittingthe winning entries will be the guests of honor at the OPTIMUS PRIME SpinoffContest awards ceremony in May 2013. While there, the winners will receive theOPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Contest trophy and have the opportunity to meet NASAVIPs, astronauts and actor Peter Cullen, who voices the character OPTIMUSPRIME.

TRANSFORMERS and OPTIMUS PRIME are trademarks ofHasbro and are used with permission. © 2012 Hasbro. All Rights Reserved.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/news/releases/2012/12-077.html.

Questions about this contest should be directedto Darryl Mitchell at Darryl.R.Mitchell@nasa.gov.

________________________________________________________________

Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA.For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — Nov. 15, 2012

Check out the followingNASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listedbelow.

NASAEducation Launches New Clubhouse
Audience: K-4 Educators and Students

Free Education Webinar Series from the Aerospace Education Services Project
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Dates: Various Dates During November 2012

NASA Social Event at the AmericanGeophysical Union Fall Meeting 2012
Audience: All Educators and Students 18+ Years Old
Registration Deadline: 5 p.m. on Nov. 16, 2012

2012-2013 RealWorld Design Challenge
Audience: 9-12 Educators and Students — U.S. Only
Registration Deadline: Nov. 16, 2012

Free Smithsonian’s StarsLecture Series
Audience: All Educators and 9-Higher Education Students
Next Lecture Date: Nov. 17, 2012

NASA CubeSat SpaceMissions
Audience: Higher Education Educators &Students
Application Deadline: Nov. 20, 2012

Distance/Rate/Time Problems: Smart Skies Web Seminar
Audience: 5-9 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Nov. 28, 2012

2012 OPTIMUS PRIMESpinoff Video Contest
Audience: Grade 3-12 Students
Registration Deadline: Dec. 15, 2012

2013 NASA and Worcester PolytechnicInstitute Sample Return Robot Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Early Bird Registration Deadline: Jan. 7, 2013

NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowships Program Accepting Proposalsfor 2013-2014 Academic Year
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Proposal Deadline: Feb. 1, 2013

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NASA Education Launches NewClubhouse

A new room awaits kids on the NASA Kids’ Clubwebsite. Find your way to the new Clubhouse from the mission control console onthe NASA Kids’ Club page. Journey with Nebula, the Clubhouse commander, andexplore games and interactive features designed for K-4 audiences. Look throughthe porthole in the floor to see pictures of Earth taken from space; read aboutwhy NASA explores; play a game about what astronauts eat in space; discoverwhat your age and weight would be on a moon or another planet; color picturesof wildlife living on NASA centers; assemble a polygon featuring NASA aircraft;and check out the “hot spots” that come to life upon contact.

In addition to the many games NASA Kids’ Club offers, its “Now in Space” areaprovides current and past information about the astronauts on the InternationalSpace Station. Look in the “More Pictures” section for incredible NASA images.

NASA Kids’ Club is an award-winning educational website designed for childrenin kindergarten through fourth grade. Content is based on education standardsand designed to engage young children in science, technology, engineering andmathematics.

Click the link below to begin your NASA Kids’Club adventure.

https://www.nasa.gov/education/kidsclub

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FreeEducation Webinar Series from the Aerospace Education Services Project

The Aerospace Education Services Project ispresenting a series of free webinars throughout November 2012. All webinars canbe accessed online. Join aerospace education specialists to learn aboutactivities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources to bring NASA into yourclassroom.

Here an Earth, There an Earth, Everywhere an Earth: The Kepler TelescopeSearch for Habitable Planets Beyond Our Solar System (Grades 5-12)
Nov. 15, 2012, 5 – 6 p.m. EST
Aerospace education specialist Steve Culivan will discuss NASA’s Keplertelescope and its search for Earth-like planets orbiting other stars.Participants will learn how to use Johannes Kepler’s Third Law and actualKepler telescope data to construct graphs to record and interpret data thatdetermine if a planet orbiting a star in another solar system is a possiblecandidate to support life.

Robotics on a Budget (Grades 5-12)
Nov. 28, 2012, 4:30 – 5:30 p.m. EST
Aerospace education specialist Steve Culivan will explore how to use robotics toenhance your students’ understanding of science, technology, engineering andmathematics, or STEM. Participants will also learn about NASA STEM roboticsmissions, curriculum and activities that are available.

For more information about these webinars, and to see a full list of webinarstaking place through December 2012, visithttp://neon.psu.edu/webinars/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to KatieHayden at Katie.S.Hayden@nasa.gov.

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NASA Social Event at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting 2012

NASA and the American Geophysical Union areinviting social media followers to a unique behind-the-scenes NASA Social onTuesday, Dec. 4, 2012, in San Francisco. The event will bring 20 social mediausers together with some of the world’s best and brightest scientific minds atthe world’s largest Earth and solar system science conference.

NASA Socials are in-person meetings with people who engage with the agencythrough Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and other social networks. Participants willget special access to parts of the AGU meeting and meet with NASA and otherscientists presenting research on Earth’s climate, deep ocean exploration andthe latest findings from Mars. Additionally, guests will sit in on a pressconference, attend a panel on deep ocean exploration with film-maker JamesCameron and a NASA astrobiologist, explore the expansive exhibit hall, and meetfellow science enthusiasts who are active on social media.

Registration is open until 5 p.m. Friday, Nov. 16. NASA and the AGU will select20 participants at random from Web registrants. Additional applicants will beplaced on a waiting list. Because of space limitations, those selected will notbe permitted to bring a guest. Each participant must be age 18 or older.

For more NASA Social and sign up information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/social.

To join and track the conversation online during the NASA Socials, follow the hashtags#NASASocial and #AGU12.

The AGU Fall Meeting attracts as many as 20,000 attendees and offers a platformfor scientists to present their most cutting-edge work. For more information onthe meeting, visit http://fallmeeting.agu.org/2012.

Questions about this NASA Social event should be directed to HQ-Social@mail.nasa.gov.

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2012-2013 RealWorld Design Challenge

The Real World Design Challenge is an annual U.S. competition that givesstudents in grades 9-12 the opportunity to work on real-world engineeringchallenges in a team environment. This year, NASA is teaming up with other RWDCpartners on the Aviation Challenge. This challenge invites students to designan unmanned aerial system to help locate a lost child.

Participating schools receive real engineeringsoftware and partner with mentors who are professional engineers. The contestprovides students with opportunities to apply the lessons of the classroom toreal technical problems.

The deadline for team registration is Nov. 16, 2012. Entriesmust be submitted by Jan. 18, 2013.

For more information about the challenge, visit http://www.realworlddesignchallenge.org.

Questions about the Real World Design Challenge should be directed to RalphCoppola at rkcoppola@outlook.com.

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Free Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series

Curious about our nearest star, moon rocks, volcanoes and other wonders ofthe universe? Come to the Smithsonian’s Stars, a series of 10 lectures bySmithsonian researchers who are exploring the sun, the moon, planets, stars,galaxies and the universe. These speakers will share behind-the-scenes detailsabout how their research is done and technologies that advance new discoveriesat the Smithsonian Institution.

Each lecture begins at 5:15 p.m. and is followedby a question-and-answer session. A Discovery Station activity will take placeat 4 p.m. prior to each lecture. Stay after the lecture to visit theobservatory, weather permitting.

Nov. 17, 2012 — The Dynamic Sun
The sun is even more dynamic, mysterious andbeautiful than you probably imagine. Astrophysicist Mark Weber will explorethis incredible star with observations from some of the most advancedtelescopes. Learn what scientists have discovered and what they are onlybeginning to understand.

Dec. 1, 2012 — A Universe of Data
This century has seen stunning cosmicdiscoveries. The digital age has given everyone free access to space data; thetrick is to turn that data into quantitative science and pictures that tell astory. Astrophysicist Jonathan McDowell will use images from the Chandra SpaceTelescope to help explain how astronomers study space in the computer age.

Dec. 15, 2012 — TheMission of the Mars Science Laboratory, Curiosity
Since landing on Mars in early August 2012, the Mars Science LaboratoryCuriosity rover has returned an array of stunning data that is being used toevaluate whether Mars may have harbored habitable environments. Geologist JohnGrant will delve into the recent findings from Curiosity.

For more information about the Smithsonian’sStars Lecture Series and to see a full schedule of upcoming lectures, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/lectures/stars/index.cfm.

Questions about this lecture series should bedirected to the visitor service line at 202-633-1000.

The Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series is madepossible by a grant from NASA.

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NASA CubeSatSpace Missions

NASA is seeking proposals for small satellitepayloads to fly on rockets planned to launch between 2013 and 2016. Theseminiature spacecraft, known as CubeSats, could be auxiliary payloads onpreviously planned missions.

CubeSats are a class of research spacecraftcalled nanosatellites. These cube-shaped satellites are approximately fourinches long, have a volume of about one quart and weigh less than three pounds.

Proposed CubeSat investigations must beconsistent with NASA’s Strategic Plan and the NASA education vision and goals.The research must address aspects of science, exploration, technologydevelopment, education or operations.

Applicants must submit proposals electronicallyby 4:30 p.m. EST, Nov. 20, 2012. NASA will select the payloads by Jan. 31,2013. Selection does not guarantee a launch opportunity. The selectedspacecraft will be eligible for flight after final negotiations when a launchopportunity arises. NASA will not provide funding for the development of thesmall satellites.

