NASA Education Express Message — Jan. 5, 2017

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Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


NEW THIS WEEK!


Bring the Story of “Hidden Figures” to the Classroom With the “Who Is Katherine Johnson?” Profiles and Modern Figures Toolkit
Audience: K-12 Educators

Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: Jan. 5, 2017, at 6 p.m. EST

2017 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge
Audience: 9-12 and Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Deadline for International Teams: Jan. 6, 2017
Registration Deadline for U.S. Teams: Feb. 1, 2017

2017 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education
Next Lecture Date: Jan. 12, 2017, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)

U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Domestic Nuclear Detection Office Summer Internship Program
Audience: Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Application Deadline: Jan. 25, 2017, at 11:59 p.m. EST

Center for Retirement Research’s Steven H. Sandell Grant Program
Audience: Scholars in the Field of Retirement Research and Policy
Proposal Deadline: Jan. 31, 2017

Center for Retirement Research’s Dissertation Fellowship Program
Audience: Doctoral Candidates
Application Deadline: Jan. 31, 2017

2016-2017 NASA College and University Aeronautics Design Challenges: Supersonic Business Jet and Low Noise Subsonic Transport
Audience: Students at U.S. Colleges and Universities
Notice of Intent Deadline: Feb. 1, 2017
Proposal Deadline: June 1, 2017

U.S. Department of Energy EERE Robotics Internship Program
Audience: Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 13, 2017, at 8 a.m. EST

Space Launch System Video Series — “No Small Steps”
Audience: All Educators and Students

New “NASA Intern Stories” Website
Audience: 9-12 and Higher Education Students

What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website?
Audience: K-6 Educators


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event – Virtual Field Trip to Kennedy Space Center
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-12
Event Date: Jan. 12, 2017

Free Program — Cubes in SpaceTM
Audience: Students Ages 11-18 and Their Teachers
Registration Deadline: Jan. 13, 2017

Research Grants: Partnerships for Enhanced Engagement in Research
Audience: Researchers at Academic Institutions in Developing Countries
Application Deadline: Jan. 13, 2017

Free Educator Workshop: Earth Science Workshop
Audience: Formal and Informal Educators of Grades K-8
Event Date: Jan. 14, 2017, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. PST

Free Educator Workshop — Solar System and Beyond: Modern Figures
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Event Dates: Jan. 18, 2017, 4:30-6 p.m. PST

2017 RASC-AL Aerospace Concepts Design Competition
Audience: Higher Education Students
Abstract Submission Deadline: Jan. 19, 2017

Nancy Grace Roman Technology Fellowships for Early Career Researchers
Audience: Researchers Who Have Received a Ph.D. in the Last Eight Years
Notice of Intent Deadline: Jan. 20, 2017
Proposal Deadline: March 17, 2017

Free Educator Workshop: Utilizing Renewable Energy
Audience: Pre-service Educators and Educators of Grades 9-12
Event Date: Jan. 21, 2017, 10 a.m. – Noon PST

Future Engineers Mars Medical Challenge
Audience: Educators and Students Ages 5 to 19
Entry Deadline: Jan. 25, 2017

Free Educator Professional Development Workshops From NASA’s Stennis Space Center Office of Education
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: Jan. 26, 2017, 9 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. CST
Workshop Location: Infinity Science Center in Pearlington, Mississippi

Generation Nano: Small Science, Superheroes
Audience: High School Students
Submission Deadline: Jan. 31, 2017

NASA’s DIVER (Diving into Experimental Research) Challenge
Audience: 9-12 Students
Proposal Deadline: Feb. 1, 2017

Call for Proposals — Research Projects on Determinants of Life Expectancy by Income and Geography, and Implications for Social Security Policy
Audience: Higher Education Faculty and Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 1, 2017

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students and Higher Education Institutions


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html


NEW THIS WEEK!


Bring the Story of “Hidden Figures” to the Classroom With the “Who Is Katherine Johnson?” Profiles and Modern Figures Toolkit

In the 1960s, the U.S. was on an ambitious journey to the moon, and Katherine Johnson and her fellow human computers helped get NASA there. Bring the excitement of their story to your classroom with new resources from NASA Education.

Learn more about Katherine Johnson with the “Who Is Katherine Johnson?” profiles written just for students. Versions written for K-4 and 5-8 students are available.

“Who Is Katherine Johnson?” — K-4 Students Version
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/k-4/stories/nasa-knows/who-is-katherine-johnson-k4

“Who Is Katherine Johnson?” — 5-8 Students Version
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/5-8/features/nasa-knows/who-is-katherine-johnson-5-8

Also available online, the Modern Figures Toolkit is a collection of resources and educational activities for students in grades K-12. Each educational activity and resource includes a brief description, as well as information about how the activities and lessons align to education standards. Resources highlighted include videos, historical references and STEM materials.

Bring Katherine Johnson’s inspiring story to your classroom by downloading the Modern Figures Toolkit at www.nasa.gov/modernfigures-education-toolkit.


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Aeronautics — Come Fly With Us: Flying Things in Your Classroom
Audience:
Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-8
Event Date: Jan. 5, 2017, at 6 p.m. EST
Explore the principles and physics of flight by flying things in your classroom. Use NASA online resources and simple, inexpensive STEM classroom activities and design challenges to investigate the parts of an airplane, what makes an airplane fly, and how to model aircraft that can fly in your classroom. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/219444

Teachers Connect: LaRC Centennial Badge Webinar
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School, and Informal Educators of Grades 6-8
Event Date: Jan. 10, 2017, at 4 p.m. EST
The first half of this webinar will focus on clouds and their role in Earth’s “energy budget” and on implementation ideas using GLOBE for different classroom settings as part of the “Earth Right Now: LaRC 100th” digital badge. Participants also will talk about student badge implementations, extension ideas and extra resources. The second half-hour will center on the engineering design process using the “Drag Race to Mars Engineering Design Challenge” as part of the “Journey to Mars: LaRC 100th” digital badge. This portion of the webinar will focus on forces and motion and math calculations using paper airplanes and testing different materials as part of the “Aeronautics: LaRC 100th” digital badge.

This webinar meets requirements of teacher discussions within the NASA Langley 100th Educator Professional Development Collaborative digital badges. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/207906. To learn more about the Langley 100th digital badges, log in to https://nasatxstate-epdc.net/ and search for LaRC 100th.

Aeronautics — Come Fly with Us: Making Foam Rockets
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 2-8
Event Date: Jan. 11, 2017, at 4 p.m. EST
Discover a classroom activity where students design rockets made from pipe insulating foam and use them to investigate the trajectory relationship between launch angle and range in a controlled investigation. The launch of a foam rocket is a good demonstration of Newton’s third law of motion. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/216447

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


2017 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge

NASA has opened team registration for the 2017 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge. Organized by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, the event will be held March 30 – April 1, 2017, at the U.S. Space & Rocket Center in Huntsville.

The challenge engages high school, college and university students in hands-on, experiential learning activities, while also testing potential technologies needed for future deep space exploration.

Student teams participating in the rover challenge must design, engineer and test a human-powered rover on a mock course designed to simulate the harsh and demanding terrains future NASA explorers may find on distant planets, moons and asteroids.

Both U.S. and international teams may register to participate. Each school may enter up to two teams. However, for international entries, no more than four teams from each country can be accepted.

Registration for international teams closes Jan. 6, 2017. For U.S. teams, registration closes Feb. 1, 2017.

For more information on the 2017 Human Exploration Rover Challenge and registration, visit https://www.nasa.gov/roverchallenge/home/index.html.

Teams with questions about this event or registration may email Diedra Williams at MSFC-RoverChallenge2017@mail.nasa.gov.


2017 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online

The Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, named after the founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and presented by JPL’s Office of Communication and Education, shares the excitement of the space program’s missions, instruments and other technologies.

Lectures take place twice per month, on consecutive Thursdays and Fridays. The Thursday lectures take place in JPL’s Theodore von Kármán Auditorium, and Friday lectures take place at Pasadena City College’s Vosloh Forum. Both start at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT). Admission and parking are free for all lectures. No reservations are required, but seating is limited. The Thursday evening lectures are streamed live for viewing online. Archives of past lectures are also available online.

Next Lecture in the Series:

Exoplanets: The Quest for Strange New Worlds
Event Date:
Jan. 12 and Jan. 13, 2017, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2017&month=1
Exoplanets, planets orbiting other stars, have become an important field of astronomical study over the past two-and-a-half decades. Join Dr. Eric Mamajek from the NASA Exoplanet Exploration Program at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory for a discussion about the recent findings from NASA’s Kepler mission that suggest nearly every star you see in the night sky has exoplanets orbiting it.

For more information about the Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, including a complete list of upcoming lectures, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.php.

Questions about this series should be directed to http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php.


U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Domestic Nuclear Detection Office Summer Internship Program

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Domestic Nuclear Detection Office Summer Internship Program provides opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students to participate in projects at federal research facilities located across the country. The projects interns take part in will help DNDO meet its mission of “implementing domestic nuclear detection efforts for a managed and coordinated response to radiological and nuclear threats, as well as integration of federal nuclear forensics programs.”

Applicants must be U.S. citizens and at least 18 years of age by May 1, 2017. Students must have a GPA of 3.3 or higher on a 4.0 scale and must be majoring in a STEM field with interest in nuclear detection and in radiological and nuclear threats. Undergraduate applicants must be enrolled full-time as a sophomore, junior or senior at a U.S. accredited 2-year or 4-year college or university. Graduate applicants must be enrolled full-time at a U.S. accredited college or university.

Applications are due Jan. 25, 2017, at 11:59 p.m. EST.

Additional information about the program, including access to the online application system may be found at http://orau.gov/dndo/.

Please direct inquiries about this opportunity to DHSed@orau.org.


Center for Retirement Research’s Steven H. Sandell Grant Program

The Center for Retirement Research at Boston College is soliciting proposals for the annual Steven H. Sandell Grant Program for scholars in the field of retirement research and policy. The program is funded by the U.S. Social Security Administration to provide opportunities scholars to pursue cutting-edge projects on retirement income issues.

Junior scholars within the first 10 years of their academic career or senior scholars working in a new area are encouraged to submit a proposal. The center welcomes applications from all academic disciplines.

Up to five grants of $45,000 will be awarded based upon the quality of the applicant’s proposal and his or her proposed budget. Applicants must complete the research outlined in the proposal within one year of the award. Grant recipients may be required to present their work to the Social Security Administration in Washington, D.C., or Baltimore.

The proposal submission deadline is Jan. 31, 2017.

For more information, visit http://crr.bc.edu/about-us/grant-programs/steven-h-sandell-grant-program-2/.

Questions about this grant opportunity should be directed to Marina Tsiknis at tsiknis@bc.edu.


Center for Retirement Research’s Dissertation Fellowship Program

The Center for Retirement Research at Boston College is soliciting proposals for the annual Dissertation Fellowship Program in the field of retirement income research. The program is funded by the U.S. Social Security Administration and provides funding opportunities for doctoral candidates to pursue cutting-edge research on retirement issues.

Applicants must be enrolled in a qualified doctoral program at a U.S. university and have completed all course work for a Ph.D. by the time funding would start. Applicants must demonstrate that their dissertation focuses on one of the following research priorities: (1) Social Security and retirement income and policy; (2) macroeconomic analyses of Social Security; (3) wealth and retirement income; (4) program interactions; (5) international research; or (6) demographic research. Applicants must have a dissertation advisor and/or committee and have the chair of the dissertation committee confirm that he or she has read and approved the research methodology for the proposal. Doctoral candidates from all academic disciplines are encouraged to submit a proposal.

Up to five fellowships of $28,000 will be awarded. Recipients may be required to present their work to the Social Security Administration in Washington, D.C., or Baltimore.

The application submission deadline is Jan. 31, 2017.

For more information, visit http://crr.bc.edu/about-us/grant-programs/dissertation-fellowship-program-2/.

Questions about this grant opportunity should be directed to Marina Tsiknis at tsiknis@bc.edu.


2016-2017 NASA College and University Aeronautics Design Challenges: Supersonic Business Jet and Low Noise Subsonic Transport

NASA’s Aeronautics Mission Directorate is seeking entries for the 2016-2017 NASA College and University Aeronautics Design Challenge. Students are invited to submit technical papers outlining their solutions for one of two aeronautics design challenges.

The Supersonic Business Jet Challenge seeks ideas for a commercial supersonic business jet that might fly in 2025 and that meets NASA’s goals for noise, emissions, speed, range, payload and fuel efficiency. The Low Noise Subsonic Transport Challenge seeks designs for a large commercial airliner that would enter service between 2025 and 2035 and would address NASA’s goals for reductions in noise, emissions and fuel use.

The contest is open to teams of full-time students enrolled in higher education institutions of the United States or its territories. This particular design challenge is for colleges and universities only. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

An optional notice of intent is requested by Feb. 1, 2017. Final entries are due June 1, 2017.

For more information and a complete list of rules, visit https://aero.larc.nasa.gov/university-contest/.

Questions about the challenge should be directed to Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.


U.S. Department of Energy EERE Robotics Internship Program

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy is accepting applications from students interested in hands-on, 10-week practical robotics internships at federal national laboratories and organizations in the private sector throughout the United States. Participants will perform research or other technical activities under the guidance of a mentor who is a technical staff scientist or engineer at the host facility.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens and at least 18 years old by May 1, 2017. High school seniors and college students/recent graduates are encouraged to apply. Experience in robotics competitions is preferred.

Applications are due Feb. 13, 2017, at 8 a.m. EST.

Additional information about the program may be found at http://www.orise.orau.gov/roboticsinternship/index.html.

Please direct inquiries about this opportunity to Robotics.Internships@orau.org.


Space Launch System Video Series — “No Small Steps”

The challenge of going to Mars is monumental, and it’s going to take a monumental rocket to make it possible. NASA’s Space Launch System will be the most powerful rocket ever built and will help send humans to deep space destinations. SLS is an advanced, heavy-lift launch vehicle that will provide an entirely new capability for science and human exploration beyond Earth’s orbit.

Learn more about the Space Launch System with the “No Small Steps” video series. Hosted by Stephen Granade, the entertaining and informative series gets into the “how” of making a trip to Mars happen — taking rocket science and making it relatable.

Episode 1: “Getting to Mars”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TOYXa9jx-TI

Episode 2: “A Foundation for Mars”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DesBgDPR22Q

Episode 3: “Rocket Fuel”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zJXQQv9UZNg

Episode 4: “Working With Gravity”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4wlcFU1Le4U


New “NASA Intern Stories” Website

Each year, almost 2,000 students across the United States get the opportunity of a lifetime: a chance to intern at NASA. Some have dreamed of working with the agency their whole lives. Others have overcome great challenges before being accepted. Many have made important contributions to space exploration. And they all have a story.

The new “NASA Intern Stories” website features inspiring stories from NASA interns across the agency. To read their stories and learn how to apply to become a NASA intern, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/interns/index.html.


What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website?

Space Place is a NASA website for elementary students, their teachers and their parents. Check it out at www.spaceplace.nasa.gov.

Don’t forget to subscribe to our monthly e-newsletter, the NASA Space Place Gazette! http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/subscribe

New Resources

What Is an Asteroid?
— Asteroids are small, rocky objects that orbit the sun. While there are many asteroids in our solar system, most of them “live” in the main asteroid belt — a region between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. But where did they come from, and are they all the same? Find out here!
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/asteroid

What’s the Difference Between an Asteroid and a Meteor? — Both are types of space rocks, but the difference between the two depends on how close they are to Earth’s surface.
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/asteroid-or-meteor

Exoplanets — All the planets in our solar system orbit around the sun. Planets that orbit around other stars are called exoplanets. How do we know they exist? Check out our new article!
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/all-about-exoplanets

Be sure to check out our new video and poster about exoplanets!
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/exoplanet-snap

Moon Cookies — Make our delicious no-bake moon cookies! Follow our video for simple instructions.
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/moon-cookies

All About Planets — Our solar system is home to eight amazing planets: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. No two of them are the same! Some are small and rocky; some are freezing cold. Learn all about each planet and what makes each one unique!
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/planets

What Are Black Holes? — And are they really as scary as they sound? A black hole is an area of such immense gravity that nothing — not even light — can escape from it. Check out our short video and poster to learn more.
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/black-holes

Special Days to Celebrate
Find out about noteworthy days in NASA and space history that you can observe in your classroom.

Jan. 7 — In 1610, Galileo discovered several of Jupiter’s moons!

Jupiter has many moons. Have you heard of its moon Io?
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/io-tides

Jan. 16 — NASA selected the first U.S. women astronauts in 1978.
See some photos of astronauts in action!
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/gallery-technology

Jan. 24 — Voyager 2 encountered Uranus on this day in 1986.
Did you know that Uranus has faint rings? Learn all about this blue planet here!
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/all-about-uranus

Jan. 25 — The Opportunity rover landed on Mars in 2004.
Why were Spirit and Opportunity sent to Mars in the first place?
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/mars-spirit-opportunity

Feb. 6 — In 1971, Alan Shepard played golf on the moon.
How far away is the moon? The answer might surprise you!
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/moon-distance

Feb. 18 — Pluto was discovered in 1930 by astronomer Clyde Tombaugh.
Why is Pluto no longer considered a planet?
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/ice-dwarf

Share
Do you want some help spreading the word about NASA’s Space Place? We have a page with ready-to-use website descriptions, logos and links to all our social media. Check out http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/share.

Subscribe to Our Monthly E-newsletter!
Interested in keeping up with the latest and greatest news from NASA Space Place? Subscribe to the NASA Space Place Gazette. The NASA Space Place Gazette is for educators, parents and space enthusiasts of all ages. It includes special bulletins for noteworthy days and NASA events, such as a lunar eclipse, planet flyby or rover landing. It’s easy to subscribe — just click here.
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/subscribe

Send Feedback
Please let us know your ideas about ways to use The Space Place in your teaching. Send them to info@spaceplace.nasa.gov.


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites U.S. educational institutions to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets, and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

Nonprofit museums, libraries and planetariums (sponsored through their respective State Agency Surplus Property, or SASP, organization) are also eligible to make requests. Visit the link below for special instructions to request items. To find the contact information for the SASP representative for your area, visit http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/100851.

A nominal shipping fee must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event – Virtual Field Trip to Kennedy Space Center

Join the education specialists of NASA’s Digital Learning Network as they travel to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Jan. 12, 2017. The multipart series of Virtual Field Trips will feature different landmarks and projects taking place at Kennedy.

Explore Kennedy Space Center during the following 30-minute sessions:

10 a.m. EST — Join DLN education specialists Caryn Long from NASA’s Langley Research Center and Lisa Ilowsky from NASA’s Ames Research Center to learn more about the Vehicle Assembly Building and Mobile Launch Pad.

Noon EST — Join DLN education specialists Lindsey Jones from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center and Rachel Power from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center to learn more about Kennedy’s Swamp Works project.

2 p.m. EST — Join DLN education specialists Kristy Brumfield from NASA’s Stennis Space Center and David Alexander from NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center to learn more about the Orion and Crew Exploration Vehicle.

View the webcast events live at https://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-dlinfo.

For more information about this and other DLN events, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please send them to dlinfochannel@gmail.com.


Free Program — Cubes in SpaceTM

Cubes in Space™ provides students ages 11-18 an opportunity to design and compete to launch an experiment into space at no cost! Cubes in Space™ is offered by idoodledu, inc., in partnership with NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center’s Wallops Flight Facility, the Colorado Space Grant Consortium and NASA’s Langley Research Center.

This global education program based on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics) enables students to learn about space exploration using innovative problem-solving and inquiry-based learning methods. Participants have access to resources that help prepare them to design and develop an experiment to be integrated into a small cube.

This year, experiments will be launched into space via sounding rocket from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island, Virginia, in late June 2017 or from a high-altitude balloon launched from NASA’s Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility in Fort Sumner, New Mexico, in August 2017.

The deadline for program registration is Jan. 13, 2017. For more information, visit http://www.cubesinspace.com. Questions about this program may be directed to info@cubesinspace.com.

About idoodedu inc.
idoodledu inc., a charitable nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization, is a wholly owned subsidiary of idoodlelearning inc., and was created in 2015 as a legal vehicle to bring public/private partnerships and publicly funded programs to all learners and educators. idoodlelearning inc. is an education company based in Ottawa, Canada; London, England; and Virginia Beach, Virginia, USA.


Research Grants: Partnerships for Enhanced Engagement in Research

The Partnerships for Enhanced Engagement in Research, or PEER, program is a competitive awards program that invites scientists in developing countries to apply for funds to support research and capacity-building activities on topics of importance to the United States Agency for International Development and conducted in partnership with U.S. government-supported and selected private sector partners.

PEER applicants who submit pre-proposals to PEER must be based at an academic institution, nonprofit organization, or government-managed research laboratory, center or institute in a PEER-eligible country. Applicants also must hold a career-track position or equivalent at their respective institution or organization. Applicants should be working in the country from which they are applying and should be nationals (citizens or permanent residents) of a PEER-eligible country for the focus area to which they are applying.

The deadline for submission of pre-proposals is Jan. 13, 2017. Pre-proposals should be completed through the PEER online application site no later than 11:59 p.m. (U.S. Eastern Standard Time) on that date.

For more information, visit http://www.nationalacademies.org/peer.

The PEER program is supported by the United States Agency for International Development and implemented by the U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to peer@nas.edu.


Free Educator Workshop: Earth Science Workshop

Explore the impact of increasing global temperature on glaciers and sea level using real satellite data from NASA. Then, discover ways to turn these resources into engineering, mathematics and science lessons for students. Finally, learn to use the engineering design process to develop water-filtration and recycling systems to minimize our adverse impact on the water cycle.

Join NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory on Jan. 14, 2017, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. PST for this workshop at the von Kármán Auditorium at NASA’s JPL in Pasadena, California.

For more information and to register to attend, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/events/2017/1/14/earth-science-workshop/.

Can’t make it to the workshop? Explore these lessons online at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/teach/activity/water-filtration-challenge/ and http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/teach/activity/the-science-of-earths-rising-seas/.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Paula Partida at Paula.S.Partida@jpl.nasa.gov.


Free Educator Workshop — Solar System and Beyond: Modern Figures

Join the Office of Education of NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center for an educator professional development workshop as we look back at the history of human computers like Katherine Johnson and look forward toward exploration of the solar system. Learn about OSIRIS-REx (Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, and Security – Regolith Explorer) on its search for asteroids using modern-day technology to calculate launch windows and orbits. Educators will engage in standards-aligned mathematics, science and engineering activities about launch windows, planetary orbits and robotics. Participants will receive hands-on activities for students that combine math, science, engineering and social studies.

The workshop will take place Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2017, 4:30-6 p.m. PST at NASA’s Armstrong Educator Resource Center at the AERO Institute in Palmdale, California.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/erc_workshop_01_18_17a.pdf

Please direct questions about this workshop to Sondra Geddes at sondra.l.geddes@nasa.gov.


2017 RASC-AL Aerospace Concepts Design Competition

NASA and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2017 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts-Academic Linkage Aerospace Concepts competition. RASC-AL is a design project competition for university-level engineering students and faculty.

The 2017 RASC-AL competition challenges teams to develop new concepts that leverage innovations to improve our ability to work more effectively in microgravity, by responding to one of four themes:
— Lightweight Exercise Suite.
— Airlock Design.
— Commercially enabled LEO/Mars Habitable Module.
— Logistics Delivery System.

Potentially, NASA could implement concepts derived from the design projects.

Interested teams must submit an abstract for their proposed project by Jan. 19, 2017.

NEW THIS YEAR: As a part of the abstract proposal submission process, teams will be required to include a two-minute video. The intent is for the video to augment each team’s abstract proposal by including animation, graphics, or other creative ways of showcasing unique aspects of their proposed concept.

The 2017 RASC-AL Competition will implement a two-tiered down-select process. A steering committee of NASA and industry experts will evaluate the abstract and video proposals and select as many as 20 undergraduate or graduate teams to move to the next phase of the competition. Based on evaluation of five- to seven-page mid-project papers submitted by these teams in mid-March, the field will be narrowed once again to 12-16 teams who will be selected for the final round of the competition. The finalists will present their concepts to the panel of judges (the RASC-AL Steering Committee) at the RASC-AL Forum in June 2017 in Florida.

The RASC-AL competition is open to full-time undergraduate or graduate students majoring in engineering or science at an accredited college or university. University design teams must include one faculty or industry advisor with a university affiliation and two or more undergraduate or graduate students. A group of universities also may collaborate on a design project entry. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

For more information about this competition, visit http://rascal.nianet.org.

If you have questions about this competition, please contact the RASC-AL team at rascal@nianet.org.


Nancy Grace Roman Technology Fellowships for Early Career Researchers

The Nancy Grace Roman Technology Fellowship in astrophysics seeks to provide early-career researchers the opportunity to develop the skills necessary to lead astrophysics flight instrument development projects, including suborbital investigations, in preparation to become principal investigators of future astrophysics missions; to develop innovative technologies for space astrophysics that have the potential to enable major scientific breakthroughs; and to foster new talent by putting early-career instrument builders on a trajectory toward long-term positions. NASA is committed to supporting deserving early-career researchers by selecting one or more Roman Technology Fellows every year.

This fellowship consists of two components with two different submission procedures. (1) The first component is the application to be named a Roman Technology Fellow through a one-page application submitted along with a proposal submitted to D.3, the Astrophysics Research and Analysis, or APRA, program element. (2) The second component is the subsequent submission of a proposal for up to $300K in fellowship funds by a previously selected Roman Technology Fellow once that individual obtains a permanent or permanent track position.

A notice of intent to submit a proposal is required and is due Jan. 20, 2017. Proposals are due March 17, 2017.

For complete fellowship details and application procedures, visit http://go.nasa.gov/2hmrro0.

Questions concerning this opportunity may be directed to William Lightsey at Billy.Lightsey@nasa.gov.


Educator Workshop: Utilizing Renewable Energy

Learn how to help students break down complex issues into more manageable pieces in a lesson that explores the math, science and engineering considerations involved in using solar energy. Join NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory on Jan. 21, 2017, from 10 a.m. to noon PST for this workshop at the Columbia Memorial Space Center in Downey, California.

The workshop is free for all pre-service and fully credentialed teachers! Participants must bring their teacher or student ID the day of the workshop. Lunch will be provided.

Pre-registration is required. For more information and to register to attend, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/events/2017/1/21/utilizing-renewable-energy/.

Can’t make it to the workshop? Explore the lesson online at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/teach/activity/think-green-utilizing-renewable-solar-energy/.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Sandra Valencia at (562) 231-1205.


Future Engineers Mars Medical Challenge

Calling all students! NASA wants your help to design an object that could be used by an astronaut to maintain physical health on a three-year mission to Mars. The Mars Medical Challenge is the fifth in a series of Future Engineers Challenges where students in grades K-12 create and submit a digital 3-D model intended to be printed in 3-D and used for a wide range of medical needs including diagnostic, preventive, first-aid, emergency, surgical and/or dental purposes.

As NASA continues to investigate how the human body adjusts to weightlessness, radiation and stress that occur long-duration spaceflight, Future Engineers proposes to engage students with a related challenge. The Mars Medical Challenge asks students to design a 3-D printed object that will keep astronauts healthy during the long trip to the Red Planet. Specifically, medical and dental hardware will be emphasized during this challenge.

Students ages 5-19 are invited to become the creators and innovators of tomorrow by using 3-D modeling software to submit their designs for hardware that could be used by astronauts on a future mission to Mars. Students have the opportunity to win prizes ranging from a Mars prize pack or a 3-D printer for their school to a trip to Houston for a tour of NASA’s Johnson Space Center. The challenge closes on Jan. 25, 2017, and winners will be announced on March 28, 2017.

What health-related items do you think an astronaut will need on that journey, and why would these items require a 3-D printer? It’s time to start flexing your problem-solving and design skills to find a solution – good luck!

For more information about the challenge and how to enter, visit www.futureengineers.org/marsmedical.


Free Educator Professional Development Workshops From NASA’s Stennis Space Center Office of Education

NASA’s Stennis Space Center Office of Education is presenting a series of free science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, educator professional development workshops open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom.

Journey to Mars
Audience
: Grades 4-8, In-service, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Registration Deadline: Jan. 22, 2017 (maximum of 30 participants)
Event Date: Jan. 26, 2017, 9 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. CST
Launch an investigation into the Red Planet using Earth and Mars comparisons, models, and engineering design. This workshop will integrate NASA online resources and STEM classroom activities, including those from NASA’s “Modern Figures” campaign. “Modern Figures” activities highlight the contributions made by the African American women called “human computers,” as seen in the new movie “Hidden Figures.” The workshop will be presented at the Infinity Science Center in Pearlington, Mississippi. (Map).
Register Online: https://www.etouches.com/219171

NASA Aeronautics: The Science of Flight
Audience
: Grades 4-8, In-service, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Registration Deadline: Feb. 19, 2017 (maximum of 30 participants)
Event Date: Feb. 23, 2017, 9 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. CST
Explore basic principles of flight, construct aircraft models, and use the engineering design process to make these activities educationally challenging. NASA aeronautics technology will be introduced. Learn how these inquiry-based lessons can help students develop concepts, practice data analysis skills, and relate their investigations to real-world applications. The workshop will be presented at the Infinity Science Center in Pearlington, Mississippi. (Map).
Register Online: https://www.etouches.com/219187

For more information on the upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development workshops, email Aprill McIntosh at april.l.mcintosh@nasa.gov.


Generation Nano: Small Science, Superheroes

The National Science Foundation and the National Nanotechnology Initiative invite high school students to take part in the Generation Nano: Small Science, Superheroes competition. This contest challenges high school students to focus on a particular mission for society and then design nanotechnology-enabled gear for an original superhero.

Students can envision gear that is grounded in current research but not yet possible, a process in which they learn about the potentials and limitations of real-world nanotechnology. Students will first identify one societal mission from a list of four to address and then submit an entry with three parts: a written section, a short comic strip and a 90-second video.

Each submission must be made by an individual student or a team of two or three students. All entrants must be U.S. citizens, nationals, or permanent residents. Participants must be enrolled in a high school or home schooled in the U.S., its territories, or possessions at the time of entry.

Submissions are due at 11:59 p.m. EST on Jan. 31, 2017.

For more information, visit www.nsf.gov/GenNano. Questions about this competition may be directed to gennano@nsf.gov.


NASA’s DIVER (Diving into Experimental Research) Challenge

NASA and the American Society for Gravitational and Space Research, or ASGSR, are challenging high school students to design and build an object that will float in water in normal gravity but will submerge in water as far as possible when exposed to microgravity.

After student proposals are evaluated, selected teams will have their objects tested in NASA’s 2.2 Second Drop Tower at NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Ohio. Teams are only responsible for their diving objects. NASA will provide the rest of the experimental hardware and interact with teams remotely during testing.

The winning DIVER teams will have the opportunity to present their results in a student poster session at ASGSR’s 2017 conference in Seattle, Washington, in October 2017.

Proposals are due Feb. 1, 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit https://spaceflightsystems.grc.nasa.gov/education-outreach/diver/.

Please email questions about this opportunity to celere@lists.nasa.gov.


Call for Proposals — Research Projects on Determinants of Life Expectancy by Income and Geography, and Implications for Social Security Policy

The National Bureau for Economic Research seeks applications for pilot research projects that deepen our understanding of the mechanisms explaining geographic variation in the relationship between income and life expectancy in the United States. Research projects will use recently released statistics from the Health Inequality Project. With funding support from the Social Security Administration through the NBER Retirement Research Center, the NBER encourages proposals for projects that use the new data to better understand the reasons for the strong relationship between income and life expectancy, its geographic variability, and its implications for interventions and policy.

Applications will be accepted from junior faculty, postdoctoral fellows and doctoral students. Individuals and research teams are eligible to apply. NBER expects to fund five to seven proposals.

Applications are due Feb. 1, 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit http://www.nber.org/programs/ag/funding.html.

Please email questions about this opportunity to agfellow@nber.org.


Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design, or STEAMD; or activities culturally relevant to or focused on populations underrepresented in STEM careers, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or nonreimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA announcement.


Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Are you an undergraduate or graduate student seeking opportunities in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)? The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science — in collaboration with the participating agencies in the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on STEM Education (CoSTEM) and the Science.gov Alliance — has launched a search portal for both students and universities to discover federally sponsored STEM education training and funding opportunities.

Student users can search the site for opportunities they can apply to directly, such as research internships and fellowships. Likewise, universities can search the site for federal funding opportunities to establish innovative training programs for undergraduates or graduate students.

Users can search the site through faceted searching capabilities for characteristics such as program type, STEM discipline, institution location, federal sponsor, and eligibility. Or they can search through the open text option.

For programs and opportunities for undergraduates, visit http://stemundergrads.science.gov/.

For graduate programs and opportunities, visit http://stemgradstudents.science.gov/.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at https://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the new ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Eduation: https://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express Message — Dec. 29, 2016

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: Jan. 3, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EST

Free Educator Professional Development Workshops From NASA’s Stennis Space Center Office of Education
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: Jan. 26, 2017, 9 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. CST
Workshop Location: Infinity Science Center in Pearlington, Mississippi

NASA’s DIVER (Diving into Experiment Research) Challenge
Audience: 9-12 Students
Proposal Deadline: Feb. 1, 2017

Call for Proposals — Research Projects on Determinants of Life Expectancy by Income and Geography, and Implications for Social Security Policy
Audience: Higher Education Faculty and Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 1, 2017

Be a Citizen Scientist With the ‘Aurorasaurus’ Project
Audience: All Educators and Students
Project Timeframe: Ongoing


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

Modern Figures Toolkit: Activities and Resources Related to Katherine Johnson and Human Computers
Audience: K-12 Educators

2017 Space Exploration Educators Conference
Audience: K-12 Educators
Early Bird Registration Deadline: Dec. 30, 2016
Event Date: Feb. 9-11, 2017

NASA’s Langley Research Center Centennial Student Art Contest
Audience: K-12 Students
Entry Period: Nov. 1 – Dec. 31, 2016

2017 Mission X: Train Like an Astronaut “Walk to the Moon” Challenge
Audience: All Educators and Students, Home School Parents and After-school Groups
Registration Deadline: Dec. 31, 2016
Challenge Dates: Jan. 12 – April 28, 2017

Center for Astronomy Education Regional Teaching Exchanges and Workshops — Fall/Winter 2016-2017
Audience: Current and Future College Instructors of Astronomy
Next Event Date: Jan. 4, 2017

Free Program — Cubes in SpaceTM

Audience: Students Ages 11-18 and Their Teachers
Registration Deadline: Jan. 6, 2017

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event – Virtual Field Trip to Kennedy Space Center
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-12
Event Date: Jan. 12, 2017

Research Grants: Partnerships for Enhanced Engagement in Research
Audience: Researchers at Academic Institutions in Developing Countries
Application Deadline: Jan. 13, 2017

Free Educator Workshop: Earth Science Workshop
Audience: Formal and Informal Educators of Grades K-8
Event Date: Jan. 14, 2017, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. PST

Free Educator Workshop — Solar System and Beyond: Modern Figures
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Event Dates: Jan. 18, 2017, 4:30-6 p.m. PST

2017 RASC-AL Aerospace Concepts Design Competition
Audience: Higher Education Students
Abstract Submission Deadline: Jan. 19, 2017

Nancy Grace Roman Technology Fellowships for Early Career Researchers
Audience: Researchers Who Have Received a Ph.D. in the Last Eight Years
Notice of Intent Deadline: Jan. 20, 2017
Proposal Deadline: March 17, 2017

Future Engineers Mars Medical Challenge
Audience: Educators and Students Ages 5 to 19
Entry Deadline: Jan. 25, 2017

National Science Foundation’s Mathematical Sciences Graduate Internship Program
Audience: Mathematical Sciences Doctoral Students
Application Deadline: March 1, 2017

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students and Higher Education Institutions


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Don’t Count NASA Out of Your Math Classes: Mass vs. Weight
Audience:
Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: Jan. 3, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EST
Learn about hands-on, standards-aligned activities comparing mass and weight. Participants will learn about the microgravity environment of the International Space Station. This webinar addresses Common Core Math Standards and the Next Generation Science Standards ESS1 and ESS2. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/207364

Aeronautics — Come Fly With Us: Balloons and Kites for Elementary Educators
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-5
Event Date: Jan. 4, 2017, at 4 p.m. EST
Explore NASA’s “The Courage to Soar” educator guide. Learn about education activities on flight that relate to science, math, language arts, engineering design and art. Participants will discuss the history of kites and balloons. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/217984

Aeronautics — Come Fly With Us: Flying Things in Your Classroom
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-8
Event Date: Jan. 5, 2017, at 6 p.m. EST
Explore the principles and physics of flight by flying things in your classroom. Use NASA online resources and simple, inexpensive STEM classroom activities and design challenges to investigate the parts of an airplane, what makes an airplane fly, and how to model aircraft that can fly in your classroom. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/219444

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


Free Educator Professional Development Workshops From NASA’s Stennis Space Center Office of Education

NASA’s Stennis Space Center Office of Education is presenting a series of free science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, educator professional development workshops open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom.