NASA recently announced the results from thethird round of the CubeSat Launch Initiative. From the first three launchinitiatives, 64 payloads made the short list for launch opportunities between2011 and 2014. They are eligible for launch pending an appropriate opportunityand final negotiations. The satellites come from 25 states: Alabama, Alaska, California,Colorado, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland,Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, North Dakota, New Hampshire, NewMexico, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, Utah, Vermont and Virginia.

For additional information about NASA’s CubeSatLaunch Initiative program, visit http://go.nasa.gov/puk9K2and http://go.nasa.gov/CubeSatOp.

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Distance/Rate/Time Problems: Smart Skies Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, theNASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association arehosting a 90-minute professional development Web seminar for educators on Nov. 28, 2012, at 6:30 p.m. EST. Learnhow to use an innovative air traffic control simulator to engage your studentsas they explore the mathematics involved in the role of an air trafficcontroller. In the three-plane problem featured in this lesson, the challengeis to change routes and speeds to line up the planes safely, with properspacing, at a given route intersection.

This seminar will be repeated on Apr. 3, 2013.

For more information and toregister online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES3/webseminar15.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

E-mail any questions about this opportunity to the NES Help Desk at NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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2013NASA and Worcester Polytechnic Institute Sample Return Robot Challenge

NASA and the Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Worcester, Mass., are seekingteams to compete in a robot technology demonstration competition with apotential $1.5 million prize purse.

During the Sample Return Robot Challenge, teams will compete to demonstrate arobot that can locate and retrieve geologic samples from a wide and variedterrain without human control. The objective of the competition is to encourageinnovations in automatic navigation and robotic manipulator technologies.Innovations stemming from this challenge may improve NASA’s capability toexplore a variety of destinations in space, as well as enhance the nation’srobotic technology for use in industries and applications on Earth.

NASA provides the prize money to the winning team as part of the agency’sCentennial Challenges competitions, which seek unconventional solutions toproblems of interest to the agency and the nation. While NASA provides theprize purse, the competitions are managed by nonprofit organizations that coverthe cost of operations through commercial or private sponsorships. Thecompetition is planned for June 2013 in Worcester and is anticipated to attracthundreds of competitors from industry and academia nationwide.

Early bird registration and fees for the competition are due by Jan. 7, 2013. Teams wishing to registerafter this date are subject to approval by the judging committee.

For more information about the Sample Return Robot Challenge and to registeronline for the competition, visit http://challenge.wpi.edu.

The Centennial Challenges program is part of NASA’sSpace Technology Program, which is innovating, developing, testing and flyinghardware for use in NASA’s future missions. NASA’s Space Technology Program andthe Centennial Challenges are creating new technological solutions for NASA andour nation’s future. For more information about NASA’s Centennial Challengesand the Space
Technology Program, visit https://www.nasa.gov/challenges.

Questions about the Sample Return Robot Challenge should be sent to challenge@wpi.edu.

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2012 OPTIMUSPRIME Spinoff Video Contest

NASA has opened registration for the 2012OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Video Contest. Featuring OPTIMUS PRIME, the leader fromthe popular TRANSFORMERS brand, the contest highlights spinoffs from NASAtechnologies that are used on Earth. The goal is to help students understandthe benefits of NASA technology to their daily lives.

Each student, or group of students, will submita three- to five-minute video on a selected NASA spinoff technology listed inNASA’s 2011 “Spinoff” publication. Videos must demonstrate an understanding ofthe NASA spinoff technology and the associated NASA mission, as well as thecommercial application and public benefit associated with the spinofftechnology.

Participants must register for the contest by Dec. 15, 2012.

Video entries will be posted on the NASA YouTubechannel, and the public will be responsible for the first round of judging. Thetop five submissions from each of the three grade groups (elementary [3rd-5th],middle [6th-8th] and high school [9th-12th]) will advance for final judging. ANASA panel will select a winning entry from each group. The students submittingthe winning entries will be the guests of honor at the OPTIMUS PRIME SpinoffContest awards ceremony in May 2013. While there, the winners will receive theOPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Contest trophy and have the opportunity to meet NASAVIPs, astronauts and actor Peter Cullen, who voices the character OPTIMUSPRIME.

TRANSFORMERS and OPTIMUS PRIME are trademarks ofHasbro and are used with permission. © 2012 Hasbro. All Rights Reserved.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/news/releases/2012/12-077.html.

Questions about this contest should be directedto Darryl Mitchell at Darryl.R.Mitchell@nasa.gov.

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NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowships Program Accepting Proposalsfor 2013-2014 Academic Year

The NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, or NESSF, is solicitingapplications from accredited U.S. universities on behalf of individualspursuing master’s or doctoral degrees in earth and space sciences, or relateddisciplines, for the 2013-2014 academic year. The purpose of NESSF is to ensurecontinued training of a highly qualified workforce in disciplines needed toachieve NASA’s scientific goals. Awards resulting from the competitiveselection will be training grants to the respective universities, with theadvisor serving as the principal investigator. The financial support for theNESSF program comes from the Science Mission Directorate’s four sciencedivisions: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Planetary Science and Astrophysics.

Initially, NESSF awards are made for one year. They may be renewed for no morethan two additional years, contingent upon satisfactory progress (as reflectedin academic performance, research progress and recommendation by the facultyadvisor) and the availability of funds.

The maximum amount of a NESSF award is $30,000 per year.

Proposals for this opportunity are due Feb. 1, 2013.

For more information about this solicitation, visit http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId={BC1C168E-1D9B-0BD1-816B-14E1C31BB0D3}&path=open.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to:

For earth science, Claire Macaulay at Claire.I.Macaulay@nasa.gov.

For heliophysics, planetary science and astrophysics, Dolores Holland at hq-nessf-Space@nasa.gov.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA.For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — Nov. 8, 2012

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

International Space Station EarthKAM Fall 2012 Mission
Audience: 5-8 Educators
Event Date: Nov. 13-16, 2012

High Power Microscopes: The Virtual Lab Web Seminar
Audience: 9-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Nov. 13, 2012

Free Education Webinar Series from the Aerospace Education Services Project
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Dates: Various Dates During November 2012

Engineering Design Challenge: Spacecraft Structures Web Seminar
Audience: 5-9 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Nov. 14, 2012

National Air and Space Museum Downlink Event
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Nov. 15, 2012, at 11:35 a.m. EST

NASA’s DEVELOP Program — 2013 Spring and Summer Sessions

Audience: 9-12 and Higher Education Educators and Students
Spring Session Deadline: Nov. 15, 2012
Summer Session Deadline: Feb. 4, 2013

“The World’s a Place of Living Things” Art Contest
Audience: Students in Grades 2-4

Entry Deadline: Nov. 16, 2012

2012-2013 Real World Design Challenge
Audience: 9-12 Educators and Students — U.S. Only

Registration Deadline: Nov. 16, 2012

DEADLINE EXTENDED: NASA CubeSat Space Missions

Audience: Higher Education Educators & Students
Application Deadline: Nov. 20, 2012

2012 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Video Contest

Audience: Grade 3-12 Students
Registration Deadline: Dec. 15, 2012

Registration Open for the 20th Annual NASA Great Moonbuggy Race
Audience: 9-12 & Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Deadline for International Teams: Jan. 7, 2013
Registration Deadline for U.S. Teams: Feb. 4, 2013

IRIS Challenge: Tracking a Solar Storm
Audience: 5-8 Educators
Registration Open Now, Challenge Begins February 2013

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International Space Station EarthKAM Fall 2012 Mission

Middle school educators are invited to join NASA for the International Space Station EarthKAM Fall 2012 Mission from Nov. 13-16, 2012. Find out more about this exciting opportunity that allows students to take pictures of Earth from a digital camera aboard the International Space Station.

International Space Station EarthKAM is a NASA-sponsored project that provides stunning, high-quality photographs of Earth taken from the space shuttle and the space station. Since 1996, EarthKAM students have taken hundreds of thousands of photographs of Earth by using the World Wide Web to direct a digital camera on select spaceflights and, currently, on the space station.

For more information about the project and to register for the upcoming mission, visit the EarthKAM home page
www.EarthKAM.ucsd.edu.

If you have questions about the EarthKAM project, please email
ek-help@earthkam.ucsd.edu.

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High Power Microscopes: The Virtual Lab Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute Web seminar for educators on Nov. 13, 2012, at 7:30 p.m. EST. Learn to use a computer program simulating three high-power virtual microscopes: an atomic force microscope, a scanning electron microscope and a fluorescence light microscope. Viewing specimens include one-celled organisms, human tissue, computer chips, insects and fungi. You will get an overview of the software, watch videos of students exploring specimens and learn to use the Virtual Lab website and software.

For more information and to register online, visit URL http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES3/webseminar13.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to the NASA Explorer Schools help desk at NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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Free Education Webinar Series from the Aerospace Education Services Project

The Aerospace Education Services Project is presenting a series of free webinars throughout November 2012. All webinars can be accessed online. Join aerospace education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources to bring NASA into your classroom.

Train Like an Astronaut (Grades 1-12)
Nov. 14, 2012, 2 – 3 p.m. EST
Aerospace education specialist Lester Morales will discuss the “Train Like an Astronaut” education materials. These activities use a physical and inquiry-based approach to human health and fitness on Earth and in space. Activities are modeled after the real-life training that astronauts do to prepare for exploring space. This webinar is part of the Department of Education’s Green Strides webinar series.