Journey to Mars
Audience
: Grades 4-8, In-service, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Registration Deadline: Jan. 22, 2017 (maximum of 30 participants)
Event Date: Jan. 26, 2017, 9 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. CST
Launch an investigation into the Red Planet using Earth and Mars comparisons, models, and engineering design. This workshop will integrate NASA online resources and STEM classroom activities, including those from NASA’s “Modern Figures” campaign. “Modern Figures” activities highlight the contributions made by the African American women called “human computers,” as seen in the new movie “Hidden Figures.” The workshop will be presented at the Infinity Science Center in Pearlington, Mississippi. (Map).
Register Online: https://www.etouches.com/219171

NASA Aeronautics: The Science of Flight
Audience
: Grades 4-8, In-service, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Registration Deadline: Feb. 19, 2017 (maximum of 30 participants)
Event Date: Feb. 23, 2017, 9 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. CST
Explore basic principles of flight, construct aircraft models, and use the engineering design process to make these activities educationally challenging. NASA aeronautics technology will be introduced. Learn how these inquiry-based lessons can help students develop concepts, practice data analysis skills, and relate their investigations to real-world applications. The workshop will be presented at the Infinity Science Center in Pearlington, Mississippi. (Map).
Register Online: https://www.etouches.com/219187

Keesler Air Force Base (Hurricane Hunters) and NASA: Weather and Hurricanes
Audience: Grades 4-8, In-service, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Registration Deadline: March 26, 2017 (maximum of 30 participants)
Event Date: March 30, 2017, 9 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. CDT
Learn about the role of the Air Force and NASA in our understanding and forecasting of weather, climate, hurricanes and their effects on Earth’s systems. Air Force and NASA data, STEM curriculum resources, and tours will guide participants through classroom activities and learning strategies. The workshop will be presented at Keesler Air Force Base in Biloxi, Mississippi. (Map). *Registration is restricted to US citizens only*
Register Online: https://www.etouches.com/211635

For more information on the upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development workshops, email Aprill McIntosh at april.l.mcintosh@nasa.gov.


NASA’s DIVER (Diving into Experiment Research) Challenge

NASA and the American Society for Gravitational and Space Research, or ASGSR, are challenging high school students to design and build an object that will float in water in normal gravity but will submerge in water as far as possible when exposed to microgravity.

After student proposals are evaluated, selected teams will have their objects tested in NASA’s 2.2 Second Drop Tower at NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Ohio. Teams are only responsible for their diving objects. NASA will provide the rest of the experimental hardware and interact with teams remotely during testing.

The winning DIVER teams will have the opportunity to present their results in a student poster session at ASGSR’s 2017 conference in Seattle, Washington, in October 2017.

Proposals are due Feb. 1, 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit https://spaceflightsystems.grc.nasa.gov/education-outreach/diver/.

Please email questions about this opportunity to celere@lists.nasa.gov.


Call for Proposals — Research Projects on Determinants of Life Expectancy by Income and Geography, and Implications for Social Security Policy

The National Bureau for Economic Research seeks applications for pilot research projects that deepen our understanding of the mechanisms explaining geographic variation in the relationship between income and life expectancy in the United States. Research projects will use recently released statistics from the Health Inequality Project. With funding support from the Social Security Administration through the NBER Retirement Research Center, the NBER encourages proposals for projects that use the new data to better understand the reasons for the strong relationship between income and life expectancy, its geographic variability, and its implications for interventions and policy.

Applications will be accepted from junior faculty, postdoctoral fellows and doctoral students. Individuals and research teams are eligible to apply. NBER expects to fund five to seven proposals.

Applications are due Feb. 1, 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit http://www.nber.org/programs/ag/funding.html.

Please email questions about this opportunity to agfellow@nber.org.


Be a Citizen Scientist With the ‘Aurorasaurus’ Project

Aurorasaurus is the first and only citizen science project that tracks auroras around the world via online reports, mobile apps and social media.

Aurorasaurus is a citizen science project that gathers real-time data about aurora sightings and sends out notifications to users when the northern or southern lights are likely visible in their area. Registered users get location-based notifications and a real-time monitor of space weather activity. The project also allows users to help verify tweets and search for real sightings. Plus, the website features answers to science and aurora questions.

To learn more, visit http://www.aurorasaurus.org/.

Please direct questions about this project to aurorasaurus.info@gmail.com.

This project receives support from the National Science Foundation and NASA’s Science Mission Directorate.


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


Modern Figures Toolkit: Activities and Resources Related to Katherine Johnson and Human Computers

In the 1960’s, the U.S. was on an ambitious journey to the moon, and Katherine Johnson and her fellow human computers helped get NASA there. Bring the excitement of their story to your classroom with the Modern Figures Toolkit.

The Modern Figures Toolkit is a collection of resources and educational activities for students in grades K-12. Each educational activity and resource includes a brief description, as well as information about how the activities and lessons align to education standards. Resources highlighted include videos, historical references and STEM materials.

Bring Katherine Johnson’s inspiring story to your classroom by downloading the Modern Figures Toolkit at www.nasa.gov/modernfigures-education-toolkit.


2017 Space Exploration Educators Conference

Make plans to attend the 23rd Annual Space Exploration Educators Conference to be held Feb. 9-11, 2017, at Space Center Houston. This conference is for all K-12 educators. Activities presented use space-related themes to teach across the curricula. The activities may be used for science, language arts, mathematics, history and more.

Attend sessions hosted by scientists and engineers working on exciting projects like the International Space Station and the exploration of Mars and other parts of our solar system. Hear from astronauts who will be “leading the charge” in exploration. Attend sessions presented by educators and receive ready-to-implement classroom ideas. Attendees can earn up to 24 hours of continuing professional education credit.

For discounted registration, sign up to attend before the Early Bird Registration deadline on Dec. 30, 2016!

For more information, visit http://spacecenter.org/teacher-programs/teachers-seec/.

Please email any questions about the conference to seec@spacecenter.org.


NASA’s Langley Research Center Centennial Student Art Contest

Calling all artists, grades K-12!

On July 17, 2017, NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, will turn 100 years old! To celebrate, Langley invites you to take part in its Centennial Art Contest. The theme for this year’s contest is “A Storied Legacy, A Soaring Future.”

The contest is open to all children in grades K-12 who are attending public, private, parochial and homeschools in the United States. Artwork entries may consist of drawings, paintings, mixed media and digital creations.

A grand prize winner will be chosen from all contest entries. A first place winner will be chosen from each grade level, as well as second place, third place and honorable mention. Each entry will receive a certificate of participation.

The art contest submission period began on Nov. 1, 2016, and concludes on Dec. 31, 2016, at midnight EST.

For more information, visit https://artcontest.larc.nasa.gov/.

Please direct questions about this contest to Kristina Cors at larc-art-contest@mail.nasa.gov.


2017 Mission X: Train Like an Astronaut “Walk to the Moon” Challenge

Mission X encourages children of all ages, as well as people with particular needs, to pursue healthy lifestyles based on the model of training like an astronaut. During six- to nine-week “challenges” each fall and spring, schools and student groups from around the world complete Mission X classroom-based science lessons and physical education activities.

In 2017, Mission X is challenging Fit Explorers around the world to work together to perform activities that will move Astro Charlie the 478 million steps it would take to walk from Earth to the moon! That’s 238,857 miles, or 384,403 kilometers! At an average walking speed, that would take one person about nine years to complete.

The challenge kicks off in January. For full challenge details and to do your part to help reach this out-of-this-world goal, visit http://trainlikeanastronaut.org/wttm. The deadline to register for this challenge is Dec. 31, 2016. You may apply for Team USA at http://trainlikeanastronaut.org/usa_application.

In 2016, Mission X was represented by 30 countries and more than 53,000 participants. The challenge was available in 17 languages.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Nubia Carvajal at nubia.a.carvajal@nasa.gov.


Center for Astronomy Education Regional Teaching Exchanges and Workshops — Fall/Winter 2016-2017

NASA’s Center for Astronomy Education, or CAE, announces a series of regional teaching exchanges and workshops for astronomy and space science educators.

Teaching exchanges foster a sense of community among geographically linked current and future college instructors of astronomy. Regional experts from the broader CAE community are ready to provide the opportunity for you to meet your neighbors, expand your instructional repertoire and share your own expertise.

Workshops provide participants with experiences needed to create effective and productive active-learning classroom environments. Workshop leaders model best practices in implementing many different classroom-tested instructional strategies. But more importantly, workshop participants will gain first-hand experience implementing these proven strategies.

Jan. 4, 2017 — Gaylord Texan Resort and Convention Center in Grapevine, Texas
CAE Tier I Teaching Excellence Workshop — New Methods for Teaching About Exoplanets

Jan. 5, 2017 — Gaylord Texan Resort and Convention Center in Grapevine, Texas
CAE Tier I Teaching Excellence Workshop — New Methods for Teaching in the Flipped Classroom

For more information and to register for the teaching exchanges, visit http://astronomy101.jpl.nasa.gov/workshops/index.cfm.

Inquiries about this series of events should be directed to Gina Brissenden at gbrissenden@as.arizona.edu.

CAE is funded through NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s Exoplanet Exploration Program.


Free Program — Cubes in SpaceTM

Cubes in Space™ provides students ages 11-18 an opportunity to design and compete to launch an experiment into space at no cost! Cubes in Space™ is offered by idoodledu, inc., in partnership with NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center’s Wallops Flight Facility, the Colorado Space Grant Consortium and NASA’s Langley Research Center.

This global education program based on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics) enables students to learn about space exploration using innovative problem-solving and inquiry-based learning methods. Participants have access to resources that help prepare them to design and develop an experiment to be integrated into a small cube.

This year, experiments will be launched into space via sounding rocket from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island, Virginia, in late June 2017 or from a high-altitude balloon launched from NASA’s Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility in Fort Sumner, New Mexico, in August 2017.

The deadline for program registration is Jan. 6, 2017. For more information, visit http://www.cubesinspace.com. Questions about this program may be directed to info@cubesinspace.com.

About idoodedu inc.

idoodledu inc., a charitable nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization, is a wholly owned subsidiary of idoodlelearning inc., and was created in 2015 as a legal vehicle to bring public/private partnerships and publicly funded programs to all learners and educators. idoodlelearning inc. is an education company based in Ottawa, Canada; London, England; and Virginia Beach, Virginia, USA.


Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites U.S. educational institutions to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets, and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

Nonprofit museums, libraries and planetariums (sponsored through their respective State Agency Surplus Property, or SASP, organization) are also eligible to make requests. Visit the link below for special instructions to request items. To find the contact information for the SASP representative for your area, visit http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/100851.

A nominal shipping fee must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event – Virtual Field Trip to Kennedy Space Center

Join the education specialists of NASA’s Digital Learning Network as they travel to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Jan. 12, 2017. The multipart series of Virtual Field Trips will feature different landmarks and projects taking place at Kennedy.

Explore Kennedy Space Center during the following 30-minute sessions:

10 a.m. EST — Join DLN education specialists Caryn Long from NASA’s Langley Research Center and Lisa Ilowsky from NASA’s Ames Research Center to learn more about the Vehicle Assembly Building and Mobile Launch Pad.

Noon EST — Join DLN education specialists Lindsey Jones from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center and Rachel Power from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center to learn more about Kennedy’s Swamp Works project.

2 p.m. EST — Join DLN education specialists Kristy Brumfield from NASA’s Stennis Space Center and David Alexander from NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center to learn more about the Orion and Crew Exploration Vehicle.

Up to three schools will be able to join DLN live and interactively during each of the three individual webcasts. To register for this opportunity, please complete the form found at https://goo.gl/forms/U4UvoCJXHSCpDZNv2. Each school may request to participate in only one session.

Schools that are not selected to be a part of the interactive audience will be able to view the webcast event live at https://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-dlinfo.

For more information about this and other DLN events, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please send them to dlinfochannel@gmail.com.


Research Grants: Partnerships for Enhanced Engagement in Research

The Partnerships for Enhanced Engagement in Research, or PEER, program is a competitive awards program that invites scientists in developing countries to apply for funds to support research and capacity-building activities on topics of importance to the United States Agency for International Development and conducted in partnership with U.S. government-supported and selected private sector partners.

PEER applicants who submit pre-proposals to PEER must be based at an academic institution, nonprofit organization, or government-managed research laboratory, center or institute in a PEER-eligible country. Applicants also must hold a career-track position or equivalent at their respective institution or organization. Applicants should be working in the country from which they are applying and should be nationals (citizens or permanent residents) of a PEER-eligible country for the focus area to which they are applying.

The deadline for submission of pre-proposals is Jan. 13, 2017. Pre-proposals should be completed through the PEER online application site no later than 11:59 p.m. (U.S. Eastern Standard Time) on that date.

For more information, visit http://www.nationalacademies.org/peer.

The PEER program is supported by the United States Agency for International Development and implemented by the U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to peer@nas.edu.


Free Educator Workshop: Earth Science Workshop

Explore the impact of increasing global temperature on glaciers and sea level using real satellite data from NASA. Then, discover ways to turn these resources into engineering, mathematics and science lessons for students. Finally, learn to use the engineering design process to develop water-filtration and recycling systems to minimize our adverse impact on the water cycle.

Join NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory on Jan. 14, 2017, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. PST for this workshop at the von Kármán Auditorium at NASA’s JPL in Pasadena, California.

For more information and to register to attend, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/events/2017/1/14/earth-science-workshop/.

Can’t make it to the workshop? Explore these lessons online at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/teach/activity/water-filtration-challenge/ and http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/teach/activity/the-science-of-earths-rising-seas/.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Paula Partida at Paula.S.Partida@jpl.nasa.gov.


Free Educator Workshop — Solar System and Beyond: Modern Figures

Join the Office of Education of NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center for an educator professional development workshop as we look back at the history of human computers like Katherine Johnson and look forward toward exploration of the solar system. Learn about OSIRIS-REx (Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, and Security – Regolith Explorer) on its search for asteroids using modern-day technology to calculate launch windows and orbits. Educators will engage in standards-aligned mathematics, science and engineering activities about launch windows, planetary orbits and robotics. Participants will receive hands-on activities for students that combine math, science, engineering and social studies.

The workshop will take place Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2017, 4:30-6 p.m. PST at NASA’s Armstrong Educator Resource Center at the AERO Institute in Palmdale, California.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/erc_workshop_01_18_17a.pdf

Please direct questions about this workshop to Sondra Geddes at sondra.l.geddes@nasa.gov.


2017 RASC-AL Aerospace Concepts Design Competition

NASA and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2017 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts-Academic Linkage Aerospace Concepts competition. RASC-AL is a design project competition for university-level engineering students and faculty.

The 2017 RASC-AL competition challenges teams to develop new concepts that leverage innovations to improve our ability to work more effectively in microgravity, by responding to one of four themes:
— Lightweight Exercise Suite.
— Airlock Design.
— Commercially enabled LEO/Mars Habitable Module.
— Logistics Delivery System.

Potentially, NASA could implement concepts derived from the design projects.

Interested teams must submit an abstract for their proposed project by Jan. 19, 2017.

NEW THIS YEAR: As a part of the abstract proposal submission process, teams will be required to include a two-minute video. The intent is for the video to augment each team’s abstract proposal by including animation, graphics, or other creative ways of showcasing unique aspects of their proposed concept.

The 2017 RASC-AL Competition will implement a two-tiered down-select process. A steering committee of NASA and industry experts will evaluate the abstract and video proposals and select as many as 20 undergraduate or graduate teams to move to the next phase of the competition. Based on evaluation of five- to seven-page mid-project papers submitted by these teams in mid-March, the field will be narrowed once again to 12-16 teams who will be selected for the final round of the competition. The finalists will present their concepts to the panel of judges (the RASC-AL Steering Committee) at the RASC-AL Forum in June 2017 in Florida.

The RASC-AL competition is open to full-time undergraduate or graduate students majoring in engineering or science at an accredited college or university. University design teams must include one faculty or industry advisor with a university affiliation and two or more undergraduate or graduate students. A group of universities also may collaborate on a design project entry. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

For more information about this competition, visit http://rascal.nianet.org.

If you have questions about this competition, please contact the RASC-AL team at rascal@nianet.org.


Nancy Grace Roman Technology Fellowships for Early Career Researchers

The Nancy Grace Roman Technology Fellowship in astrophysics seeks to provide early-career researchers the opportunity to develop the skills necessary to lead astrophysics flight instrument development projects, including suborbital investigations, in preparation to become principal investigators of future astrophysics missions; to develop innovative technologies for space astrophysics that have the potential to enable major scientific breakthroughs; and to foster new talent by putting early-career instrument builders on a trajectory toward long-term positions. NASA is committed to supporting deserving early-career researchers by selecting one or more Roman Technology Fellows every year.

This fellowship consists of two components with two different submission procedures. (1) The first component is the application to be named a Roman Technology Fellow through a one-page application submitted along with a proposal submitted to D.3, the Astrophysics Research and Analysis, or APRA, program element. (2) The second component is the subsequent submission of a proposal for up to $300K in fellowship funds by a previously selected Roman Technology Fellow once that individual obtains a permanent or permanent track position.

A notice of intent to submit a proposal is required and is due Jan. 20, 2017. Proposals are due March 17, 2017.

For complete fellowship details and application procedures, visit http://go.nasa.gov/2hmrro0.

Questions concerning this opportunity may be directed to William Lightsey at Billy.Lightsey@nasa.gov.


Future Engineers Mars Medical Challenge

Calling all students! NASA wants your help to design an object that could be used by an astronaut to maintain physical health on a three-year mission to Mars. The Mars Medical Challenge is the fifth in a series of Future Engineers Challenges where students in grades K-12 create and submit a digital 3-D model intended to be printed in 3-D and used for a wide range of medical needs including diagnostic, preventive, first-aid, emergency, surgical and/or dental purposes.

As NASA continues to investigate how the human body adjusts to weightlessness, radiation and stress that occur long-duration spaceflight, Future Engineers proposes to engage students with a related challenge. The Mars Medical Challenge asks students to design a 3-D printed object that will keep astronauts healthy during the long trip to the Red Planet. Specifically, medical and dental hardware will be emphasized during this challenge.

Students ages 5-19 are invited to become the creators and innovators of tomorrow by using 3-D modeling software to submit their designs for hardware that could be used by astronauts on a future mission to Mars. Students have the opportunity to win prizes ranging from a Mars prize pack or a 3-D printer for their school to a trip to Houston for a tour of NASA’s Johnson Space Center. The challenge closes on Jan. 25, 2017, and winners will be announced on March 28, 2017.

What health-related items do you think an astronaut will need on that journey, and why would these items require a 3-D printer? It’s time to start flexing your problem-solving and design skills to find a solution – good luck!

For more information about the challenge and how to enter, visit www.futureengineers.org/marsmedical.


National Science Foundation’s Mathematical Sciences Graduate Internship Program

The National Science Foundation is accepting applications for its Mathematical Sciences Graduate Internship Program. MSGI provides an opportunity for mathematical sciences doctoral students to participate in internships at national laboratories, industry and other approved facilities. Participation in an internship will provide first-hand experience of the use of mathematics in a nonacademic setting. The internships are aimed at students who are interested in understanding the application of advanced mathematical and statistical techniques to “real-world” problems, regardless of whether the student plans to pursue an academic or nonacademic career.

MSGI is open to graduate students pursuing a doctoral degree in mathematics, statistics or applied mathematics who are enrolled as full-time graduate students at an accredited U.S. college or university during the 2016-2017 academic year. Applicants must have a cumulative GPA of 3.30 or higher on a 4.0 scale, including fall 2016 grades.

The application submission deadline is March 1, 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.orise.orau.gov/nsf-msgi/default.html.

Questions about this internship opportunity should be directed to nsf-msgi@orise.orau.gov.


Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design, or STEAMD; or activities culturally relevant to or focused on populations underrepresented in STEM careers, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or nonreimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA announcement.


Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Are you an undergraduate or graduate student seeking opportunities in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)? The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science — in collaboration with the participating agencies in the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on STEM Education (CoSTEM) and the Science.gov Alliance — has launched a search portal for both students and universities to discover federally sponsored STEM education training and funding opportunities.

Student users can search the site for opportunities they can apply to directly, such as research internships and fellowships. Likewise, universities can search the site for federal funding opportunities to establish innovative training programs for undergraduates or graduate students.

Users can search the site through faceted searching capabilities for characteristics such as program type, STEM discipline, institution location, federal sponsor, and eligibility. Or they can search through the open text option.

For programs and opportunities for undergraduates, visit http://stemundergrads.science.gov/.

For graduate programs and opportunities, visit http://stemgradstudents.science.gov/.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at https://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the new ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Eduation: https://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express Message — Dec. 22, 2016

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


NEW THIS WEEK!


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event – Virtual Field Trip to Kennedy Space Center
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-12
Event Date: Jan. 12, 2017

Free Educator Workshop: Earth Science Workshop
Audience: Formal and Informal Educators of Grades K-8
Event Date: Jan. 14, 2017, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. PST

Free Educator Workshop — Solar System and Beyond: Modern Figures
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Event Dates: Jan. 18, 2017, 4:30-6 p.m. PST

Nancy Grace Roman Technology Fellowships for Early Career Researchers
Audience: Researchers Who Have Received a Ph.D. in the Last Eight Years
Notice of Intent Deadline: Jan. 20, 2017
Proposal Deadline: March 17, 2017

2017 NOAA Undergraduate Scholarships
Audience: Undergraduate Students
Application Deadline: Jan. 31, 2017

NASA History Program Office Internships — Summer 2017
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 1, 2017

2017 Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program
Audience: Undergraduate Students Majoring in Geology or a Related Science
Application Deadline: Feb. 10, 2017

FY2017 and FY2018 NASA Cooperative Agreement Notice for the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR)
Audience: Higher Education Institutions in Jurisdictions With a Currently Serving NASA EPSCoR Director
Notice of Intent Deadline: Feb. 13, 2017
Proposal Deadline: March 16, 2017

2017 NASA Marshall Faculty Fellowship Program
Audience: Higher Education Educators
Application Deadline: Feb. 15, 2017


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

Modern Figures Toolkit: Activities and Resources Related to Katherine Johnson and Human Computers
Audience: K-12 Educators

Summer Research Team Program for Minority Serving Institutions
Audience: Faculty at Minority-Serving Institutions
Application Deadline: Dec. 26, 2016, at 11:59 p.m. EST

2017 Space Exploration Educators Conference
Audience: K-12 Educators
Early Bird Registration Deadline: Dec. 30, 2016
Event Date: Feb. 9-11, 2017

NASA’s Langley Research Center Centennial Student Art Contest
Audience: K-12 Students
Entry Period: Nov. 1 – Dec. 31, 2016

2017 Mission X: Train Like an Astronaut “Walk to the Moon” Challenge
Audience: All Educators and Students, Home School Parents and After-school Groups
Registration Deadline: Dec. 31, 2016
Challenge Dates: Jan. 12 – April 28, 2017

Center for Astronomy Education Regional Teaching Exchanges and Workshops — Fall/Winter 2016-2017
Audience: Current and Future College Instructors of Astronomy
Next Event Date: Jan. 4, 2017

Free Program — Cubes in SpaceTM

Audience: Students Ages 11-18 and Their Teachers
Registration Deadline: Jan. 6, 2017

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

Research Grants: Partnerships for Enhanced Engagement in Research
Audience: Researchers at Academic Institutions in Developing Countries
Application Deadline: Jan. 13, 2017

Mars Survival Kit: Lessons and Activities to Guide Your Exploration of Mars!
Audience: K-12 Educators

National Science Foundation’s Mathematical Sciences Graduate Internship Program
Audience: Mathematical Sciences Doctoral Students
Application Deadline: Jan. 16, 2017

U.S. Department of Energy’s BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge
Audience: Students in Grades 9-12
Registration Deadline: Feb. 3, 2017
Infographic Submission Deadline: March 3, 2017

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students and Higher Education Institutions


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html


NEW THIS WEEK!


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event – Virtual Field Trip to Kennedy Space Center

Join the education specialists of NASA’s Digital Learning Network as they travel to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Jan. 12, 2017. The multipart series of Virtual Field Trips will feature different landmarks and projects taking place at Kennedy.

Explore Kennedy Space Center during the following 30-minute sessions:

10 a.m. EST — Join DLN education specialists Caryn Long from NASA’s Langley Research Center and Lisa Ilowsky from NASA’s Ames Research Center to learn more about the Vehicle Assembly Building and Mobile Launch Pad.

Noon EST — Join DLN education specialists Lindsey Jones from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center and Rachel Power from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center to learn more about Kennedy’s Swamp Works project.

2 p.m. EST — Join DLN education specialists Kristy Brumfield from NASA’s Stennis Space Center and David Alexander from NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center to learn more about the Orion and Crew Exploration Vehicle.

Up to three schools will be able to join DLN live and interactively during each of the three individual webcasts. To register for this opportunity, please complete the form found at https://goo.gl/forms/U4UvoCJXHSCpDZNv2. Each school may request to participate in only one session.

Schools that are not selected to be a part of the interactive audience will be able to view the webcast event live at https://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-dlinfo.

For more information about this and other DLN events, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please send them to dlinfochannel@gmail.com.


Educator Workshop: Earth Science Workshop

Explore the impact of increasing global temperature on glaciers and sea level using real satellite data from NASA. Then, discover ways to turn these resources into engineering, mathematics and science lessons for students. Finally, learn to use the engineering design process to develop water-filtration and recycling systems to minimize our adverse impact on the water cycle.

Join NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory on Jan. 14, 2017, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. PST for this workshop at the von Kármán Auditorium at NASA’s JPL in Pasadena, California.

For more information and to register to attend, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/events/2017/1/14/earth-science-workshop/.

Can’t make it to the workshop? Explore these lessons online at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/teach/activity/water-filtration-challenge/ and http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/teach/activity/the-science-of-earths-rising-seas/.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Paula Partida at Paula.S.Partida@jpl.nasa.gov.


Free Educator Workshop — Solar System and Beyond: Modern Figures

Join the Office of Education of NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center for an educator professional development workshop as we look back at the history of human computers like Katherine Johnson and look forward toward exploration of the solar system. Learn about OSIRIS-REx (Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, and Security – Regolith Explorer) on its search for asteroids using modern-day technology to calculate launch windows and orbits. Educators will engage in standards-aligned mathematics, science and engineering activities about launch windows, planetary orbits and robotics. Participants will receive hands-on activities for students that combine math, science, engineering and social studies.

The workshop will take place Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2017, 4:30-6 p.m. PST at NASA’s Armstrong Educator Resource Center at the AERO Institute in Palmdale, California.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/erc_workshop_01_18_17a.pdf

Please direct questions about this workshop to Sondra Geddes at sondra.l.geddes@nasa.gov.


Nancy Grace Roman Technology Fellowships for Early Career Researchers

The Nancy Grace Roman Technology Fellowship in astrophysics seeks to provide early-career researchers the opportunity to develop the skills necessary to lead astrophysics flight instrument development projects, including suborbital investigations, in preparation to become principal investigators of future astrophysics missions; to develop innovative technologies for space astrophysics that have the potential to enable major scientific breakthroughs; and to foster new talent by putting early-career instrument builders on a trajectory toward long-term positions. NASA is committed to supporting deserving early-career researchers by selecting one or more Roman Technology Fellows every year.

This fellowship consists of two components with two different submission procedures. (1) The first component is the application to be named a Roman Technology Fellow through a one-page application submitted along with a proposal submitted to D.3, the Astrophysics Research and Analysis, or APRA, program element. (2) The second component is the subsequent submission of a proposal for up to $300K in fellowship funds by a previously selected Roman Technology Fellow once that individual obtains a permanent or permanent track position.

A notice of intent to submit a proposal is required and is due Jan. 20, 2017. Proposals are due March 17, 2017.

For complete fellowship details and application procedures, visit http://go.nasa.gov/2hmrro0.

Questions concerning this opportunity may be directed to William Lightsey at Billy.Lightsey@nasa.gov.


2017 NOAA Undergraduate Scholarships

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is accepting applications for its 2017 Educational Partnership Program Undergraduate Scholarship and 2017 Ernest F. Hollings Scholarship Programs.

The Educational Partnership Program Undergraduate Scholarship Program provides scholarships for two years of undergraduate study to students majoring in STEM fields that directly support NOAA’s mission. Participants conduct research at a NOAA facility during two paid summer internships. A stipend and housing allowance is provided. Students attending an accredited Minority Serving Institution as defined by the U.S. Department of Education (Hispanic Serving Institutions, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tribal Colleges and Universities, Alaskan-Native Serving Institutions, and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions) are eligible to apply for the program. The institutions must be within the United States or U.S. Territories. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and must earn and maintain a minimum 3.2 grade point average on a 4.0 scale.

The Ernest F. Hollings Scholarship Program provides scholarships for two years of undergraduate study with a paid internship at a NOAA facility during the interim summer session. A stipend and housing allowance is provided. Applicants must be U.S. citizens enrolled full-time at an accredited college or university. Applicants must have and maintain a declared major in a discipline including, but not limited to, oceanic, environmental, biological and atmospheric sciences; mathematics; engineering; remote-sensing technology; physical and social sciences including geography, physics, hydrology and geomatics; or teacher education that supports NOAA’s programs and mission. Participants must earn and maintain a minimum 3.0 grade point average on a 4.0 scale.

Applications for both scholarship programs are due Jan. 31, 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.oesd.noaa.gov/scholarships/.

Please direct questions about these scholarship opportunities to StudentScholarshipPrograms@noaa.gov.


NASA History Program Office Internships — Summer 2017

The NASA History Program Office is seeking undergraduate and graduate students for summer 2017 internships. The History Program Office maintains archival materials to answer research questions from NASA personnel, journalists, scholars, students at all levels and others from around the world. The division also edits and publishes several books and monographs each year. It maintains a large number of websites on NASA history.

Students of all majors are welcome to apply. While detailed prior knowledge of the aeronautics and space fields is not necessary, a keen interest and some basic familiarity with these topics are needed. Strong research, writing and editing skills are essential. Experience with social media is a plus.

Intern projects are flexible. Typical projects include handling a variety of information requests, writing posts for the NASA history Twitter and Facebook pages, editing historical manuscripts, doing research and writing biographical sketches, and identifying and captioning photos.

Applications for summer 2017 internships are due Feb. 1, 2017. Applications for fall 2017 internship applications are due June 1, 2017 and applications for spring 2018 internships are due Oct. 1, 2017.

For more information, visit http://history.nasa.gov/interncall.htm.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please contact Bill Barry at bill.barry@nasa.gov.


2017 Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program

The Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program, or PGGURP, pairs qualified undergraduate students with NASA-funded investigators at research locations across the U.S. for eight weeks during the summer. Students spend the summer at the NASA scientists’ home institutions. Selected students receive a cost-of-living stipend and compensation for housing and travel.

Undergraduate students majoring in geology or related sciences are eligible to apply. Students graduating in 2017 who have not started graduate school yet are also eligible. Preference is given to U.S. citizens and permanent residents.

Applications are due Feb. 10, 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/~tgregg/pggurp_homepage.html.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please email Robyn Wagner, PGGURP administrator, at pggurp@buffalo.edu.


FY2017 and FY2018 NASA Cooperative Agreement Notice for the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR)

NASA’s Office of Education is seeking proposals for the NASA Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research, or EPSCoR, program. Each funded NASA EPSCoR proposal is expected to establish research activities that will contribute significantly to the strategic research and technology development priorities of one or more of NASA’s mission directorates. Funded proposals are expected to contribute to the overall research infrastructure; science and technology capabilities; higher education; and economic development of the jurisdiction receiving funding.

While proposals can be accepted only from institutions where a NASA EPSCoR Director is currently serving, all institutions of higher education within the jurisdiction shall be made aware of this NASA EPSCoR CAN and given the opportunity to compete.

NASA EPSCoR is moving to a two-year procurement cycle. As a result, jurisdictions responding to this CAN may submit up to two proposals. It is anticipated that three to five awards for FY 2017 and three to five awards for FY 2018 of up to $750,000 to be expended over a three-year period of performance may be made under this CAN. The exact number of awards depends on the available EPSCoR research budget.

A required notice of intent is due Feb. 13, 2017. Proposals are due March 16, 2017.

For more information and instructions for submitting a proposal, visit http://go.nasa.gov/2gaYION.

Please direct questions about this request to Jeppie Compton at Jeppie.R.Compton@nasa.gov.


2017 NASA Marshall Faculty Fellowship Program

Applications are being accepted for the 2017 NASA Marshall Faculty Fellowship Program. This program provides a summer residency at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The 10-week fellowship begins on Monday, June 5, 2017, and runs through Friday, Aug. 11, 2017.

To be eligible for the program, applicants must hold a full-time teaching or research appointment in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, at an accredited university or college in the United States. Applicants must be U.S. citizens. Women, underrepresented minorities and persons with disabilities are particularly encouraged to apply.

The program covers limited travel expenses for qualified and accepted faculty, as well as stipends for all accepted faculty. Please note that stipend payments or salaries from other federal funding sources, including research grants and contracts, may not be accepted during the 10-week tenure of a Marshall faculty fellowship appointment.

The deadline for applications is Feb. 15, 2017. For more information about this opportunity, visit https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/descriptions/MSFC-Faculty-Fellowship.html.

Inquiries about NASA’s Marshall Faculty Fellowship Program should be directed to Dr. Frank Six at Frank.Six@nasa.gov.


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


Modern Figures Toolkit: Activities and Resources Related to Katherine Johnson and Human Computers

In the 1960’s, the U.S. was on an ambitious journey to the moon, and Katherine Johnson and her fellow human computers helped get NASA there. Bring the excitement of their story to your classroom with the Modern Figures Toolkit.