Here an Earth, There an Earth, Everywhere an Earth: The Kepler Telescope Search for Habitable Planets Beyond Our Solar System (Grades 5-12)
Nov. 15, 2012, 5 – 6 p.m. EST
Aerospace education specialist Steve Culivan will discuss NASA’s Kepler telescope and its search for Earth-like planets orbiting other stars. Participants will learn how to use Johannes Kepler’s Third Law and actual Kepler telescope data to construct graphs to record and interpret data that determine if a planet orbiting a star in another solar system is a possible candidate to support life.

Robotics on a Budget (Grades 5-12)
Nov. 28, 2012, 4:30 – 5:30 p.m. EST
Aerospace education specialist Steve Culivan will explore how to use robotics to enhance your students’ understanding of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM. Participants will also learn about NASA STEM robotics missions, curriculum and activities that are available.


For more information about these webinars, and to see a full list of webinars taking place through December 2012, visit http://neon.psu.edu/webinars/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Katie Hayden at Katie.S.Hayden@nasa.gov.

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Engineering Design Challenge: Spacecraft Structures Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on Nov. 14, 2012, at 6:30 p.m. EDT. Learn how to incorporate the excitement of rocketry into your classroom during this Web seminar and receive an overview of the student engineering design challenge, Spacecraft Structures, where students design and construct a strong, but lightweight, structure that can withstand the launch of a water bottle “rocket.”

This Web seminar will be repeated on Mar. 20, 2013.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES3/webseminar14.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov
.

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National Air and Space Museum Downlink Event

Join NASA and the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum on Nov. 15, 2012, at 11:35 a.m. EST to see students involved in the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program, or SSEP, talk live with astronauts Kevin Ford and Suni Williams.

SSEP is an in-orbit educational research opportunity that allows students to design and send experiments to the space station through a partnership with NanoRacks, LLC. Astronaut Williams has been involved in activating the latest round of SSEP experiments that launched to the space station on the Dragon spacecraft in early October.

The downlink, hosted at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C., takes place during International Education Week, or IEW. IEW is a joint initiative between the U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Department of Education that celebrates the benefits of international education and exchange worldwide. Deputy Secretary of Education Tony Miller, National Air and Space Museum Director General Jack Dailey, Smithsonian Institute Assistant Secretary for Education and Access Claudine Brown, and the NASA Associate Administrator for Education Leland Melvin will participate in the program.


To watch the downlink event live online, visit 
http://ncesse.org/events/isswebcast/.

For more information about the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/.

To learn more about NASA education downlinks, visit
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/teachingfromspace/students/downlinks.html.

Questions about this event should be directed to Becky Kamas at
JSC-Teaching-From-Space@mail.nasa.gov.

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NASA’s DEVELOP Program — 2013 Spring and Summer Sessions

DEVELOP is a NASA Science Mission Directorate Applied Sciences-sponsored internship that fosters the training and development of students in the Earth sciences. The DEVELOP Program extends the application of NASA Earth science research and technology to meet societal needs.

Students conduct projects that focus on the practical application of NASA’s Earth science research and demonstrate how results can benefit partner organizations and local communities. Advisors and mentors, from NASA and partner institutions, provide guidance and support for the program. Students gain experience using NASA science and technology in a professional setting.

Students from high school through doctoral levels are selected through a competitive application process. Students chosen by DEVELOP work on teams onsite at 13 locations in North America. Activities are conducted during three 10-week terms per year: spring, summer and fall. To apply to a DEVELOP center at a NASA location, applicants must be a citizen of the U.S. However, international students currently registered at an accredited school in the U.S. are eligible to apply to DEVELOP regional locations. International applicants must already have a visa that permits them to work in the U.S.

Applications for the spring 2013 session are due Nov. 15, 2012. Summer 2013 applications are due Feb. 4, 2013.

For more information about this unique internship opportunity, please visit the DEVELOP website at http://develop.larc.nasa.gov.

Questions about the DEVELOP Program should be directed by email to NASA-DL-DEVELOP@mail.nasa.gov or by telephone to 757-864-3761.

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“The World’s a Place of Living Things” Art Contest

The Institute for Global Environmental Strategies, or IGES, invites young scientists and artists to explore biodiversity. There are many different types of life on Earth — from bacteria to insects to plants and animals. Biodiversity is everywhere. Students in grades 2-4 are encouraged to learn more about the forms of life in a particular place — what types of life can be seen? What types of life are hard to see? Do the different types of life interact with each other?

Students should investigate these questions, and create a piece of artwork (no larger than 16″x20″) to show what they have learned. First-, second-, and third-place artists will receive a $100, $75, and $50 gift card, respectively, framed color certificates and their artwork will be showcased on the IGES website.

Entries are due Nov. 16, 2012. For full details on the contest, resources on biodiversity and to download an entry form, visit http://www.strategies.org/artcontest.


Questions about this opportunity should be directed to info@strategies.org.

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2012-2013 Real World Design Challenge

The Real World Design Challenge is an annual U.S. competition that gives students in grades 9-12 the opportunity to work on real-world engineering challenges in a team environment. This year, NASA is teaming up with other RWDC partners on the Aviation Challenge. This challenge invites students to design an unmanned aerial system to help locate a lost child.


Participating schools receive real engineering software and partner with mentors who are professional engineers. The contest provides students with opportunities to apply the lessons of the classroom to real technical problems.

The deadline for team registration is Nov. 16, 2012. Entries must be submitted by Jan. 18, 2013.

For more information about the challenge, visit http://www.realworlddesignchallenge.org.

Questions about the Real World Design Challenge should be directed to Ralph Coppola at rcoppola@ptc.com.

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DEADLINE EXTENDED: NASA CubeSat Space Missions


NASA is seeking proposals for small satellite payloads to fly on rockets planned to launch between 2013 and 2016. These miniature spacecraft, known as CubeSats, could be auxiliary payloads on previously planned missions.

CubeSats are a class of research spacecraft called nanosatellites. These cube-shaped satellites are approximately four inches long, have a volume of about one quart and weigh less than three pounds.

Proposed CubeSat investigations must be consistent with NASA’s Strategic Plan and the NASA education vision and goals. The research must address aspects of science, exploration, technology development, education or operations.

Applicants must submit proposals electronically by 4:30 p.m. EST, Nov. 20, 2012. NASA will select the payloads by Jan. 31, 2013. Selection does not guarantee a launch opportunity. The selected spacecraft will be eligible for flight after final negotiations when a launch opportunity arises. NASA will not provide funding for the development of the small satellites.

NASA recently announced the results from the third round of the CubeSat Launch Initiative. From the first three launch initiatives, 64 payloads made the short list for launch opportunities between 2011 and 2014. They are eligible for launch pending an appropriate opportunity and final negotiations. The satellites come from 25 states: Alabama, Alaska, California, Colorado, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, North Dakota, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, Utah, Vermont and Virginia.

For additional information about NASA’s CubeSat Launch Initiative program, visit http://go.nasa.gov/puk9K2 and http://go.nasa.gov/CubeSatOp.

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2012 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Video Contest


NASA has opened registration for the 2012 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Video Contest. Featuring OPTIMUS PRIME, the leader from the popular TRANSFORMERS brand, the contest highlights spinoffs from NASA technologies that are used on Earth. The goal is to help students understand the benefits of NASA technology to their daily lives.

Each student, or group of students, will submit a three- to five-minute video on a selected NASA spinoff technology listed in NASA’s 2011 “Spinoff” publication. Videos must demonstrate an understanding of the NASA spinoff technology and the associated NASA mission, as well as the commercial application and public benefit associated with the spinoff technology.

Participants must register for the contest by Dec. 15, 2012.

Video entries will be posted on the NASA YouTube channel, and the public will be responsible for the first round of judging. The top five submissions from each of the three grade groups (elementary [3rd-5th], middle [6th-8th] and high school [9th-12th]) will advance for final judging. A NASA panel will select a winning entry from each group. The students submitting the winning entries will be the guests of honor at the OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Contest awards ceremony in May 2013. While there, the winners will receive the OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Contest trophy and have the opportunity to meet NASA VIPs, astronauts and actor Peter Cullen, who voices the character OPTIMUS PRIME.

TRANSFORMERS and OPTIMUS PRIME are trademarks of Hasbro and are used with permission. © 2012 Hasbro. All Rights Reserved.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/news/releases/2012/12-077.html.

Questions about this contest should be directed to Darryl Mitchell at Darryl.R.Mitchell@nasa.gov.

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Registration Open for the 20th Annual NASA Great Moonbuggy Race

Registration is open for the 20th Annual NASA Great Moonbuggy Race. High school and college students are challenged to design and build a vehicle that addresses a series of engineering problems similar to those faced by the original lunar-roving vehicle team. Each school may enter up to two teams. International teams are limited to 10 teams per country. The race will take place April 25-27, 2013, in Huntsville, Ala., at the U.S. Space & Rocket Center.

International teams must register by Jan. 7, 2013. U.S. teams must register by Feb. 4, 2013.

For more information about the competition and to register online, visit http://moonbuggy.msfc.nasa.gov/index.html.

International teams with questions about this event and registration should email Marilyn Lewis at Marilyn.H.Lewis@nasa.gov. U.S. teams with questions should contact Diedra Williams at Diedra.A.Williams@nasa.gov.