The Modern Figures Toolkit is a collection of resources and educational activities for students in grades K-12. Each educational activity and resource includes a brief description, as well as information about how the activities and lessons align to education standards. Resources highlighted include videos, historical references and STEM materials.

Bring Katherine Johnson’s inspiring story to your classroom by downloading the Modern Figures Toolkit at www.nasa.gov/modernfigures-education-toolkit.


Summer Research Team Program for Minority Serving Institutions

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is accepting applications for the Summer Research Team Program for Minority Serving Institutions. This 10-week program offers the opportunity to enhance the scientific leadership at MSIs in research areas that support the mission and goals of the Department of Homeland Security. Faculty, along with undergraduate and graduate students, will conduct collaborative research that provides opportunities to help advance the DHS Areas of Research and strengthen the talent pool of scientists and engineers.

Faculty members currently teaching at an MSI are encouraged to apply. Selected faculty will be invited to submit a research project proposal in collaboration with a DHS Center researcher and put a team together composed of one or two qualified students to complete the summer research experience.

Participants will receive a weekly stipend plus travel expenses. Some participants may be eligible for a housing allowance. Faculty are encouraged to apply for up to $50,000 in follow-on funding at the end of their appointment.

To be eligible, applicants must be U.S. citizens. Applications are due Dec. 26, 2016, at 11:59 p.m. EST.

Additional information about the program, including eligibility requirements, program benefits, application requirements and access to the online application system may be found at http://www.orau.gov/dhseducation/faculty/index.html.

Please direct inquiries about this opportunity to DHSed@orau.org.


2017 Space Exploration Educators Conference

Make plans to attend the 23rd Annual Space Exploration Educators Conference to be held Feb. 9-11, 2017, at Space Center Houston. This conference is for all K-12 educators. Activities presented use space-related themes to teach across the curricula. The activities may be used for science, language arts, mathematics, history and more.

Attend sessions hosted by scientists and engineers working on exciting projects like the International Space Station and the exploration of Mars and other parts of our solar system. Hear from astronauts who will be “leading the charge” in exploration. Attend sessions presented by educators and receive ready-to-implement classroom ideas. Attendees can earn up to 24 hours of continuing professional education credit.

For discounted registration, sign up to attend before the Early Bird Registration deadline on Dec. 30, 2016!

For more information, visit http://spacecenter.org/teacher-programs/teachers-seec/.

Please email any questions about the conference to seec@spacecenter.org.


NASA’s Langley Research Center Centennial Student Art Contest

Calling all artists, grades K-12!

On July 17, 2017, NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, will turn 100 years old! To celebrate, Langley invites you to take part in its Centennial Art Contest. The theme for this year’s contest is “A Storied Legacy, A Soaring Future.”

The contest is open to all children in grades K-12 who are attending public, private, parochial and homeschools in the United States. Artwork entries may consist of drawings, paintings, mixed media and digital creations.

A grand prize winner will be chosen from all contest entries. A first place winner will be chosen from each grade level, as well as second place, third place and honorable mention. Each entry will receive a certificate of participation.

The art contest submission period began on Nov. 1, 2016, and concludes on Dec. 31, 2016, at midnight EST.

For more information, visit https://artcontest.larc.nasa.gov/.

Please direct questions about this contest to Kristina Cors at larc-art-contest@mail.nasa.gov.


2017 Mission X: Train Like an Astronaut “Walk to the Moon” Challenge

Mission X encourages children of all ages, as well as people with particular needs, to pursue healthy lifestyles based on the model of training like an astronaut. During six- to nine-week “challenges” each fall and spring, schools and student groups from around the world complete Mission X classroom-based science lessons and physical education activities.

In 2017, Mission X is challenging Fit Explorers around the world to work together to perform activities that will move Astro Charlie the 478 million steps it would take to walk from Earth to the moon! That’s 238,857 miles, or 384,403 kilometers! At an average walking speed, that would take one person about nine years to complete.

The challenge kicks off in January. For full challenge details and to do your part to help reach this out-of-this-world goal, visit http://trainlikeanastronaut.org/wttm. The deadline to register for this challenge is Dec. 31, 2016. You may apply for Team USA at http://trainlikeanastronaut.org/usa_application.

In 2016, Mission X was represented by 30 countries and more than 53,000 participants. The challenge was available in 17 languages.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Nubia Carvajal at nubia.a.carvajal@nasa.gov.


Center for Astronomy Education Regional Teaching Exchanges and Workshops — Fall/Winter 2016-2017

NASA’s Center for Astronomy Education, or CAE, announces a series of regional teaching exchanges and workshops for astronomy and space science educators.

Teaching exchanges foster a sense of community among geographically linked current and future college instructors of astronomy. Regional experts from the broader CAE community are ready to provide the opportunity for you to meet your neighbors, expand your instructional repertoire and share your own expertise.

Workshops provide participants with experiences needed to create effective and productive active-learning classroom environments. Workshop leaders model best practices in implementing many different classroom-tested instructional strategies. But more importantly, workshop participants will gain first-hand experience implementing these proven strategies.

Jan. 4, 2017 — Gaylord Texan Resort and Convention Center in Grapevine, Texas
CAE Tier I Teaching Excellence Workshop — New Methods for Teaching About Exoplanets

Jan. 5, 2017 — Gaylord Texan Resort and Convention Center in Grapevine, Texas
CAE Tier I Teaching Excellence Workshop — New Methods for Teaching in the Flipped Classroom

For more information and to register for the teaching exchanges, visit http://astronomy101.jpl.nasa.gov/workshops/index.cfm.

Inquiries about this series of events should be directed to Gina Brissenden at gbrissenden@as.arizona.edu.

CAE is funded through NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s Exoplanet Exploration Program.


Free Program — Cubes in SpaceTM

Cubes in Space™ provides students ages 11-18 an opportunity to design and compete to launch an experiment into space at no cost! Cubes in Space™ is offered by idoodledu, inc., in partnership with NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center’s Wallops Flight Facility, the Colorado Space Grant Consortium and NASA’s Langley Research Center.

This global education program based on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics) enables students to learn about space exploration using innovative problem-solving and inquiry-based learning methods. Participants have access to resources that help prepare them to design and develop an experiment to be integrated into a small cube.

This year, experiments will be launched into space via sounding rocket from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island, Virginia, in late June 2017 or from a high-altitude balloon launched from NASA’s Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility in Fort Sumner, New Mexico, in August 2017.

The deadline for program registration is Jan. 6, 2017. For more information, visit http://www.cubesinspace.com. Questions about this program may be directed to info@cubesinspace.com.

About idoodedu inc.

idoodledu inc., a charitable nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization, is a wholly owned subsidiary of idoodlelearning inc., and was created in 2015 as a legal vehicle to bring public/private partnerships and publicly funded programs to all learners and educators. idoodlelearning inc. is an education company based in Ottawa, Canada; London, England; and Virginia Beach, Virginia, USA.


Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites U.S. educational institutions to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets, and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

Nonprofit museums, libraries and planetariums (sponsored through their respective State Agency Surplus Property, or SASP, organization) are also eligible to make requests. Visit the link below for special instructions to request items. To find the contact information for the SASP representative for your area, visit http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/100851.

A nominal shipping fee must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.


Research Grants: Partnerships for Enhanced Engagement in Research

The Partnerships for Enhanced Engagement in Research, or PEER, program is a competitive awards program that invites scientists in developing countries to apply for funds to support research and capacity-building activities on topics of importance to the United States Agency for International Development and conducted in partnership with U.S. government-supported and selected private sector partners.

PEER applicants who submit pre-proposals to PEER must be based at an academic institution, nonprofit organization, or government-managed research laboratory, center or institute in a PEER-eligible country. Applicants also must hold a career-track position or equivalent at their respective institution or organization. Applicants should be working in the country from which they are applying and should be nationals (citizens or permanent residents) of a PEER-eligible country for the focus area to which they are applying.

The deadline for submission of pre-proposals is Jan. 13, 2017. Pre-proposals should be completed through the PEER online application site no later than 11:59 p.m. (U.S. Eastern Standard Time) on that date.

For more information, visit http://www.nationalacademies.org/peer.

The PEER program is supported by the United States Agency for International Development and implemented by the U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to peer@nas.edu.


Mars Survival Kit: Lessons and Activities to Guide Your Exploration of Mars!

NASA is embarking on a journey to Mars! Are your students ready to join in the adventure? Spark excitement in your classroom with the Mars Survival Kit.

The Mars Survival Kit is a collection of educational activities for students in grades K-12. Each educational activity includes a brief description, as well as information about how the activities and lessons align to the Next Generation Science Standards.

Start your classroom’s journey to Mars at http://go.nasa.gov/1NnZ0Rg.

To learn more about NASA’s Journey to Mars, visit https://www.nasa.gov/topics/journeytomars/index.html.


National Science Foundation’s Mathematical Sciences Graduate Internship Program

The National Science Foundation is accepting applications for its Mathematical Sciences Graduate Internship Program. MSGI provides an opportunity for mathematical sciences doctoral students to participate in internships at national laboratories, industry and other approved facilities. Participation in an internship will provide first-hand experience of the use of mathematics in a nonacademic setting. The internships are aimed at students who are interested in understanding the application of advanced mathematical and statistical techniques to “real-world” problems, regardless of whether the student plans to pursue an academic or nonacademic career.

MSGI is open to graduate students pursuing a doctoral degree in mathematics, statistics or applied mathematics who are enrolled as full-time graduate students at an accredited U.S. college or university during the 2016-2017 academic year. Applicants must have a cumulative GPA of 3.30 or higher on a 4.0 scale, including fall 2016 grades.

The application submission deadline is Jan. 16, 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.orise.orau.gov/nsf-msgi/default.html.

Questions about this internship opportunity should be directed to nsf-msgi@orise.orau.gov.


U.S. Department of Energy’s BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge

Registration is open for the U.S. Department of Energy’s BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. This competition challenges teams of high school students to research one of five specific cross-curricular bioenergy topics and design infographics to share what they have learned through social media.

Selected infographics will be promoted nationally on the Challenge website and via social media. One team of students will be selected to present their infographic at the Bioenergy Technologies Office’s annual conference in Washington, D.C.

Registration for student teams closes on Feb. 3, 2017, and teams have until March 3, 2017, to submit their infographics.

For more information, visit http://www.energy.gov/eere/bioenergy/infographic-challenge.

Check out the interactive BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Map to see submissions from teams across the country from prior years. Put your school on the BioenergizeME map by participating in this year’s Challenge.

Please direct questions about the Challenge to BioenergizeME@ee.doe.gov.


Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design, or STEAMD; or activities culturally relevant to or focused on populations underrepresented in STEM careers, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or nonreimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA announcement.


Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Are you an undergraduate or graduate student seeking opportunities in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)? The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science — in collaboration with the participating agencies in the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on STEM Education (CoSTEM) and the Science.gov Alliance — has launched a search portal for both students and universities to discover federally sponsored STEM education training and funding opportunities.

Student users can search the site for opportunities they can apply to directly, such as research internships and fellowships. Likewise, universities can search the site for federal funding opportunities to establish innovative training programs for undergraduates or graduate students.

Users can search the site through faceted searching capabilities for characteristics such as program type, STEM discipline, institution location, federal sponsor, and eligibility. Or they can search through the open text option.

For programs and opportunities for undergraduates, visit http://stemundergrads.science.gov/.

For graduate programs and opportunities, visit http://stemgradstudents.science.gov/.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at https://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the new ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Eduation: https://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express Message — Dec. 15, 2016

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


New This Week!


Free NASA Educator Professional Development Webinars
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: Dec. 15, 2016, at 4 p.m. EST

Space Poop Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Submission Deadline: Dec. 20, 2016

Summer Research Team Program for Minority Serving Institutions
Audience: Faculty at Minority-Serving Institutions
Application Deadline: Dec. 26, 2016, at 11:59 p.m. EST

Research Grants: Partnerships for Enhanced Engagement in Research
Audience: Researchers at Academic Institutions in Developing Countries
Application Deadline: Jan. 13, 2017

National Science Foundation’s Mathematical Sciences Graduate Internship Program
Audience: Mathematical Sciences Doctoral Students
Application Deadline: Jan. 16, 2017

2017 NASA Glenn Faculty Fellowship Program
Audience: Higher Education Educators
Application Deadline: Feb. 16, 2017 at 11:59 p.m. EST

NASA Cooperative Agreement Notice for EPSCoR International Space Station Flight Opportunity
Audience: Higher Education Institutions With Current or Previously-funded EPSCoR Projects
Application Deadline: March 6, 2017

Update From NASA Space Place — Space Place App Discontinued
Audience: K-6 Educators and Students


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

Modern Figures Toolkit: Activities and Resources Related to Katherine Johnson and Human Computers
Audience: K-12 Educators

2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education
Next Lecture Date: Dec. 15, 2016, at 7 p.m. PST (10 p.m. EST)

Call for Proposals — NASA Research Announcement for Use of the NASA Physical Sciences Informatics System: Appendix C
Audience: Graduate Students
Proposal Deadline: Dec. 15, 2016

2017 High-Altitude Student Platform Opportunity
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: Dec. 16, 2016

Educator Workshop: Making Moon Craters
Audience: Pre-service Educators and Educators of Grades 1-6
Event Date: Dec. 17, 2016, 10 a.m. – Noon PST

2017 Space Exploration Educators Conference
Audience: K-12 Educators
Early Bird Registration Deadline: Dec. 30, 2016
Event Date: Feb. 9-11, 2017

NASA’s Langley Research Center Centennial Student Art Contest
Audience: K-12 Students
Entry Period: Nov. 1 – Dec. 31, 2016

2017 Mission X: Train Like an Astronaut “Walk to the Moon” Challenge
Audience: All Educators and Students, Home School Parents and After-school Groups
Registration Deadline: Dec. 31, 2016
Challenge Dates: Jan. 12 – April 28, 2017

Center for Astronomy Education Regional Teaching Exchanges and Workshops — Fall/Winter 2016-2017
Audience: Current and Future College Instructors of Astronomy
Next Event Date: Jan. 4, 2017

Free Program — Cubes in SpaceTM

Audience: Students Ages 11-18 and Their Teachers
Registration Deadline: Jan. 6, 2017

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event – Virtual Field Trip to Kennedy Space Center
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-12
Event Date: Jan. 12, 2017

Future Engineers Mars Medical Challenge
Audience: Educators and Students Ages 5 to 19
Entry Deadline: Jan. 25, 2017

Generation Nano: Small Science, Superheroes
Audience: High School Students
Submission Deadline: Jan. 31, 2017

NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowships Program Accepting Proposals for 2017-2018 Academic Year
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Proposal Deadline: Feb. 1, 2017

2017-2018 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Undergraduate STEM Research Scholarship
Audience: Undergraduate Sophomores and Juniors at Virginia Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions (Awardees must be classified as juniors or seniors during the 2017-2018 academic year)
Application Deadline: Feb. 13, 2017

2017-2018 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Graduate STEM Research Fellowship
Audience: Graduate Students at Virginia Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: Feb. 13, 2017

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students and Higher Education Institutions


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Teachers Connect: LaRC Centennial Badge Webinar
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School, and Informal Educators of Grades 6-8
Event Date: Dec. 15, 2016, at 4 p.m. EST
This webinar will focus for the first half-hour on clouds and their role in Earth’s “energy budget” and on implementation ideas using GLOBE for different classroom settings as part of the “Earth Right Now: LaRC 100th” digital badge. We also will talk about student badge implementations, extension ideas and extra resources. The second half-hour will be very similar but centered on the engineering design process using the Drag Race to Mars Engineering Design Challenge as part of the “Journey to Mars: LaRC 100th” digital badge. This portion of the webinar will focus on forces and motion and math calculations using paper airplanes and testing different materials as part of the “Aeronautics: LaRC 100th” digital badge. This webinar meets requirements of teacher discussions within the NASA Langley 100th Educator Professional Development Collaborative digital badges. To learn more about the Langley 100th digital badges, log in to https://nasatxstate-epdc.net/ and search for LaRC 100th. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/207902

Don’t Count NASA Out of Your Math Classes: How Do I Measure This? and Other Math Questions
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 3-10
Event Date: Dec. 19, 2016, at 4 p.m. EST
Why are taking accurate measurements critical to STEM research? What is the importance of standardized measurement? How do we explain the importance of taking accurate measurements? Why is collaboration and communication an integral part of STEM research? How does accurate measurement allow us to draw logical and scientific conclusions? How do we take accurate measurements and make inferences and draw reasonable conclusions? Join the webinar to explore these questions and more. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/208809

Don’t Count NASA Out of Your Math Classes: Exploring Exoplanets Using Math
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School, and Informal Educators of Grades 7-10
Event Date: Dec. 20, 2016, at 7 p.m. EST
In this webinar, we will learn about how scientists use math to learn about distant planets. Using Kepler’s laws, algebra and geometry, we can gather a plethora of information on planet size, speed and movement in our search for planets similar to our own! The activity discussed in this webinar covers math standards pertaining to radicals and linear and exponential models, as well as Next Generation Science Standards in space science. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/210405

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


Space Poop Challenge

NASA seeks proposed solutions for fecal, urine and menstrual management systems to be used in the crew’s launch and entry suits over a continuous duration of up to 144 hours. An in-suit waste management system would be beneficial for contingency scenarios or for any long-duration tasks.

The challenge offers up to $30,000 in prizes for innovative solutions. NASA will award up to three prizes for the best ideas.

Submissions are due Dec. 20, 2016.

For information about the Space Poop Challenge, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/space-poop-challenge.

Please direct questions about this challenge to Steve Rader at steven.n.rader@nasa.gov.


Summer Research Team Program for Minority Serving Institutions

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is accepting applications for the Summer Research Team Program for Minority Serving Institutions. This 10-week program offers the opportunity to enhance the scientific leadership at MSIs in research areas that support the mission and goals of the Department of Homeland Security. Faculty, along with undergraduate and graduate students, will conduct collaborative research that provides opportunities to help advance the DHS Areas of Research and strengthen the talent pool of scientists and engineers.

Faculty members currently teaching at an MSI are encouraged to apply. Selected faculty will be invited to submit a research project proposal in collaboration with a DHS Center researcher and put a team together composed of one or two qualified students to complete the summer research experience.

Participants will receive a weekly stipend plus travel expenses. Some participants may be eligible for a housing allowance. Faculty are encouraged to apply for up to $50,000 in follow-on funding at the end of their appointment.

To be eligible, applicants must be U.S. citizens. Applications are due Dec. 26, 2016, at 11:59 p.m. EST.

Additional information about the program, including eligibility requirements, program benefits, application requirements and access to the online application system may be found at http://www.orau.gov/dhseducation/faculty/index.html.

Please direct inquiries about this opportunity to DHSed@orau.org.


Research Grants: Partnerships for Enhanced Engagement in Research

The Partnerships for Enhanced Engagement in Research, or PEER, program is a competitive awards program that invites scientists in developing countries to apply for funds to support research and capacity-building activities on topics of importance to the United States Agency for International Development and conducted in partnership with U.S. government-supported and selected private sector partners.

PEER applicants who submit pre-proposals to PEER must be based at an academic institution, nonprofit organization, or government-managed research laboratory, center or institute in a PEER-eligible country. Applicants also must hold a career-track position or equivalent at their respective institution or organization. Applicants should be working in the country from which they are applying and should be nationals (citizens or permanent residents) of a PEER-eligible country for the focus area to which they are applying.

The deadline for submission of pre-proposals is Jan. 13, 2017. Pre-proposals should be completed through the PEER online application site no later than 11:59 p.m. (U.S. Eastern Standard Time) on that date.

For more information, visit http://www.nationalacademies.org/peer.

The PEER program is supported by the United States Agency for International Development and implemented by the U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to peer@nas.edu.


National Science Foundation’s Mathematical Sciences Graduate Internship Program

The National Science Foundation is accepting applications for its Mathematical Sciences Graduate Internship Program. MSGI provides an opportunity for mathematical sciences doctoral students to participate in internships at national laboratories, industry and other approved facilities. Participation in an internship will provide first-hand experience of the use of mathematics in a nonacademic setting. The internships are aimed at students who are interested in understanding the application of advanced mathematical and statistical techniques to “real-world” problems, regardless of whether the student plans to pursue an academic or nonacademic career.

MSGI is open to graduate students pursuing a doctoral degree in mathematics, statistics or applied mathematics who are enrolled as full-time graduate students at an accredited U.S. college or university during the 2016-2017 academic year. Applicants must have a cumulative GPA of 3.30 or higher on a 4.0 scale, including fall 2016 grades.

The application submission deadline is Jan. 16, 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.orise.orau.gov/nsf-msgi/default.html.

Questions about this internship opportunity should be directed to nsf-msgi@orise.orau.gov.


2017 NASA Glenn Faculty Fellowship Program

Applications are being accepted for the 2017 NASA Glenn Faculty Fellowship Program. This program provides a summer residency at NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The 10-week fellowship begins on Monday, June 5, 2017, and runs through Friday, Aug. 11, 2017.

To be eligible for the program, applicants must be full-time science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, faculty members who are U.S. citizens. Applicants must be tenured faculty or in tenure-track positions at four-year accredited U.S. colleges and universities, or full-time faculty at two-year U.S. academic institutions. Faculty members from underrepresented groups and at Minority Serving Institutions, as designated by the U.S. Department of Education, are particularly encouraged to apply.

The program covers limited travel expenses for qualified and accepted faculty, as well as stipends for all accepted faculty. Please note that stipend payments or salaries from other federal funding sources, including research grants and contracts, may not be accepted during the 10-week tenure of a Glenn faculty fellowship appointment.

The deadline for applications is 11:59 p.m. EST on Feb. 16, 2017. For more information about this opportunity, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/nasa-glenn-higher-education-students-faculty-postdoc-fellows.

Inquiries about NASA’s Glenn Faculty Fellowship Program should be directed to Dr. M. David Kankam at Mark.D.Kankam@nasa.gov.


NASA Cooperative Agreement Notice for EPSCoR International Space Station Flight Opportunity

NASA’s Office of Education is seeking proposals for the NASA Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research, or EPSCoR, International Space Station Flight Opportunity. Each funded NASA EPSCoR proposal is expected to establish research activities that will contribute significantly to the strategic research and technology development priorities of one or more of NASA’s mission directorates. Funded proposals are expected to contribute to the overall research infrastructure; science and technology capabilities; higher education; and economic development of the jurisdiction receiving funding.

This Cooperative Agreement Notice, or CAN, is for current or previously funded EPSCoR projects that are mature enough to design a research experiment or develop research experimental hardware to the point that it can be flown safely on the International Space Station.

NASA EPSCoR is moving to a two-year procurement cycle. As a result, jurisdictions responding to this CAN may submit up to two proposals. It is anticipated that three to five awards for FY 2017 and three to five awards for FY 2018 of up to $100,000 for each proposal to be expended over a three-year period of performance may be made under this CAN. The exact number of awards depends on the available EPSCoR Research Budget.

Proposals are due March 6, 2017.

For more information and instructions for submitting a proposal, visit http://go.nasa.gov/2ghW90E.

Please direct questions about this request to Jeppie Compton at Jeppie.R.Compton@nasa.gov.


Update From NASA Space Place — Space Place App Discontinued

The NASA Space Place app, known as Space Place Prime, is being removed from the iTunes App Store and Google Play. However, the NASA Space Place website is mobile-friendly and easy to navigate! You can check it out on your smartphone at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov.

Please send any comments or feedback to SpacePlaceConnect@jpl.nasa.gov.


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


Modern Figures Toolkit: Activities and Resources Related to Katherine Johnson and Human Computers

In the 1960’s, the U.S. was on an ambitious journey to the moon, and Katherine Johnson and her fellow human computers helped get NASA there. Bring the excitement of their story to your classroom with the Modern Figures Toolkit.

The Modern Figures Toolkit is a collection of resources and educational activities for students in grades K-12. Each educational activity and resource includes a brief description, as well as information about how the activities and lessons align to education standards. Resources highlighted include videos, historical references and STEM materials.

Bring Katherine Johnson’s inspiring story to your classroom by downloading the Modern Figures Toolkit at www.nasa.gov/modernfigures-education-toolkit.


2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online

The Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, named after the founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and presented by JPL’s Office of Communication and Education, shares the excitement of the space program’s missions, instruments and other technologies.

Lectures take place twice per month, on consecutive Thursdays and Fridays. The Thursday lectures take place in JPL’s Theodore von Kármán Auditorium, and Friday lectures take place at Pasadena City College’s Vosloh Forum. Both start at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT). Admission and parking are free for all lectures. No reservations are required, but seating is limited. The Thursday evening lectures are streamed live for viewing online. Archives of past lectures are also available online.

Next Lecture in the Series:

Spinning Black Holes, Exploding Stars and Hyperluminous Pulsars: Results From the NuSTAR Satellite
Event Date:
Dec. 15 and Dec. 16, 2016, at 7 p.m. PST (10 p.m. EST)
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2016&month=12
NASA’s Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, launched in June 2012 and became the first telescope in orbit to focus high-energy X-ray light. Join NuSTAR project scientist Dr. Daniel K. Stern for a discussion about the highlights from the first four years of NuSTAR observations, including the surprising discovery of a new class of hyperluminous neutron stars, measurements of how fast black holes spin, and unique insight into the physics of supernova explosions.

For more information about the Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, including a complete list of upcoming lectures, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.php.

Questions about this series should be directed to http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php.


Call for Proposals — NASA Research Announcement for Use of the NASA Physical Sciences Informatics System: Appendix C

NASA is seeking ground-based research proposals from graduate students and established researchers to use NASA’s Physical Sciences Informatics system to develop new analyses and scientific insights. The PSI system is a resource for researchers to data mine information generated from completed physical sciences experiments performed on the International Space Station or from related ground-based studies.

This solicitation appendix focuses on the following five research areas: combustion science, complex fluids, fluid physics, fundamental physics and materials science.

For graduate students (students working toward an advanced degree), this NASA Research Announcement is soliciting proposals that advance fundamental research in one of the physical sciences disciplines identified above and also assist in the awarding of an advanced degree to the graduate student. This call is open to students who meet the following eligibility requirements:

— The student is pursuing an advanced degree directly related to a physical sciences discipline. Only technical degrees are permitted (not degrees in policy or management).
— The student is a U.S. citizen, a permanent resident alien of the U.S., or on a student visa at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission.
— The student is enrolled in a master’s or doctoral degree program at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission. Or, if the student is an undergraduate starting graduate studies, he or she has been accepted to a master’s or doctoral degree program at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission and will start during the next academic year.
— The student has an academic graduate advisor who will submit the application for the graduate student. The student must perform the proposed research under the guidance of the assigned graduate advisor.

The agency expects to make approximately 10 awards in spring 2016. Research and development efforts will take place over two years. The typical award will be $75,000-$100,000 per year, for up to two years.

The deadline for submitting proposals is Dec. 15, 2016.

For information, visit http://psi.nasa.gov/.

Please direct questions about this NASA Research Announcement to Dr. Francis Chiaramonte at francis.p.chiaramonte@nasa.gov.


2017 High-Altitude Student Platform Opportunity

The Louisiana Space Consortium, or LaSPACE, is accepting applications from students at U.S. colleges and universities who want to send experiments to the edge of space on a high-flying scientific balloon.

The annual project, supported by the NASA Balloon Program Office and LaSPACE, provides near-space access for 12 undergraduate and graduate student experiments to be carried by a NASA high-altitude research balloon. The flights typically last 15 to 20 hours and reach an altitude of 23 miles. Experiments may include compact satellites or prototypes.

The experiments are flown aboard the High-Altitude Student Platform, or HASP, a balloon-born instrument stack launched from the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility’s remote site in Fort Sumner, New Mexico. The goals of the project are to provide a space test platform to encourage student research and stimulate the development of student satellite payloads and other space-engineering products.

HASP seeks to enhance the technical skills and research abilities of students in critical science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines.

The deadline for applications is Dec. 16, 2016.

For application information and technical details about the program, visit http://laspace.lsu.edu/hasp.

Questions about the High-Altitude Student Platform opportunity should be directed to T. Gregory Guzik at guzik@phunds.phys.lsu.edu.


Educator Workshop: Making Moon Craters

Learn how to use baking ingredients to whip up a moonlike crater as a demonstration for students in classrooms, camps or at home. Join NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory on Dec. 17, 2016, from 10 a.m. to noon PST for this workshop at the Columbia Memorial Space Center in Downey, California.

The workshop is free for all pre-service and fully credentialed teachers! Participants must bring their teacher or student ID the day of the workshop. Lunch will be provided. Pre-registration is required.

For more information and to register to attend, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/events/2016/12/17/making-moon-craters/.

Can’t make it to the workshop? Explore the lesson online at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/teach/activity/make-a-crater/.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Sandra Valencia at (562) 231-1205.


2017 Space Exploration Educators Conference

Make plans to attend the 23rd Annual Space Exploration Educators Conference to be held Feb. 9-11, 2017, at Space Center Houston. This conference is for all K-12 educators. Activities presented use space-related themes to teach across the curricula. The activities may be used for science, language arts, mathematics, history and more.

Attend sessions hosted by scientists and engineers working on exciting projects like the International Space Station and the exploration of Mars and other parts of our solar system. Hear from astronauts who will be “leading the charge” in exploration. Attend sessions presented by educators and receive ready-to-implement classroom ideas. Attendees can earn up to 24 hours of continuing professional education credit.

For discounted registration, sign up to attend before the Early Bird Registration deadline on Dec. 30, 2016!

For more information, visit http://spacecenter.org/teacher-programs/teachers-seec/.

Please email any questions about the conference to seec@spacecenter.org.


NASA’s Langley Research Center Centennial Student Art Contest

Calling all artists, grades K-12!

On July 17, 2017, NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, will turn 100 years old! To celebrate, Langley invites you to take part in its Centennial Art Contest. The theme for this year’s contest is “A Storied Legacy, A Soaring Future.”

The contest is open to all children in grades K-12 who are attending public, private, parochial and homeschools in the United States. Artwork entries may consist of drawings, paintings, mixed media and digital creations.

A grand prize winner will be chosen from all contest entries. A first place winner will be chosen from each grade level, as well as second place, third place and honorable mention. Each entry will receive a certificate of participation.

The art contest submission period began on Nov. 1, 2016, and concludes on Dec. 31, 2016, at midnight EST.

For more information, visit https://artcontest.larc.nasa.gov/.

Please direct questions about this contest to Kristina Cors at larc-art-contest@mail.nasa.gov.


2017 Mission X: Train Like an Astronaut “Walk to the Moon” Challenge

Mission X encourages children of all ages, as well as people with particular needs, to pursue healthy lifestyles based on the model of training like an astronaut. During six- to nine-week “challenges” each fall and spring, schools and student groups from around the world complete Mission X classroom-based science lessons and physical education activities.

In 2017, Mission X is challenging Fit Explorers around the world to work together to perform activities that will move Astro Charlie the 478 million steps it would take to walk from Earth to the moon! That’s 238,857 miles, or 384,403 kilometers! At an average walking speed, that would take one person about nine years to complete.

The challenge kicks off in January. For full challenge details and to do your part to help reach this out-of-this-world goal, visit http://trainlikeanastronaut.org/wttm. The deadline to register for this challenge is Dec. 31, 2016. You may apply for Team USA at http://trainlikeanastronaut.org/usa_application.

In 2016, Mission X was represented by 30 countries and more than 53,000 participants. The challenge was available in 17 languages.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Nubia Carvajal at nubia.a.carvajal@nasa.gov.


Center for Astronomy Education Regional Teaching Exchanges and Workshops — Fall/Winter 2016-2017

NASA’s Center for Astronomy Education, or CAE, announces a series of regional teaching exchanges and workshops for astronomy and space science educators.

Teaching exchanges foster a sense of community among geographically linked current and future college instructors of astronomy. Regional experts from the broader CAE community are ready to provide the opportunity for you to meet your neighbors, expand your instructional repertoire and share your own expertise.

Workshops provide participants with experiences needed to create effective and productive active-learning classroom environments. Workshop leaders model best practices in implementing many different classroom-tested instructional strategies. But more importantly, workshop participants will gain first-hand experience implementing these proven strategies.

Jan. 4, 2017 — Gaylord Texan Resort and Convention Center in Grapevine, Texas
CAE Tier I Teaching Excellence Workshop — New Methods for Teaching About Exoplanets

Jan. 5, 2017 — Gaylord Texan Resort and Convention Center in Grapevine, Texas
CAE Tier I Teaching Excellence Workshop — New Methods for Teaching in the Flipped Classroom

For more information and to register for the teaching exchanges, visit http://astronomy101.jpl.nasa.gov/workshops/index.cfm.

Inquiries about this series of events should be directed to Gina Brissenden at gbrissenden@as.arizona.edu.

CAE is funded through NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s Exoplanet Exploration Program.


Free Program — Cubes in SpaceTM

Cubes in Space™ provides students ages 11-18 an opportunity to design and compete to launch an experiment into space at no cost! Cubes in Space™ is offered by idoodledu, inc., in partnership with NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center’s Wallops Flight Facility, the Colorado Space Grant Consortium and NASA’s Langley Research Center.

This global education program based on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics) enables students to learn about space exploration using innovative problem-solving and inquiry-based learning methods. Participants have access to resources that help prepare them to design and develop an experiment to be integrated into a small cube.

This year, experiments will be launched into space via sounding rocket from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island, Virginia, in late June 2017 or from a high-altitude balloon launched from NASA’s Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility in Fort Sumner, New Mexico, in August 2017.

The deadline for program registration is Jan. 6, 2017. For more information, visit http://www.cubesinspace.com. Questions about this program may be directed to info@cubesinspace.com.

About idoodedu inc.

idoodledu inc., a charitable nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization, is a wholly owned subsidiary of idoodlelearning inc., and was created in 2015 as a legal vehicle to bring public/private partnerships and publicly funded programs to all learners and educators. idoodlelearning inc. is an education company based in Ottawa, Canada; London, England; and Virginia Beach, Virginia, USA.


Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites U.S. educational institutions to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets, and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

Nonprofit museums, libraries and planetariums (sponsored through their respective State Agency Surplus Property, or SASP, organization) are also eligible to make requests. Visit the link below for special instructions to request items. To find the contact information for the SASP representative for your area, visit http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/100851.

A nominal shipping fee must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event – Virtual Field Trip to Kennedy Space Center

Join the education specialists of NASA’s Digital Learning Network as they travel to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Jan. 12, 2017. The multipart series of Virtual Field Trips will feature different landmarks and projects taking place at Kennedy.

Up to four schools will be able to join DLN live and interactively during each of the individual webcasts. Registration and more specific event details will be provided after Jan. 1. If you have any questions about this opportunity, please send them to dlinfochannel@gmail.com.

For more information about this and other DLN events, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln.


Future Engineers Mars Medical Challenge

Calling all students! NASA wants your help to design an object that could be used by an astronaut to maintain physical health on a three-year mission to Mars. The Mars Medical Challenge is the fifth in a series of Future Engineers Challenges where students in grades K-12 create and submit a digital 3-D model intended to be printed in 3-D and used for a wide range of medical needs including diagnostic, preventive, first-aid, emergency, surgical and/or dental purposes.

As NASA continues to investigate how the human body adjusts to weightlessness, radiation and stress that occur long-duration spaceflight, Future Engineers proposes to engage students with a related challenge. The Mars Medical Challenge asks students to design a 3-D printed object that will keep astronauts healthy during the long trip to the Red Planet. Specifically, medical and dental hardware will be emphasized during this challenge.

Students ages 5-19 are invited to become the creators and innovators of tomorrow by using 3-D modeling software to submit their designs for hardware that could be used by astronauts on a future mission to Mars. Students have the opportunity to win prizes ranging from a Mars prize pack or a 3-D printer for their school to a trip to Houston for a tour of NASA’s Johnson Space Center. The challenge closes on Jan. 25, 2017, and winners will be announced on March 28, 2017.

What health-related items do you think an astronaut will need on that journey, and why would these items require a 3-D printer? It’s time to start flexing your problem-solving and design skills to find a solution – good luck!

For more information about the challenge and how to enter, visit www.futureengineers.org/marsmedical.


Generation Nano: Small Science, Superheroes

The National Science Foundation and the National Nanotechnology Initiative invite high school students to take part in the Generation Nano: Small Science, Superheroes competition. This contest challenges high school students to focus on a particular mission for society and then design nanotechnology-enabled gear for an original superhero.

Students can envision gear that is grounded in current research but not yet possible, a process in which they learn about the potentials and limitations of real-world nanotechnology. Students will first identify one societal mission from a list of four to address and then submit an entry with three parts: a written section, a short comic strip and a 90-second video.

Each submission must be made by an individual student or a team of two or three students. All entrants must be U.S. citizens, nationals, or permanent residents. Participants must be enrolled in a high school or home schooled in the U.S., its territories, or possessions at the time of entry.

Submissions are due at 11:59 p.m. EST on Jan. 31, 2017.

For more information, visit www.nsf.gov/GenNano. Questions about this competition may be directed to gennano@nsf.gov.


NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowships Program Accepting Proposals for 2017-2018 Academic Year

The NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship program is soliciting applications from accredited U.S. universities on behalf of individuals pursuing master’s or doctoral degrees in Earth and space sciences, or related disciplines, for the 2017-2018 academic year. The purpose of NESSF is to ensure continued training of a highly qualified workforce in disciplines needed to achieve NASA’s scientific goals. Awards resulting from the competitive selection will be training grants to the respective universities, with the advisor serving as the principal investigator. Financial support for the NESSF program comes from the Science Mission Directorate’s four science divisions: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Planetary Science and Astrophysics.

Initially, NESSF awards are made for one year. They may be renewed for up to two additional years, contingent upon satisfactory progress (as reflected in academic performance, research progress and recommendation by the faculty advisor) and the availability of funds.

The maximum amount of a NESSF award is $45,000 per year.

Proposals for this opportunity are due Feb. 1, 2017.

For more information about this solicitation, visit http://go.nasa.gov/2f2baB3.

Questions about Earth Science Research NESSF opportunities should be directed to Claire Macaulay at Claire.I.Macaulay@nasa.gov.

Questions about Heliophysics Research, Planetary Science Research and Astrophysics Research opportunities should be directed to Dolores Holland at hq-nessf-Space@nasa.gov


2017-2018 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Undergraduate STEM Research Scholarship

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium is offering undergraduate research scholarships of up to $8,500 to encourage talented individuals to conduct research in STEM fields (science, technology, engineering or mathematics).

These one-year awards are nonrenewable and based on student academic merit, quality of the research proposal, and alignment of research with the goals of NASA and the aerospace sector. Underrepresented minority students, female students and students with disabilities are encouraged to apply.

Participants must participate in an active faculty-mentored research experience that aligns with the aerospace sector and NASA’s mission. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and enrolled at one of the five Virginia Space Grant member universities: The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia, and Virginia Tech. Applicants must have completed at least two years of a STEM undergraduate program and be classified as a junior or senior during the 2017-2018 academic year.

The deadline for submitting applications is Feb. 13, 2017.

For more information, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/undergrad/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to VSGC@odu.edu.


2017-2018 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Graduate STEM Research Fellowship

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium’s Graduate STEM Research Fellowship Program provides fellowships of $6,000 in add-on support to graduate students to supplement and enhance basic research support. The objective of this research fellowship in science, technology, engineering and mathematics is to encourage talented individuals to pursue careers in STEM industries that support NASA’s mission.

Participants in the Graduate STEM Research Fellowship Program must take part in an active faculty‐mentored research experience that aligns with the aerospace sector and NASA’s mission. Awards are made annually and are renewable for one year for students making satisfactory progress in academics and research.

This is a competitive fellowship program, and awards are based on merit to recognize high academic achievement and promise. Underrepresented minority students, female students and students with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and enrolled at one of the five Virginia Space Grant member universities: The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia, and Virginia Tech.

The deadline for submitting applications is Feb. 13, 2017.

For more information about this opportunity and to apply online, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/gradfellow/. Please email any questions to VSGC@odu.edu.


Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design, or STEAMD; or activities culturally relevant to or focused on populations underrepresented in STEM careers, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or nonreimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA announcement.


Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Are you an undergraduate or graduate student seeking opportunities in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)? The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science — in collaboration with the participating agencies in the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on STEM Education (CoSTEM) and the Science.gov Alliance — has launched a search portal for both students and universities to discover federally sponsored STEM education training and funding opportunities.

Student users can search the site for opportunities they can apply to directly, such as research internships and fellowships. Likewise, universities can search the site for federal funding opportunities to establish innovative training programs for undergraduates or graduate students.

Users can search the site through faceted searching capabilities for characteristics such as program type, STEM discipline, institution location, federal sponsor, and eligibility. Or they can search through the open text option.

For programs and opportunities for undergraduates, visit http://stemundergrads.science.gov/.

For graduate programs and opportunities, visit http://stemgradstudents.science.gov/.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at https://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the new ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Eduation: https://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express Message — Dec. 8, 2016

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


NEW THIS WEEK!


New ‘Teachable Moment’ Educational Resources Available From JPL Education — Cassini’s ‘Ring-Grazing’ Maneuver
Audience: Educators of Grades 5-12

Free NASA Educator Professional Development Webinars
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: Dec. 8, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EST

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event – Ants in Space Webcast
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-12
Event Date: Dec. 9, 2016, 11 – 11:45 a.m. EST

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Live Video Chat: NASA STARS en Español
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Dec. 13, 2016, Noon -12:45 p.m. EST

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — NASA STARS en Español
Audiencia: Todos los Educadores y Estudiantes
Fecha del Evento: Diciembre 13, 2016, 12-12:45 p.m. EST

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event – Virtual Field Trip to Kennedy Space Center
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-12
Event Date: Jan. 12, 2017

NASA’s Ames Research Center Summer Internships — NASA Astrobiology Institute
Audience: Undergraduate Students Who Have Completed Their Sophomore Year or More
Application Deadline: Feb. 15, 2017

Get Ready for the 2017 Solar Eclipse With NASA Resources
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Aug. 21, 2017


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

Modern Figures Toolkit: Activities and Resources Related to Katherine Johnson and Human Computers
Audience: K-12 Educators

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

Call for Proposals — 2017 NASA Education Aeronautics Scholarship and Advanced STEM Training and Research (AS&ASTAR) Fellowship
Audience: First-year Master’s or Doctoral Students
Informational Webinars: Dec. 14 2016, at 10 a.m. EST
Proposal Deadline: Feb. 24, 2017

Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘STEM in 30’ Webcast Series
Audience: Grades 6-8 Educators and Students
Next Webcast Date: Dec. 14, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EST

2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education
Next Lecture Date: Dec. 15, 2016, at 7 p.m. PST (10 p.m. EST)

Call for Proposals — NASA Research Announcement for Use of the NASA Physical Sciences Informatics System: Appendix C
Audience: Graduate Students
Proposal Deadline: Dec. 15, 2016

2017 High-Altitude Student Platform Opportunity
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: Dec. 16, 2016

Educator Workshop: Making Moon Craters
Audience: Pre-service Educators and Educators of Grades 1-6
Event Date: Dec. 17, 2016, 10 a.m. – Noon PST

2017 Space Exploration Educators Conference
Audience: K-12 Educators
Early Bird Registration Deadline: Dec. 30, 2016
Event Date: Feb. 9-11, 2017

NASA’s Langley Research Center Centennial Student Art Contest
Audience: K-12 Students
Entry Period: Nov. 1 – Dec. 31, 2016

2017 Mission X: Train Like an Astronaut “Walk to the Moon” Challenge
Audience: All Educators and Students, Home School Parents and After-school Groups
Registration Deadline: Dec. 31, 2016
Challenge Dates: Jan. 12 – April 28, 2017

Center for Astronomy Education Regional Teaching Exchanges and Workshops — Fall/Winter 2016-2017
Audience: Current and Future College Instructors of Astronomy
Next Event Date: Jan. 4, 2017

Free Program — Cubes in SpaceTM

Audience: Students Ages 11-18 and Their Teachers
Registration Deadline: Jan. 6, 2017

2017 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Promotion and Research Challenge
Audience: Students in Grades 3-12
Entry Deadline: Feb. 10, 2017

National Science Foundation’s 2016-2017 Community College Innovation Challenge
Audience: Community College Students and Faculty
Application Deadline: Feb. 15, 2017

2017-2018 Virginia Space Grant Consortium STEM Bridge Scholarships
Audience: Minority Undergraduate Students (Underclassmen) at Virginia Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: March 13, 2017

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students and Higher Education Institutions


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html


NEW THIS WEEK!


New ‘Teachable Moment’ Educational Resources Available From JPL Education — Cassini’s ‘Ring-Grazing’ Maneuver

Are you looking for ways to bring the latest NASA science and mission news into your classroom? Education specialists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California have the resources to help you do just that! The “Teachable Moments” blog brings together news, activities and education tips on the latest happenings at NASA.

Check out the latest offering from JPL Education.

Teachable Moment: Cassini Spacecraft’s ‘Ring-Grazing’ Maneuver to Deliver New Science From Saturn — Grades 5-12
On Nov. 29, 2016, the Cassini spacecraft will go where no spacecraft has gone before when it flies just past the edge of Saturn’s main rings. The maneuver is a first for the spacecraft, which has spent more than 12 years orbiting the giant ringed planet. And the maneuver is part of a lead-up to a series of increasingly awesome feats that make up the mission’s “Grand Finale” with Cassini’s plunge into Saturn on Sept. 15, 2017. Learn more about the maneuver, why it’s important, and how you can bring this current event into your classroom. Check it out at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/news/2016/11/22/spacecrafts-ring-grazing-maneuver-to-deliver-new-science-from-saturn/.

Looking for more? Check out the “Teachable Moments” archives for more resources. http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/news/column/teachable-moments/


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Don’t Count NASA Out of Your Math Classes: Mass vs Weight
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: Dec. 8, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EST
Participants will learn about hands-on standards-aligned activities comparing mass and weight. They also will learn about the microgravity environment of the International Space Station. This webinar addresses the Next Generation Science Standards ESS1 and ESS2 and Common Core Math Standards. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/207364

Don’t Count NASA Out of Your Math Classes: Scale of Discovery
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: Dec. 12, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EST
Participants will engage in hands-on standards-aligned activities using scale to create a scroll of the universe exploring the inner planets, outer planets and the asteroid belt. They also will use mathematical conversions and scale to compare planets and asteroids using various-sized fruit while learning about the Dawn and New Horizons. This webinar addresses the Next Generation Science Standards ESS1 and ESS2 and Common Core Math Standards. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/207360

Teachers Connect: LaRC Centennial Badge Webinar
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School, and Informal Educators of Grades 6-8
Event Date: Dec. 13, 2016, at 4 p.m. EST
This webinar will focus for the first half-hour on clouds and their role in Earth’s “energy budget” and on implementation ideas using GLOBE for different classroom settings as part of the “Earth Right Now: LaRC 100th” digital badge. We also will talk about student badge implementations, extension ideas and extra resources. The second half-hour will be very similar but centered on the engineering design process using the Drag Race to Mars Engineering Design Challenge as part of the “Journey to Mars: LaRC 100th” digital badge. This portion of the webinar will focus on forces and motion and math calculations using paper airplanes and testing different materials as part of the “Aeronautics: LaRC 100th” digital badge. This webinar meets requirements of teacher discussions within the NASA Langley 100th Educator Professional Development Collaborative digital badges. To learn more about the Langley 100th digital badges, log in to https://nasatxstate-epdc.net/ and search for LaRC 100th. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/207899

Don’t Count NASA Out of Your Math Classes: So You Want to be a Rocket Scientist?
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-8
Event Date: Dec. 14, 2016, at 6 p.m. EST
So you want to be a rocket scientist? Explore the math and science of rockets with NASA missions and STEM curriculum resources. Launch your students’ interest in forces and motion with inquiry rocket activities and design challenges that include designing, building and launching simple rockets while recording and analyzing data. Join us in a learning journey “blast-off.” Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/209754

Teachers Connect: LaRC Centennial Badge Webinar
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School, and Informal Educators of Grades 6-8
Event Date: Dec. 15, 2016, at 4 p.m. EST
This webinar will focus for the first half-hour on clouds and their role in Earth’s “energy budget” and on implementation ideas using GLOBE for different classroom settings as part of the “Earth Right Now: LaRC 100th” digital badge. We also will talk about student badge implementations, extension ideas and extra resources. The second half-hour will be very similar but centered on the engineering design process using the Drag Race to Mars Engineering Design Challenge as part of the “Journey to Mars: LaRC 100th” digital badge. This portion of the webinar will focus on forces and motion and math calculations using paper airplanes and testing different materials as part of the “Aeronautics: LaRC 100th” digital badge. This webinar meets requirements of teacher discussions within the NASA Langley 100th Educator Professional Development Collaborative digital badges. To learn more about the Langley 100th digital badges, log in to https://nasatxstate-epdc.net/ and search for LaRC 100th. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/207902

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event – Ants in Space Webcast

Do ants behave the same in space as they do on Earth? Connect your middle or high school class with the Digital Learning Network to talk with Dr. Deborah Gordon, a researcher at Stanford University studying ants on the International Space Station. The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space, or CASIS, manages the U.S. National Laboratory and sponsors this experiment.

Gordon says that collective behavior takes many forms, such as emergence, self-organization, superorganism, quorum sensing, artificial intelligence, and dynamical networks. At her research laboratory at Stanford University, Gordon has been studying ants in many environments including ants in space! In her lab, her students and researchers use ant colonies to investigate systems that operate without central control and explore analogies with other systems, such as the internet, the immune system and the brain.

The 45-minute event will be webcast on the NASA DLiNfo Channel on Dec. 9, 2016, at 11 a.m. EST. Tweet questions with #askDLN or email DLiNfochannel@gmail.com.

For more information about this and other DLN events, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln.

Please direct questions about this event to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com, ATTN: CASIS Academy Live.


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Live Video Chat: NASA STARS en Español

Do you want to be one of NASA’s STARS? In this series of live Spanish video chats, “Students Talk About Real STEM” with NASA professionals who work in these areas. Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network and Educator Professional Development Collaborative for an inside look at NASA missions, research and careers.

The next 45-minute event will be webcast on the NASA DLiNfo Channel on Dec. 13, 2016, at Noon EST.

Submit questions via Twitter using #NASASTARS or via email to astrosdeNASA@gmail.com. Or sign up at https://www.txstate-epdc.net/nasa-stars/) for your class to connect directly.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln. Please send questions about this event to astrosdeNASA@gmail.com.


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — NASA STARS en Español

¿Quieres ser uno de los Astros de NASA? En esta serie de video conferencia en español y en vivo, los estudiantes hablarán de lo que es en realidad STEM (ciencias, tecnología, ingeniería y matemáticas) con profesionales de NASA que están trabajando en estas ramas. Acompaña a los programas de conexión digital de NASA (DLN for sus siglas en inglés) y el programa de colaboraciones de desarrolló profesional educativo (EPDC por sus siglas en inglés) hablando de diferentes misiones, investigaciones y carreras en NASA.

El siguiente programa será transmitido por NASA DLiNfo Channel el 13 de diciembre de 2016 a la 12 p.m. EST.

Envia tus preguntas por medio de Twitter usando #NASASTARS ó por correo electrónico astrosdeNASA@gmail.com. O inscribe tu escuela y conectate.

Para más información, visite la página https://www.nasa.gov/dln. Escribanos si usted esta interesado en conectarse directo para participar y cualquier pregunta sobre el programa astrosdeNASA@gmail.com.


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event – Virtual Field Trip to Kennedy Space Center

Join the education specialists of NASA’s Digital Learning Network as they travel to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Jan. 12, 2017. The multipart series of Virtual Field Trips will feature different landmarks and projects taking place at Kennedy.

Up to four schools will be able to join DLN live and interactively during each of the individual webcasts. Registration and more specific event details will be provided after Jan. 1. If you have any questions about this opportunity, please send them to dlinfochannel@gmail.com.

For more information about this and other DLN events, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln.


NASA’s Ames Research Center Summer Internships — NASA Astrobiology Institute

The NASA Astrobiology Institute at NASA’s Ames Research Center in California is looking for internship candidates for summer 2017 sessions. Internship opportunities are available within three modules of NAI research.

Laboratory Studies of Chemical Processing in Astrophysical Ices
The intern will work in the Astrochemistry and Astrophysics Laboratory to help carry out experiments designed to study the photochemistry and catalytic chemistry that occurs in astrophysical ice analogs of cometary, planetary and interstellar ices. Emphasis will be placed on how these processes produce organic compounds, particularly compounds of astrobiological interest.

Computer Modeling of Protoplanetary Disks
The intern will work on astronomical modeling of planet-forming disks using existing computational models. The main task will be to apply these models to one or two objects and infer the physical and chemical conditions in planet-forming regions of the disk. The intern will learn to compute disk models, analyze results, and compare observable signatures with available astronomical data from disks.

Computational Quantum Chemistry Studies of Astrophysical Ices and Gases
Computational quantum chemistry is an important tool to elucidate the detailed mechanisms of quantum chemical reactions in both the gas and condensed phases. The intern will study important reactions that lead to the gas and solid-state formation of biogenic molecules using computer programs. Work will include exploring molecular structures, reaction rates, spectroscopic constants and reaction pathways of important biomolecules and their precursors.

Students selected for all three 10-week internships will do real, ongoing NASA research. It is anticipated that these efforts may lead to one or more reports or peer-reviewed scientific publications on which the student would be coauthor. 

These opportunities are open to underrepresented students who are currently enrolled in a college or university and who have successfully completed their sophomore, junior or senior years with a GPA of 3.0 or higher (based on a 4.0 scale). Applicants must be U.S. citizens and at least 18 years of age. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

Application materials are due Feb. 15, 2017.

For more information and complete application process details, visit https://amesteam.arc.nasa.gov/TeamMemberDirectory/intern_opportunities2017.html.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Scott Sandford at scott.a.sandford@nasa.gov.


Get Ready for the 2017 Solar Eclipse With NASA Resources

On Aug. 21, 2017, the United States will experience a solar eclipse! This celestial event will provide a golden opportunity to engage and educate diverse audiences, and NASA has the resources to help.

Along a path 60 to 70 miles wide stretching from Oregon to South Carolina, observers will be able to see a total solar eclipse. Others across North America will see a partial eclipse. The event will happen around lunch time across the country. For an interactive map with timing information along the path of the eclipse, visit http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEgoogle/SEgoogle2001/SE2017Aug21Tgoogle.html.

Visit the following websites to find additional information and resources, including:
— Tips for safely viewing the solar eclipse.
— Recorded interviews with NASA scientists, mission specialists and eclipse path communities.
— Topical online eclipse videos, featuring a variety of STEM and cultural topics.
— Social media community development and networking.
— Mobile educational eclipse applications.
— Public challenges and engagement activities.
— 2-D and 3-D printing exercises for K-16 students.
— Citizen science campaigns in partnership with NASA mission observations.
— Adjunct activities and educational resources.
— Live streaming of observations and programming.

Total Eclipse 2017 — Through the Eyes of NASA
http://eclipse2017.nasa.gov

Eclipses and Transits
https://www.nasa.gov/eclipse

Watch “The Solar Eclipse 2017 PREVIEW Show” with NASA EDGE.
https://youtu.be/6DDICymjhg0


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


Modern Figures Toolkit: Activities and Resources Related to Katherine Johnson and Human Computers

In the 1960’s, the U.S. was on an ambitious journey to the moon, and Katherine Johnson and her fellow human computers helped get NASA there. Bring the excitement of their story to your classroom with the Modern Figures Toolkit.

The Modern Figures Toolkit is a collection of resources and educational activities for students in grades K-12. Each educational activity and resource includes a brief description, as well as information about how the activities and lessons align to education standards. Resources highlighted include videos, historical references and STEM materials.

Bring Katherine Johnson’s inspiring story to your classroom by downloading the Modern Figures Toolkit at www.nasa.gov/modernfigures-education-toolkit.


Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites U.S. educational institutions to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets, and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

Nonprofit museums, libraries and planetariums (sponsored through their respective State Agency Surplus Property, or SASP, organization) are also eligible to make requests. Visit the link below for special instructions to request items. To find the contact information for the SASP representative for your area, visit http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/100851.

A nominal shipping fee must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.


Call for Proposals — 2017 NASA Education Aeronautics Scholarship and Advanced STEM Training and Research (AS&ASTAR) Fellowship

NASA Education is seeking proposals for a NASA Education Aeronautics Scholarship and Advanced STEM Training and Research, or AS&ASTAR, Fellowship opportunity. The NASA Education AS&ASTAR Fellowship provides funding for fellowship candidates to perform graduate research at their respective campuses during the academic year under the guidance of their faculty adviser and a NASA researcher.

To be eligible to submit a proposal, candidates must be U.S. citizens or naturalized citizens who hold a bachelor’s degree in a STEM field earned prior to Aug. 31, 2017. Candidates must be enrolled in a master’s or doctoral degree program no later than Sept. 1, 2017, and intend to pursue a research-based master’s or Ph.D. program in a NASA-relevant field.

Proposals are due Feb. 24, 2017.

For full program details, visit http://go.nasa.gov/2fYxdsn.

An informational webinar about this fellowship will be presented on Wednesday, Dec. 14, 2016, at 10 a.m. EST. To participate, visit https://ac.arc.nasa.gov/nifs/ and join the teleconference as a guest. The telecom number is 1-844-467-6272 and the passcode is 993012.

Questions concerning this program element may be directed to Elizabeth Cartier at elizabeth.a.cartier@nasa.gov.


Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘STEM in 30’ Webcast Series

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is presenting a series of free education webcast events called “STEM in 30.” This program consists of live, fast-paced 30-minute webcasts designed to increase interest and engagement in science, technology, engineering and mathematics for students. To enhance the learning experience, students can get involved with the content through the interactive “Cover It Live” feature, which includes poll questions and classroom activities. The webcasts are available live on the National Air and Space Museum website and NASA TV, and they will be archived for on-demand viewing.

The Wright Stuff: Flying the Wright Flyer
Dec. 14, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EST
The birth of aeronautical engineering began in the Wright brothers’ bike shop in Dayton, Ohio. The family tree of airplanes can be traced back to the Wright brothers’ 1903 Flyer. The principles of flight that got the Wrights into the air are the same today. Join the webcast to investigate the principles of flight and how the Wright Flyer made it into the air and then into the history books.

“STEM in 30” webcasts are online learning experiences but are filmed in front of a live audience. If you are interested in bringing your school group to a live filming of “STEM in 30,” please email STEMin30@si.edu for details.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s “STEM in 30” Webcast Series, including a full list of upcoming webcasts, visit https://airandspace.si.edu/connect/stem-30.

Questions about this series should be directed to STEMin30@si.edu.


2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online

The Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, named after the founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and presented by JPL’s Office of Communication and Education, shares the excitement of the space program’s missions, instruments and other technologies.

Lectures take place twice per month, on consecutive Thursdays and Fridays. The Thursday lectures take place in JPL’s Theodore von Kármán Auditorium, and Friday lectures take place at Pasadena City College’s Vosloh Forum. Both start at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT). Admission and parking are free for all lectures. No reservations are required, but seating is limited. The Thursday evening lectures are streamed live for viewing online. Archives of past lectures are also available online.

Next Lecture in the Series:

Spinning Black Holes, Exploding Stars and Hyperluminous Pulsars: Results From the NuSTAR Satellite
Event Date:
Dec. 15 and Dec. 16, 2016, at 7 p.m. PST (10 p.m. EST)
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2016&month=12
NASA’s Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, launched in June 2012 and became the first telescope in orbit to focus high-energy X-ray light. Join NuSTAR project scientist Dr. Daniel K. Stern for a discussion about the highlights from the first four years of NuSTAR observations, including the surprising discovery of a new class of hyperluminous neutron stars, measurements of how fast black holes spin, and unique insight into the physics of supernova explosions.

For more information about the Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, including a complete list of upcoming lectures, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.php.

Questions about this series should be directed to http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php.


Call for Proposals — NASA Research Announcement for Use of the NASA Physical Sciences Informatics System: Appendix C

NASA is seeking ground-based research proposals from graduate students and established researchers to use NASA’s Physical Sciences Informatics system to develop new analyses and scientific insights. The PSI system is a resource for researchers to data mine information generated from completed physical sciences experiments performed on the International Space Station or from related ground-based studies.

This solicitation appendix focuses on the following five research areas: combustion science, complex fluids, fluid physics, fundamental physics and materials science.

For graduate students (students working toward an advanced degree), this NASA Research Announcement is soliciting proposals that advance fundamental research in one of the physical sciences disciplines identified above and also assist in the awarding of an advanced degree to the graduate student. This call is open to students who meet the following eligibility requirements:

— The student is pursuing an advanced degree directly related to a physical sciences discipline. Only technical degrees are permitted (not degrees in policy or management).
— The student is a U.S. citizen, a permanent resident alien of the U.S., or on a student visa at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission.
— The student is enrolled in a master’s or doctoral degree program at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission. Or, if the student is an undergraduate starting graduate studies, he or she has been accepted to a master’s or doctoral degree program at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission and will start during the next academic year.
— The student has an academic graduate advisor who will submit the application for the graduate student. The student must perform the proposed research under the guidance of the assigned graduate advisor.

The agency expects to make approximately 10 awards in spring 2016. Research and development efforts will take place over two years. The typical award will be $75,000-$100,000 per year, for up to two years.

The deadline for submitting proposals is Dec. 15, 2016.

For information, visit http://psi.nasa.gov/.

Please direct questions about this NASA Research Announcement to Dr. Francis Chiaramonte at francis.p.chiaramonte@nasa.gov.


2017 High-Altitude Student Platform Opportunity

The Louisiana Space Consortium, or LaSPACE, is accepting applications from students at U.S. colleges and universities who want to send experiments to the edge of space on a high-flying scientific balloon.

The annual project, supported by the NASA Balloon Program Office and LaSPACE, provides near-space access for 12 undergraduate and graduate student experiments to be carried by a NASA high-altitude research balloon. The flights typically last 15 to 20 hours and reach an altitude of 23 miles. Experiments may include compact satellites or prototypes.

The experiments are flown aboard the High-Altitude Student Platform, or HASP, a balloon-born instrument stack launched from the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility’s remote site in Fort Sumner, New Mexico. The goals of the project are to provide a space test platform to encourage student research and stimulate the development of student satellite payloads and other space-engineering products.

HASP seeks to enhance the technical skills and research abilities of students in critical science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines.

The deadline for applications is Dec. 16, 2016.

For application information and technical details about the program, visit http://laspace.lsu.edu/hasp.

Questions about the High-Altitude Student Platform opportunity should be directed to T. Gregory Guzik at guzik@phunds.phys.lsu.edu.


Educator Workshop: Making Moon Craters

Learn how to use baking ingredients to whip up a moonlike crater as a demonstration for students in classrooms, camps or at home. Join NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory on Dec. 17, 2016, from 10 a.m. to noon PST for this workshop at the Columbia Memorial Space Center in Downey, California.

The workshop is free for all pre-service and fully credentialed teachers! Participants must bring their teacher or student ID the day of the workshop. Lunch will be provided. Pre-registration is required.

For more information and to register to attend, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/events/2016/12/17/making-moon-craters/.

Can’t make it to the workshop? Explore the lesson online at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/teach/activity/make-a-crater/.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Sandra Valencia at (562) 231-1205.


2017 Space Exploration Educators Conference

Make plans to attend the 23rd Annual Space Exploration Educators Conference to be held Feb. 9-11, 2017, at Space Center Houston. This conference is for all K-12 educators. Activities presented use space-related themes to teach across the curricula. The activities may be used for science, language arts, mathematics, history and more.

Attend sessions hosted by scientists and engineers working on exciting projects like the International Space Station and the exploration of Mars and other parts of our solar system. Hear from astronauts who will be “leading the charge” in exploration. Attend sessions presented by educators and receive ready-to-implement classroom ideas. Attendees can earn up to 24 hours of continuing professional education credit.

For discounted registration, sign up to attend before the Early Bird Registration deadline on Dec. 30, 2016!

For more information, visit http://spacecenter.org/teacher-programs/teachers-seec/.

Please email any questions about the conference to seec@spacecenter.org.


NASA’s Langley Research Center Centennial Student Art Contest

Calling all artists, grades K-12!

On July 17, 2017, NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, will turn 100 years old! To celebrate, Langley invites you to take part in its Centennial Art Contest. The theme for this year’s contest is “A Storied Legacy, A Soaring Future.”

The contest is open to all children in grades K-12 who are attending public, private, parochial and homeschools in the United States. Artwork entries may consist of drawings, paintings, mixed media and digital creations.

A grand prize winner will be chosen from all contest entries. A first place winner will be chosen from each grade level, as well as second place, third place and honorable mention. Each entry will receive a certificate of participation.

The art contest submission period began on Nov. 1, 2016, and concludes on Dec. 31, 2016, at midnight EST.

For more information, visit https://artcontest.larc.nasa.gov/.

Please direct questions about this contest to Kristina Cors at larc-art-contest@mail.nasa.gov.


2017 Mission X: Train Like an Astronaut “Walk to the Moon” Challenge

Mission X encourages children of all ages, as well as people with particular needs, to pursue healthy lifestyles based on the model of training like an astronaut. During six- to nine-week “challenges” each fall and spring, schools and student groups from around the world complete Mission X classroom-based science lessons and physical education activities.

In 2017, Mission X is challenging Fit Explorers around the world to work together to perform activities that will move Astro Charlie the 478 million steps it would take to walk from Earth to the moon! That’s 238,857 miles, or 384,403 kilometers! At an average walking speed, that would take one person about nine years to complete.

The challenge kicks off in January. For full challenge details and to do your part to help reach this out-of-this-world goal, visit http://trainlikeanastronaut.org/wttm. The deadline to register for this challenge is Dec. 31, 2016. You may apply for Team USA at http://trainlikeanastronaut.org/usa_application.

In 2016, Mission X was represented by 30 countries and more than 53,000 participants. The challenge was available in 17 languages.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Nubia Carvajal at nubia.a.carvajal@nasa.gov.


Center for Astronomy Education Regional Teaching Exchanges and Workshops — Fall/Winter 2016-2017

NASA’s Center for Astronomy Education, or CAE, announces a series of regional teaching exchanges and workshops for astronomy and space science educators.

Teaching exchanges foster a sense of community among geographically linked current and future college instructors of astronomy. Regional experts from the broader CAE community are ready to provide the opportunity for you to meet your neighbors, expand your instructional repertoire and share your own expertise.

Workshops provide participants with experiences needed to create effective and productive active-learning classroom environments. Workshop leaders model best practices in implementing many different classroom-tested instructional strategies. But more importantly, workshop participants will gain first-hand experience implementing these proven strategies.

Jan. 4, 2017 — Gaylord Texan Resort and Convention Center in Grapevine, Texas
CAE Tier I Teaching Excellence Workshop — New Methods for Teaching About Exoplanets

Jan. 5, 2017 — Gaylord Texan Resort and Convention Center in Grapevine, Texas
CAE Tier I Teaching Excellence Workshop — New Methods for Teaching in the Flipped Classroom

For more information and to register for the teaching exchanges, visit http://astronomy101.jpl.nasa.gov/workshops/index.cfm.

Inquiries about this series of events should be directed to Gina Brissenden at gbrissenden@as.arizona.edu.

CAE is funded through NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s Exoplanet Exploration Program.


Free Program — Cubes in SpaceTM

Cubes in Space™ provides students ages 11-18 an opportunity to design and compete to launch an experiment into space at no cost! Cubes in Space™ is offered by idoodledu, inc., in partnership with NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center’s Wallops Flight Facility, the Colorado Space Grant Consortium and NASA’s Langley Research Center.

This global education program based on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics) enables students to learn about space exploration using innovative problem-solving and inquiry-based learning methods. Participants have access to resources that help prepare them to design and develop an experiment to be integrated into a small cube.

This year, experiments will be launched into space via sounding rocket from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island, Virginia, in late June 2017 or from a high-altitude balloon launched from NASA’s Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility in Fort Sumner, New Mexico, in August 2017.

The deadline for program registration is Jan. 6, 2017. For more information, visit http://www.cubesinspace.com. Questions about this program may be directed to info@cubesinspace.com.

About idoodedu inc.

idoodledu inc., a charitable nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization, is a wholly owned subsidiary of idoodlelearning inc., and was created in 2015 as a legal vehicle to bring public/private partnerships and publicly funded programs to all learners and educators. idoodlelearning inc. is an education company based in Ottawa, Canada; London, England; and Virginia Beach, Virginia, USA.


2017 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Promotion and Research Challenge

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center invites students in grades 3-12 to take part in the OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Promotion and Research Challenge, or OPSPARC. Participants are challenged to help raise awareness and understanding of NASA technologies and their many benefits to our everyday lives.

The challenge provides contestants with a tool, developed by Glogster, for creating and submitting their entries. Glogster is a cloud-based platform for presentation and interactive learning. The tool allows contestants to combine different kinds of media on a virtual canvas to create multimedia posters and to access an existing library of educational content created by students and educators worldwide. Contestants will develop a Glog of their own as part of OPSPARC that will include information on spinoffs and NASA missions. The students also will create video describing their own ideas for a new NASA spinoff technology.

After completing their Glogs, 20 teams of students in grades 9 through 12 will be invited to work with college student mentors to further develop their spinoff concept within a 3-D, multiuser, virtual-world setting through creation of computer-aided design, or CAD, models and application of engineering and business analyses on their spinoff concepts. The InWorld portion of the contest is being sponsored by NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope project.

Students who submit the winning entries in each age category will have the opportunity to visit NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, for an awards ceremony and workshop to be held in their honor. The workshop will include a behind-the-scenes look at Goddard, the chance to meet some of the top minds at NASA, and the opportunity for the students to design and create their own public service announcement video with guidance from NASA video producers and actor Peter Cullen, the voice of the TRANSFORMERS character OPTIMUS PRIME.

The deadline to register and submit Glogs is 11:59 PM EST on Feb. 10, 2017.

To learn more about the challenge and to register to participate, visit http://itpo.gsfc.nasa.gov/opsparc/.

Please direct questions about this contest to Darryl Mitchell at Darryl.R.Mitchell@nasa.gov.

TRANSFORMERS and OPTIMUS PRIME are trademarks of Hasbro and are used with permission. © 2015 Hasbro. All rights reserved.


National Science Foundation’s 2016-2017 Community College Innovation Challenge

The National Science Foundation’s Community College Innovation Challenge is underway and seeking teams to propose innovative STEM-based solutions for real-world problems. Teams must include three to five community college students, a faculty mentor, and a community or industry partner.