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IRIS Challenge: Tracking a Solar Storm

Join the Tracking a Solar Storm Challenge and guide students as they learn about our sun’s anatomy, the space weather it generates and why studying the sun is important.

This challenge is designed around NASA’s solar mission Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, or IRIS. Scheduled to launch in 2013, the IRIS spacecraft will study the dynamics of our sun’s atmosphere using an ultraviolet telescope and spectrograph. As students participate in the challenge, they will learn more about the IRIS mission and the instruments that scientists will use to gather data.

An educators’ guide for the IRIS challenge will be posted in mid-November outlining basic lesson plans and supplementary learning projects available to help you lead students in studying the sun’s weather, tracking a solar storm and predicting its effect on Earth.

The challenge will run February – May 2013.

To learn more about the challenge, visit
http://irischallenge.arc.nasa.gov/.

Educators are invited to register now at
https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/ZRBWQQK to receive updates as the challenge develops.

Please email any questions about this challenge to Linda Conrad at arc-quest-challenge@mail.nasa.gov
.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub
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NASA Education Express — Nov. 1, 2012

Check out the followingNASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listedbelow.

HeatTransfer: MESSENGER — My Angle on Cooling Web Seminar
Audience: 5-8 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Nov 1, 2012, 6:30 – 8 p.m. EDT

NASA’s Digital Learning Network PresentsSpace Shuttle Atlantis “Roll Over” Celebration
Audience: Grades 4-12
Event Date: Nov. 2, 2012, 1 – 2 p.m. EDT

NASA’s GlennResearch Center’s High School Shadowing Project
Audience: Students inGrades 10-12
Session I ApplicationDeadline: Nov. 2, 2012
Session II ApplicationDeadline: Jan. 25, 2013
Sessions III and IVApplication Deadline: Feb. 22, 2013

Free Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series
Audience: All Educators and 9-Higher EducationStudents
Next Lecture Date: Nov. 3, 2012

NASA Hosts Social Media Event inD.C. With Astronaut Joe Acaba
Audience: Educators and Students Ages 18+
Registration Deadline: Nov. 5, 2012 at 5 p.m. EST

Free Education Webinar Series from the AerospaceEducation Services Project
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Dates: Various Dates During November 2012

Algebraic Equations: CalculatorControlled Robots Web Seminar
Audience: Algebra Teachers and Informal Educators
Event Date: Nov. 7, 2012

NASA UniversityResearch Centers Virtual Symposium
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Event Dates: Nov. 8, 2012

International Space StationEarthKAM Fall 2012 Mission
Audience: 5-8 Educators
Event Date: Nov. 13-16, 2012

DEADLINE EXTENDED: “TheWorld’s a Place of Living Things” Art Contest
Audience: Students in Grades 2-4
Entry Deadline: Nov. 16, 2012

2013 CanSat Competition
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: Nov. 30, 2012

2013 Texas HighSchool Aerospace Scholars
Audience: 9-12 Students
New Extended Deadline: Nov. 30, 2012

2013 NASA Unmanned Aerial SystemsChallenge
Audience: Higher Education Students and Faculty
Notice of Intent Deadline: Jan. 15, 2013

2012-2013 Game Changing EngineeringDesign Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Students and Faculty
Notice of Intent Deadline: Jan. 15, 2013

2013 Planetary Geology and GeophysicsUndergraduate Research Program
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 1, 2013

NASA Wavelength Online Science ResourceNow Available
Audience: All Educators and Students

Find NASA Education Resources With theNASA Materials Finder
Audience: All Educators

What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website
Audience: K-6 Educators

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Heat Transfer: MESSENGER — MyAngle on Cooling Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, theNASA Explorer Schools and the National Science Teachers Association are hostinga 90-minute Web seminar on Nov 1, 2012,at 6:30 p.m. EDT. Learn how the MESSENGER mission to Mercury takes advantage of passivecooling methods to keep the spacecraft functioning in a high-temperatureenvironment. You will also see how to use the mission’s Staying Cool activities tolead students through an examination of different solutions to the problem ofhow to deal with too much sunlight and energy.

This seminar will be repeated on Mar. 21, 2013.

For more informationand to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES3/webseminar11.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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NASA’s Digital Learning Network Presents Space Shuttle Atlantis”Roll Over” Celebration

NASA’s Digital Learning Network, or DLN, is hosting a special event on Nov. 2, 2012, at 1 p.m. EDT tocommemorate the departure of space shuttle Atlantis. JoinDLN hosts Rachel Power and Joshua Santora live at NASA’s Kennedy Space Centerin Florida as space shuttle Atlantis is transferred from the Vehicle AssemblyBuilding to its permanent home at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex.

The Space Shuttle Atlantis “Roll Over”Celebration will feature special guests including NASA Administrator and astronautCharles Bolden, members of the space shuttle’s processing team and members fromthe team responsible for the design of the new home for Atlantis.

For more information and to watch the webcast online, visit the DLN website at http://dln.nasa.gov.

Do you have a question you would like to see answered live during the webcast?Send questions to dlinfochannel@gmail.com.

Inquiries about this webcast should be directed to JoshuaSantora at Joshua.Santora@nasa.gov.

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NASA’sGlenn Research Center’s High School Shadowing Project

NASA’s Glenn ResearchCenter, or GRC, in Cleveland, Ohio, is accepting applications for its HighSchool Shadowing Project sessions for the 2012-2013 school year. Thisopportunity provides students with a one- to five-day career explorationexperience at Glenn Research Center.

The project provides highschool students with an opportunity to explore career possibilities in aresearch and development environment while under the guidance of a NASAscientist, engineer, technician or administrative professional that serves asthe student’s mentor. Students are provided information about various careers,career paths and Glenn Research Center educational resources and programs.

Applicants must be U.S.citizens and at least 16 years old by the application deadline. Four sessionsare scheduled for the 2012-2013 school year.

Session I —
Application Deadline: Nov.2, 2012
Session Date: Dec. 4, 2012

Session II —
Application Deadline: Jan.25, 2013
Session Date: Feb. 27, 2013

Session III —
Application Deadline: Feb.22, 2013
Session Date: March 26,2013

Session IV —
Application Deadline: Feb.22, 2013
Session Date: April 24,2013

For more information aboutthis opportunity, please visit https://www.nasa.gov/centers/glenn/education/ShadowingProgram_GRC.html.

Questions about the GRCHigh School Shadowing Project should be directed by email to GRC-Intern@mail.nasa.gov or bytelephone to 216-433-6656.

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Free Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series

Curious about our nearest star, moon rocks, volcanoesand other wonders of the universe? Come to the Smithsonian’s Stars, a series of10 lectures by Smithsonian researchers who are exploring the sun, the moon,planets, stars, galaxies and the universe. These speakers will sharebehind-the-scenes details about how their research is done and technologiesthat advance new discoveries at the Smithsonian Institution.

Each lecture begins at 5:15 p.m. and is followedby a question-and-answer session. A Discovery Station activity will take placeat 4 p.m. prior to each lecture. Stay after the lecture to visit theobservatory, weather permitting.

Nov. 3, 2012 — Moon Rocks and How They BecameFamous
In the late 1960s, Apollo astronauts collectedrocks from the moon and brought them back to Earth. Scientists studied theserocks, curators put them on display in museums around the world and PresidentNixon gave them as gifts to foreign heads of state. Teasel Muir-Harmony willexplore the wide-ranging roles that these rocks played.

Nov. 17, 2012 — The Dynamic Sun
The sun is even more dynamic, mysterious andbeautiful than you probably imagine. Astrophysicist Mark Weber will explorethis incredible star with observations from some of the most advancedtelescopes. Learn what scientists have discovered and what they are onlybeginning to understand.

Dec. 1, 2012 — AUniverse of Data
This century has seen stunning cosmic discoveries. The digital age hasgiven everyone free access to space data; the trick is to turn that data intoquantitative science and pictures that tell a story. Astrophysicist JonathanMcDowell will use images from the Chandra Space Telescope to help explain howastronomers study space in the computer age.

For more information about the Smithsonian’sStars Lecture Series and to see a full schedule of upcoming lectures, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/lectures/stars/index.cfm.

Questions about this lecture series should bedirected to the visitor service line at 202-633-1000.

The Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series is madepossible by a grant from NASA.

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NASA Hosts Social Media Event in D.C. WithAstronaut Joe Acaba

NASA invites its social media followers to a specialevent with astronaut Joe Acaba on Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2012, in Washington, D.C.Registration for the event is open to NASA social media followers and theirguests until 5 p.m. EST Monday, Nov. 5,2012. NASA will select 150 participants by lottery from those who registeronline. Additional applicants will be placed on a waiting list.

NASA Socials are in-person meetings with people who engage with the agencythrough Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and other social networks. This NASA Socialis an opportunity to meet and speak with Acaba, the people behind NASA’s socialmedia accounts and other space-exploration-minded participants.

Acaba launched to the International Space Station on a Russian Soyuz spacecrafton May 15, 2012. He spent 123 days aboard the orbiting laboratory as a flightengineer of the Expedition 31 and 32 crews. He returned to Earth on Sept. 17after four months off the planet.

Acaba participated in numerous scientific research experiments and performedregular maintenance and operational tasks aboard the orbiting complex. He alsofrequently tweeted on his Twitter account, @AstroAcaba, and participated in an#askStation TweetChat.