Challenge entries consist of two components: a written portion and a 90-second video. Each team’s entry must address one of the three themes outlined by the National Science Foundation. This year’s themes are Maker to Manufacturer, Energy and Environment, and Security Technologies.

Finalists will be invited to attend an Innovation Boot Camp, a professional development workshop on innovation and entrepreneurship.

The entry submission deadline is Feb. 15, 2017.

For additional information about the challenge, visit https://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/communitycollege/index.jsp.

Questions about this challenge should be directed to InnovationChallenge@nsf.gov.


2017-2018 Virginia Space Grant Consortium STEM Bridge Scholarships

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium is offering renewable scholarships to undergraduate students studying science, technology, engineering or mathematics. The STEM Bridge Scholarships are $1,000.

The scholarships are available to students who are U.S. citizens from any federally recognized minority group and are enrolled full time at one of the five VSGC member universities: The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia, and Virginia Tech. Applicants must have completed at least one year of a STEM undergraduate program and be classified as a sophomore during the 2017-2018 academic year.

The STEM Bridge Program connects students to future opportunities by mentoring and guiding them to future VSGC scholarships and NASA-related paid internships. The program encourages students to explore how their majors can apply to NASA’s mission.

This is a competitive program, and awards are based on student academic merit and the quality of interest essay, as well as letters of recommendation from current college faculty who can attest to the student’s interest in STEM areas.

The deadline for submitting applications is March 13, 2017.

For more information, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/Bridge/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to Tysha Sanford at tsanford@odu.edu.


Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design, or STEAMD; or activities culturally relevant to or focused on populations underrepresented in STEM careers, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or nonreimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA announcement.


Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Are you an undergraduate or graduate student seeking opportunities in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)? The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science — in collaboration with the participating agencies in the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on STEM Education (CoSTEM) and the Science.gov Alliance — has launched a search portal for both students and universities to discover federally sponsored STEM education training and funding opportunities.

Student users can search the site for opportunities they can apply to directly, such as research internships and fellowships. Likewise, universities can search the site for federal funding opportunities to establish innovative training programs for undergraduates or graduate students.

Users can search the site through faceted searching capabilities for characteristics such as program type, STEM discipline, institution location, federal sponsor, and eligibility. Or they can search through the open text option.

For programs and opportunities for undergraduates, visit http://stemundergrads.science.gov/.

For graduate programs and opportunities, visit http://stemgradstudents.science.gov/.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at https://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the new ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Eduation: https://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express Message — Dec. 1, 2016

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


New This Week!


NASA Modern Figures Toolkit: Activities and Resources Related to Katherine Johnson and Human Computers
Audience: K-12 Educators

Free NASA Educator Professional Development Webinars
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: Dec. 1, 2016, at 6 p.m. EST

Call for Proposals — 2017 NASA Education Aeronautics Scholarship and Advanced STEM Training and Research (AS&ASTAR) Fellowship
Audience: First-year Master’s or Doctoral Students
Informational Webinars: Dec. 14 2016
Proposal Deadline: Feb. 24, 2017

Educator Workshop: Making Moon Craters
Audience: Pre-service Educators and Educators of Grades 1-6
Event Date: Dec. 17, 2016, 10 a.m. – Noon PST

Educator Workshop: Utilizing Renewable Energy
Audience: Pre-service Educators and Educators of Grades 9-12
Event Date: Jan. 21, 2017, 10 a.m. – Noon PST

2016-2017 Cassini Scientist for a Day Essay Contest
Audience: 5-12 Students
Entry Deadline: Feb. 24, 2017

Educator Workshop: Ring Wing Glider
Audience: Pre-service Educators and Educators of Grades 3-8
Event Date: Feb. 25, 2017, 10 a.m. – Noon PST


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Presents: ‘Hidden Figures’ Virtual Event
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 7-12
Event Date: Dec. 1, 2016, 11 a.m. – Noon EST

Access NASA Data to Analyze Astronaut Radiation Exposure in Space
Audience: Educators and Students, Ages 14 to 18
Entry Deadline: Dec. 3, 2016

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

Call for Proposals — NASA Research Announcement for Use of the NASA Physical Sciences Informatics System: Appendix C
Audience: Graduate Students
Proposal Deadline: Dec. 15, 2016

2017 High-Altitude Student Platform Opportunity
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: Dec. 16, 2016

2017 Space Exploration Educators Conference
Audience: K-12 Educators
Early Bird Registration Deadline: Dec. 30, 2016
Event Date: Feb. 9-11, 2017

NASA’s Langley Research Center Centennial Student Art Contest
Audience: K-12 Students
Entry Period: Nov. 1 – Dec. 31, 2016

2017 RASC-AL Aerospace Concepts Design Competition
Audience: Higher Education Students
Abstract Submission Deadline: Jan. 19, 2017

NASA’s Centennial Challenges: Cube Quest Challenge
Audience: All Interested U.S. Citizens, Including Higher Education Educators and Students
Next Submission Deadline: Feb. 3, 2017

National Science Foundation’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities — Undergraduate Program
Audience: Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Broadening Participation Research Centers — Preliminary Proposal Deadline: March 21, 2017

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

NASA’s Centennial Challenges: Vascular Tissue Challenge
Audience: All Interested U.S. Citizens, Including Higher Education Educators and Students
Deadline: No Later Than Sept. 30, 2019

Be a Citizen Earth Scientist With the ‘GLOBE Observer’ App
Audience: All Educators and Students

Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students and Higher Education Institutions


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

 


NEW THIS WEEK!


NASA Modern Figures Toolkit: Activities and Resources Related to Katherine Johnson and Human Computers

In the 1960s, the U.S. was on an ambitious journey to the moon, and Katherine Johnson and her fellow human computers helped get NASA there. Bring the excitement of their story to your classroom with the NASA Modern Figures Toolkit.

The NASA Modern Figures Toolkit is a collection of resources and educational activities for students in grades K-12. Each educational activity and resource includes a brief description, as well as information about how the activities and lessons align to education standards. Resources highlighted include videos, historical references and STEM materials.

Bring Katherine Johnson’s inspiring story to your classroom by downloading the NASA Modern Figures Toolkit at www.nasa.gov/modernfigures-education-toolkit.


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Don’t Count NASA Out of Your Math Classes: Solar System Math
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-8
Event Date: Dec. 1, 2016, at 6 p.m. EST
Bring out-of-this-world math and science into your classroom with NASA STEM solar system activities and missions. Investigate real data, classification, graphing and scale models to better understand and visualize our sun, planets, asteroids and other objects in our solar system. Register online to participate.
https://www.etouches.com/209753

Don’t Count NASA Out of Your Math Classes: Fuel for the Fire
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 7-9
Event Date: Dec. 5, 2016, at 5 p.m. EST
Explore ways to engage your students with a game that involves landing the Eagle module at Tranquility Base. Game players learn how the shape of a fuel tank is related to a graph of height vs. time as the tank is filled at a constant rate. Students will use the knowledge gained from that exploration to determine a function for computing the volume of fuel given the height in the cylindrical tanks of the Space Launch System rocket. Finally, students will use that function to launch the SLS on its first mission around the moon. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/212571

Picking Up STEAM: Using Models and Data to Understand Clouds
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-10
Event Date: Dec. 6, 2016, at 5 p.m. EST
Practice STEAM through the use of inquiry-based science activities from NASA curriculum guides. The activities and NASA educational websites introduced will provide participants with new curriculum ideas to assist in reaching the Next Generation Science Standards and CORE learning outcomes standards. This STEAM workshop will guide participants through inquiry-based learning activities related to clouds, phase change, light, water cycle, weather and climate. Participants will use authentic data sets to model STEAM lessons. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/205303

Don’t Count NASA Out of Your Math Classes: SpaceMath – Linking Math and Science
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-8
Event Date: Dec. 6, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EST
Space Mathematics is a two-part series designed to help educators make the critical linkage between mathematics and science in the classroom. In Part 1 — Linking Math and Science, participants will survey some of the available NASA resources and discuss the use of science as a vehicle for mathematics instruction. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/199140

Don’t Count NASA Out of Your Math Classes: SpaceMath – Active Math
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-8
Event Date: Dec. 7, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EST
Space Mathematics is a two-part series designed to help educators make the critical linkage between mathematics and science in the classroom. In Part 2 — Active Math, participants will explore the use of inquiry to reinforce mathematics skills while engaging students with hands-on activities. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/199142

Don’t Count NASA Out of Your Math Classes: Mass vs Weight
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: Dec. 8, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EST
Participants will learn about hands-on standards-aligned activities comparing mass and weight. They also will learn about the microgravity environment of the International Space Station. This webinar addresses the Next Generation Science Standards ESS1 and ESS2 and Common Core Math Standards. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/207364

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


Call for Proposals — 2017 NASA Education Aeronautics Scholarship and Advanced STEM Training and Research (AS&ASTAR) Fellowship

NASA Education is seeking proposals for a NASA Education Aeronautics Scholarship and Advanced STEM Training and Research, or AS&ASTAR, Fellowship opportunity. The NASA Education AS&ASTAR Fellowship provides funding for fellowship candidates to perform graduate research at their respective campuses during the academic year under the guidance of their faculty adviser and a NASA researcher.

To be eligible to submit a proposal, candidates must be U.S. citizens or naturalized citizens who hold a bachelor’s degree in a STEM field earned prior to Aug. 31, 2017. Candidates must be enrolled in a master’s or doctoral degree program no later than Sept. 1, 2017, and intend to pursue a research-based master’s or Ph.D. program in a NASA-relevant field.

Proposals are due Feb. 24, 2017.

For full program details, visit http://go.nasa.gov/2fYxdsn .

An informational webinar about this fellowship will be presented on Wednesday, Dec. 14, 2016, at 10 a.m. EST. To participate, visit https://ac.arc.nasa.gov/nifs/ and join the teleconference as a guest. The telecom number is 1-844-467-6272 and the passcode is 993012.

Questions concerning this program element may be directed to Elizabeth Cartier at elizabeth.a.cartier@nasa.gov.


Educator Workshop: Making Moon Craters

Learn how to use baking ingredients to whip up a moonlike crater as a demonstration for students in classrooms, camps or at home. Join NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory on Dec. 17, 2016, from 10 a.m. to noon PST for this workshop at the Columbia Memorial Space Center in Downey, California.

The workshop is free for all pre-service and fully credentialed teachers! Participants must bring their teacher or student ID the day of the workshop. Lunch will be provided. Pre-registration is required.

For more information and to register to attend, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/events/2016/12/17/making-moon-craters/.

Can’t make it to the workshop? Explore the lesson online at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/teach/activity/make-a-crater/.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Sandra Valencia at (562) 231-1205.


Educator Workshop: Utilizing Renewable Energy

Learn how to help students break down complex issues into more manageable pieces in a lesson that explores the math, science and engineering considerations involved in using solar energy. Join NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory on Jan. 21, 2017, from 10 a.m. to noon PST for this workshop at the Columbia Memorial Space Center in Downey, California.

The workshop is free for all pre-service and fully credentialed teachers! Participants must bring their teacher or student ID the day of the workshop. Lunch will be provided.

Pre-registration is required. For more information and to register to attend, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/events/2017/1/21/utilizing-renewable-energy/.

Can’t make it to the workshop? Explore the lesson online at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/teach/activity/think-green-utilizing-renewable-solar-energy/.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Sandra Valencia at (562) 231-1205.


2016-2017 Cassini Scientist for a Day Essay Contest

The Cassini Scientist for a Day contest challenges students to become NASA scientists studying Saturn. Participants examine three of the best scientific targets imaged by the Cassini spacecraft in its 12 years at Saturn. After researching the topics, students are to choose the one they think yielded the best scientific results. This year’s targets are Enceladus’ plumes, Titan’s lakes and Saturn’s hexagon. After researching the three options, students write an essay of fewer than 500 words explaining their choice.

The contest is open to all students in the United States in grades 5-12. The essays will be divided into three groups for scoring: grades 5-6, 7-8 and 9-12. All submissions must be students’ original work. Participants may enter as individuals or as part of a team of up to four students.

The deadline for entries is Feb. 24, 2017.

For more information, visit http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/scientist-for-a-day.

If you have questions about this contest, please email scientistforaday@jpl.nasa.gov.


Educator Workshop: Ring Wing Glider

Learn how to use engineering design principles to turn a piece of paper into an experimental wing for a new type of aircraft designed to be more economical and efficient than today’s airliners. Join NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory on Feb. 25, 2017, from 10 a.m. to noon PST for this workshop at the Columbia Memorial Space Center in Downey, California.

The workshop is free for all pre-service and fully credentialed teachers! Participants must bring their teacher or student ID the day of the workshop. Lunch will be provided. Pre-registration is required.

For more information and to register to attend, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/events/2017/2/25/ring-wing-glider/.

Can’t make it to the workshop? Explore the lesson online at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/teach/activity/ring-wing-glider/.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Sandra Valencia at (562) 231-1206.


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Presents: ‘Hidden Figures’ Virtual Event

You might think you know NASA’s story, but there’s always a story behind the story. Did you know the first computers were people? That in the early days of spaceflight, there were women (including minorities) working to make sure that the United States was able to successfully launch humans into space and breaking social barriers at the same time?

Join NASA experts, director Ted Melfi, and Octavia Spencer, who plays Dorothy Vaughn in the film “Hidden Figures,” through NASA’s Digital Learning Network on Dec. 1, 2016, at 11 a.m. EST, to discuss NASA’s hidden story, learn about how NASA’s story continues, and how history and filmmaking are an important part of our space program.

To register to participate in the interactive videoconference, visit https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdZZNXHDM25mJ4XOfTjvDHuJ18QyRHyw1XM5-NBtSwz0qvvrw/viewform.

This event will also be webcast live at http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-dlinfo2 and broadcast on NASA TV at https://www.nasa.gov/nasatv.

Please direct questions about this event to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com.

For more information about other DLN events, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln.


Access NASA Data to Analyze Astronaut Radiation Exposure in Space

Imagine what it would be like to live in space. What kind of shelter would you live in? What kind of protection would you have from the elements? How long could you stay there?

On Earth, humans are protected from radiation by the atmosphere and Earth’s magnetic field. Astronauts on the space station are above the atmosphere and receive a higher dose of radiation than when they are on the ground. The harmful effects of radiation that come from the sun and other sources outside the solar system pose danger to humans living and working in space.

Radiation is one of the top concerns for humans living in deep space for long durations. A NASA group called RadWorks is using radiation detectors the size of USB thumb drives to collect data inside the International Space Station. Together with the University of Houston and the Institute for Research in Schools, RadWorks is sharing the data with high school students who are helping to analyze the radiation that astronaut Tim Peake is exposed to during his time aboard the International Space Station.

NASA is making this same data available to teachers and students through the TimPix project administered by the Institute for Research in Schools, with funding from the European Space Agency and the United Kingdom Space Agency. During European Space Agency astronaut Tim Peake’s time aboard the station, data is taken many times a minute while in orbit. A variety of data sets are currently available, and others are being added as the mission progresses. Aimed at high school physics classes, the TimPix project allows students ages 14-18 to access and analyze radiation data during Peake’s mission. They are able to take part in authentic research occurring aboard the station. What type of radiation is present? What impact do different altitudes or locations around the world have on the number and types of particles detected? What happens during a solar flare? Join us in helping NASA answer these questions!

For more information about NASA’s Radworks project, visit http://techport.nasa.gov/view/10581.

For more information or to register for the TimPix project, email timpix@researchinschools.org.


Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites U.S. educational institutions to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets, and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

Nonprofit museums, libraries and planetariums (sponsored through their respective State Agency Surplus Property, or SASP, organization) are also eligible to make requests. Visit the link below for special instructions to request items. To find the contact information for the SASP representative for your area, visit http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/100851.

A nominal shipping fee must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.


Call for Proposals — NASA Research Announcement for Use of the NASA Physical Sciences Informatics System: Appendix C

NASA is seeking ground-based research proposals from graduate students and established researchers to use NASA’s Physical Sciences Informatics system to develop new analyses and scientific insights. The PSI system is a resource for researchers to data mine information generated from completed physical sciences experiments performed on the International Space Station or from related ground-based studies.

This solicitation appendix focuses on the following five research areas: combustion science, complex fluids, fluid physics, fundamental physics and materials science.

For graduate students (students working toward an advanced degree), this NASA Research Announcement is soliciting proposals that advance fundamental research in one of the physical sciences disciplines identified above and also assist in the awarding of an advanced degree to the graduate student. This call is open to students who meet the following eligibility requirements:

— The student is pursuing an advanced degree directly related to a physical sciences discipline. Only technical degrees are permitted (not degrees in policy or management).
— The student is a U.S. citizen, a permanent resident alien of the U.S., or on a student visa at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission.
— The student is enrolled in a master’s or doctoral degree program at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission. Or, if the student is an undergraduate starting graduate studies, he or she has been accepted to a master’s or doctoral degree program at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission and will start during the next academic year.
— The student has an academic graduate advisor who will submit the application for the graduate student. The student must perform the proposed research under the guidance of the assigned graduate advisor.

The agency expects to make approximately 10 awards in spring 2016. Research and development efforts will take place over two years. The typical award will be $75,000-$100,000 per year, for up to two years.

The deadline for submitting proposals is Dec. 15, 2016.

For information, visit http://psi.nasa.gov/.

Please direct questions about this NASA Research Announcement to Dr. Francis Chiaramonte at francis.p.chiaramonte@nasa.gov.


2017 High-Altitude Student Platform Opportunity

The Louisiana Space Consortium, or LaSPACE, is accepting applications from students at U.S. colleges and universities who want to send experiments to the edge of space on a high-flying scientific balloon.

The annual project, supported by the NASA Balloon Program Office and LaSPACE, provides near-space access for 12 undergraduate and graduate student experiments to be carried by a NASA high-altitude research balloon. The flights typically last 15 to 20 hours and reach an altitude of 23 miles. Experiments may include compact satellites or prototypes.

The experiments are flown aboard the High-Altitude Student Platform, or HASP, a balloon-born instrument stack launched from the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility’s remote site in Fort Sumner, New Mexico. The goals of the project are to provide a space test platform to encourage student research and stimulate the development of student satellite payloads and other space-engineering products.

HASP seeks to enhance the technical skills and research abilities of students in critical science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines.

The deadline for applications is Dec. 16, 2016.

For application information and technical details about the program, visit http://laspace.lsu.edu/hasp.

Questions about the High-Altitude Student Platform opportunity should be directed to T. Gregory Guzik at guzik@phunds.phys.lsu.edu.


2017 Space Exploration Educators Conference

Make plans to attend the 23rd Annual Space Exploration Educators Conference to be held Feb. 9-11, 2017, at Space Center Houston. This conference is for all K-12 educators. Activities presented use space-related themes to teach across the curricula. The activities may be used for science, language arts, mathematics, history and more.

Attend sessions hosted by scientists and engineers working on exciting projects like the International Space Station and the exploration of Mars and other parts of our solar system. Hear from astronauts who will be “leading the charge” in exploration. Attend sessions presented by educators and receive ready-to-implement classroom ideas. Attendees can earn up to 24 hours of continuing professional education credit.

For discounted registration, sign up to attend before the Early Bird Registration deadline on Dec. 30, 2016!

For more information, visit http://spacecenter.org/teacher-programs/teachers-seec/.

Please email any questions about the conference to seec@spacecenter.org.


NASA’s Langley Research Center Centennial Student Art Contest

Calling all artists, grades K-12!

On July 17, 2017, NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, will turn 100 years old! To celebrate, Langley invites you to take part in its Centennial Art Contest. The theme for this year’s contest is “A Storied Legacy, A Soaring Future.”

The contest is open to all children in grades K-12 who are attending public, private, parochial and homeschools in the United States. Artwork entries may consist of drawings, paintings, mixed media and digital creations.

A grand prize winner will be chosen from all contest entries. A first place winner will be chosen from each grade level, as well as second place, third place and honorable mention. Each entry will receive a certificate of participation.

The art contest submission period began on Nov. 1, 2016, and concludes on Dec. 31, 2016, at midnight EST.

For more information, visit https://artcontest.larc.nasa.gov/.

Please direct questions about this contest to Kristina Cors at larc-art-contest@mail.nasa.gov.


2017 RASC-AL Aerospace Concepts Design Competition

NASA and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2017 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts-Academic Linkage Aerospace Concepts competition. RASC-AL is a design project competition for university-level engineering students and faculty.

The 2017 RASC-AL competition challenges teams to develop new concepts that leverage innovations to improve our ability to work more effectively in microgravity, by responding to one of four themes:
— Lightweight Exercise Suite.
— Airlock Design.
— Commercially enabled LEO/Mars Habitable Module.
— Logistics Delivery System.

Potentially, NASA could implement concepts derived from the design projects.

Interested teams must submit an abstract for their proposed project by Jan. 19, 2017.

NEW THIS YEAR: As a part of the abstract proposal submission process, teams will be required to include a two-minute video. The intent is for the video to augment each team’s abstract proposal by including animation, graphics, or other creative ways of showcasing unique aspects of their proposed concept.

The 2017 RASC-AL Competition will implement a two-tiered down-select process. A steering committee of NASA and industry experts will evaluate the abstract and video proposals and select as many as 20 undergraduate or graduate teams to move to the next phase of the competition. Based on evaluation of five- to seven-page mid-project papers submitted by these teams in mid-March, the field will be narrowed once again to 12-16 teams who will be selected for the final round of the competition. The finalists will present their concepts to the panel of judges (the RASC-AL Steering Committee) at the RASC-AL Forum in June 2017 in Florida.

The RASC-AL competition is open to full-time undergraduate or graduate students majoring in engineering or science at an accredited college or university. University design teams must include one faculty or industry advisor with a university affiliation and two or more undergraduate or graduate students. A group of universities also may collaborate on a design project entry. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

For more information about this competition, visit http://rascal.nianet.org.

If you have questions about this competition, please contact the RASC-AL team at rascal@nianet.org.


NASA’s Centennial Challenges: Cube Quest Challenge

Registration is open for NASA’s Cube Quest Challenge, which advances communication and propulsion technologies for CubeSats. Competitors have a shot at a share of $5 million in prize money and an opportunity to participate in space exploration and technology development. Participants can compete for a chance at flying their very own CubeSat to the moon and beyond as secondary payload on the first integrated flight of NASA’s Orion spacecraft and Space Launch System, or SLS. Or the competitors can launch their satellite using an independent launch provider.

Challenge objectives include designing, building and launching flight-qualified, small satellites capable of advanced operations near and beyond the moon. The challenge and prize purse are divided into three major areas:

— Ground Tournaments: $500,000 in the four qualifying ground tournaments to determine who will have the ability to fly on the first SLS flight

— Deep Space Derby: $1.5-million purse for demonstrating communication and CubeSat durability at a distance greater than almost 2.5 million miles (4,000,000 km), 10 times the distance from Earth to the moon

— Lunar Derby: $3-million purse for demonstrating the ability to place a CubeSat in a stable lunar orbit and demonstrate communication and durability near the moon.

The Cube Quest Challenge seeks to develop and test subsystems necessary to perform deep space exploration using small spacecraft. Advancements in small spacecraft capabilities will provide benefits to future missions and also may enable new mission scenarios, including future investigations of near-Earth asteroids.

All teams may compete in any one of the four ground tournaments, or GT. Submissions for the final tournament, GT-4, are due Feb. 3, 2017. Teams that rate high on mission safety and probability of success will receive incremental awards. Participation in GT-4 is required to earn a secondary payload spot on SLS.

Teams must register at least 30 days prior to the ground tournament in which they plan to participate. Check the Cube Quest Challenge website for updates.

The Lunar Derby focuses primarily on propulsion for small spacecraft and near-Earth communications, while the Deep Space Derby focuses on finding innovative solutions to deep space communications using small spacecraft. Together, these competitions will contribute to opening deep space exploration to nongovernment spacecraft.

For more information on the Cube Quest Challenge, visit https://www.nasa.gov/cubequest.

To learn more about NASA’s challenges and citizen science efforts, visit https://www.nasa.gov/solve.

Please direct any questions about the Cube Quest Challenge to James Cockrell at james.j.cockrell@nasa.gov.


National Science Foundation’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities — Undergraduate Program

The National Science Foundation is seeking proposals for the Historically Black Colleges and Universities — Undergraduate Program. HBCU-UP is committed to enhancing the quality of undergraduate STEM education and research at Historically Black Colleges and Universities as a means to broaden participation in the nation’s STEM workforce. HBCU-UP realizes this purpose by providing awards to develop, implement, and study innovative models and approaches for making dramatic improvements in the preparation and success of HBCU undergraduate students so that they may participate successfully in graduate programs and/or careers in STEM disciplines.

HBCU-UP provides support for a variety of opportunities. These include:

Broadening Participation Research Centers: These centers represent the collective intelligence of HBCU STEM higher education and serve as the national hubs for the rigorous study and broad dissemination of the critical pedagogies and culturally sensitive interventions that contribute to the success of HBCUs in educating African-American STEM undergraduates. Centers are expected to conduct research on STEM education and broadening participation in STEM; perform outreach to HBCUs to build capacity for conducting this type of research; and work to transfer and disseminate promising participation-broadening research to enhance STEM education and research outcomes for African-American undergraduates across the country. The preliminary proposal deadline for this opportunity is March 21, 2017. Full proposals are due Nov. 22, 2017.

For more information on the overall Historically Black Colleges and Universities — Undergraduate Program, visit http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5481.

Please direct questions about these opportunities to Claudia Rankins at crankins@nsf.gov and Andrea Johnson at andjohns@nsf.gov.


Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design, or STEAMD; or activities culturally relevant to or focused on populations underrepresented in STEM careers, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or nonreimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA announcement.


NASA’s Centennial Challenges: Vascular Tissue Challenge

NASA, in partnership with the nonprofit Methuselah Foundation’s New Organ Alliance, is seeking ways to advance the field of bioengineering through a new prize competition. The Vascular Tissue Challenge offers a $500,000 prize to be divided among the first three teams that successfully create thick, metabolically functional, human vascularized organ tissue in a controlled laboratory environment.

Competitors must produce vascularized tissue that is more than .39 inches (1 centimeter) in thickness and maintains more than 85 percent survival of the required cells throughout a 30-day trial period. To win an award, teams must demonstrate three successful trials with at least a 75 percent success rate. In addition to the laboratory trials, teams must submit a proposal that details how they would further advance some aspect of their research through a microgravity experiment that could be conducted in the U.S. National Laboratory on the International Space Station.

The first registered team(s) to meet the required guidelines and complete their trials by Sept. 30, 2019, will win the awards.

The Vascular Tissue Challenge prize purse is provided by NASA’s Centennial Challenges Program, part of NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate. Centennial Challenges, managed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, is NASA’s citizen-inventor prize program. It invites the nation to help advance the technologies that will enable us to go to Mars and beyond, as well as improve life on Earth. The New Organ Alliance is administering the competition on behalf of NASA. The alliance is a nonprofit organization focused on regenerative medicine research and development to benefit human disease research and tissue engineering.

For information about the Methuselah Foundation’s New Organ Alliance, official challenge documents, rules and schedule of events, visit https://neworgan.org/vtc-prize.php.

For more information about the Vascular Tissue Challenge, visit https://www.nasa.gov/vtchallenge.


Be a Citizen Earth Scientist With the ‘GLOBE Observer’ App

Want to be a citizen Earth scientist? To contribute to NASA’s studies of our home planet, all you need is a smartphone, access to the outdoors, and the “GLOBE Observer” app.

Now available for Apple and Android phones, the app is an initiative of the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment program. For over two decades, GLOBE has enabled schools and students in over 110 countries to investigate their local environment and put their observations in a global context.

To learn more, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2016/nasa-launches-new-citizen-science-opportunity and http://observer.globe.gov.


Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Are you an undergraduate or graduate student seeking opportunities in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)? The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science — in collaboration with the participating agencies in the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on STEM Education (CoSTEM) and the Science.gov Alliance — has launched a search portal for both students and universities to discover federally sponsored STEM education training and funding opportunities.

Student users can search the site for opportunities they can apply to directly, such as research internships and fellowships. Likewise, universities can search the site for federal funding opportunities to establish innovative training programs for undergraduates or graduate students.

Users can search the site through faceted searching capabilities for characteristics such as program type, STEM discipline, institution location, federal sponsor, and eligibility. Or they can search through the open text option.

For programs and opportunities for undergraduates, visit http://stemundergrads.science.gov/.

For graduate programs and opportunities, visit http://stemgradstudents.science.gov/.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at https://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the new ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Eduation: https://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express Message — Nov. 23, 2016

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


New This Week!


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event – Science on Station Webcast
Audience: Middle and High School Students and Educators
Event Date: Nov. 28, 2016, 11 – 11:45 a.m. EST

Free NASA Educator Professional Development Webinars
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: Nov. 28, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT

2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education
Next Lecture Date: Dec. 15, 2016, at 7 p.m. PST (10 p.m. EST)

2017 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Promotion and Research Challenge
Audience: Students in Grades 3-12
Entry Deadline: Feb. 10, 2017


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

Commercial Crew 2017 Calendar Artwork Contest
Audience: Students 4 to 12 Years Old
Entry Deadline: Nov. 30, 2016

2017 BIG Idea Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Students and Faculty
Proposal Deadline: Nov. 30, 2016

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Presents: ‘Hidden Figures’ Virtual Event
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 7-12
Event Date: Dec. 1, 2016, 11 a.m. – Noon EST

Access NASA Data to Analyze Astronaut Radiation Exposure in Space
Audience: Educators and Students, Ages 14 to 18
Entry Deadline: Dec. 3, 2016

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

2017 High-Altitude Student Platform Opportunity
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: Dec. 16, 2016

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students and Higher Education Institutions


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html


NEW THIS WEEK!


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event – Science on Station Webcast

Tune in Nov. 28 and #askDLN questions on the NASA DLiNfo Channel at 11 a.m. EST.

How does a pill dissolve in your body after you swallow it? Connect your middle or high school class with the Digital Learning Network, or DLN, to talk with Dr. Kenneth Savin, a chemist at Eli Lilly and Company studying hard-to-wet surfaces on the International Space Station. The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space, or CASIS, manages the U.S. National Laboratory and sponsors this experiment.

Savin’s research on the space station evaluates the role of microgravity on wettability and ultimate dissolution rates of drugs to gain a better understanding of fundamental processes. Many active pharmaceutical ingredients and inert substances commonly used in formulating modern-day pharmaceuticals are characterized as hard-to-wet solids. As such, these ingredients represent a challenge to their ultimate pharmaceutical effectiveness as well as their development and manufacturing. In space, the behavior of these hard-to-wet solids may be totally different, so this research can tell us many things about what we must do before traveling away from Earth into deep space.

Please direct questions about this event to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com, ATTN: CASIS Academy Live.

The 45-minute event will be webcast on the NASA DLiNfo Channel on Nov. 28, 2016, at 11 a.m. EST.

For more information about this and other DLN events, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln.


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

NASA Technology in Your Classroom: Robotics on a Budget
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-8
Event Date: Nov. 28, 2016, at 6 p.m. EST
Robots are part of our everyday lives. We use them in ways we don’t always realize. What are robots? How are they used in our lives, and how are they used at NASA? These are some of the questions investigated in this webinar. Explore how to use robotics inexpensively in your classroom to enhance your students’ STEM understanding by integrating NASA STEM robotics missions, curriculum, online resources and the NGSS 3-5.ETS1 / MS.ETS1. Register online to participate.
https://www.etouches.com/203862

NASA Technology in Your Classroom — BEST GPIM
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: Nov. 29, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EST
Participants will learn about how “Technology Drives Exploration.” Using the Beginning Engineering Science and Technology, or BEST, curriculum, participants will learn how to use the engineering design process to build a satellite and test green propellant. Participants also will learn about current research at NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in California. Register online to participate.
https://www.etouches.com/205661

Teachers Connect: LaRC Centennial Badge Webinar
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School, and Informal Educators of Grades 6-8
Event Date: Nov. 30, 2016, at 4 p.m. EST
This webinar will focus for the first half-hour on clouds and their role in Earth’s “energy budget” and on implementation ideas using GLOBE for different classroom settings as part of the Earth Right Now: LaRC 100th digital badge. We also will talk about student badge implementations, extension ideas and extra resources. The second half-hour will be very similar but centered on the engineering design process using the Drag Race to Mars Engineering Design Challenge as part of the Journey to Mars: LaRC 100th digital badge. This portion of the webinar will focus on forces and motion and math calculations using paper airplanes and testing different materials as part of the Aeronautics: LaRC 100th digital badge. This webinar meets requirements of teacher discussions within the NASA Langley 100th EPDC digital badges. To learn more about the Langley 100th digital badges, log in to https://nasatxstate-epdc.net/ and search for LaRC 100th. Register online to participate.
https://www.etouches.com/207894

Don’t Count NASA Out of Your Math Classes: Solar System Math
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-8
Event Date: Dec. 1, 2016, at 6 p.m. EST
Bring out-of-this-world math and science into your classroom with NASA STEM solar system activities and missions. Investigate real data, classification, graphing and scale models to better understand and visualize our sun, planets, asteroids and other objects in our solar system. Register online to participate.
https://www.etouches.com/209753

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online

The Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, named after the founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and presented by JPL’s Office of Communication and Education, shares the excitement of the space program’s missions, instruments and other technologies.

Lectures take place twice per month, on consecutive Thursdays and Fridays. The Thursday lectures take place in JPL’s Theodore von Kármán Auditorium, and Friday lectures take place at Pasadena City College’s Vosloh Forum. Both start at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT). Admission and parking are free for all lectures. No reservations are required, but seating is limited. The Thursday evening lectures are streamed live for viewing online. Archives of past lectures are also available online.

Next Lecture in the Series:

Spinning Black Holes, Exploding Stars and Hyperluminous Pulsars: Results From the NuSTAR Satellite
Event Date:
Dec. 15 and Dec. 16, 2016, at 7 p.m. PST (10 p.m. EST)
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2016&month=12
NASA’s Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, launched in June 2012 and became the first telescope in orbit to focus high-energy X-ray light. Join NuSTAR project scientist Dr. Daniel K. Stern for a discussion about the highlights from the first four years of NuSTAR observations, including the surprising discovery of a new class of hyperluminous neutron stars, measurements of how fast black holes spin, and unique insight into the physics of supernova explosions.

For more information about the Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, including a complete list of upcoming lectures, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.php.

Questions about this series should be directed to http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php.


2017 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Promotion and Research Challenge

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center invites students in grades 3-12 to take part in the OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Promotion and Research Challenge, or OPSPARC. Participants are challenged to help raise awareness and understanding of NASA technologies and their many benefits to our everyday lives.

The challenge provides contestants with a tool, developed by Glogster, for creating and submitting their entries. Glogster is a cloud-based platform for presentation and interactive learning. The tool allows contestants to combine different kinds of media on a virtual canvas to create multimedia posters and to access an existing library of educational content created by students and educators worldwide. Contestants will develop a Glog of their own as part of OPSPARC that will include information on spinoffs and NASA missions. The students also will create video describing their own ideas for a new NASA spinoff technology.

After completing their Glogs, 20 teams of students in grades 9 through 12 will be invited to work with college student mentors to further develop their spinoff concept within a 3-D, multiuser, virtual-world setting through creation of computer-aided design, or CAD, models and application of engineering and business analyses on their spinoff concepts. The InWorld portion of the contest is being sponsored by NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope project.

Students who submit the winning entries in each age category will have the opportunity to visit NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, for an awards ceremony and workshop to be held in their honor. The workshop will include a behind-the-scenes look at Goddard, the chance to meet some of the top minds at NASA, and the opportunity for the students to design and create their own public service announcement video with guidance from NASA video producers and actor Peter Cullen, the voice of the TRANSFORMERS character OPTIMUS PRIME.

The deadline to register and submit Glogs is 11:59 PM EST on Feb. 10, 2017.

To learn more about the challenge and to register to participate, visit http://itpo.gsfc.nasa.gov/opsparc/.

Please direct questions about this contest to Darryl Mitchell at Darryl.R.Mitchell@nasa.gov.

TRANSFORMERS and OPTIMUS PRIME are trademarks of Hasbro and are used with permission. © 2015 Hasbro. All rights reserved.


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


Commercial Crew 2017 Calendar Artwork Contest

NASA’s Commercial Crew Program is holding an artwork contest for students 4 to 12 years old. The artwork will be used to create a 2017 calendar. Each month will have a different theme related to the International Space Station, astronauts, growing food in space and more! Unique and original artwork will be selected for each month. Once the calendar is complete, NASA will transmit it to astronauts aboard the space station. The calendar also will include supplemental education materials for kids on Earth to learn more about the space-related themes.

Entries are due Nov. 30, 2016.

For complete contest rules and submission guidelines, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/commercial-crew-2017-calendar-artwork-contest.

Please direct questions about this contest to ksc-connect2ccp@mail.nasa.gov.


2017 BIG Idea Challenge

NASA’s Game Changing Development Program and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2017 Breakthrough, Innovative, and Game-changing Idea Challenge. The BIG Idea Challenge invites teams and their faculty advisors to work together to design and analyze potential modular concepts and systems that provide the ability to construct large solar electric propulsion, or SEP, tugs in space that can transfer payloads for low Earth orbit to a lunar distant retrograde orbit. Concepts can employ new approaches for packaging modules in one or more launch vehicles that minimize launch loads; modular (distributed) solar arrays and ion engines; and robust robotic assembly (joining) of the modules that form the SEP tug.

Interested teams of three to five undergraduate and/or graduate students will submit proposals (eight to10 pages) describing their BIG Idea. Based on a review of the proposals, four teams will be selected to submit full technical papers and present their concepts to a panel of NASA judges at the 2017 BIG Idea Forum at NASA’s Langley Research Center on Feb. 15 and 16, 2017, in Hampton, Virginia.

The final four qualifying teams will receive a $6,000 stipend to facilitate participation in the BIG Idea Forum. The winning team will receive offers to participate in paid internships with the Game Changing Development team at Langley Research Center where they can work toward further developing their concept under the mentorship of NASA experts.

Proposals are due Nov. 30, 2016.

For full competition details, including design constraints and submission guidelines, please visit http://BigIdea.nianet.org.

If you have any questions about the competition, please contact BigIdea@nianet.org.

 


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Presents: ‘Hidden Figures’ Virtual Event

You might think you know NASA’s story, but there’s always a story behind the story. Did you know the first computers were people? That in the early days of spaceflight, there were women (including minorities) working to make sure that the United States was able to successfully launch humans into space and breaking social barriers at the same time?

Join NASA experts, director Ted Melfi, and Octavia Spencer, who plays Dorothy Vaughn in the film “Hidden Figures,” through NASA’s Digital Learning Network on Dec. 1, 2016, at 11 a.m. EST, to discuss NASA’s hidden story, learn about how NASA’s story continues, and how history and filmmaking are an important part of our space program.

To register to participate in the interactive videoconference, visit https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdZZNXHDM25mJ4XOfTjvDHuJ18QyRHyw1XM5-NBtSwz0qvvrw/viewform.

This event will also be webcast live at http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-dlinfo2 and broadcast on NASA TV at https://www.nasa.gov/nasatv.

Please direct questions about this event to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com.

For more information about other DLN events, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln.


Access NASA Data to Analyze Astronaut Radiation Exposure in Space

Imagine what it would be like to live in space. What kind of shelter would you live in? What kind of protection would you have from the elements? How long could you stay there?

On Earth, humans are protected from radiation by the atmosphere and Earth’s magnetic field. Astronauts on the space station are above the atmosphere and receive a higher dose of radiation than when they are on the ground. The harmful effects of radiation that come from the sun and other sources outside the solar system pose danger to humans living and working in space.

Radiation is one of the top concerns for humans living in deep space for long durations. A NASA group called RadWorks is using radiation detectors the size of USB thumb drives to collect data inside the International Space Station. Together with the University of Houston and the Institute for Research in Schools, RadWorks is sharing the data with high school students who are helping to analyze the radiation that astronaut Tim Peake is exposed to during his time aboard the International Space Station.

NASA is making this same data available to teachers and students through the TimPix project administered by the Institute for Research in Schools, with funding from the European Space Agency and the United Kingdom Space Agency. During European Space Agency astronaut Tim Peake’s time aboard the station, data is taken many times a minute while in orbit. A variety of data sets are currently available, and others are being added as the mission progresses. Aimed at high school physics classes, the TimPix project allows students ages 14-18 to access and analyze radiation data during Peake’s mission. They are able to take part in authentic research occurring aboard the station. What type of radiation is present? What impact do different altitudes or locations around the world have on the number and types of particles detected? What happens during a solar flare? Join us in helping NASA answer these questions!

For more information about NASA’s Radworks project, visit http://techport.nasa.gov/view/10581.

For more information or to register for the TimPix project, email timpix@researchinschools.org.


Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites U.S. educational institutions to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets, and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

Nonprofit museums, libraries and planetariums (sponsored through their respective State Agency Surplus Property, or SASP, organization) are also eligible to make requests. Visit the link below for special instructions to request items. To find the contact information for the SASP representative for your area, visit http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/100851.

A nominal shipping fee must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.


2017 High-Altitude Student Platform Opportunity

The Louisiana Space Consortium, or LaSPACE, is accepting applications from students at U.S. colleges and universities who want to send experiments to the edge of space on a high-flying scientific balloon.

The annual project, supported by the NASA Balloon Program Office and LaSPACE, provides near-space access for 12 undergraduate and graduate student experiments to be carried by a NASA high-altitude research balloon. The flights typically last 15 to 20 hours and reach an altitude of 23 miles. Experiments may include compact satellites or prototypes.

The experiments are flown aboard the High-Altitude Student Platform, or HASP, a balloon-born instrument stack launched from the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility’s remote site in Fort Sumner, New Mexico. The goals of the project are to provide a space test platform to encourage student research and stimulate the development of student satellite payloads and other space-engineering products.

HASP seeks to enhance the technical skills and research abilities of students in critical science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines.

The deadline for applications is Dec. 16, 2016.

For application information and technical details about the program, visit http://laspace.lsu.edu/hasp.

Questions about the High-Altitude Student Platform opportunity should be directed to T. Gregory Guzik at guzik@phunds.phys.lsu.edu.


Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design, or STEAMD; or activities culturally relevant to or focused on populations underrepresented in STEM careers, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or nonreimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA announcement.


Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Are you an undergraduate or graduate student seeking opportunities in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)? The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science — in collaboration with the participating agencies in the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on STEM Education (CoSTEM) and the Science.gov Alliance — has launched a search portal for both students and universities to discover federally sponsored STEM education training and funding opportunities.

Student users can search the site for opportunities they can apply to directly, such as research internships and fellowships. Likewise, universities can search the site for federal funding opportunities to establish innovative training programs for undergraduates or graduate students.

Users can search the site through faceted searching capabilities for characteristics such as program type, STEM discipline, institution location, federal sponsor, and eligibility. Or they can search through the open text option.

For programs and opportunities for undergraduates, visit http://stemundergrads.science.gov/.

For graduate programs and opportunities, visit http://stemgradstudents.science.gov/.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at https://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the new ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/

________________________________________________________________

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Eduation: https://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express Message — Nov. 17, 2016

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


New This Week!


Free NASA Educator Professional Development Webinars
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: Nov. 20, 2016, at 5 p.m. EDT

Spring 2017 University Student Design Challenge at NASA’s Glenn Research Center
Audience: Undergraduate Students
Registration Deadline: Nov. 23, 2016

2017 Mission X: Train Like an Astronaut “Walk to the Moon” Challenge
Audience: All Educators and Students, Home School Parents and After-school Groups
Registration Deadline: Dec. 31, 2016
Challenge Dates: Jan. 12 – April 28, 2017

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Presents: ‘Hidden Figures’ Virtual Event
Audience: All
Event Date: Dec. 1, 2016, 11 a.m. – noon EST

New Publication from NASA’s Earth Observatory — EO Kids
Audience: K-12 Educators and Students


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

Celebrate American Education Week With a Virtual Career Panel From NASA’s Digital Learning Network
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Dates: Nov. 17, 2016, 8 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. EST

Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program Accepting Applications for 2017-2018 Fellowship Year
Audience: K-12 STEM Educators
Application Deadline: Nov. 17, 2016, at 8 p.m. EST

2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education
Next Lecture Date: Nov. 17, 2016, at 7 p.m. PST (10 p.m. EST)

2017 RASC-AL Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Students
Entry Deadline: Nov. 17, 2016

NASA CubeSat Launch Opportunity
Audience: Informal Educators, Higher Education Educators and Students
Proposal Deadline: Nov. 22, 2016

Commercial Crew 2017 Calendar Artwork Contest
Audience: Students 4 to 12 Years Old
Entry Deadline: Nov. 30, 2016

2017 BIG Idea Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Students and Faculty
Proposal Deadline: Nov. 30, 2016

Access NASA Data to Analyze Astronaut Radiation Exposure in Space
Audience: Educators and Students, Ages 14 to 18
Entry Deadline: Dec. 3, 2016

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

Mars Survival Kit: Lessons and Activities to Guide Your Exploration of Mars!
Audience: K-12 Educators

2017 High-Altitude Student Platform Opportunity

Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: Dec. 16, 2016

2017 Space Exploration Educators Conference
Audience: K-12 Educators
Early Bird Registration Deadline: Dec. 30, 2016
Event Date: Feb. 9-11, 2017

Center for Astronomy Education Regional Teaching Exchanges and Workshops — Fall/Winter 2016-2017
Audience: Current and Future College Instructors of Astronomy
Next Event Date: Jan. 4, 2017

U.S. Department of Energy’s BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge
Audience: Students in Grades 9-12
Registration Deadline: Feb. 3, 2017
Infographic Submission Deadline: March 3, 2017

Fly Your Exoplanet on the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite
Audience: All Educators and Students
Submission Deadline: March 1, 2017

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

NASA Unveils New Public Web Portal for Research Results
Audience: All Educators and Students

Help NASA Study Mars — Planet Four: Terrains
Audience: All Educators and Students
Project Timeframe: Ongoing

Free “NASA’s Journey to Mars” Planetarium/Dome Show
Audience: All Formal and Informal Educators

Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students and Higher Education Institutions


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

NASA Technology in Your Classroom: Images and Data
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-10
Event Date: Nov. 21, 2016, at 5 p.m. EST
Explore NASA resources for using images and data in the classroom. These resources can be used to engage students, illustrate concepts, and develop educational exhibits, programs or products. Learn about the latest science discoveries and more at http://nasawavelength.org/data-and-images. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/203264

Astrobiology and the Origin of Life
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: Nov. 21, 2016, at 7 p.m. EST
Learn how NASA has turned the search for alien life from science fiction to a quickly growing research field. Topics in earth and space science linked to biology will help us understand the most current theories for how life came to be here on Earth and where we could find it next. Classroom activities fit for numerous grade levels will put this exploration into the hands of our next generation of scientists! Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/198801

NASA Technology in Your Classroom: NASA Apps for All Ages
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: Nov. 22, 2016, at 4 p.m. EST
NASA has over 50 FREE apps for educational use. Learn how to use and integrate some of the applications in the classroom setting. Virtual reality, 3-D exploration and NASA missions come alive with the use of these apps. Engage students on topics such as earth science, the solar system, robotics and space station research through the usage of technology apps. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/202778

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


Spring 2017 University Student Design Challenge at NASA’s Glenn Research Center

NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Ohio has been researching and developing innovative technologies in both aeronautics and spaceflight for 75 years. As an opportunity to further involve undergraduate students, Glenn is hosting a spring 2017 University Student Design Challenge with aeronautics and space themes.

The competition is open to teams of full-time undergraduate students who are sophomores, juniors or seniors enrolled at accredited U.S. academic institutions. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged and will be composed primarily of science, technology, engineering and mathematics majors. However, the team formation also may comprise students majoring in areas such as economics, marketing, graphic arts, or other non-STEM disciplines that will aid in the success of the design challenge. Each university or college team must have at least one faculty advisor. Participants will have access to technical experts at Glenn.

Interested teams must register by Nov. 23, 2016.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/university-student-design-challenge. Questions about this competition may be directed to grc-university-design-challenge@mail.nasa.gov.


2017 Mission X: Train Like an Astronaut “Walk to the Moon” Challenge

Mission X encourages children of all ages, as well as people with particular needs, to pursue healthy lifestyles based on the model of training like an astronaut. During six- to nine-week “challenges” each fall and spring, schools and student groups from around the world complete Mission X classroom-based science lessons and physical education activities.

In 2017, Mission X is challenging Fit Explorers around the world to work together to perform activities that will move Astro Charlie the 478 million steps it would take to walk from Earth to the moon! That’s 238,857 miles, or 384,403 kilometers! At an average walking speed, that would take one person about nine years to complete.

The challenge kicks off in January. For full challenge details and to do your part to help reach this out-of-this-world goal, visit http://trainlikeanastronaut.org/wttm. The deadline to register for this challenge is Dec. 31, 2016. You may apply for Team USA at http://trainlikeanastronaut.org/usa_application.

In 2016, Mission X was represented by 30 countries and more than 53,000 participants. The challenge was available in 17 languages.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Nubia Carvajal at nubia.a.carvajal@nasa.gov.


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Presents: ‘Hidden Figures’ Virtual Event
Audience: All
Event Date: Dec. 1, 2016, 11 a.m. – noon EST

You might think you know NASA’s story, but there’s always a story behind the story. Did you know the first computers were people? That in the early days of spaceflight, there were women (including minorities) working to make sure that the United States was able to successfully launch humans into space and breaking social barriers at the same time?

Join NASA experts, director Ted Melfi, and Octavia Spencer, who plays Dorothy Vaughn in the film “Hidden Figures,” through NASA’s Digital Learning Network on Dec. 1, 2016, at 11 a.m. EST, to discuss NASA’s hidden story, learn about how NASA’s story continues, and how history and filmmaking are an important part of our space program.

To register to participate in the interactive videoconference, visit https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdZZNXHDM25mJ4XOfTjvDHuJ18QyRHyw1XM5-NBtSwz0qvvrw/viewform.

This event will also be webcast live at http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-dlinfo2 and broadcast on NASA TV at https://www.nasa.gov/nasatv.


New Publication from NASA’s Earth Observatory — EO Kids

NASA is introducing a new publication from its Earth Observatory — EO Kids — bringing engaging science stories from the Earth Observatory to a younger audience.

The premier issue of EO Kids explores how NASA observes and measures fresh water from space. Find out why Lake Mead appears to have a bathtub ring around its shoreline and how less snow in the mountains means less drinking water for California. Explore satellite images of where fresh water is stored in and on Earth. Discover what NASA does in the field with an update from scientists on the Olympic Mountain Experiment (OLYMPEX) campaign.

EO Kids offers hands-on activities, experiments and more. The Maker Corner provides instructions for making a model aquifer and a self-watering planter. Explore the science behind fresh water with a snowmelt experiment, and be a data detective by analyzing satellite data like a scientist. Kids can even create their own data visualization by coloring in a map showing ice thickness on Greenland.

To download your copy of the EO Kids: Fresh Water issue, visit http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/eokids.

To learn more about NASA’s missions to study Earth, visit the Earth Observatory at http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/.


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


Celebrate American Education Week With a Virtual Career Panel From NASA’s Digital Learning Network

Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network in celebrating American Education Week, Nov. 14-18, 2016. The DLN invites you to take part in a virtual career panel with experts from various disciplines across NASA on Nov. 17, 2016. The all-day event will feature 30-minute discussions from NASA professionals at the top of each hour.

8-8:30 a.m. EST — Kick-off with Kennedy Space Center Director Astronaut Robert Cabana
Robert Cabana is a former NASA astronaut, currently serving as director of NASA’s John F. Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In his current role, Cabana manages all NASA facilities and activities at the spaceport, including the team of civil service and contractor employees who operate and support numerous space programs and projects.

9-9:30 a.m. EST — Josh Fody, Thermal Engineer at Langley Research Center (Project: CHIEFS)
Josh Fody is a thermal engineer on the CHIEFS project who is working on designing a Ceramic Matrix Composite heat exchanger with tubeless imbedded cooling channels. The purpose of the application is to keep engine combustion section walls cooler longer for hypersonic aircraft.

10-10:30 a.m. EST — Kurt Leucht, Software Engineer at Kennedy Space Center (Project: Swarmies)
Kurt Leucht is a software engineer at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. For much of his 25-year career, he has developed command and control systems and also robotic systems that are used for in-situ resource utilization, or ISRU, research projects. These ISRU robots could support future human Mars missions where astronauts will live off the land to survive and thrive.

11-11:30 a.m. EST — Kate Cryderman, Engineer at Kennedy Space Center (Projects: RESOLVE, LAVA)
Kate Cryderman is an engineer on RESOLVE (Regolith and Environment Science & Oxygen and Lunar Volatile Extraction) — the primary payload on the Resource Prospector mission planned for launch in the early 2020s. The Resource Prospector will prospect for lunar volatiles to better understand how local materials can be used to support exploration beyond low Earth orbit. Cryderman works on the Lunar Advanced Volatiles Analysis, or LAVA, subsystem, where her primary responsibilities include hardware integration and testing to support design trade studies and flight hardware development.

Noon-12:30 p.m. EST — Margaret Domingues, Optical Engineer at Goddard Space Flight Center (Graduate Coop, Pathways Intern)
Domingues is an optical engineer at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight center. She originally came to Goddard as a summer intern, and then as a graduate COOP. She received her graduate degree from the College of Optical Sciences at the University of Arizona. In the optics branch at Goddard, she been working on optical engineering and testing for the James Webb Space Telescope.

1-1:30 p.m. EST — Anne Meier, Chemical Engineer at Kennedy Space Center
Anne Meier is a chemical engineer at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center working on several projects that focus on deep space exploration and resource reutilization for human spaceflight. One project is an in-situ resource reutilization system called the Mars Atmospheric Processing Module. The Atmospheric Processing Module is a system that collects and converts the carbon dioxide from the Mars atmosphere using dual cryocoolers and converts the carbon dioxide into methane (fuel) and water. Another project includes the development of a system that converts logistical space trash into useful byproducts for volume reduction and fuel production. As a crew member of the 2014 HI-SEAS Mars analog simulation, Meier took part in a 120-day psychological study and performed various research projects while living in an isolated Mars-like habitat with an international crew.

2-2:30 p.m. EST — Michael Cooney, Electrical Engineer at Langley Research Center (Projects: MEDLI2, GL-10)
Michael Cooney is an electrical engineer designing and testing hardware for the MEDLI2 experiment, an instrument suite to be installed in the heat shield and backshell of the Mars 2020 aeroshell. He also is working in a systems engineering capacity on the GL-10, an all-electrical, Vertical Take Off and Landing Unmanned Air Vehicle. Cooney recently has worked on designing hardware for multiple CubeSat missions. Before joining NASA Langley, Cooney worked and attended college at the University of Hawaii.

The events will be livestreamed for all schools to watch at http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-dlinfo. Three schools will be selected to interact with speakers during each event. To apply for this special opportunity, visit https://goo.gl/forms/ZqyJZj5edCCIz4np2.

For additional details about the events and more information about the featured experts, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln/American-Education-Week.

To learn about other Digital Learning Network events, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln.


Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program Accepting Applications for 2017-2018 Fellowship Year

The Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program provides a unique opportunity for accomplished K-12 educators in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics to serve in the national education arena. Fellows spend 11 months working in a federal agency or U.S. congressional office to bring their extensive classroom knowledge and experience to efforts related to STEM education programs and policy.

To be eligible, applicants must be U.S. citizens who are currently employed full time in a U.S. public or private elementary or secondary school or school district. Applicants must have been teaching full time in a public or private elementary or secondary school for at least five of the last seven years in a STEM discipline.

Current sponsoring agencies included NASA, the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation. The DOE sponsors up to four placements in U.S. congressional offices.

The Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program is managed by the DOE Office of Science through its Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists, in collaboration with the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education and partnering federal agencies.

Program applications are due Nov. 17, 2016, at 8 p.m. EST and must be submitted through an online application system.

Additional information about the program, including eligibility requirements, program benefits, application requirements and access to the online application system, may be found at http://science.energy.gov/wdts/einstein/.

Please direct inquiries about the Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program to sc.einstein@science.doe.gov.


2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online

The Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, named after the founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and presented by JPL’s Office of Communication and Education, shares the excitement of the space program’s missions, instruments and other technologies.

Lectures take place twice per month, on consecutive Thursdays and Fridays. The Thursday lectures take place in JPL’s Theodore von Kármán Auditorium, and Friday lectures take place at Pasadena City College’s Vosloh Forum. Both start at 7 p.m. PST (10 p.m. EST). Admission and parking are free for all lectures. No reservations are required, but seating is limited. The Thursday evening lectures are streamed live for viewing online. Archives of past lectures are also available online.

Next Lecture in the Series:

The James Webb Space Telescope: Successor to Hubble
Event Date:
Nov. 17 and Nov. 18, 2016, at 7 p.m. PST (10 p.m. EST)
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2016&month=11
After its launch in late 2018, the James Webb Space Telescope will help revolutionize study of the cosmos. Built to address the questions beyond the capabilities of the Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes, JWST will look more deeply at infrared wavelengths with instruments with capabilities not previously available. Join Dr. Michael Ressler for a discussion about JWST as a whole but focused on the Mid-Infrared Instrument, the longest wavelength instrument on JWST.

For more information about the Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, including a complete list of upcoming lectures, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.php.

Questions about this series should be directed to http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php.


2017 RASC-AL Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge

NASA and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2017 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts-Academic Linkage, or RASC-AL, Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge. This new special edition challenge for 2017 is taking place in celebration of the 100th anniversary of NASA’s Langley Research Center! This design competition is aimed at university-level engineering students and is one of several NASA RASC-AL competitions.

The Mars Ice Challenge requires participants to build a prototype ice drilling system. Teams will compete to extract the most water from simulated Martian subsurface ice at NASA Langley in a three-day competition during summer 2017. During this competition, each participating team will receive a simulated subsurface ice test station composed of solid blocks of ice. The blocks will be in an ice container with a layer of overburden (dirt, rocks, etc.) on top. After drilling through the overburden into the ice, teams must devise innovative solutions to deliver clean water from the ice to an external storage tank (filtering out sediments).

Up to four members of the team (plus the faculty advisor) may travel to NASA Langley for the onsite testing. The drilling and water extraction systems must operate autonomously or via teleoperation, and they are subject to mass, volume and power constraints.

After completion of the test and validation portion of the project, teams will present their drilling concepts to a design review panel composed of NASA judges. Presentations will be based on the team’s technical paper that details the drill concept’s path-to-flight (how the design can be applied to actual drilling on Mars).

Teams must submit a project plan for their proposed system by Nov. 17, 2016.

A Steering Committee of NASA experts will evaluate the project plans and select up to eight teams to compete against each other at NASA’s Langley Research Center in summer 2017. Each of the selected teams will receive a $10,000 stipend to develop their drilling and water extraction system.

The RASCAL Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge is open to full-time undergraduate or graduate students majoring in engineering, science or related disciplines at an accredited university in the United States. University design teams must include (a) one faculty or industry advisor with a university affiliation and (b) two or more undergraduate or graduate students. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

For more information about this competition, visit http://rascal.nianet.org/mars-ice-challenge.

If you have questions about this competition, please contact the RASC-AL team at rascal@nianet.org.


NASA CubeSat Launch Opportunity

NASA has opened the next round of its CubeSat Launch Initiative in an effort to engage the growing community of space enthusiasts who can contribute to NASA’s space exploration goals.

The CubeSat Launch Initiative gives students, teachers and faculty a chance to get hands-on flight hardware development experience in the process of designing, building and operating small research satellites. It also provides a low-cost pathway to space for research in the areas of science, exploration, technology development, education or operations consistent with NASA’s Strategic Plan.

Applicants must submit their proposals electronically by 4:30 p.m. EST, Nov. 22, 2016. NASA will choose the payloads by Feb. 17, 2017, but initial selection does not guarantee a launch opportunity. Certain selected experiments are slated to be flown as auxiliary payloads on agency rocket launches or to be deployed from the International Space Station beginning in 2017 and running through 2020. NASA does not fund the development of the small satellites, and this opportunity is open only to U.S. nonprofit organizations and U.S. accredited educational organizations.

One goal of the CubeSat Launch Initiative is to extend the successes of space exploration to all 50 states by launching a small satellite from at least one participant in each state in the next five years. During this round, NASA is particularly focused on gaining participation in the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and 18 states not previously selected for the CubeSat Launch Initiative. These states are Arkansas, Delaware, Georgia, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, South Dakota, Washington and Wyoming.

CubeSats are in a class of research spacecraft called nanosatellites. The base CubeSat dimensions are about 4 inches by 4 inches by 4 inches (10 centimeters by 10 centimeters by 11 centimeters), which equals one “cube,” or 1U. CubeSats supported by this launch effort include volumes of 1U, 2U, 3U and 6U. CubeSats of 1U, 2U and 3U size typically have a mass of about three pounds (1.33 kilograms) per 1U Cube. A 6U CubeSat typically has a mass of about 26.5 pounds (12 kilograms). The CubeSat’s final mass depends on which deployment method is selected.

To date, NASA has selected 119 CubeSat missions from 66 unique organizations. Of those missions, 46 have been launched into space with 29 more CubeSats scheduled to go in the next 12 months.

For additional information about NASA’s CubeSat Launch Initiative program, visit http://go.nasa.gov/CubeSat_initiative.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Jason Crusan at Jason.Crusan@nasa.gov.


Commercial Crew 2017 Calendar Artwork Contest

NASA’s Commercial Crew Program is holding an artwork contest for students 4 to 12 years old. The artwork will be used to create a 2017 calendar. Each month will have a different theme related to the International Space Station, astronauts, growing food in space and more! Unique and original artwork will be selected for each month. Once the calendar is complete, NASA will transmit it to astronauts aboard the space station. The calendar also will include supplemental education materials for kids on Earth to learn more about the space-related themes.

Entries are due Nov. 30, 2016.

For complete contest rules and submission guidelines, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/commercial-crew-2017-calendar-artwork-contest.

Please direct questions about this contest to ksc-connect2ccp@mail.nasa.gov.


2017 BIG Idea Challenge

NASA’s Game Changing Development Program and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2017 Breakthrough, Innovative, and Game-changing Idea Challenge. The BIG Idea Challenge invites teams and their faculty advisors to work together to design and analyze potential modular concepts and systems that provide the ability to construct large solar electric propulsion, or SEP, tugs in space that can transfer payloads for low Earth orbit to a lunar distant retrograde orbit. Concepts can employ new approaches for packaging modules in one or more launch vehicles that minimize launch loads; modular (distributed) solar arrays and ion engines; and robust robotic assembly (joining) of the modules that form the SEP tug.

Interested teams of three to five undergraduate and/or graduate students will submit proposals (eight to10 pages) describing their BIG Idea. Based on a review of the proposals, four teams will be selected to submit full technical papers and present their concepts to a panel of NASA judges at the 2017 BIG Idea Forum at NASA’s Langley Research Center on Feb. 15 and 16, 2017, in Hampton, Virginia.

The final four qualifying teams will receive a $6,000 stipend to facilitate participation in the BIG Idea Forum. The winning team will receive offers to participate in paid internships with the Game Changing Development team at Langley Research Center where they can work toward further developing their concept under the mentorship of NASA experts.

Proposals are due Nov. 30, 2016.

For full competition details, including design constraints and submission guidelines, please visit http://BigIdea.nianet.org.

If you have any questions about the competition, please contact BigIdea@nianet.org.


Access NASA Data to Analyze Astronaut Radiation Exposure in Space

Imagine what it would be like to live in space. What kind of shelter would you live in? What kind of protection would you have from the elements? How long could you stay there?

On Earth, humans are protected from radiation by the atmosphere and Earth’s magnetic field. Astronauts on the space station are above the atmosphere and receive a higher dose of radiation than when they are on the ground. The harmful effects of radiation that come from the sun and other sources outside the solar system pose danger to humans living and working in space.

Radiation is one of the top concerns for humans living in deep space for long durations. A NASA group called RadWorks is using radiation detectors the size of USB thumb drives to collect data inside the International Space Station. Together with the University of Houston and the Institute for Research in Schools, RadWorks is sharing the data with high school students who are helping to analyze the radiation that astronaut Tim Peake is exposed to during his time aboard the International Space Station.

NASA is making this same data available to teachers and students through the TimPix project administered by the Institute for Research in Schools, with funding from the European Space Agency and the United Kingdom Space Agency. During European Space Agency astronaut Tim Peake’s time aboard the station, data is taken many times a minute while in orbit. A variety of data sets are currently available, and others are being added as the mission progresses. Aimed at high school physics classes, the TimPix project allows students ages 14-18 to access and analyze radiation data during Peake’s mission. They are able to take part in authentic research occurring aboard the station. What type of radiation is present? What impact do different altitudes or locations around the world have on the number and types of particles detected? What happens during a solar flare? Join us in helping NASA answer these questions!

For more information about NASA’s Radworks project, visit http://techport.nasa.gov/view/10581.

For more information or to register for the TimPix project, email timpix@researchinschools.org.


Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites U.S. educational institutions to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets, and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

Nonprofit museums, libraries and planetariums (sponsored through their respective State Agency Surplus Property, or SASP, organization) are also eligible to make requests. Visit the link below for special instructions to request items. To find the contact information for the SASP representative for your area, visit http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/100851.

A nominal shipping fee must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.


Mars Survival Kit: Lessons and Activities to Guide Your Exploration of Mars!

NASA is embarking on a journey to Mars! Are your students ready to join in the adventure? Spark excitement in your classroom with the Mars Survival Kit.

The Mars Survival Kit is a collection of educational activities for students in grades K-12. Each educational activity includes a brief description, as well as information about how the activities and lessons align to the Next Generation Science Standards.

Start your classroom’s journey to Mars at http://go.nasa.gov/1NnZ0Rg.

To learn more about NASA’s Journey to Mars, visit https://www.nasa.gov/topics/journeytomars/index.html.


2017 High-Altitude Student Platform Opportunity

The Louisiana Space Consortium, or LaSPACE, is accepting applications from students at U.S. colleges and universities who want to send experiments to the edge of space on a high-flying scientific balloon.

The annual project, supported by the NASA Balloon Program Office and LaSPACE, provides near-space access for 12 undergraduate and graduate student experiments to be carried by a NASA high-altitude research balloon. The flights typically last 15 to 20 hours and reach an altitude of 23 miles. Experiments may include compact satellites or prototypes.

The experiments are flown aboard the High-Altitude Student Platform, or HASP, a balloon-born instrument stack launched from the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility’s remote site in Fort Sumner, New Mexico. The goals of the project are to provide a space test platform to encourage student research and stimulate the development of student satellite payloads and other space-engineering products.

HASP seeks to enhance the technical skills and research abilities of students in critical science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines.

The deadline for applications is Dec. 16, 2016.

For application information and technical details about the program, visit http://laspace.lsu.edu/hasp.

Questions about the High-Altitude Student Platform opportunity should be directed to T. Gregory Guzik at guzik@phunds.phys.lsu.edu.


2017 Space Exploration Educators Conference

Make plans to attend the 23rd Annual Space Exploration Educators Conference to be held Feb. 9-11, 2017, at Space Center Houston. This conference is for all K-12 educators. Activities presented use space-related themes to teach across the curricula. The activities may be used for science, language arts, mathematics, history and more.

Attend sessions hosted by scientists and engineers working on exciting projects like the International Space Station and the exploration of Mars and other parts of our solar system. Hear from astronauts who will be “leading the charge” in exploration. Attend sessions presented by educators and receive ready-to-implement classroom ideas. Attendees can earn up to 24 hours of continuing professional education credit.

For discounted registration, sign up to attend before the Early Bird Registration deadline on Dec. 30, 2016!

For more information, visit http://spacecenter.org/teacher-programs/teachers-seec/.

Please email any questions about the conference to seec@spacecenter.org.


Center for Astronomy Education Regional Teaching Exchanges and Workshops — Fall/Winter 2016-2017

NASA’s Center for Astronomy Education, or CAE, announces a series of regional teaching exchanges and workshops for astronomy and space science educators.

Teaching exchanges foster a sense of community among geographically linked current and future college instructors of astronomy. Regional experts from the broader CAE community are ready to provide the opportunity for you to meet your neighbors, expand your instructional repertoire and share your own expertise.

Workshops provide participants with experiences needed to create effective and productive active-learning classroom environments. Workshop leaders model best practices in implementing many different classroom-tested instructional strategies. But more importantly, workshop participants will gain first-hand experience implementing these proven strategies.

Jan. 4, 2017 — Gaylord Texan Resort and Convention Center in Grapevine, Texas
CAE Tier I Teaching Excellence Workshop — New Methods for Teaching About Exoplanets

Jan. 5, 2017 — Gaylord Texan Resort and Convention Center in Grapevine, Texas
CAE Tier I Teaching Excellence Workshop — New Methods for Teaching in the Flipped Classroom

For more information and to register for the teaching exchanges, visit http://astronomy101.jpl.nasa.gov/workshops/index.cfm.

Inquiries about this series of events should be directed to Gina Brissenden at gbrissenden@as.arizona.edu.

CAE is funded through NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s Exoplanet Exploration Program.


U.S. Department of Energy’s BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge

Registration is open for the U.S. Department of Energy’s BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. This competition challenges teams of high school students to research one of five specific cross-curricular bioenergy topics and design infographics to share what they have learned through social media.

Selected infographics will be promoted nationally on the Challenge website and via social media. One team of students will be selected to present their infographic at the Bioenergy Technologies Office’s annual conference in Washington, D.C.

Registration for student teams closes on Feb. 3, 2017, and teams have until March 3, 2017, to submit their infographics.

For more information, visit http://www.energy.gov/eere/bioenergy/infographic-challenge.

Check out the interactive BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Map to see submissions from teams across the country from prior years. Put your school on the BioenergizeME map by participating in this year’s Challenge.

Please direct questions about the Challenge to BioenergizeME@ee.doe.gov.


Fly Your Exoplanet on the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite

Set to launch in June 2018, the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite is an explorer-class planet finder. In the first-ever spaceborne all-sky transit survey, TESS will identify planets ranging from Earth-sized to gas giants and will orbit a wide range of stellar types and orbital distances. As the TESS team prepares for launch, it invites the public to ponder what exoplanets might look like and share their ideas in the form of sketches and graphics.

This opportunity is open to all ages and skill levels. Submissions will be collected via email. To download the template for submitting your artwork, visit https://tess.gsfc.nasa.gov/fly_your_exoplanet.html.