Acaba also flew aboard space shuttle Discovery in March 2009 during a spacestation assembly mission, during which he spent almost 13 hours performing twospacewalks.

To join and track the conversation online during the NASA Social, follow thehashtag #NASASocial. For more information on NASA Socials and to register,visit https://www.nasa.gov/social.

Acaba’s Twitter account is https://twitter.com/AstroAcaba.

Acaba’s biography is available at http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/acaba-jm.html.

For information about connecting and collaborating with NASA, visit https://www.nasa.gov/connect.

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Free Education Webinar Series from the Aerospace Education ServicesProject

The Aerospace Education Services Project is presenting a series of freewebinars throughout November 2012. All webinars can be accessed online. Joinaerospace education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans,educator guides and resources to bring NASA into your classroom.

Amusement Park Physics (Grades 6-12)
Nov. 5, 2012, 7 – 8 p.m. EST
Aerospace education specialist John Weis will provide participants with anintroduction to the “Amusement Park Physics With a NASA Twist”educator guide and classroom activities. These activities cover multiplephysics concepts including energy, describing motion, collisions and simple harmonicmotion.

Sun, Earth and Moon Relationships: Anatomy of an Eclipse (Grades 2-8)
Nov. 7, 2012, 4 – 5 p.m. EST
For centuries people have been amazed by the spectacle created by lunar andsolar eclipses. On Nov. 13, 2012, a total solar eclipse will occur in the SouthPacific. Join aerospace education specialist Rick Varner for a free webcast tolearn about eclipse-related NASA resources. Varner will also share a simpleactivity to simulate eclipses in the classroom.

Train Like an Astronaut (Grades 1-12)
Nov. 14, 2012, 2 – 3 p.m. EST
Aerospace education specialist Lester Morales will discuss the”Train Like an Astronaut” education materials. These activities use aphysical and inquiry-based approach to human health and fitness on Earth and inspace. Activities are modeled after the real-life training that astronauts doto prepare for exploring space. This webinar is part of the Department ofEducation’s Green Strides webinar series.

Here an Earth, There an Earth, Everywhere an Earth: The Kepler TelescopeSearch for Habitable Planets Beyond Our Solar System (Grades 5-12)
Nov. 15, 2012, 5 – 6 p.m. EST
Aerospace education specialist Steve Culivan will discuss NASA’s Keplertelescope and its search for Earth-like planets orbiting other stars.Participants will learn how to use Johannes Kepler’s Third Law and actualKepler telescope data to construct graphs to record and interpret data thatdetermine if a planet orbiting a star in another solar system is a possiblecandidate to support life.

Robotics on a Budget (Grades 5-12)
Nov. 28, 2012, 4:30 – 5:30 p.m. EST
Aerospace education specialist Steve Culivan will explore how to use robotics toenhance your students’ understanding of science, technology, engineering andmathematics, or STEM. Participants will also learn about NASA STEM roboticsmissions, curriculum and activities that are available.

For more information about these webinars, and to see a full list of webinarstaking place through December 2012, visithttp://neon.psu.edu/webinars/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to KatieHayden at Katie.S.Hayden@nasa.gov.

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Algebraic Equations: Calculator Controlled Robots WebSeminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, theNASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association arehosting a 90-minute Web seminar on Nov. 7,2012, at 6:30 p.m. EST. Discover a unique way of integrating robotictechnology into your algebra classes. Robotic missions engage students andprovide a unique way of bringing to life the concepts you are teaching. Learnto use programmable Texas Instruments, or TI, calculators and Norland ResearchRobots to solve problems requiring substituting values for variables informulas.

This seminar provides an overview of using robotics in algebra so you can makean informed decision about purchasing the robots and other equipment. You donot need to have a Norland Research Robot or programmable TI calculator toparticipate in this seminar, or know how to program the calculator.

For more information and to registeronline, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES3/webseminar12.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to the NASA Explorer Schools help deskat NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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NASA University Research Centers VirtualSymposium

NASA University Research Centers, or URC, ishosting a Virtual Symposium to highlight talented students within the NASA URCprogram and their recent experiences as interns or co-ops at NASA.

During a series of poster sessions held on Oct. 24-31, 2012,students presented virtual poster presentations of the research that wasconducted during their internship or co-op. During the sessions, participantshad the opportunity to ask questions, exchange information and ideas, andinteract with students and other event participants via the Facebook socialnetwork. A panel of NASA subject matter experts reviewed and scored the posterpresentations.

Top finalists will give oral presentations oftheir research during a virtual symposium on Nov. 8, 2012.

To learn more about the NASA URC Virtual Symposium,visit http://www.earthzine.org/nasa-urc-fall-2012-vpss/.

Questions about this event should be emailed toDaesha Roberts at daesha.d.roberts@nasa.gov.

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InternationalSpace Station EarthKAM Fall 2012 Mission

Middle school educators are invited tojoin NASA for the International Space Station EarthKAM Fall 2012 Mission from Nov.13-16, 2012. Find out more about this exciting opportunity thatallows students to take pictures of Earth from a digital camera aboard theInternational Space Station.

International Space Station EarthKAMis a NASA-sponsored project that provides stunning, high-quality photographs ofEarth taken from the space shuttle and the space station. Since 1996, EarthKAM students have taken hundredsof thousands of photographs of Earth by using the World Wide Web to direct adigital camera on select spaceflights and, currently, on the space station.

For more information about the projectand to register for the upcoming mission, visit the EarthKAM home page www.EarthKAM.ucsd.edu.

If you have questions about the EarthKAM project, please email ek-help@earthkam.ucsd.edu.

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DEADLINE EXTENDED: “The World’s a Place ofLiving Things” Art Contest

The Institute for Global EnvironmentalStrategies, or IGES, invites young scientists and artists to explorebiodiversity. There are many different types of life on Earth — from bacteriato insects to plants and animals. Biodiversity is everywhere. Students ingrades 2-4 are encouraged to learn more about the forms of life in a particularplace — what types of life can be seen? What types of life are hard to see? Dothe different types of life interact with each other?

Students should investigate these questions, andcreate a piece of artwork (no larger than 16″x20″) to show what theyhave learned. First-, second-, and third-place artists will receive a $100,$75, and $50 gift card, respectively, framed color certificates and theirartwork will be showcased on the IGES website.

Entries are due Nov. 16, 2012. Forfull details on the contest, resources on biodiversity and to download an entryform, visit http://www.strategies.org/artcontest.

Questions about this opportunity should be directedto info@strategies.org.

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2013 CanSat Competition

Applications currently are being accepted for the 2013 CanSat Competition.

This annual competition is open to university and college students from theUnited States, Canada, Mexico and other countries. Teams of three to 10students must design, build and launch a sensor payload called a CanSat. EachCanSat is slightly larger than a soda can and must be built according to thespecifications released by the competition organizing committee.

All teams entering the CanSat competition are required to have a facultyadviser. The faculty adviser will oversee and be responsible for the conduct ofthe team at all times during the competition. The advisor is stronglyencouraged to accompany the team to the competition.

Applications are due Nov. 30, 2012.

For more information about the competition and to download the application,visit http://www.cansatcompetition.com/.

Questions about this competition should be directed to questions@juno.nrl.navy.mil.

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DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2013 Texas High SchoolAerospace Scholars

The Texas High School Aerospace Scholars projectis an interactive, online learning experience. It is highlighted by a six-dayinternship where selected students are encouraged to study mathematics,science, engineering or computer science by interacting with engineers atNASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston.

The Texas High School Aerospace Scholars projectis open to high school juniors throughout Texas. Applicants must be U.S.citizens and have access to the Internet.

The application deadline has been extended to Nov. 30, 2012.

For additional information on the project and toapply online, visit http://has.aerospacescholars.org/.

Questions about this opportunity should bedirected to jsc-aeroscho@mail.nasa.gov.

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2013 NASA Unmanned Aerial SystemsChallenge

NASA invites college teams to take part in the 2013 NASA AeronauticsMission Directorate’s Unmanned Aerial Systems Challenge. Students are invitedto propose an unmanned aerial firefighting system to battle a wildfire ragingin a drought-stricken area. Design assessment will be based on projectedeffectiveness, cost, innovation, and ease of use and operation inside theNational Air Space.

The contest is open to teams of full-time students enrolled in higher educationinstitutions of the United States or its territories. This category includesuniversities, colleges, trade schools, community colleges, professionalschools, etc. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

A notice of intent is due Jan.15, 2013. Final entries are due May 3, 2013.

For more information and a complete list of rules, visit https://aero.larc.nasa.gov/competitions_univ.htm.

Questions about the challenge should be directed to Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.

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2012-2013 Game ChangingEngineering Design Challenge

NASA invites college student teams to enter the 2013 Game Changing EngineeringDesign Challenge. Student teams are asked to design a thermal control systemfor a manned space station in low lunar orbit. Designs must accommodate asix-person crew, maintain acceptable temperatures for avionics components, andprovide a healthy environment for the crew. Multidisciplinary teams areencouraged.

The contest is open to student teams from post-secondary institutions inthe United States or its territories. This category includes universities,colleges, trade schools, community colleges, professional schools, etc.

Finalists will be invited to present their work toNASA engineers and tour a NASA center.

A notice of intent is due Jan. 15, 2013.Final entries are due on April 29, 2013.