The deadline for submissions is March 1, 2017, or when capacity of the drive carrying the submissions to space is reached, whichever occurs first.

To learn more about the TESS mission, visit https://tess.gsfc.nasa.gov/.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to GSFC-TESS@mail.nasa.gov.


Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design, or STEAMD; or activities culturally relevant to or focused on populations underrepresented in STEM careers, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or nonreimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA announcement.


NASA Unveils New Public Web Portal for Research Results

With the launch of a new agency public access portal, public access to NASA-funded research data now is just a click away. PubSpace is a repository of original science journal articles produced by NASA-funded research and available online without a fee.

While the agency always has made access to its research a high priority, the focus now is to make NASA science data more easily obtainable via “one-stop shopping.” This increased public access is intended to accelerate the dissemination of fundamental research results to advance scientific knowledge and help ensure the nation’s future prosperity.

The NASA-Funded Research Results portal was created in response to a 2013 request from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, which directed science-funding agencies to develop plans to increase access to the results of federally funded research. NASA’s public access plan was developed in coordination with the science and technology research community across the agency. NASA will continue to consult with the scientific community, academic institutions, publishers and other federal agencies to implement this plan and increase access to research results.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/open/researchaccess.


Help NASA Study Mars — Planet Four: Terrains

Help NASA study exotic landscape features near the south pole of Mars! In this citizen science project, you will view images from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter’s Context Camera. Your input will help scientists identify possible areas for even more detailed examination with the orbiter’s High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment camera. HiRISE can reveal more detail than any other camera ever put into orbit around Mars.

Some of Mars resembles deserts on Earth, but seasonal freezing and thawing of carbon-dioxide ice (known on Earth as “dry ice”) at the Martian poles create some unusual landscape features. There’s a lot of territory to cover, so scientists need your help identifying what and where these features are.

For more information and to learn how to participate, visit the “Planet Four: Terrains” website at https://www.zooniverse.org/#/projects/mschwamb/planet-four-terrains.

To learn more about NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and its mission at the Red Planet, visit http://mars.nasa.gov/mro/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Michelle Viotti at michelle.a.viotti@jpl.nasa.gov.


Free ‘NASA’s Journey to Mars’ Planetarium/Dome Show

Are you looking for ways to prepare your students for STEM-related career opportunities? Do you want to spark their interest in pushing the boundaries of technology and innovation? Right now, NASA’s fleet of Mars robotic explorers is paving the way for human exploration of the solar system in the coming decades. Have your students join NASA in preparing for a monumental journey of a lifetime — to Mars!

“NASA’s Journey to Mars” is a short planetarium presentation that can be used in the educational domes of your school district, as well as local planetariums, to inspire interest in STEM. To learn more, including how you can acquire the show for use in your area, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/journey-of-a-lifetime-mars-education-resources/.

Please direct questions about the “NASA’s Journey to Mars” planetarium/dome show to Elsie Weigel at elsie.weigel@nasa.gov.


Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Are you an undergraduate or graduate student seeking opportunities in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)? The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science — in collaboration with the participating agencies in the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on STEM Education (CoSTEM) and the Science.gov Alliance — has launched a search portal for both students and universities to discover federally sponsored STEM education training and funding opportunities.

Student users can search the site for opportunities they can apply to directly, such as research internships and fellowships. Likewise, universities can search the site for federal funding opportunities to establish innovative training programs for undergraduates or graduate students.

Users can search the site through faceted searching capabilities for characteristics such as program type, STEM discipline, institution location, federal sponsor, and eligibility. Or they can search through the open text option.

For programs and opportunities for undergraduates, visit http://stemundergrads.science.gov/.

For graduate programs and opportunities, visit http://stemgradstudents.science.gov/.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at https://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the new ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Eduation: https://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express Message — Nov. 10, 2016

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


New This Week!


2017 High-Altitude Student Platform Opportunity
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Informational Webinar: Nov. 11, 2016 at 9 a.m. EDT
Application Deadline: Dec. 16, 2016

Celebrate American Education Week With a Virtual Career Panel From NASA’s Digital Learning Network
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Dates: Nov. 17, 2016, 8 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. EST

Commercial Crew 2017 Calendar Artwork Contest
Audience: Students 4 to 12 Years Old
Entry Deadline: Nov. 30, 2016

Future Engineers Mars Medical Challenge
Audience: Educators and Students Ages 5 to 19
Entry Deadline: Jan. 25, 2017

Generation Nano: Small Science, Superheroes
Audience: High School Students
Submission Deadline: Jan. 31, 2017

NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowships Program Accepting Proposals for 2017-2018 Academic Year
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Proposal Deadline: Feb. 1, 2017

2017-2018 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Undergraduate STEM Research Scholarship
Audience: Undergraduate Sophomores and Juniors at Virginia Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions (Awardees must be classified as juniors or seniors during the 2017-2018 academic year)
Application Deadline: Feb. 13, 2017

2017-2018 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Graduate STEM Research Fellowship
Audience: Graduate Students at Virginia Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: Feb. 13, 2017


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

Celebrate National Distance Learning Week With NASA’s Digital Learning Network
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event: Nov. 10, 2016, at 10 a.m. EST

Free NASA Educator Professional Development Webinars
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: Nov. 10, 2016, at 4 p.m. EDT

Join NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center for Maryland STEMFest 2016 Events
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Dates: Now Through Nov. 13, 2016

National Science Foundation’s East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes Fellowship Program
Audience: U.S. Graduate Students
Application Deadline: Nov. 10, 2016

NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Hosts Beginning Engineering, Science and Technology STEM EPD Program
Audience: K-8 and Informal Educators
Kickoff Event Date: Nov. 14, 2016

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘STEM in 30’ Webcast Series
Audience: Grades 6-8 Educators and Students
Next Webcast Date: Nov. 16, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EDT

Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program Accepting Applications for 2017-2018 Fellowship Year
Audience: K-12 STEM Educators
Application Deadline: Nov. 17, 2016, at 8 p.m. EST

2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education
Next Lecture Date: Nov. 17, 2016, at 7 p.m. PST (10 p.m. EST)

2017 RASC-AL Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Students
Entry Deadline: Nov. 17, 2016

NASA CubeSat Launch Opportunity
Audience: Informal Educators, Higher Education Educators and Students
Proposal Deadline: Nov. 22, 2016

2017 BIG Idea Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Students and Faculty
Proposal Deadline: Nov. 30, 2016

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

NASA Invites You to #SpotHubble
Audience: All Educators and Students

Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students and Higher Education Institutions


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

 


NEW THIS WEEK!


2017 High-Altitude Student Platform Opportunity

The Louisiana Space Consortium, or LaSPACE, is accepting applications from students at U.S. colleges and universities who want to send experiments to the edge of space on a high-flying scientific balloon.

The annual project, supported by the NASA Balloon Program Office and LaSPACE, provides near-space access for 12 undergraduate and graduate student experiments to be carried by a NASA high-altitude research balloon. The flights typically last 15 to 20 hours and reach an altitude of 23 miles. Experiments may include compact satellites or prototypes.

The experiments are flown aboard the High-Altitude Student Platform, or HASP, a balloon-born instrument stack launched from the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility’s remote site in Fort Sumner, New Mexico. The goals of the project are to provide a space test platform to encourage student research and stimulate the development of student satellite payloads and other space-engineering products.

HASP seeks to enhance the technical skills and research abilities of students in critical science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines.

A question-and-answer teleconference will take place on Nov. 11, 2016, at 9 a.m. EST. Groups who previously have flown experiments on HASP, as well as new organizations, are encouraged to attend. To participate, dial in to 1-844-467-4685 a few minutes before conference time. When requested, enter the conference ID number 780290 followed by the # key.

The deadline for applications is Dec. 16, 2016.

For application information and technical details about the program, visit http://laspace.lsu.edu/hasp.

Questions about the High-Altitude Student Platform opportunity should be directed to T. Gregory Guzik at guzik@phunds.phys.lsu.edu.


Celebrate American Education Week With a Virtual Career Panel From NASA’s Digital Learning Network

Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network in celebrating American Education Week, Nov. 14-18, 2016. The DLN invites you to take part in a virtual career panel with experts from various disciplines across NASA on Nov. 17, 2016. The all-day event will feature 30-minute discussions from NASA professionals at the top of each hour.

8-8:30 a.m. EST — Kick-off with Kennedy Space Center Director Astronaut Robert Cabana
Robert Cabana is a former NASA astronaut, currently serving as director of NASA’s John F. Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In his current role, Cabana manages all NASA facilities and activities at the spaceport, including the team of civil service and contractor employees who operate and support numerous space programs and projects.

9-9:30 a.m. EST — Josh Fody, Thermal Engineer at Langley Research Center (Project: CHIEFS)
Josh Fody is a thermal engineer on the CHIEFS project who is working on designing a Ceramic Matrix Composite heat exchanger with tubeless imbedded cooling channels. The purpose of the application is to keep engine combustion section walls cooler longer for hypersonic aircraft.

10-10:30 a.m. EST — Kurt Leucht, Software Engineer at Kennedy Space Center (Project: Swarmies)
Kurt Leucht is a software engineer at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. For much of his 25-year career, he has developed command and control systems and also robotic systems that are used for in-situ resource utilization, or ISRU, research projects. These ISRU robots could support future human Mars missions where astronauts will live off the land to survive and thrive.

11-11:30 a.m. EST — Kate Cryderman, Engineer at Kennedy Space Center (Projects: RESOLVE, LAVA)
Kate Cryderman is an engineer on RESOLVE (Regolith and Environment Science & Oxygen and Lunar Volatile Extraction) — the primary payload on the Resource Prospector mission planned for launch in the early 2020s. The Resource Prospector will prospect for lunar volatiles to better understand how local materials can be used to support exploration beyond low Earth orbit. Cryderman works on the Lunar Advanced Volatiles Analysis, or LAVA, subsystem, where her primary responsibilities include hardware integration and testing to support design trade studies and flight hardware development.

Noon-12:30 p.m. EST — Margaret Domingues, Optical Engineer at Goddard Space Flight Center (Graduate Coop, Pathways Intern)
Domingues is an optical engineer at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight center. She originally came to Goddard as a summer intern, and then as a graduate COOP. She received her graduate degree from the College of Optical Sciences at the University of Arizona. In the optics branch at Goddard, she been working on optical engineering and testing for the James Webb Space Telescope.

1-1:30 p.m. EST — Anne Meier, Chemical Engineer at Kennedy Space Center
Anne Meier is a chemical engineer at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center working on several projects that focus on deep space exploration and resource reutilization for human spaceflight. One project is an in-situ resource reutilization system called the Mars Atmospheric Processing Module. The Atmospheric Processing Module is a system that collects and converts the carbon dioxide from the Mars atmosphere using dual cryocoolers and converts the carbon dioxide into methane (fuel) and water. Another project includes the development of a system that converts logistical space trash into useful byproducts for volume reduction and fuel production. As a crew member of the 2014 HI-SEAS Mars analog simulation, Meier took part in a 120-day psychological study and performed various research projects while living in an isolated Mars-like habitat with an international crew.

2-2:30 p.m. EST — Michael Cooney, Electrical Engineer at Langley Research Center (Projects: MEDLI2, GL-10)
Michael Cooney is an electrical engineer designing and testing hardware for the MEDLI2 experiment, an instrument suite to be installed in the heat shield and backshell of the Mars 2020 aeroshell. He also is working in a systems engineering capacity on the GL-10, an all-electrical, Vertical Take Off and Landing Unmanned Air Vehicle. Cooney recently has worked on designing hardware for multiple CubeSat missions. Before joining NASA Langley, Cooney worked and attended college at the University of Hawaii.

The events will be livestreamed for all schools to watch at http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-dlinfo. Three schools will be selected to interact with speakers during each event. To apply for this special opportunity, visit https://goo.gl/forms/ZqyJZj5edCCIz4np2.

For additional details about the events and more information about the featured experts, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln/American-Education-Week.

To learn about other Digital Learning Network events, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln.


Commercial Crew 2017 Calendar Artwork Contest

NASA’s Commercial Crew Program is holding an artwork contest for students 4 to 12 years old. The artwork will be used to create a 2017 calendar. Each month will have a different theme related to the International Space Station, astronauts, growing food in space and more! Unique and original artwork will be selected for each month. Once the calendar is complete, NASA will transmit it to astronauts aboard the space station. The calendar also will include supplemental education materials for kids on Earth to learn more about the space-related themes.

Entries are due Nov. 30, 2016.

For complete contest rules and submission guidelines, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/commercial-crew-2017-calendar-artwork-contest.

Please direct questions about this contest to ksc-connect2ccp@mail.nasa.gov.


Future Engineers Mars Medical Challenge

Calling all students! NASA wants your help to design an object that could be used by an astronaut to maintain physical health on a three-year mission to Mars. The Mars Medical Challenge is the fifth in a series of Future Engineers Challenges where students in grades K-12 create and submit a digital 3-D model intended to be printed in 3-D and used for a wide range of medical needs including diagnostic, preventive, first-aid, emergency, surgical and/or dental purposes.

As NASA continues to investigate how the human body adjusts to weightlessness, radiation and stress that occur long-duration spaceflight, Future Engineers proposes to engage students with a related challenge. The Mars Medical Challenge asks students to design a 3-D printed object that will keep astronauts healthy during the long trip to the Red Planet. Specifically, medical and dental hardware will be emphasized during this challenge.

Students ages 5-19 are invited to become the creators and innovators of tomorrow by using 3-D modeling software to submit their designs for hardware that could be used by astronauts on a future mission to Mars. Students have the opportunity to win prizes ranging from a Mars prize pack or a 3-D printer for their school to a trip to Houston for a tour of NASA’s Johnson Space Center. The challenge closes on Jan. 25, 2017, and winners will be announced on March 28, 2017.

What health-related items do you think an astronaut will need on that journey, and why would these items require a 3-D printer? It’s time to start flexing your problem-solving and design skills to find a solution – good luck!

For more information about the challenge and how to enter, visit www.futureengineers.org/marsmedical.


Generation Nano: Small Science, Superheroes

The National Science Foundation and the National Nanotechnology Initiative invite high school students to take part in the Generation Nano: Small Science, Superheroes competition. This contest challenges high school students to focus on a particular mission for society and then design nanotechnology-enabled gear for an original superhero.

Students can envision gear that is grounded in current research but not yet possible, a process in which they learn about the potentials and limitations of real-world nanotechnology. Students will first identify one societal mission from a list of four to address and then submit an entry with three parts: a written section, a short comic strip and a 90-second video.

Each submission must be made by an individual student or a team of two or three students. All entrants must be U.S. citizens, nationals, or permanent residents. Participants must be enrolled in a high school or home schooled in the U.S., its territories, or possessions at the time of entry.

Submissions are due at 11:59 p.m. EST on Jan. 31, 2017.

For more information, visit www.nsf.gov/GenNano. Questions about this competition may be directed to gennano@nsf.gov.


NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowships Program Accepting Proposals for 2017-2018 Academic Year

The NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship program is soliciting applications from accredited U.S. universities on behalf of individuals pursuing master’s or doctoral degrees in Earth and space sciences, or related disciplines, for the 2017-2018 academic year. The purpose of NESSF is to ensure continued training of a highly qualified workforce in disciplines needed to achieve NASA’s scientific goals. Awards resulting from the competitive selection will be training grants to the respective universities, with the advisor serving as the principal investigator. Financial support for the NESSF program comes from the Science Mission Directorate’s four science divisions: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Planetary Science and Astrophysics.

Initially, NESSF awards are made for one year. They may be renewed for up to two additional years, contingent upon satisfactory progress (as reflected in academic performance, research progress and recommendation by the faculty advisor) and the availability of funds.

The maximum amount of a NESSF award is $45,000 per year.

Proposals for this opportunity are due Feb. 1, 2017.

For more information about this solicitation, visit http://go.nasa.gov/2f2baB3.

Questions about Earth Science Research NESSF opportunities should be directed to Claire Macaulay at Claire.I.Macaulay@nasa.gov.

Questions about Heliophysics Research, Planetary Science Research and Astrophysics Research opportunities should be directed to Dolores Holland at hq-nessf-Space@nasa.gov


2017-2018 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Undergraduate STEM Research Scholarship

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium is offering undergraduate research scholarships of up to $8,500 to encourage talented individuals to conduct research in STEM fields (science, technology, engineering or mathematics).

These one-year awards are nonrenewable and based on student academic merit, quality of the research proposal, and alignment of research with the goals of NASA and the aerospace sector. Underrepresented minority students, female students and students with disabilities are encouraged to apply.

Participants must participate in an active faculty-mentored research experience that aligns with the aerospace sector and NASA’s mission. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and enrolled at one of the five Virginia Space Grant member universities: The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia, and Virginia Tech. Applicants must have completed at least two years of a STEM undergraduate program and be classified as a junior or senior during the 2017-2018 academic year.

The deadline for submitting applications is Feb. 13, 2017.

For more information, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/undergrad/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to VSGC@odu.edu.


2017-2018 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Graduate STEM Research Fellowship

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium’s Graduate STEM Research Fellowship Program provides fellowships of $6,000 in add-on support to graduate students to supplement and enhance basic research support. The objective of this research fellowship in science, technology, engineering and mathematics is to encourage talented individuals to pursue careers in STEM industries that support NASA’s mission.

Participants in the Graduate STEM Research Fellowship Program must take part in an active faculty‐mentored research experience that aligns with the aerospace sector and NASA’s mission. Awards are made annually and are renewable for one year for students making satisfactory progress in academics and research.

This is a competitive fellowship program, and awards are based on merit to recognize high academic achievement and promise. Underrepresented minority students, female students and students with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and enrolled at one of the five Virginia Space Grant member universities: The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia, and Virginia Tech.

The deadline for submitting applications is Feb. 13, 2017.

For more information about this opportunity and to apply online, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/gradfellow/. Please email any questions to VSGC@odu.edu.


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


Celebrate National Distance Learning Week With NASA’s Digital Learning Network

Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network in celebrating National Distance Learning Week, Nov. 7-11, 2016. The DLN invites you to take part in one or more of the special programs listed below and visit their website for classroom lessons and special events throughout the year.

From the DLN at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center: STEM Shorts
Nov. 10, 2016, at 10 a.m. EST
— Math: How Does Math Relate to the Solar Eclipse?
http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-gsfc
Explore solar eclipses with NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center through the new STEM Shorts digital program! Each presentation will be a brief 15-minute informational lesson followed by a live question and answer session from the audience. Questions can be submitted via twitter @GSFCEducation using #STEMShorts or by email to gsfceducation@gmail.com. Please contact Lindsey Jones at lindsey.jones-1@nasa.gov for more information or general inquiries about the program.

From the DLN at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center: NASA STARS en Español With Alex Bengoa From NASA’s Ground Systems Development and Operations Program
Nov. 10, 2016, at Noon EST
http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-dlinfo
NASA STARS en Español promotes awareness of NASA’s diverse career opportunities for minority populations and highlights Hispanic professionals as role models in STEM careers. This monthly webcast is live-streamed in Spanish. DLN invites you to participate with your STEM classes, Spanish classes, Spanish clubs, etc. Bring your classroom into the conversation because Students Talking About Real STEM are the STARS of tomorrow. Learn about November’s guest speaker at https://www.txstate-epdc.net/epdc-post/alex-j-bengoa/. Questions can be submitted during the event via Twitter using #NASASTARS or by email to astrosdenasa@gmail.com. For more information about the program, visit https://www.txstate-epdc.net/nasa-stars/.

NASA’s Digital Learning Network celebrates distance learning every day through a wide variety of programs that include:
DLN Interactive Classroom — DLN specialists connect with one or more schools to deliver an interactive classroom lesson. Descriptions of the lessons can be found at: https://www.nasa.gov/dln/lessons.
DLN Live — DLN specialists or subject matter experts present a special topic related to current events that may involve interviews, demonstrations and live questions from the audience.
DLN Virtual Visits — The DLN specialists connects a subject matter expert with a specific classroom where topics about careers and NASA experiences are discussed.
DLN Virtual Field Trip — A DLN specialist gives a virtual tour of points of interest such as a laboratory or launch on a NASA center.

For more information and other DLN events, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln.


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

NASA Technology in Your Classroom: Solar Eclipse 2017
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: Nov. 10, 2016, at 4 p.m. EST
Participants in this webinar will discuss Solar Eclipse 2017 “Spotlights” for the classroom using NASA’s unique resources. Educators will discover NASA websites, digital badging and applications to implement with students before next year’s 2017 stellar event! Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/196478

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


Join NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center for Maryland STEMFest 2016 Events

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center will celebrate Maryland STEMFest 2016 in a very special way: by highlighting next year’s total solar eclipse! On Aug. 21, 2017, all 48 contiguous states will have the opportunity to view a solar eclipse — an event that has not been seen across the lower 48 states in 38 years! The event will provide scientists the chance to collect valuable research on the sun, its corona and other features. Goddard’s programs for Maryland STEMFest 2016 will highlight the STEM behind solar eclipses, so please join us this year as we celebrate this monumental occasion!

STEM@NASA Goddard: Library Edition — NASA Heliophysics
Nov. 10, 2016, 5-6 p.m. EST
NASA heliophysics experts will be broadcast live to county libraries across Maryland. Don’t miss this opportunity to learn about the incredible work NASA does and the upcoming 2017 Total Solar Eclipse! Contact your local library http://directory.sailor.lib.md.us/pub_use/county_map.cfm for more information on how to participate. Participants will be able to pose questions to NASA expert via email and Twitter. For more information on how to interact with our experts, please contact Jordan Snyder at jordan.a.snyder@nasa.gov.

New Interactive Classroom Experience From NASA’s Digital Learning Network — Our Magnificent Sun: Solar Eclipse 2017 Edition
Scheduling Options Available Nov. 4-13, 2016
https://www.nasa.gov/dln/lessons#Our Magnificent Sun
With the solar eclipse of 2017 approaching, Our Magnificent Sun for younger grades will help students answer their questions about the sun in a highly interactive session. During this web-based, interactive classroom program, students illustrate features of the sun by participating in a story time. Our Magnificent Sun for upper grades uses a teachable moment to introduce space weather and answer questions students might have about a solar eclipse.

Professional Development Opportunity: NASA Goddard’s Solar Eclipse Spotlight Digital Badge for Educators
Ongoing Throughout the School Year With Special Incentive for Completion Before Nov. 13, 2016
Digital badging is an online professional development process for certifying learning. The NASA STEM EPDC Digital Badging System allows you to select from a wide variety of STEM topics, engage in exciting learning opportunities, demonstrate your mastery of the topic, and receive a badge of accomplishment for your work that you can share with others. The latest NASA Goddard Solar Eclipse Spotlight 2017 badge is a great way to prepare for the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse! Educators who complete this digital badge by Nov. 13, 2016, will have the opportunity for priority scheduling to take part in a Solar Eclipse 2017 module from NASA’s Distance Learning Network.

To sign up, visit https://nasatxstate-epdc.net/ and use the login buttons to begin exploring this digital badge as well as other exciting professional development opportunities available to you through the NASA STEM EPDC Digital Badging System. Please contact Kelly Kohli at kelly.kohli@nasa.gov for questions or additional information.


National Science Foundation’s East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes Fellowship Program

The National Science Foundation is accepting applications for its East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes, or EAPSI, Fellowship Program. This program provides U.S. graduate students in science, engineering and education with an opportunity to spend eight weeks during the summer conducting research at one of seven host locations in East Asia and the Pacific. Host locations are Australia, China, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, Singapore and Taiwan. The program is a collaboration between NSF and counterpart agencies in each host location.

EAPSI is open to graduate students who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents and are enrolled in a research-oriented master’s or doctoral program in science or engineering. Applicants must propose a research project in a science, technology, engineering or mathematics field supported by NSF. Applicants identify and contact host researchers on their own prior to submitting their EAPSI proposals. Lists of prospective host institutions are available at the opportunity website.

NSF provides EAPSI Fellows with a $5,000 stipend and roundtrip airplane ticket to the host location. The program’s foreign counterparts provide in-country living expenses and accommodations. (Arrangements vary by host location.)

The application submission deadline for summer 2017 is Nov. 10, 2016.

For additional information about the program, including location-specific handbooks, a How to Apply guide, and helpful tips for applicants, visit www.nsf.gov/eapsi.

Questions about this fellowship opportunity should be directed to eapsi@nsf.gov.


NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Hosts Beginning Engineering, Science and Technology STEM EPD Program

The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center’s Office of Education at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York City invites K-8 STEM and informal educators to attend a series of professional development sessions to learn about the Beginning Engineering, Science and Technology Program!

Become part of a STEM educator cohort to help improve STEM education experiences for your students and community. Participants will explore hands-on, NASA-themed engineering design challenges, attend presentations from NASA subject matter experts, and develop BEST STEM lesson to fit individual classroom needs. Participants will also receive supplementary NASA educational resources and the opportunity to join an ongoing STEM community of practice.

NASA’s BEST activity guides bring the principles of engineering alive to younger audiences. The content in the guides can be used to supplement curricula during the school day or as activities for after-school clubs. Educators may use the materials as a set or as individual activities.

This professional development opportunity kicks off with a webinar on Nov. 14, 2016. Seven additional in-person training sessions will take place at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York City. Participants must attend all sessions to receive certificate of completion.

For more information, including a full list of session dates and registration details, visit http://smdepo.org/post/9102.

Please direct inquiries about this opportunity to Matthew Pearce at matthew.d.pearce@nasa.gov.


Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites U.S. educational institutions to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets, and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

Nonprofit museums, libraries and planetariums (sponsored through their respective State Agency Surplus Property, or SASP, organization) are also eligible to make requests. Visit the link below for special instructions to request items. To find the contact information for the SASP representative for your area, visit http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/100851.

A nominal shipping fee must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.


Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘STEM in 30’ Webcast Series

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is presenting a series of free education webcast events called “STEM in 30.” This program consists of live, fast-paced 30-minute webcasts designed to increase interest and engagement in science, technology, engineering and mathematics for students. To enhance the learning experience, students can get involved with the content through the interactive “Cover It Live” feature, which includes poll questions and classroom activities. The webcasts are available live on the National Air and Space Museum website and NASA TV, and they will be archived for on-demand viewing.

Scientist or Guinea Pig: Science on the Station
Nov. 16, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EST
Do you like being poked, prodded and analyzed? If you said yes, then you may have a future as an astronaut. Astronauts on the International Space Station don’t just conduct scientific experiments — they are part of an experiment themselves. Learning about the human factors of spaceflight is an important element to a future trip to Mars. Join the webcast to explore the effects of space on the humans who travel there.

The Wright Stuff: Flying the Wright Flyer
Dec. 14, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EST
The birth of aeronautical engineering began in the Wright brothers’ bike shop in Dayton, Ohio. The family tree of airplanes can be traced back to the Wright brothers’ 1903 Flyer. The principles of flight that got the Wrights into the air are the same today. Join the webcast to investigate the principles of flight and how the Wright Flyer made it into the air and then into the history books.

“STEM in 30” webcasts are online learning experiences but are filmed in front of a live audience. If you are interested in bringing your school group to a live filming of “STEM in 30,” please email STEMin30@si.edu for details.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s “STEM in 30” Webcast Series, including a full list of upcoming webcasts, visit https://airandspace.si.edu/connect/stem-30.

Questions about this series should be directed to STEMin30@si.edu.


Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program Accepting Applications for 2017-2018 Fellowship Year

The Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program provides a unique opportunity for accomplished K-12 educators in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics to serve in the national education arena. Fellows spend 11 months working in a federal agency or U.S. congressional office to bring their extensive classroom knowledge and experience to efforts related to STEM education programs and policy.

To be eligible, applicants must be U.S. citizens who are currently employed full time in a U.S. public or private elementary or secondary school or school district. Applicants must have been teaching full time in a public or private elementary or secondary school for at least five of the last seven years in a STEM discipline.

Current sponsoring agencies included NASA, the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation. The DOE sponsors up to four placements in U.S. congressional offices.

The Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program is managed by the DOE Office of Science through its Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists, in collaboration with the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education and partnering federal agencies.

Program applications are due Nov. 17, 2016, at 8 p.m. EST and must be submitted through an online application system.

Additional information about the program, including eligibility requirements, program benefits, application requirements and access to the online application system, may be found at http://science.energy.gov/wdts/einstein/.

Please direct inquiries about the Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program to sc.einstein@science.doe.gov.


2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online

The Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, named after the founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and presented by JPL’s Office of Communication and Education, shares the excitement of the space program’s missions, instruments and other technologies.

Lectures take place twice per month, on consecutive Thursdays and Fridays. The Thursday lectures take place in JPL’s Theodore von Kármán Auditorium, and Friday lectures take place at Pasadena City College’s Vosloh Forum. Both start at 7 p.m. PST (10 p.m. EST). Admission and parking are free for all lectures. No reservations are required, but seating is limited. The Thursday evening lectures are streamed live for viewing online. Archives of past lectures are also available online.

Next Lecture in the Series:

The James Webb Space Telescope: Successor to Hubble
Event Date:
Nov. 17 and Nov. 18, 2016, at 7 p.m. PST (10 p.m. EST)
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2016&month=11
After its launch in late 2018, the James Webb Space Telescope will help revolutionize study of the cosmos. Built to address the questions beyond the capabilities of the Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes, JWST will look more deeply at infrared wavelengths with instruments with capabilities not previously available. Join Dr. Michael Ressler for a discussion about JWST as a whole but focused on the Mid-Infrared Instrument, the longest wavelength instrument on JWST.

For more information about the Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, including a complete list of upcoming lectures, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.php.

Questions about this series should be directed to http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php.


2017 RASC-AL Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge

NASA and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2017 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts-Academic Linkage, or RASC-AL, Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge. This new special edition challenge for 2017 is taking place in celebration of the 100th anniversary of NASA’s Langley Research Center! This design competition is aimed at university-level engineering students and is one of several NASA RASC-AL competitions.

The Mars Ice Challenge requires participants to build a prototype ice drilling system. Teams will compete to extract the most water from simulated Martian subsurface ice at NASA Langley in a three-day competition during summer 2017. During this competition, each participating team will receive a simulated subsurface ice test station composed of solid blocks of ice. The blocks will be in an ice container with a layer of overburden (dirt, rocks, etc.) on top. After drilling through the overburden into the ice, teams must devise innovative solutions to deliver clean water from the ice to an external storage tank (filtering out sediments).

Up to four members of the team (plus the faculty advisor) may travel to NASA Langley for the onsite testing. The drilling and water extraction systems must operate autonomously or via teleoperation, and they are subject to mass, volume and power constraints.

After completion of the test and validation portion of the project, teams will present their drilling concepts to a design review panel composed of NASA judges. Presentations will be based on the team’s technical paper that details the drill concept’s path-to-flight (how the design can be applied to actual drilling on Mars).

Teams must submit a project plan for their proposed system by Nov. 17, 2016.

A Steering Committee of NASA experts will evaluate the project plans and select up to eight teams to compete against each other at NASA’s Langley Research Center in summer 2017. Each of the selected teams will receive a $10,000 stipend to develop their drilling and water extraction system.

The RASCAL Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge is open to full-time undergraduate or graduate students majoring in engineering, science or related disciplines at an accredited university in the United States. University design teams must include (a) one faculty or industry advisor with a university affiliation and (b) two or more undergraduate or graduate students. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

For more information about this competition, visit http://rascal.nianet.org/mars-ice-challenge.

If you have questions about this competition, please contact the RASC-AL team at rascal@nianet.org.


NASA CubeSat Launch Opportunity

NASA has opened the next round of its CubeSat Launch Initiative in an effort to engage the growing community of space enthusiasts who can contribute to NASA’s space exploration goals.

The CubeSat Launch Initiative gives students, teachers and faculty a chance to get hands-on flight hardware development experience in the process of designing, building and operating small research satellites. It also provides a low-cost pathway to space for research in the areas of science, exploration, technology development, education or operations consistent with NASA’s Strategic Plan.

Applicants must submit their proposals electronically by 4:30 p.m. EST, Nov. 22, 2016. NASA will choose the payloads by Feb. 17, 2017, but initial selection does not guarantee a launch opportunity. Certain selected experiments are slated to be flown as auxiliary payloads on agency rocket launches or to be deployed from the International Space Station beginning in 2017 and running through 2020. NASA does not fund the development of the small satellites, and this opportunity is open only to U.S. nonprofit organizations and U.S. accredited educational organizations.

One goal of the CubeSat Launch Initiative is to extend the successes of space exploration to all 50 states by launching a small satellite from at least one participant in each state in the next five years. During this round, NASA is particularly focused on gaining participation in the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and 18 states not previously selected for the CubeSat Launch Initiative. These states are Arkansas, Delaware, Georgia, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, South Dakota, Washington and Wyoming.

CubeSats are in a class of research spacecraft called nanosatellites. The base CubeSat dimensions are about 4 inches by 4 inches by 4 inches (10 centimeters by 10 centimeters by 11 centimeters), which equals one “cube,” or 1U. CubeSats supported by this launch effort include volumes of 1U, 2U, 3U and 6U. CubeSats of 1U, 2U and 3U size typically have a mass of about three pounds (1.33 kilograms) per 1U Cube. A 6U CubeSat typically has a mass of about 26.5 pounds (12 kilograms). The CubeSat’s final mass depends on which deployment method is selected.

To date, NASA has selected 119 CubeSat missions from 66 unique organizations. Of those missions, 46 have been launched into space with 29 more CubeSats scheduled to go in the next 12 months.

For additional information about NASA’s CubeSat Launch Initiative program, visit http://go.nasa.gov/CubeSat_initiative.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Jason Crusan at Jason.Crusan@nasa.gov.


2017 BIG Idea Challenge

NASA’s Game Changing Development Program and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2017 Breakthrough, Innovative, and Game-changing Idea Challenge. The BIG Idea Challenge invites teams and their faculty advisors to work together to design and analyze potential modular concepts and systems that provide the ability to construct large solar electric propulsion, or SEP, tugs in space that can transfer payloads for low Earth orbit to a lunar distant retrograde orbit. Concepts can employ new approaches for packaging modules in one or more launch vehicles that minimize launch loads; modular (distributed) solar arrays and ion engines; and robust robotic assembly (joining) of the modules that form the SEP tug.

Interested teams of three to five undergraduate and/or graduate students will submit proposals (eight to10 pages) describing their BIG Idea. Based on a review of the proposals, four teams will be selected to submit full technical papers and present their concepts to a panel of NASA judges at the 2017 BIG Idea Forum at NASA’s Langley Research Center on Feb. 15 and 16, 2017, in Hampton, Virginia.

The final four qualifying teams will receive a $6,000 stipend to facilitate participation in the BIG Idea Forum. The winning team will receive offers to participate in paid internships with the Game Changing Development team at Langley Research Center where they can work toward further developing their concept under the mentorship of NASA experts.

Proposals are due Nov. 30, 2016.

For full competition details, including design constraints and submission guidelines, please visit http://BigIdea.nianet.org.

If you have any questions about the competition, please contact BigIdea@nianet.org.


Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design, or STEAMD; or activities culturally relevant to or focused on populations underrepresented in STEM careers, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or nonreimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA announcement.


NASA Invites You to #SpotHubble

Since its launch in 1990, the Hubble Space Telescope has sent back mind-blowing images that not only changed our understanding of our universe, but also changed where we see glimpses of our universe in everyday life.

Hubble is more than a science spacecraft; it’s a cultural phenomenon! Take a moment to think about where you’ve seen the Hubble Space Telescope or Hubble images in your daily life. Maybe you own a textbook with a picture of the telescope on the cover, or you walk by a mural inspired by Hubble images every day on your way to work. Perhaps you’ve even created art based on Hubble images. NASA wants to see the Hubble impact in your life! Share your photos with NASA on Instagram, Twitter, Flickr and Facebook.

Images may be submitted on the following social media platforms:

— Flickr:
Submit your photos to the Spot Hubble Flickr Group.
— Instagram: Use the Instagram app to upload your photo, and in the description include #SpotHubble and #NASAGoddard.
Twitter: Share your image on Twitter and include #SpotHubble in the tweet.
— Facebook: Share your image on Facebook and include #SpotHubble in the post.

Your #SpotHubble image may be shared on NASA Hubble social media accounts!

To learn more, visit https://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/2016/spothubble.


Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Are you an undergraduate or graduate student seeking opportunities in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)? The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science — in collaboration with the participating agencies in the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on STEM Education (CoSTEM) and the Science.gov Alliance — has launched a search portal for both students and universities to discover federally sponsored STEM education training and funding opportunities.

Student users can search the site for opportunities they can apply to directly, such as research internships and fellowships. Likewise, universities can search the site for federal funding opportunities to establish innovative training programs for undergraduates or graduate students.

Users can search the site through faceted searching capabilities for characteristics such as program type, STEM discipline, institution location, federal sponsor, and eligibility. Or they can search through the open text option.

For programs and opportunities for undergraduates, visit http://stemundergrads.science.gov/.

For graduate programs and opportunities, visit http://stemgradstudents.science.gov/.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at https://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the new ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/

________________________________________________________________

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Eduation: https://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express Message — Nov. 3, 2016

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


New This Week!


Free NASA Educator Professional Development Webinars
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: Nov. 3, 2016, at 4 p.m. EDT

Join NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center for Maryland STEMFest 2016 Events
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Dates: Nov. 4-13, 2016

Celebrate National Distance Learning Week With NASA’s Digital Learning Network
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Dates: Nov. 7-11, 2016

NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Hosts Beginning Engineering, Science and Technology STEM EPD Program
Audience: K-8 and Informal Educators
Kickoff Event Date: Nov. 14, 2016

Free Program — Cubes in SpaceTM
Audience: Students Ages 11-18 and Their Teachers
Registration Deadline: Jan. 6, 2017

National Science Foundation’s 2016-2017 Community College Innovation Challenge
Audience: Community College Students and Faculty
Application Deadline: Feb. 15, 2017

2017-2018 Virginia Space Grant Consortium STEM Bridge Scholarships
Audience: Minority Undergraduate Students (Underclassmen) at Virginia Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: March 13, 2017

What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website?
Audience: K-6 Educators


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

Photo Contest — Win a Trip to Space Camp With Space Racers
Audience: Parents and/or Guardians of One or More Minor Children
Entry Deadline: Nov. 6, 2016, at 11:59 p.m. ET

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Postdoctoral Fellowships in Space Biology to Study the Microbiome of the International Space Station as a Built Environment
Audience: Postdoctoral Students
Required Notice of Intent Deadline: Nov. 7, 2016

Sally Ride EarthKAM @ Space Camp Announces Fall 2016 Mission
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Mission Date: Nov. 8-12, 2016

National Science Foundation’s Advancing Informal STEM Learning Program
Audience: Organizations Interested in Advancing STEM Learning in Informal Environments
Full Proposal Deadline: Nov. 8, 2016

National Science Foundation’s East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes Fellowship Program
Audience: U.S. Graduate Students
Application Deadline: Nov. 10, 2016

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program Accepting Applications for 2017-2018 Fellowship Year
Audience: K-12 STEM Educators
Application Deadline: Nov. 17, 2016, at 8 p.m. EST

2017 RASC-AL Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Students
Entry Deadline: Nov. 17, 2016

NASA CubeSat Launch Opportunity
Audience: Informal Educators, Higher Education Educators and Students
Proposal Deadline: Nov. 22, 2016

Call for Proposals — NASA Research Announcement for Use of the NASA Physical Sciences Informatics System: Appendix C
Audience: Graduate Students
Proposal Deadline: Dec. 15, 2016

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students and Higher Education Institutions


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Teachers Connect: LaRC Centennial Badge Webinar
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-8
Event Date: Nov. 3, 2016, at 4 p.m. EDT
This webinar will focus for the first half-hour on clouds and their role in Earth’s “energy budget” and on implementation ideas using GLOBE for different types of classroom settings as part of Earth Right Now: LaRC 100th digital badge. We also will talk about student badge implementations, extension ideas and extra resources. The second half-hour will be very similar but centered on the engineering design process using the Drag Race to Mars Engineering Design Challenge as part of Journey to Mars: LaRC 100th digital badge. This portion of the webinar will focus on forces and motion and math calculations using paper airplanes and testing different materials as part of Aeronautics: LaRC 100th digital badge. This webinar meets requirements of teacher discussions within the NASA Langley 100th EPDC digital badges. To learn more about the Langley 100th digital badges, login to https://nasatxstate-epdc.net/ and search for LaRC 100th. Register online to participate.
https://www.etouches.com/207888

NASA Technology in Your Classroom: Mission Imagination — Heart to Heart
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-8
Event Date: Nov. 7, 2016, at 5 p.m. EST
Step into the role of NASA flight surgeons with this innovative TI-Nspire™ activity that helps your students understand the science of how life in the microgravity environment of space affects the human heart. Developed by NASA and Texas Instruments for middle grades’ life science and high school biology, “Heart to Heart” looks back to the earliest days of America’s space program; at NASA’s ongoing Human Research Program aboard the International Space Station; and forward to a manned Mars mission. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/199054

NASA Technology in Your Classroom: NASA’s Eyes
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: Nov. 8, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EST
This webinar introduces NASA’s Eyes, a three-part, web-based resource that allows students and educators to study Earth from space, the solar system and extrasolar planets. The webinar addresses Next Generation Science Standards. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/199137

Making Waves With NASA: Optics Resources
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-12
Event Date: Nov. 9, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EST
This webinar gives an overview of NASA resources for teaching about waves, lenses and mirrors. The resources covered in the webinar address the Next Generation Science Standard PS4. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/199138

NASA Technology in Your Classroom: Solar Eclipse 2017
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: Nov. 10, 2016, at 4 p.m. EST
Participants in this webinar will discuss Solar Eclipse 2017 “Spotlights” for the classroom using NASA’s unique resources. Educators will discover NASA websites, digital badging and applications to implement with students before next year’s 2017 stellar event! Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/196478

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


Join NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center for Maryland STEMFest 2016 Events

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center will celebrate Maryland STEMFest 2016 in a very special way: by highlighting next year’s total solar eclipse! On Aug. 21, 2017, all 48 contiguous states will have the opportunity to view a solar eclipse — an event that has not been seen across the lower 48 states in 38 years! The event will provide scientists the chance to collect valuable research on the sun, its corona and other features. Goddard’s programs for Maryland STEMFest 2016 will highlight the STEM behind solar eclipses, so please join us this year as we celebrate this monumental occasion!

New Interactive Classroom Experience From NASA’s Digital Learning Network — Our Magnificent Sun: Solar Eclipse 2017 Edition
Scheduling Options Available Nov. 4-13, 2016
https://www.nasa.gov/dln/lessons#Our Magnificent Sun
With the solar eclipse of 2017 approaching, Our Magnificent Sun for younger grades will help students answer their questions about the sun in a highly interactive session. During this web-based, interactive classroom program, students illustrate features of the sun by participating in a story time. Our Magnificent Sun for upper grades uses a teachable moment to introduce space weather and answer questions students might have about a solar eclipse.

Join NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center at Greenbelt Observatory Public Star Party
Nov. 5, 2016, 6-9 p.m. EDT
The Astronomical Society of Greenbelt and the Goddard Astronomy Club are hosting a special Maryland STEM Festival star party at the City of Greenbelt Observatory, weather permitting. This event will start an hour earlier than regular ASG star parties in order to give children and young adults a chance to see the various telescopes being set up. Attendees will have the opportunity to observe the moon, planets, and deep sky objects such as galaxies, nebulae and star clusters. For information, contact Goddard’s Astronomy Club (joseph.novotka-1@nasa.gov) or Deanna Trask (deanna.m.trask@nasa.gov).

From the Digital Learning Network at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center: STEM Shorts
Nov. 7, 2016, at 10 a.m. EST
— Science: The Science of the Sun
Nov. 8, 2016, at 10 a.m. EST
— Technology: Studying Earth and Our Solar System
Nov. 9, 2016, at 10 a.m. EST
— Engineering: Designing a Satellite
Nov. 10, 2016, at 10 a.m. EST
— Math: How Does Math Relate to the Solar Eclipse?
http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-gsfc
Explore solar eclipses with NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center through the new STEM Shorts digital program! Each presentation will be a brief 15-minute informational lesson followed by a live question and answer session from the audience. Questions can be submitted via twitter @GSFCEducation using #STEMShorts or by email to gsfceducation@gmail.com. Please contact Lindsey Jones at lindsey.jones-1@nasa.gov for more information or general inquiries about the program.

Join STEM@NASA Goddard in Celebrating STEM During Maryland STEM Fest 2016
Nov. 7-10, 2016, 1-1:30 p.m. EST
Celebrate Maryland STEM Fest 2016 with STEM@NASA Goddard! During these daily events, participants can interact live with scientists and engineers as they discuss how they practice STEM in their careers. Each day will highlight a letter in STEM: Science Monday, Technology Tuesday, Engineering Wednesday, and Math Thursday. The programs will stream live on NASA Goddard’s Ustream channel, and participants may submit questions by email and Twitter. For more information, please contact Erin McKinley at erin.e.mckinley@nasa.gov.

Professional Development Opportunity: NASA Goddard’s Solar Eclipse Spotlight Digital Badge for Educators
Ongoing Throughout the School Year With Special Incentive for Completion Before Nov. 13, 2016
Digital badging is an online professional development process for certifying learning. The NASA STEM EPDC Digital Badging System allows you to select from a wide variety of STEM topics, engage in exciting learning opportunities, demonstrate your mastery of the topic, and receive a badge of accomplishment for your work that you can share with others. The latest NASA Goddard Solar Eclipse Spotlight 2017 badge is a great way to prepare for the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse! Educators who complete this digital badge by Nov. 13, 2016, will have the opportunity for priority scheduling to take part in a Solar Eclipse 2017 module from NASA’s Distance Learning Network.

To sign up, visit https://nasatxstate-epdc.net/ and use the login buttons to begin exploring this digital badge as well as other exciting professional development opportunities available to you through the NASA STEM EPDC Digital Badging System. Please contact Kelly Kohli at kelly.kohli@nasa.gov for questions or additional information.

Join NASA’s Goddard Space Center and GLOBE for “Maryland-wide Eyes on the Skies”
Nov. 9, 2016, 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. EST

http://observer.globe.gov/about/citizen-science
Join NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland and NASA’s GLOBE program on Nov. 9, 2016, for a statewide day of citizen science! GLOBE Observer invites you to make environmental observations that complement NASA satellite observations to help scientists studying Earth and the global environment. Version 1.1 includes GLOBE Clouds, which allows you to photograph clouds and record sky observations and compare them with NASA satellite images. GLOBE is now the major source of cloud observations by humans, which provide more information than automated systems. Recommended observation hours are between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. EST.

University of Maryland Eastern Shore 2nd Annual Maryland STEM Festival
Nov. 9, 2016, 6-7:30 p.m. EST
The University of Maryland Eastern Shore is hosting the 2nd Annual Maryland STEM Festival. STEM activities will include underwater robotics, amphibious vehicles, 3-D printing, space exploration and more. K-12 students are invited to embark on this virtual experience to NASA Goddard’s Digital Learning Network and will be able to discuss what it is like to live and work in space, how space exploration affects lives here on Earth, and challenges that astronauts living in space must overcome. Please contact Jocelyn Koller at jckoller@umd.edu for additional information.

NASA Technology in Your Classroom: Solar Eclipse 2017
Nov. 10, 2016, at 4 p.m. EST
https://www.etouches.com/196478
Participants in this webinar will discuss Solar Eclipse 2017 “Spotlights” for the classroom using NASA’s unique resources. Educators will discover NASA websites, digital badging and applications to implement with students before the 2017 solar eclipse! Register online to participate.

STEM@NASA Goddard: Library Edition — NASA Heliophysics
Nov. 10, 2016, 5-6 p.m. EST
NASA heliophysics experts will be broadcast live to county libraries across Maryland. Don’t miss this opportunity to learn about the incredible work NASA does and the upcoming 2017 Total Solar Eclipse! Contact your local library http://directory.sailor.lib.md.us/pub_use/county_map.cfm for more information on how to participate. Participants will be able to pose questions to NASA expert via email and Twitter. For more information on how to interact with our experts, please contact Jordan Snyder at jordan.a.snyder@nasa.gov.


Celebrate National Distance Learning Week With NASA’s Digital Learning Network

Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network in celebrating National Distance Learning Week, Nov. 7-11, 2016. The DLN invites you to take part in one or more of the special programs listed below and visit their website for classroom lessons and special events throughout the year.

From the DLN at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center: STEM Shorts
Nov. 7, 2016, at 10 a.m. EST
— Science: The Science of the Sun
Nov. 8, 2016, at 10 a.m. EST
— Technology: Studying Earth and Our Solar System
Nov. 9, 2016, at 10 a.m. EST
— Engineering: Designing a Satellite
Nov. 10, 2016, at 10 a.m. EST
— Math: How Does Math Relate to the Solar Eclipse?
http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-gsfc
Explore solar eclipses with NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center through the new STEM Shorts digital program! Each presentation will be a brief 15-minute informational lesson followed by a live question and answer session from the audience. Questions can be submitted via twitter @GSFCEducation using #STEMShorts or by email to gsfceducation@gmail.com. Please contact Lindsey Jones at lindsey.jones-1@nasa.gov for more information or general inquiries about the program.

From the DLN at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center: Working for the National Park Service: Live From Little River Canyon National Preserve Presented by: Niki Wayner, Little River Canyon National Preserve
Nov. 7, 2016, at 2 p.m.  EST

Have you ever imagined yourself working for the National Park Service? Are you interested in a career in science? Meet some of the people who help protect the plants, animals, sounds and oceans in the National Park Service. The National Park Service preserves the natural and cultural resources and values of the National Park System for the enjoyment, education and inspiration of this and future generations. In this videoconference, you will learn about some of the fascinating careers available.
Note: This video conference is only for schools in the state of Alabama. For more information, contact Scott Anderson at scott.c.anderson@nasa.gov.

From the DLN at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center: NASA STARS en Español With Alex Bengoa From NASA’s Ground Systems Development and Operations Program
Nov. 10, 2016, at Noon EST
http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-dlinfo
NASA STARS en Español promotes awareness of NASA’s diverse career opportunities for minority populations and highlights Hispanic professionals as role models in STEM careers. This monthly webcast is live-streamed in Spanish. DLN invites you to participate with your STEM classes, Spanish classes, Spanish clubs, etc. Bring your classroom into the conversation because Students Talking About Real STEM are the STARS of tomorrow. Learn about November’s guest speaker at https://www.txstate-epdc.net/epdc-post/alex-j-bengoa/. Questions can be submitted during the event via Twitter using #NASASTARS or by email to astrosdenasa@gmail.com. For more information about the program, visit https://www.txstate-epdc.net/nasa-stars/.

NASA’s Digital Learning Network celebrates distance learning every day through a wide variety of programs that include:
DLN Interactive Classroom — DLN specialists connect with one or more schools to deliver an interactive classroom lesson. Descriptions of the lessons can be found at: https://www.nasa.gov/dln/lessons.
DLN Live — DLN specialists or subject matter experts present a special topic related to current events that may involve interviews, demonstrations and live questions from the audience.
DLN Virtual Visits — The DLN specialists connects a subject matter expert with a specific classroom where topics about careers and NASA experiences are discussed.
DLN Virtual Field Trip — A DLN specialist gives a virtual tour of points of interest such as a laboratory or launch on a NASA center.

For more information and other DLN events, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln.


NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Hosts Beginning Engineering, Science and Technology STEM EPD Program

The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center’s Office of Education at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York City invites K-8 STEM and informal educators to attend a series of professional development sessions to learn about the Beginning Engineering, Science and Technology Program!

Become part of a STEM educator cohort to help improve STEM education experiences for your students and community. Participants will explore hands-on, NASA-themed engineering design challenges, attend presentations from NASA subject matter experts, and develop BEST STEM lesson to fit individual classroom needs. Participants will also receive supplementary NASA educational resources and the opportunity to join an ongoing STEM community of practice.

NASA’s BEST activity guides bring the principles of engineering alive to younger audiences. The content in the guides can be used to supplement curricula during the school day or as activities for after-school clubs. Educators may use the materials as a set or as individual activities.

This professional development opportunity kicks off with a webinar on Nov. 14, 2016. Seven additional in-person training sessions will take place at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York City. Participants must attend all sessions to receive certificate of completion.

For more information, including a full list of session dates and registration details, visit http://smdepo.org/post/9102.

Please direct inquiries about this opportunity to Matthew Pearce at matthew.d.pearce@nasa.gov.


Free Program — Cubes in SpaceTM

Cubes in Space™ provides students ages 11-18 an opportunity to design and compete to launch an experiment into space at no cost! Cubes in Space™ is offered by idoodledu, inc., in partnership with NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center’s Wallops Flight Facility, the Colorado Space Grant Consortium and NASA’s Langley Research Center.

This global education program based on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics) enables students to learn about space exploration using innovative problem-solving and inquiry-based learning methods. Participants have access to resources that help prepare them to design and develop an experiment to be integrated into a small cube.

This year, experiments will be launched into space via sounding rocket from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island, Virginia, in late June 2017 or from a high-altitude balloon launched from NASA’s Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility in Fort Sumner, New Mexico, in August 2017.

The deadline for program registration is Jan. 6, 2017. For more information, visit http://www.cubesinspace.com. Questions about this program may be directed to info@cubesinspace.com.

About idoodedu inc.

idoodledu inc., a charitable nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization, is a wholly owned subsidiary of idoodlelearning inc., and was created in 2015 as a legal vehicle to bring public/private partnerships and publicly funded programs to all learners and educators. idoodlelearning inc. is an education company based in Ottawa, Canada; London, England; and Virginia Beach, Virginia, USA.


National Science Foundation’s 2016-2017 Community College Innovation Challenge

The National Science Foundation’s Community College Innovation Challenge is underway and seeking teams to propose innovative STEM-based solutions for real-world problems. Teams must include three to five community college students, a faculty mentor, and a community or industry partner.

Challenge entries consist of two components: a written portion and a 90-second video. Each team’s entry must address one of the three themes outlined by the National Science Foundation. This year’s themes are Maker to Manufacturer, Energy and Environment, and Security Technologies.

Finalists will be invited to attend an Innovation Boot Camp, a professional development workshop on innovation and entrepreneurship.

The entry submission deadline is Feb. 15, 2017.

For additional information about the challenge, visit https://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/communitycollege/index.jsp.

Questions about this challenge should be directed to InnovationChallenge@nsf.gov.


2017-2018 Virginia Space Grant Consortium STEM Bridge Scholarships

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium is offering renewable scholarships to undergraduate students studying science, technology, engineering or mathematics. The STEM Bridge Scholarships are $1,000.

The scholarships are available to students who are U.S. citizens from any federally recognized minority group and are enrolled full time at one of the five VSGC member universities: The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia, and Virginia Tech. Applicants must have completed at least one year of a STEM undergraduate program and be classified as a sophomore during the 2017-2018 academic year.

The STEM Bridge Program connects students to future opportunities by mentoring and guiding them to future VSGC scholarships and NASA-related paid internships. The program encourages students to explore how their majors can apply to NASA’s mission.

This is a competitive program, and awards are based on student academic merit and the quality of interest essay, as well as letters of recommendation from current college faculty who can attest to the student’s interest in STEM areas.

The deadline for submitting applications is March 13, 2017.

For more information, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/Bridge/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to Tysha Sanford at tsanford@odu.edu.


What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website?

Space Place is a NASA website for elementary students, their teachers and their parents. Check it out at www.spaceplace.nasa.gov.

Don’t forget to subscribe to our monthly e-newsletter, the NASA Space Place Gazette! http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/subscribe

New Resources

Planet Masks
— Our solar system has eight unique and special planets. This fun, simple activity for kids allows them to explore and learn about what makes each planet different!
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/planet-masks

How Much Water Is on Earth? — Earth has a lot of water. But exactly how much? Check out our new educational video and poster for kids.
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/water

What Is La Niña? — This is a weather pattern that begins in the Pacific Ocean. Learn all about La Niña and how it differs from El Niño in our new article for kids.
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/la-nina

Earth’s Atmosphere — Earth has a wonderful atmosphere. It keeps us warm and gives us oxygen to breathe. But did you know that our atmosphere has six layers? Each one is unique. Teach kids about Earth’s different atmospheric layers in this series of articles.
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/atmosphere

Make Pumpkin Stencils — Celebrate the fall season by making space pumpkins! This activity is simple, fun and educational. Your kids will love it!
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/pumpkins

Special Days to Celebrate
Find out about noteworthy days in NASA and space history that you can observe in your classroom.

Nov. 8 — X-rays were discovered on this day in 1895.

Explore X-rays with our Cosmic Colors viewer.
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/cosmic-colors

Nov. 17 — Leonid meteor shower at maximum
Learn about meteor showers and find tips on how to get the best view.
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/meteor-shower

Nov. 20 — Happy birthday to astronomer Edwin Hubble (1889)!
The Hubble Space Telescope was named after him. Learn all about the amazing telescope!
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/hubble-wfpc

Dec. 3 — Pioneer 10 flew past Jupiter on this day in 1973.
Jupiter is the largest planet in our solar system. It has big storms like the Great Red Spot, which has been going on for hundreds of years.
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/all-about-jupiter

Dec. 11 — The first aurora borealis sighting was recorded on this day in 1719.
Make a pastel aurora to learn more about these beautiful light displays.
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/pastel-aurora

Dec. 21 — Today is the first day of winter!
Why do we have seasons here on Earth?
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/seasons

Share
Do you want some help spreading the word about NASA’s Space Place? We have a page with ready-to-use website descriptions, logos and links to all our social media. Check out http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/share.

Subscribe to Our Monthly E-newsletter!
Interested in keeping up with the latest and greatest news from NASA Space Place? Subscribe to the NASA Space Place Gazette. The NASA Space Place Gazette is for educators, parents and space enthusiasts of all ages. It includes special bulletins for noteworthy days and NASA events, such as a lunar eclipse, planet flyby or rover landing. It’s easy to subscribe — just click here.
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/subscribe

Send Feedback
Please let us know your ideas about ways to use The Space Place in your teaching. Send them to info@spaceplace.nasa.gov.


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


Photo Contest — Win a Trip to Space Camp With Space Racers

Space Racers® Season 2 is launching on Nov. 5! This animated TV series follows a group of adventurous spaceship cadets and exposes young children to key aspects of the science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, curricula. Space Racers is collaborating in a partnership with the U.S. Space & Rocket Center’s Space Camp, to which NASA serves as technical and educational consultant pursuant to a cooperative agreement.

To celebrate the new season, parents and guardians are invited to submit a photo of their future astronaut for a chance to win a prize! Daily giveaways include memberships to science museums across the country. And a grand prize winner will receive an all-expenses paid family trip to Space Camp!

The deadline to enter is Nov. 6, 2016, at 11:59 p.m. ET.

For complete rules and submission guidelines, visit http://contest.spaceracers.org/.

For more information on Space Racers, go to www.SpaceRacers.org.

Please submit questions about this opportunity to info@spaceracers.org.


DEADLINE EXTENDED: Postdoctoral Fellowships in Space Biology to Study the Microbiome of the International Space Station as a Built Environment

NASA is seeking proposals from potential postdoctoral fellows to conduct studies to characterize microbial populations isolated from the International Space Station. Selected studies will provide insight into how microbes and microbial populations adapt to spaceflight. Proposed experiments will use microbial isolates collected from the space station that have been archived at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston.

Proposals will be accepted from graduate students in their final year of their Ph.D. or equivalent degree program; from postdoctoral fellows (Ph.D., M.D., D.D.S., D.V.M., or equivalent doctoral degree from an accredited domestic or foreign institution); or from applicants who received a doctoral degree within the past two years but have not yet had postdoctoral training. Applicants must have no more than four years of postdoctoral research experience at the time of the initial or the subsequent resubmission or revision application. The program is open to U.S. citizens, permanent residents, or persons with pre-existing visas obtained through their sponsoring institutions that permit postdoctoral training for the project’s duration. Sponsoring institutions must be U.S. academic, government or commercial institutions that will provide appropriate mentors.

Interested applicants must submit a required notice of intent no later than Nov. 7, 2016.

For more information, visit http://go.nasa.gov/2eup7bg .

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Dr. David Tomko at dtomko@nasa.gov.


Sally Ride EarthKAM @ Space Camp Announces Fall 2016 Mission

Registration is open for the fall 2016 mission for the Sally Ride EarthKAM @ Space Camp program taking place Nov. 8-12, 2016. During the mission, students worldwide may submit requests to have a camera aboard the International Space Station capture an image of a specific location on Earth. Related resources, including images and activities, are available for use in the classroom. The optional online activities are targeted at middle school students but are adaptable for other grade levels. All students and educators are welcome, including participants in after-school programs.

For more information and to register for the upcoming mission, visit https://www.earthkam.org/.

Please submit questions about the Sally Ride EarthKAM @ Space Camp program via https://www.earthkam.org/contact.


National Science Foundation’s Advancing Informal STEM Learning Program

The National Science Foundation is accepting proposals for the Advancing Informal STEM Learning, or AISL, program. This program seeks to advance new approaches to evidence-based understanding of the design and development of STEM learning opportunities for the public in informal environments; to provide multiple pathways for broadening access to and engagement in STEM learning experiences; and to advance innovative research on and assessment of STEM learning in informal environments.

Proposals are due Nov. 8, 2016.

For additional information about the program, including anticipated awards, visit http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2015/nsf15593/nsf15593.htm.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to DRLAISL@NSF.gov.


National Science Foundation’s East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes Fellowship Program

The National Science Foundation is accepting applications for its East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes, or EAPSI, Fellowship Program. This program provides U.S. graduate students in science, engineering and education with an opportunity to spend eight weeks during the summer conducting research at one of seven host locations in East Asia and the Pacific. Host locations are Australia, China, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, Singapore and Taiwan. The program is a collaboration between NSF and counterpart agencies in each host location.

EAPSI is open to graduate students who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents and are enrolled in a research-oriented master’s or doctoral program in science or engineering. Applicants must propose a research project in a science, technology, engineering or mathematics field supported by NSF. Applicants identify and contact host researchers on their own prior to submitting their EAPSI proposals. Lists of prospective host institutions are available at the opportunity website.

NSF provides EAPSI Fellows with a $5,000 stipend and roundtrip airplane ticket to the host location. The program’s foreign counterparts provide in-country living expenses and accommodations. (Arrangements vary by host location.)

The application submission deadline for summer 2017 is Nov. 10, 2016.

For additional information about the program, including location-specific handbooks, a How to Apply guide, and helpful tips for applicants, visit www.nsf.gov/eapsi.

Questions about this fellowship opportunity should be directed to eapsi@nsf.gov.


Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites U.S. educational institutions to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets, and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

Nonprofit museums, libraries and planetariums (sponsored through their respective State Agency Surplus Property, or SASP, organization) are also eligible to make requests. Visit the link below for special instructions to request items. To find the contact information for the SASP representative for your area, visit http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/100851.

A nominal shipping fee must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.


Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program Accepting Applications for 2017-2018 Fellowship Year

The Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program provides a unique opportunity for accomplished K-12 educators in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics to serve in the national education arena. Fellows spend 11 months working in a federal agency or U.S. congressional office to bring their extensive classroom knowledge and experience to efforts related to STEM education programs and policy.

To be eligible, applicants must be U.S. citizens who are currently employed full time in a U.S. public or private elementary or secondary school or school district. Applicants must have been teaching full time in a public or private elementary or secondary school for at least five of the last seven years in a STEM discipline.

Current sponsoring agencies included NASA, the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation. The DOE sponsors up to four placements in U.S. congressional offices.

The Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program is managed by the DOE Office of Science through its Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists, in collaboration with the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education and partnering federal agencies.

Program applications are due Nov. 17, 2016, at 8 p.m. EST and must be submitted through an online application system.

Additional information about the program, including eligibility requirements, program benefits, application requirements and access to the online application system, may be found at http://science.energy.gov/wdts/einstein/.

Please direct inquiries about the Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program to sc.einstein@science.doe.gov.


2017 RASC-AL Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge

NASA and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2017 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts-Academic Linkage, or RASC-AL, Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge. This new special edition challenge for 2017 is taking place in celebration of the 100th anniversary of NASA’s Langley Research Center! This design competition is aimed at university-level engineering students and is one of several NASA RASC-AL competitions.

The Mars Ice Challenge requires participants to build a prototype ice drilling system. Teams will compete to extract the most water from simulated Martian subsurface ice at NASA Langley in a three-day competition during summer 2017. During this competition, each participating team will receive a simulated subsurface ice test station composed of solid blocks of ice. The blocks will be in an ice container with a layer of overburden (dirt, rocks, etc.) on top. After drilling through the overburden into the ice, teams must devise innovative solutions to deliver clean water from the ice to an external storage tank (filtering out sediments).

Up to four members of the team (plus the faculty advisor) may travel to NASA Langley for the onsite testing. The drilling and water extraction systems must operate autonomously or via teleoperation, and they are subject to mass, volume and power constraints.

After completion of the test and validation portion of the project, teams will present their drilling concepts to a design review panel composed of NASA judges. Presentations will be based on the team’s technical paper that details the drill concept’s path-to-flight (how the design can be applied to actual drilling on Mars).

Teams must submit a project plan for their proposed system by Nov. 17, 2016.

A Steering Committee of NASA experts will evaluate the project plans and select up to eight teams to compete against each other at NASA’s Langley Research Center in summer 2017. Each of the selected teams will receive a $10,000 stipend to develop their drilling and water extraction system.

The RASCAL Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge is open to full-time undergraduate or graduate students majoring in engineering, science or related disciplines at an accredited university in the United States. University design teams must include (a) one faculty or industry advisor with a university affiliation and (b) two or more undergraduate or graduate students. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

For more information about this competition, visit http://rascal.nianet.org/mars-ice-challenge.

If you have questions about this competition, please contact the RASC-AL team at rascal@nianet.org.


NASA CubeSat Launch Opportunity

NASA has opened the next round of its CubeSat Launch Initiative in an effort to engage the growing community of space enthusiasts who can contribute to NASA’s space exploration goals.

The CubeSat Launch Initiative gives students, teachers and faculty a chance to get hands-on flight hardware development experience in the process of designing, building and operating small research satellites. It also provides a low-cost pathway to space for research in the areas of science, exploration, technology development, education or operations consistent with NASA’s Strategic Plan.

Applicants must submit their proposals electronically by 4:30 p.m. EST, Nov. 22, 2016. NASA will choose the payloads by Feb. 17, 2017, but initial selection does not guarantee a launch opportunity. Certain selected experiments are slated to be flown as auxiliary payloads on agency rocket launches or to be deployed from the International Space Station beginning in 2017 and running through 2020. NASA does not fund the development of the small satellites, and this opportunity is open only to U.S. nonprofit organizations and U.S. accredited educational organizations.

One goal of the CubeSat Launch Initiative is to extend the successes of space exploration to all 50 states by launching a small satellite from at least one participant in each state in the next five years. During this round, NASA is particularly focused on gaining participation in the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and 18 states not previously selected for the CubeSat Launch Initiative. These states are Arkansas, Delaware, Georgia, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, South Dakota, Washington and Wyoming.

CubeSats are in a class of research spacecraft called nanosatellites. The base CubeSat dimensions are about 4 inches by 4 inches by 4 inches (10 centimeters by 10 centimeters by 11 centimeters), which equals one “cube,” or 1U. CubeSats supported by this launch effort include volumes of 1U, 2U, 3U and 6U. CubeSats of 1U, 2U and 3U size typically have a mass of about three pounds (1.33 kilograms) per 1U Cube. A 6U CubeSat typically has a mass of about 26.5 pounds (12 kilograms). The CubeSat’s final mass depends on which deployment method is selected.

To date, NASA has selected 119 CubeSat missions from 66 unique organizations. Of those missions, 46 have been launched into space with 29 more CubeSats scheduled to go in the next 12 months.

For additional information about NASA’s CubeSat Launch Initiative program, visit http://go.nasa.gov/CubeSat_initiative.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Jason Crusan at Jason.Crusan@nasa.gov.


Call for Proposals — NASA Research Announcement for Use of the NASA Physical Sciences Informatics System: Appendix C

NASA is seeking ground-based research proposals from graduate students and established researchers to use NASA’s Physical Sciences Informatics system to develop new analyses and scientific insights. The PSI system is a resource for researchers to data mine information generated from completed physical sciences experiments performed on the International Space Station or from related ground-based studies.

This solicitation appendix focuses on the following five research areas: combustion science, complex fluids, fluid physics, fundamental physics and materials science.

For graduate students (students working toward an advanced degree), this NASA Research Announcement is soliciting proposals that advance fundamental research in one of the physical sciences disciplines identified above and also assist in the awarding of an advanced degree to the graduate student. This call is open to students who meet the following eligibility requirements:

— The student is pursuing an advanced degree directly related to a physical sciences discipline. Only technical degrees are permitted (not degrees in policy or management).
— The student is a U.S. citizen, a permanent resident alien of the U.S., or on a student visa at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission.
— The student is enrolled in a master’s or doctoral degree program at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission. Or, if the student is an undergraduate starting graduate studies, he or she has been accepted to a master’s or doctoral degree program at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission and will start during the next academic year.
— The student has an academic graduate advisor who will submit the application for the graduate student. The student must perform the proposed research under the guidance of the assigned graduate advisor.

The agency expects to make approximately 10 awards in spring 2016. Research and development efforts will take place over two years. The typical award will be $75,000-$100,000 per year, for up to two years.

The deadline for submitting proposals is Dec. 15, 2016.

For information, visit http://psi.nasa.gov/.

Please direct questions about this NASA Research Announcement to Dr. Francis Chiaramonte at francis.p.chiaramonte@nasa.gov.


Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design, or STEAMD; or activities culturally relevant to or focused on populations underrepresented in STEM careers, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or nonreimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA announcement.


Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Are you an undergraduate or graduate student seeking opportunities in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)? The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science — in collaboration with the participating agencies in the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on STEM Education (CoSTEM) and the Science.gov Alliance — has launched a search portal for both students and universities to discover federally sponsored STEM education training and funding opportunities.

Student users can search the site for opportunities they can apply to directly, such as research internships and fellowships. Likewise, universities can search the site for federal funding opportunities to establish innovative training programs for undergraduates or graduate students.

Users can search the site through faceted searching capabilities for characteristics such as program type, STEM discipline, institution location, federal sponsor, and eligibility. Or they can search through the open text option.

For programs and opportunities for undergraduates, visit http://stemundergrads.science.gov/.

For graduate programs and opportunities, visit http://stemgradstudents.science.gov/.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at https://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the new ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Eduation: https://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

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