For more information and a complete list of rules, visit http://spacetech.larc.nasa.gov.

Questions about the challenge should be directed to Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.

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2013 Planetary Geology andGeophysics Undergraduate Research Program

The Planetary Geology and GeophysicsUndergraduate Research Program, or PGGURP,pairs qualified undergraduate students with NASA-funded investigators atresearch locations across the U.S. for eight weeks during the summer. Studentswill spend the summer at the NASA scientists’ home institutions. Selectedstudents receive a cost-of-living stipend and compensation for housing andtravel.

Undergraduate students interested in learning about research in planetarygeoscience are eligible to apply. Students graduating in 2013 who have notstarted graduate school yet are also eligible. Preference is given to U.S.citizens and permanent residents.

Applications are due Feb. 1, 2013.

For more information, visit http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/~tgregg/pggurp.html.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please email Robyn Wagner, PGGURPadministrator, at rlwagner@buffalo.edu.

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NASA Wavelength Online Science Resource Now Available

NASA has a new online science resource for teachersand students to help bring Earth, sun, the solar system, and the universe into theirschools and homes.

Called NASA Wavelength, the site features hundreds of resources organized bytopic and audience level from elementary to college, and out-of-school programsthat span the extent of NASA science. Educators at all levels can locate science-relatededucational resources through information on educational standards, subjectsand keywords and other relevant details, such as learning time required tocarry out a lesson or an activity, cost of materials and more.

NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, or SMD, funds a nationwide community ofeducation and outreach professionals that develop and deliver resources for alllevels of formal and informal education and public outreach activities usingNASA content, expertise and facilities.

NASA Wavelength features peer-reviewed science resources developed by thiscommunity, including award-winning curriculum tools, activities that allowstudents and teachers to learn about and participate in NASA missions, exhibitsand planetarium shows and more.

The site offers an innovative way to keep up with the latest developments inEarth and space science education. Users will be able to receive email updateson new content, and share the latest information through social media andemail.

Through featured selections highlighted on the homepage, educators can identifyscience resources relevant to specific themes, such as Mars-related activities,and lessons for educators interested in teaching about climate, theelectromagnetic spectrum or magnetism.

The Space Sciences Laboratory and Lawrence Hall of Science at the University ofCalifornia, Berkeley, the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies, andthe Adler Planetarium worked with educators across the country to define, testand launch NASA Wavelength. Scientists and educators who comprise SMD’seducation and public outreach community coordinate the continued developmentand upkeep of the site.

NASA’s Science Mission Directorate seeks new knowledge and understanding ofEarth, the sun, solar system and the universe from the vantage point of space.The directorate also constantly looks for inventive ways to reach out to thepublic using museums, classrooms, science centers and home schools.

For access to NASA Wavelength, visit http://nasawavelength.org.

For information on NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, visit http://science.nasa.gov/.

For information about NASA education programs, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education.

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Find NASA Education ResourcesWith the NASA Materials Finder

Are you looking for NASA educational resources to use in your classroom?Use the NASA Education Materials Finder search tool to find materials that fityour needs.

Search hundreds of NASA educational materials by grade level, type of materialand subject area. The ability to search by keyword is also available. Plus, thesubject areas include dozens of sub-category selections to allow you to better fine-tuneyour search.

In addition, all of these search criteria can be combined into one search,which allows you to restrict the results to exactly what you are looking for.

Click the link below to begin your search forNASA educational materials.

https://www.nasa.gov/education/materials

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What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website

Earth is a water world. Even ifwe live far from the ocean, we feel its effects. We feel it in the weather andclimate. We breathe in the oxygen produced by its plant life. We are cooler dueto the ocean’s ability to absorb some of the excess greenhouse gases we add tothe atmosphere. The ocean influences every aspect of our planet that make ithabitable. The Space Place website is about space out there and Earth down hereas studied from space out there. This month we pay tribute to the ocean and thetechnologies that help us understand it better.

What’s New on Space Place
When Earth first formed, it was very hot. Any liquid water would haveboiled away into space. So where did the ocean come from? Scientists thinkcomets may have provided an important water delivery service. But how can theyknow?

A new “Explore” article on the Space Place explains how even water hasfingerprints of sorts that can be used to trace its origin. Visit http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/comet-ocean.

Space Place en Español
Satellite images show the swirling, organized rotational cloudsystems of tropical storms and hurricanes. We can watch them in fascination –or fear, if they are headed our way. What is actually going on in the belly ofthese monsters? How do they begin and grow? What determines their severity andtheir paths? In both English and Spanish, the basics are explained. Check out¿Cómo se forman los huracanes? And see Space Place entirely in Spanish at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/sp, withtoggles to the English on every page.

Spotlight on …
“Missions to Planet Earth” is an online card game. It started out asa real card game, but we wanted everyone to be able to enjoy playing it andlearn about what it takes to build a space mission. The player competes withthe computer, but can tell the computer how “smart” to play. Sobeginners can succeed, too. The object is to gather all the necessarycomponents to complete the maximum number of missions — before the computeropponent does. This is a great game for the classroom when students have a fewminutes to spare. Go to http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/earth-card-game.

For the Classroom
Voyage on the High Seas: A Jason 1 Ocean Adventure is a real boardgame. Go to http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/posters/#high_seasto download a full-size game board (42.5 x 33 inches). You can have it printed– and perhaps laminated — at an office supply store. There are also gamecards to print on standard paper and cut apart, as well as a spinner and tinygame markers (research vessels). The game is a fun way for students to learnsome geography, oceanography and meteorology. The back side of the poster(printable on standard paper) has other related activities and articles aswell.

Forout-of-School (Cookie) Time
We leave the ocean theme for a moment to tell you of our new Oreo®cookies moon phases activity. It reduces the oft-confusing topic of moon phasesto its simplest — and sweetest — form. To make a new Moon, eat all the crèmefilling. To make a 1st or 3rd quarter Moon, scrape off half the filling. For afull Moon, alas, you must resist. Printable activity sheets make it easy for theactivity director. Go to http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/oreo-moon.

Special Days

Nov. 9, 1934: Carl Sagan was born.
Dr. Sagan helped pick the sounds and images for the Voyager spacecrafts’“Golden Record.” See and hear samples at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/voyager-to-stars.

Nov. 13, 1946: Vincent Joseph Schaefer made the first artificially inducedsnowstorm.
It’s easy to predict a snowstorm it you make it yourself. If nature makesit …not so much. Check out a little booklet that explains in the simplestpossible terms how to make a weather-prediction satellite. It’s at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/story-weather-satellite.The booklet is also in Spanish and Italian.

Nov. 29, 1803: Birthday of Christian Doppler
He described the Doppler effect, a good analogy for the expansion of spaceand understanding why the sky is dark at night. Check it out at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/classroom-activities#bluesky.

Dec. 14: Geminids Meteor Shower
Get tips on the best meteor viewing techniques at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/meteor-shower.

Dec. 25, 1642: Birthday of Isaac Newton
He understood how orbits work, and so can you by firing a cannon intospace. With enough gunpowder, you, too, can achieve orbit! Go to http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/how-orbits-work.

Dec. 31, 1705: First recorded sightingof Halley’s comet
Play “Comet Quest” and learn about comets at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/comet-quest.

Don’tForget…
You can find dozens of other ideas and rich resources for theclassroom and out-of-school time at our Parents & Educators page, http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/menu/parents-and-educators.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA.For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — Oct. 25, 2012

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

NASA University Research Centers Virtual Poster Session and Symposium
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Event Dates: Oct. 24-31 and Nov. 8, 2012

Free Education Webinar Series from the Aerospace Education Services Project
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Dates: Various Dates During October 2012

Meteorology: How Clouds Form Web Seminar
Audience: 5-8 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Oct. 25, 2012

Engineering Design Challenge: Water Filtration Web Seminar
Audience: Grades 9-10 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Oct. 30, 2012, at 7:30 p.m. EDT

NASA History Program Office Spring and Summer 2013 Internships
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Spring 2013 Application Deadline: Oct. 30, 2012
Summer 2013 Application Deadline: Feb. 4, 2013


Heat Transfer: MESSENGER — My Angle on Cooling Web Seminar
Audience: 5-8 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Nov 1, 2012

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Presents Space Shuttle Atlantis “Roll Over” Celebration
Audience: Grades 4-12
Event Date: Nov. 2, 2012, 1 – 2 p.m. EDT

2013 Texas High School Aerospace Scholars

Audience: 9-12 Students
Application Deadline: Nov. 2, 2012

NASA’s Glenn Research Center’s High School Shadowing Project

Audience: Students in Grades 10-12
Session I Application Deadline: Nov. 2, 2012
Session II Application Deadline: Jan. 25, 2013
Sessions III and IV Application Deadline: Feb. 22, 2013

NASA’s DEVELOP Program — 2013 Spring and Summer Sessions
Audience: 9-12 and Higher Education Educators and Students
Spring Session Deadline: Nov. 15, 2012
Summer Session Deadline: Feb. 4, 2013

2012-2013 Real World Design Challenge
Audience: 9-12 Educators and Students — U.S. Only
Registration Deadline: Nov. 16, 2012

2013 NASA Space Technology Research Fellowships
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Dec. 4, 2012

2013 RASC-AL Robo-Ops Competition
Audience: Higher Education Students
Deadline: Dec. 9, 2012

2013 NASA High-Altitude Student Platform Opportunity
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: Dec. 14, 2012

2013 RASC-AL Lunar Wheel Design Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Students
Deadline: Dec. 16, 2012

National Space Biomedical Research Institute Summer Internship Program
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: Dec. 31, 2012

American Meteorological Society’s DataStreme Earth’s Climate System Professional Development Course
Audience: K-12 Educators
Course Begins: Jan. 14, 2013

New Module Available from NASA’s Digital Learning Network: Digital Badges
Audience: 9-12 and Higher Education Educators


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NASA University Research Centers Virtual Poster Session and Symposium

NASA University Research Centers, or URC, is hosting a Virtual Poster Session and Symposium at the end of October and the beginning of November. These events will highlight talented students within the NASA URC program and their recent experiences as interns or co-ops at NASA.

During the session taking place Oct. 24-31, 2012, students will present virtual poster presentations of the research that was conducted during their internship or co-op. During the session, participants will have the opportunity to ask questions, exchange information and ideas, and interact with students and other event participants via the Facebook social network. A panel of NASA subject matter experts will review and score the poster presentations.

Top finalists will give oral presentations of their research during a virtual symposium on Nov. 8, 2012.

To learn more about the NASA URC Virtual Poster Session and Symposium, visit
http://www.earthzine.org/nasa-urc-fall-2012-vpss/.

Questions about this event should be emailed to Daesha Roberts at
daesha.d.roberts@nasa.gov.

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Free Education Webinar Series from the Aerospace Education Services Project

The Aerospace Education Services Project is presenting a series of free webinars throughout October 2012. All webinars can be accessed online. Join aerospace education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources to bring NASA into your classroom.

Here an Earth, There an Earth, Everywhere an Earth: The Kepler Telescope Search for Habitable Planets Beyond Our Solar System (Grades 6-12)

Oct. 25, 2012, 5 – 6 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Steve Culivan will discuss NASA’s Kepler telescope and its search for Earth-like planets orbiting other stars. Participants will learn how to use Johannes Kepler’s Third Law and actual Kepler telescope data to construct graphs to record and interpret data that determines if a planet orbiting a star in another solar system is a possible candidate to support life.

Robotics on a Budget (Grades 5-12)
Oct. 30, 2012, 4:30 – 5:30 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Steve Culivan will explore how to use robotics to enhance your students’ understanding of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM. Participants will also learn about NASA STEM robotics missions, curriculum and activities that are available.


For more information about these webinars, and to see a full list of webinars taking place through December 2012, visit http://neon.psu.edu/webinars/
.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to
Katie Hayden at
Katie.S.Hayden@nasa.gov.


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Meteorology: How Clouds Form Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a free 90-minute Web seminar on Oct. 25, 2012, at 7:30 p.m. EDT. Learn about the relationships between air pressure, temperature, volume and cloud formation. Get an overview of the necessary conditions for cloud formation and then see how to make a cloud in a bottle. Information will be provided about an extension activity, the S’COOL Project, which involves student participation in authentic science.

For more information and to register online, visit URL http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES3/webseminar10.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to the NASA Explorer Schools help desk at
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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Engineering Design Challenge: Water Filtration Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminar on Oct. 30, 2012, at 7:30 p.m. EDT. Get background information about water recycling on the International Space Station, and then see how to incorporate the information into an exciting hands-on, inquiry-based challenge requiring students to solve a problem. Participants will watch a video showing students engaged in the challenge and discuss possible modifications to the challenge to adapt it for different students and classroom situations.

This seminar will be repeated on Feb. 5, 2013.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES3/webseminar3.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit
http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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NASA History Program Office Spring and Summer 2013 Internships

The NASA History Program Office is seeking undergraduate and graduate students for spring and summer 2013 internships. The History Program Office maintains archival materials to answer research questions from NASA personnel, journalists, scholars, students at all levels and others from around the world. The division also edits and publishes several books and monographs each year. It maintains a large number of websites on NASA history.

Students of all majors are welcome to apply. While detailed prior knowledge of the aeronautics and space fields is not necessary, a keen interest and some basic familiarity with these topics are needed. Strong research, writing and editing skills are essential. Experience with computers, especially hypertext markup language, or HTML, formatting, is a plus.

Intern projects are flexible. Typical projects include handling a variety of information requests, editing historical manuscripts, doing research and writing biographical sketches, updating and creating websites, and identifying and captioning photos.

Applications for spring 2013 internships are due Oct. 30, 2012. Summer 2013 internship applications are due Feb. 4, 2013.

For more information, visit
http://history.nasa.gov/interncall.htm.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please contact Bill Barry at
bill.barry@nasa.gov.

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Heat Transfer: MESSENGER — My Angle on Cooling Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, the NASA Explorer Schools and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute Web seminar on Nov 1, 2012, at 6:30 p.m. EDT.
Learn how the MESSENGER mission to Mercury takes advantage of passive cooling methods to keep the spacecraft functioning in a high-temperature environment. You will also see how to use the mission’s Staying Cool activities to lead students through an examination of different solutions to the problem of how to deal with too much sunlight and energy.

This seminar will be repeated on Mar. 21, 2013.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES3/webseminar11.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit
http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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NASA’s Digital Learning Network Presents Space Shuttle Atlantis “Roll Over” Celebration

NASA’s Digital Learning Network, or DLN, is hosting a special event on Nov. 2, 2012, at 1 p.m. EDT to commemorate the departure of space shuttle Atlantis. Join DLN hosts Rachel Power and Joshua Santora live at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida as space shuttle Atlantis is transferred from the Vehicle Assembly Building to its permanent home at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex.

The Space Shuttle Atlantis “Roll Over” Celebration will feature special guests including NASA Administrator and astronaut Charles Bolden, members of the space shuttle’s processing team and members from the team responsible for the design of the new home for Atlantis.

For more information and to watch the webcast online, visit the DLN website at
http://dln.nasa.gov.

Do you have a question you would like to see answered live during the webcast? Send questions to
dlinfochannel@gmail.com.

Inquiries about this webcast should be directed to Joshua Santora at Joshua.Santora@nasa.gov.


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2013 Texas High School Aerospace Scholars


The Texas High School Aerospace Scholars project is an interactive, online learning experience. It is highlighted by a six-day internship where selected students are encouraged to study mathematics, science, engineering or computer science by interacting with engineers at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston.

The Texas High School Aerospace Scholars project is open to high school juniors throughout Texas. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and have access to the Internet.

The application deadline is Nov. 2, 2012.

For additional information on the project and to apply online, visit http://has.aerospacescholars.org/.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to jsc-aeroscho@mail.nasa.gov.

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NASA’s Glenn Research Center’s High School Shadowing Project


NASA’s Glenn Research Center, or GRC, in Cleveland, Ohio, is accepting applications for its High School Shadowing Project sessions for the 2012-2013 school year. This opportunity provides students with a one- to five-day career exploration experience at Glenn Research Center.

The project provides high school students with an opportunity to explore career possibilities in a research and development environment while under the guidance of a NASA scientist, engineer, technician or administrative professional that serves as the student’s mentor. Students are provided information about various careers, career paths and Glenn Research Center educational resources and programs.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens and at least 16 years old by the application deadline. Four sessions are scheduled for the 2012-2013 school year.

Session I —
Application Deadline: Nov. 2, 2012
Session Date: Dec. 4, 2012

Session II —
Application Deadline: Jan. 25, 2013
Session Date: Feb. 27, 2013

Session III —
Application Deadline: Feb. 22, 2013
Session Date: March 26, 2013

Session IV —
Application Deadline: Feb. 22, 2013
Session Date: April 24, 2013

For more information about this opportunity, please visit https://www.nasa.gov/centers/glenn/education/ShadowingProgram_GRC.html.

Questions about the GRC High School Shadowing Project should be directed by email to GRC-Intern@mail.nasa.gov or by telephone to 216-433-6656.

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NASA’s DEVELOP Program — 2013 Spring and Summer Sessions


DEVELOP is a NASA Science Mission Directorate Applied Sciences-sponsored internship that fosters the training and development of students in the Earth sciences. The DEVELOP Program extends the application of NASA Earth science research and technology to meet societal needs.

S
tudents conduct projects that focus on the practical application of NASA’s Earth science research and demonstrate how results can benefit partner organizations and local communities. Advisors and mentors, from NASA and partner institutions, provide guidance and support for the program. Students gain experience using NASA science and technology in a professional setting.

Students from high school through doctoral levels are selected through a competitive application process. Students chosen by DEVELOP work on teams onsite at 13 locations in North America. Activities are conducted during three 10-week terms per year: spring, summer and fall. To apply to a DEVELOP center at a NASA location, applicants must be a citizen of the U.S. However, international students currently registered at an accredited school in the U.S. are eligible to apply to DEVELOP regional locations. International applicants must already have a visa that permits them to work in the U.S.

Applications for the spring 2013 session are due Nov. 15, 2012. Summer 2013 applications are due Feb. 4, 2013.

For more information about this unique internship opportunity, please visit the DEVELOP website at
http://develop.larc.nasa.gov.

Questions about the DEVELOP Program should be directed by email to NASA-DL-DEVELOP@mail.nasa.gov or by telephone to 757-864-3761.

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2012-2013 Real World Design Challenge

The Real World Design Challenge is an annual U.S. competition that gives students in grades 9-12 the opportunity to work on real-world engineering challenges in a team environment. This year, NASA is teaming up with other RWDC partners on the Aviation Challenge. This challenge invites students to design an unmanned aerial system to help locate a lost child.

Participating schools receive real engineering software and partner with mentors who are professional engineers. The contest provides students with opportunities to apply the lessons of the classroom to real technical problems.

The deadline for team registration is Nov. 16, 2012. Entries must be submitted by Jan. 18, 2013.

For more information about the challenge, visit http://www.realworlddesignchallenge.org.

Questions about the Real World Design Challenge should be directed to Ralph Coppola at
rcoppola@ptc.com.

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2013 NASA Space Technology Research Fellowships


NASA is seeking applications from current and prospective graduate students for the agency’s third class of Space Technology Research Fellows. Applications will be accepted from accredited U.S. universities on behalf of individuals pursuing or planning to pursue master’s  or doctoral degrees in relevant space technology disciplines at their respective institutions beginning in fall 2013.

The fellowships will sponsor U.S. graduate student researchers who show significant potential to contribute to NASA’s strategic goals and mission in the area of space technology. NASA’s Office of the Chief Technologist and the Space Technology Program sponsor the fellowships with the goal of providing the nation a pipeline of highly skilled engineers and technologists to improve America’s technological competitiveness. Fellows will perform innovative space technology research today while building the skills necessary to become future technological leaders.

The deadline for submitting applications is Dec. 4, 2012.

For more information on the fellowships, visit
https://www.nasa.gov/offices/oct/stp/strg/nstrf13.html and https://www.nasa.gov/offices/oct/stp/strg/nstrf13_video.html.

All material related to this fellowship opportunity, including eligibility requirements and detailed instructions on how to submit an application, may be accessed from
http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId=%7b67565659-36F8-8888-A19E-6DC271DA6ED5%7d&path=open.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to Claudia Meyer at hq-nstrf-call@mail.nasa.gov.

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2013 RASC-AL Robo-Ops Competition

NASA and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2013 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts Academic Linkage Exploration Robo-Ops, also known as RASC-AL Robo-Ops, competition. This design competition is aimed at university-level engineering students.

The RASC-AL Robo-Ops contest challenges participants to build a planetary rover prototype and demonstrate its capabilities in field tests at NASA’s Johnson Space Center’s, or JSC’s, Rock Yard. Up to three members of the team (plus the faculty advisor) may travel to JSC for the onsite testing. The remaining team members will stay behind at the local university to conduct mission control tasks. The prototype rovers will be tele-operated by the university-based team members and must negotiate a series of obstacles while accomplishing a variety of tasks. The only information available to the rover controller to perform the required tasks will be information transmitted through onboard rover video camera(s) or other onboard sensors.

Teams will be required to do an education and outreach activity for their rovers that demonstrates participatory exploration approaches for future NASA missions.

Interested teams are encouraged to submit a notice of intent by Nov. 18, 2012, and teams must submit a project plan for their proposed project by Dec. 19, 2012. The RASC-AL Robo-Ops Steering Committee of NASA experts will evaluate the project plans and select as many as eight teams to compete against each other at the Rock Yard in June 2013.

The RASC-AL competition is open to full-time undergraduate or graduate students majoring in engineering or science at an accredited university. University design teams must include one faculty or industry advisor with a university affiliation and two or more undergraduate or graduate students. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

For more information about this competition, visit
http://www.nianet.org/RoboOps-2013/index.aspx.

If you have questions about this competition, please contact Stacy Dees at stacy.dees@nianet.org or Shelley Spears at shelley.spears@nianet.org.

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2013 NASA High-Altitude Student Platform Opportunity

NASA is accepting applications from students at U.S. colleges and universities who want to send experiments to the edge of space on a high-flying scientific balloon.

The annual NASA project provides near-space access for 12 undergraduate and graduate student experiments to be carried by a NASA high-altitude research balloon. The flights typically last 15 to 20 hours and reach an altitude of 23 miles. Experiments may include compact satellites or prototypes.

The experiments are flown aboard the High-Altitude Student Platform, or HASP, a balloon-born instrument stack launched from the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility’s remote site in Fort Sumner, N.M. The goals of the project are to provide a space test platform to encourage student research and stimulate the development of student satellite payloads and other space-engineering products.

HASP seeks to enhance the technical skills and research abilities of students in critical science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines. The project is a joint effort between NASA and the Louisiana Space Grant Consortium.

The deadline for applications is Dec. 14, 2012.

For application information and technical details about the program, visit
http://laspace.lsu.edu/hasp.

Questions about the High-Altitude Student Platform opportunity should be directed to T. Gregory Guzik at
guzik@phunds.phys.lsu.edu.

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2013 RASC-AL Lunar Wheel Design Challenge

NASA and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2013 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts – Academic Linkage, or RASC-AL, Lunar Wheel Design Challenge. The challenge is aimed at multidisciplinary teams of university-level engineering students.

The RASC-AL Lunar Wheel Design Challenge invites student teams to design and build a lunar wheel prototype and demonstrate its capabilities while mounted on a utility vehicle during the “Roll-Off” (field tests at NASA’s Johnson Space Center’s Rock Yard) in July 2013. Teams are challenged with developing a wheel that needs little maintenance, can travel at higher speeds needed for human rovers and can withstand several years of harsh temperature swings, abrasive regolith, intense sun radiation and lack of an Earth-like atmosphere.

In addition to the field tests, teams will present their wheel concepts to a design review panel comprising Space Exploration Vehicle, or SEV, engineers. Presentations will be based on each team’s technical paper that details the wheel concept’s path-to-flight (i.e., how the design can be applied to actual planetary exploration on an SEV).

Interested teams are encouraged to submit a notice of intent by Nov. 18, 2012, and teams must submit a project plan proposal by Dec. 16, 2012. Based on a review of each team’s proposal, up to eight teams will be selected to compete at the “Roll-Off” in July 2013.

The challenge
is open to full-time undergraduate or graduate students majoring in engineering or science at an accredited university. University design teams must include one faculty or industry advisor with a university affiliation and two or more undergraduate or graduate students.

For more information about this competition, visit
https://www.nianet.org/RASCAL-wheeldesign2012/index.aspx.

If you have questions about this competition, please contact Shannon Verstynen at
shannon.verstynen@nianet.org or Shelley Spears at shelley.spears@nianet.org
.

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National Space Biomedical Research Institute Summer Internship Program

Interns selected for the NSBRI’s summer program join ongoing project activities and gain hands-on experience in space biomedical research at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas; Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio; or Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif. The program is open to graduate students, medical students and undergraduate students who have completed their second year of studies.

Applicants are asked to submit a curriculum vitae or resume, a letter of interest, two letters of recommendation, and college transcripts. Applicants must be available from May 27 through Aug. 2, 2013.The program is open to U.S. citizens.

Applications for the 2013 program are due Dec. 31, 2012.

For more information and to apply online, visit
http://www.nsbri.org/summerinternship/. Questions about this opportunity should be directed to info@nsbri.org.


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American Meteorological Society’s DataStreme Earth’s Climate System Professional Development Course

The American Meteorological Society, with support from NASA and in partnership with the State University of New York’s College at Brockport, is developing a national cadre of K-12 teachers highly trained in climate science and familiar with climate modeling. Teachers are trained through DataStreme Earth’s Climate System, or ECS, a semester-long, graduate level, precollege teacher professional development course.

DataStreme ECS uses NASA Earth Observing System data and visualizations, and introduces the Educational Global Climate Model developed by the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, to explore the fundamentals of climate change. Teachers completing the course construct and execute a plan of action to advance public climate science literacy and affect curriculum change within their local schools and districts.

DataStreme ECS is administered through Local Implementation Teams across the country. The course is free to all participants, and the teachers are awarded three graduate credits upon successful completion of the course.

The spring 2013 course begins on Jan. 14, 2013.

For more information, including a listing of course offerings by state, and an application form, visit
http://ametsoc.org/amsedu/ECS/index.html#participates.

Questions about these courses should be directed to amsedu@ametsoc.org.


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New Module Available from NASA’s Digital Learning Network: Digital Badges

NASA’s Digital Learning Network, or DLN, is excited to offer a unique opportunity to learn about a new innovative teaching tool called a digital badge. A digital badge is an ‘official’ file, that when awarded, contains all the hidden information about that achievement and who won it. This file can then be shared and posted.

When the Mars Curiosity Rover landed successfully on Aug. 5, 2012, Web surfers were introduced to the chance to win the first pilot Starlite Digital Badge developed in conjunction with NASA. By interacting with a brand-new type of 3D content, visitors have a chance to join in the excitement by testing a game that mimics some of the exciting new rover’s capabilities. In this interactive, game-based activity, players locate sedimentary rocks on a simulated Mars landscape and activate the rover’s drill in search of evidence for past life. The game emphasizes advanced interactivity with robotics, science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

During your event, the Digital Learning Network will give an overview of the Mars Curiosity Activity and provide additional information regarding digital badges for lifelong learning.

For more information and to register for an upcoming event, visit
https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/dln/special/DigitalBadges.html
.

To try out the Mars Curiosity Activity and see the Curiosity badge in action, visit
http://www.starlitebadges.com/
.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Bob Starr at
robert.m.starr@nasa.gov.


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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators:
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students:
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club:
https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub