NASA Education Express — Nov. 15, 2012

Check out the followingNASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listedbelow.

NASAEducation Launches New Clubhouse
Audience: K-4 Educators and Students

Free Education Webinar Series from the Aerospace Education Services Project
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Dates: Various Dates During November 2012

NASA Social Event at the AmericanGeophysical Union Fall Meeting 2012
Audience: All Educators and Students 18+ Years Old
Registration Deadline: 5 p.m. on Nov. 16, 2012

2012-2013 RealWorld Design Challenge
Audience: 9-12 Educators and Students — U.S. Only
Registration Deadline: Nov. 16, 2012

Free Smithsonian’s StarsLecture Series
Audience: All Educators and 9-Higher Education Students
Next Lecture Date: Nov. 17, 2012

NASA CubeSat SpaceMissions
Audience: Higher Education Educators &Students
Application Deadline: Nov. 20, 2012

Distance/Rate/Time Problems: Smart Skies Web Seminar
Audience: 5-9 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Nov. 28, 2012

2012 OPTIMUS PRIMESpinoff Video Contest
Audience: Grade 3-12 Students
Registration Deadline: Dec. 15, 2012

2013 NASA and Worcester PolytechnicInstitute Sample Return Robot Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Early Bird Registration Deadline: Jan. 7, 2013

NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowships Program Accepting Proposalsfor 2013-2014 Academic Year
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Proposal Deadline: Feb. 1, 2013

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NASA Education Launches NewClubhouse

A new room awaits kids on the NASA Kids’ Clubwebsite. Find your way to the new Clubhouse from the mission control console onthe NASA Kids’ Club page. Journey with Nebula, the Clubhouse commander, andexplore games and interactive features designed for K-4 audiences. Look throughthe porthole in the floor to see pictures of Earth taken from space; read aboutwhy NASA explores; play a game about what astronauts eat in space; discoverwhat your age and weight would be on a moon or another planet; color picturesof wildlife living on NASA centers; assemble a polygon featuring NASA aircraft;and check out the “hot spots” that come to life upon contact.

In addition to the many games NASA Kids’ Club offers, its “Now in Space” areaprovides current and past information about the astronauts on the InternationalSpace Station. Look in the “More Pictures” section for incredible NASA images.

NASA Kids’ Club is an award-winning educational website designed for childrenin kindergarten through fourth grade. Content is based on education standardsand designed to engage young children in science, technology, engineering andmathematics.

Click the link below to begin your NASA Kids’Club adventure.

https://www.nasa.gov/education/kidsclub

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FreeEducation Webinar Series from the Aerospace Education Services Project

The Aerospace Education Services Project ispresenting a series of free webinars throughout November 2012. All webinars canbe accessed online. Join aerospace education specialists to learn aboutactivities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources to bring NASA into yourclassroom.

Here an Earth, There an Earth, Everywhere an Earth: The Kepler TelescopeSearch for Habitable Planets Beyond Our Solar System (Grades 5-12)
Nov. 15, 2012, 5 – 6 p.m. EST
Aerospace education specialist Steve Culivan will discuss NASA’s Keplertelescope and its search for Earth-like planets orbiting other stars.Participants will learn how to use Johannes Kepler’s Third Law and actualKepler telescope data to construct graphs to record and interpret data thatdetermine if a planet orbiting a star in another solar system is a possiblecandidate to support life.

Robotics on a Budget (Grades 5-12)
Nov. 28, 2012, 4:30 – 5:30 p.m. EST
Aerospace education specialist Steve Culivan will explore how to use robotics toenhance your students’ understanding of science, technology, engineering andmathematics, or STEM. Participants will also learn about NASA STEM roboticsmissions, curriculum and activities that are available.

For more information about these webinars, and to see a full list of webinarstaking place through December 2012, visithttp://neon.psu.edu/webinars/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to KatieHayden at Katie.S.Hayden@nasa.gov.

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NASA Social Event at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting 2012

NASA and the American Geophysical Union areinviting social media followers to a unique behind-the-scenes NASA Social onTuesday, Dec. 4, 2012, in San Francisco. The event will bring 20 social mediausers together with some of the world’s best and brightest scientific minds atthe world’s largest Earth and solar system science conference.

NASA Socials are in-person meetings with people who engage with the agencythrough Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and other social networks. Participants willget special access to parts of the AGU meeting and meet with NASA and otherscientists presenting research on Earth’s climate, deep ocean exploration andthe latest findings from Mars. Additionally, guests will sit in on a pressconference, attend a panel on deep ocean exploration with film-maker JamesCameron and a NASA astrobiologist, explore the expansive exhibit hall, and meetfellow science enthusiasts who are active on social media.

Registration is open until 5 p.m. Friday, Nov. 16. NASA and the AGU will select20 participants at random from Web registrants. Additional applicants will beplaced on a waiting list. Because of space limitations, those selected will notbe permitted to bring a guest. Each participant must be age 18 or older.

For more NASA Social and sign up information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/social.

To join and track the conversation online during the NASA Socials, follow the hashtags#NASASocial and #AGU12.

The AGU Fall Meeting attracts as many as 20,000 attendees and offers a platformfor scientists to present their most cutting-edge work. For more information onthe meeting, visit http://fallmeeting.agu.org/2012.

Questions about this NASA Social event should be directed to HQ-Social@mail.nasa.gov.

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2012-2013 RealWorld Design Challenge

The Real World Design Challenge is an annual U.S. competition that givesstudents in grades 9-12 the opportunity to work on real-world engineeringchallenges in a team environment. This year, NASA is teaming up with other RWDCpartners on the Aviation Challenge. This challenge invites students to designan unmanned aerial system to help locate a lost child.

Participating schools receive real engineeringsoftware and partner with mentors who are professional engineers. The contestprovides students with opportunities to apply the lessons of the classroom toreal technical problems.

The deadline for team registration is Nov. 16, 2012. Entriesmust be submitted by Jan. 18, 2013.

For more information about the challenge, visit http://www.realworlddesignchallenge.org.

Questions about the Real World Design Challenge should be directed to RalphCoppola at rkcoppola@outlook.com.

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Free Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series

Curious about our nearest star, moon rocks, volcanoes and other wonders ofthe universe? Come to the Smithsonian’s Stars, a series of 10 lectures bySmithsonian researchers who are exploring the sun, the moon, planets, stars,galaxies and the universe. These speakers will share behind-the-scenes detailsabout how their research is done and technologies that advance new discoveriesat the Smithsonian Institution.

Each lecture begins at 5:15 p.m. and is followedby a question-and-answer session. A Discovery Station activity will take placeat 4 p.m. prior to each lecture. Stay after the lecture to visit theobservatory, weather permitting.

Nov. 17, 2012 — The Dynamic Sun
The sun is even more dynamic, mysterious andbeautiful than you probably imagine. Astrophysicist Mark Weber will explorethis incredible star with observations from some of the most advancedtelescopes. Learn what scientists have discovered and what they are onlybeginning to understand.

Dec. 1, 2012 — A Universe of Data
This century has seen stunning cosmicdiscoveries. The digital age has given everyone free access to space data; thetrick is to turn that data into quantitative science and pictures that tell astory. Astrophysicist Jonathan McDowell will use images from the Chandra SpaceTelescope to help explain how astronomers study space in the computer age.

Dec. 15, 2012 — TheMission of the Mars Science Laboratory, Curiosity
Since landing on Mars in early August 2012, the Mars Science LaboratoryCuriosity rover has returned an array of stunning data that is being used toevaluate whether Mars may have harbored habitable environments. Geologist JohnGrant will delve into the recent findings from Curiosity.

For more information about the Smithsonian’sStars Lecture Series and to see a full schedule of upcoming lectures, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/lectures/stars/index.cfm.

Questions about this lecture series should bedirected to the visitor service line at 202-633-1000.

The Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series is madepossible by a grant from NASA.

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NASA CubeSatSpace Missions

NASA is seeking proposals for small satellitepayloads to fly on rockets planned to launch between 2013 and 2016. Theseminiature spacecraft, known as CubeSats, could be auxiliary payloads onpreviously planned missions.

CubeSats are a class of research spacecraftcalled nanosatellites. These cube-shaped satellites are approximately fourinches long, have a volume of about one quart and weigh less than three pounds.

Proposed CubeSat investigations must beconsistent with NASA’s Strategic Plan and the NASA education vision and goals.The research must address aspects of science, exploration, technologydevelopment, education or operations.

Applicants must submit proposals electronicallyby 4:30 p.m. EST, Nov. 20, 2012. NASA will select the payloads by Jan. 31,2013. Selection does not guarantee a launch opportunity. The selectedspacecraft will be eligible for flight after final negotiations when a launchopportunity arises. NASA will not provide funding for the development of thesmall satellites.

NASA recently announced the results from thethird round of the CubeSat Launch Initiative. From the first three launchinitiatives, 64 payloads made the short list for launch opportunities between2011 and 2014. They are eligible for launch pending an appropriate opportunityand final negotiations. The satellites come from 25 states: Alabama, Alaska, California,Colorado, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland,Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, North Dakota, New Hampshire, NewMexico, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, Utah, Vermont and Virginia.

For additional information about NASA’s CubeSatLaunch Initiative program, visit http://go.nasa.gov/puk9K2and http://go.nasa.gov/CubeSatOp.

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Distance/Rate/Time Problems: Smart Skies Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, theNASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association arehosting a 90-minute professional development Web seminar for educators on Nov. 28, 2012, at 6:30 p.m. EST. Learnhow to use an innovative air traffic control simulator to engage your studentsas they explore the mathematics involved in the role of an air trafficcontroller. In the three-plane problem featured in this lesson, the challengeis to change routes and speeds to line up the planes safely, with properspacing, at a given route intersection.

This seminar will be repeated on Apr. 3, 2013.

For more information and toregister online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES3/webseminar15.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

E-mail any questions about this opportunity to the NES Help Desk at NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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2013NASA and Worcester Polytechnic Institute Sample Return Robot Challenge

NASA and the Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Worcester, Mass., are seekingteams to compete in a robot technology demonstration competition with apotential $1.5 million prize purse.

During the Sample Return Robot Challenge, teams will compete to demonstrate arobot that can locate and retrieve geologic samples from a wide and variedterrain without human control. The objective of the competition is to encourageinnovations in automatic navigation and robotic manipulator technologies.Innovations stemming from this challenge may improve NASA’s capability toexplore a variety of destinations in space, as well as enhance the nation’srobotic technology for use in industries and applications on Earth.

NASA provides the prize money to the winning team as part of the agency’sCentennial Challenges competitions, which seek unconventional solutions toproblems of interest to the agency and the nation. While NASA provides theprize purse, the competitions are managed by nonprofit organizations that coverthe cost of operations through commercial or private sponsorships. Thecompetition is planned for June 2013 in Worcester and is anticipated to attracthundreds of competitors from industry and academia nationwide.

Early bird registration and fees for the competition are due by Jan. 7, 2013. Teams wishing to registerafter this date are subject to approval by the judging committee.

For more information about the Sample Return Robot Challenge and to registeronline for the competition, visit http://challenge.wpi.edu.

The Centennial Challenges program is part of NASA’sSpace Technology Program, which is innovating, developing, testing and flyinghardware for use in NASA’s future missions. NASA’s Space Technology Program andthe Centennial Challenges are creating new technological solutions for NASA andour nation’s future. For more information about NASA’s Centennial Challengesand the Space
Technology Program, visit https://www.nasa.gov/challenges.

Questions about the Sample Return Robot Challenge should be sent to challenge@wpi.edu.

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2012 OPTIMUSPRIME Spinoff Video Contest

NASA has opened registration for the 2012OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Video Contest. Featuring OPTIMUS PRIME, the leader fromthe popular TRANSFORMERS brand, the contest highlights spinoffs from NASAtechnologies that are used on Earth. The goal is to help students understandthe benefits of NASA technology to their daily lives.

Each student, or group of students, will submita three- to five-minute video on a selected NASA spinoff technology listed inNASA’s 2011 “Spinoff” publication. Videos must demonstrate an understanding ofthe NASA spinoff technology and the associated NASA mission, as well as thecommercial application and public benefit associated with the spinofftechnology.

Participants must register for the contest by Dec. 15, 2012.

Video entries will be posted on the NASA YouTubechannel, and the public will be responsible for the first round of judging. Thetop five submissions from each of the three grade groups (elementary [3rd-5th],middle [6th-8th] and high school [9th-12th]) will advance for final judging. ANASA panel will select a winning entry from each group. The students submittingthe winning entries will be the guests of honor at the OPTIMUS PRIME SpinoffContest awards ceremony in May 2013. While there, the winners will receive theOPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Contest trophy and have the opportunity to meet NASAVIPs, astronauts and actor Peter Cullen, who voices the character OPTIMUSPRIME.

TRANSFORMERS and OPTIMUS PRIME are trademarks ofHasbro and are used with permission. © 2012 Hasbro. All Rights Reserved.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/news/releases/2012/12-077.html.

Questions about this contest should be directedto Darryl Mitchell at Darryl.R.Mitchell@nasa.gov.

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NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowships Program Accepting Proposalsfor 2013-2014 Academic Year

The NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, or NESSF, is solicitingapplications from accredited U.S. universities on behalf of individualspursuing master’s or doctoral degrees in earth and space sciences, or relateddisciplines, for the 2013-2014 academic year. The purpose of NESSF is to ensurecontinued training of a highly qualified workforce in disciplines needed toachieve NASA’s scientific goals. Awards resulting from the competitiveselection will be training grants to the respective universities, with theadvisor serving as the principal investigator. The financial support for theNESSF program comes from the Science Mission Directorate’s four sciencedivisions: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Planetary Science and Astrophysics.

Initially, NESSF awards are made for one year. They may be renewed for no morethan two additional years, contingent upon satisfactory progress (as reflectedin academic performance, research progress and recommendation by the facultyadvisor) and the availability of funds.

The maximum amount of a NESSF award is $30,000 per year.

Proposals for this opportunity are due Feb. 1, 2013.

For more information about this solicitation, visit http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId={BC1C168E-1D9B-0BD1-816B-14E1C31BB0D3}&path=open.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to:

For earth science, Claire Macaulay at Claire.I.Macaulay@nasa.gov.

For heliophysics, planetary science and astrophysics, Dolores Holland at hq-nessf-Space@nasa.gov.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA.For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — Nov. 1, 2012

Check out the followingNASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listedbelow.

HeatTransfer: MESSENGER — My Angle on Cooling Web Seminar
Audience: 5-8 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Nov 1, 2012, 6:30 – 8 p.m. EDT

NASA’s Digital Learning Network PresentsSpace Shuttle Atlantis “Roll Over” Celebration
Audience: Grades 4-12
Event Date: Nov. 2, 2012, 1 – 2 p.m. EDT

NASA’s GlennResearch Center’s High School Shadowing Project
Audience: Students inGrades 10-12
Session I ApplicationDeadline: Nov. 2, 2012
Session II ApplicationDeadline: Jan. 25, 2013
Sessions III and IVApplication Deadline: Feb. 22, 2013

Free Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series
Audience: All Educators and 9-Higher EducationStudents
Next Lecture Date: Nov. 3, 2012

NASA Hosts Social Media Event inD.C. With Astronaut Joe Acaba
Audience: Educators and Students Ages 18+
Registration Deadline: Nov. 5, 2012 at 5 p.m. EST

Free Education Webinar Series from the AerospaceEducation Services Project
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Dates: Various Dates During November 2012

Algebraic Equations: CalculatorControlled Robots Web Seminar
Audience: Algebra Teachers and Informal Educators
Event Date: Nov. 7, 2012

NASA UniversityResearch Centers Virtual Symposium
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Event Dates: Nov. 8, 2012

International Space StationEarthKAM Fall 2012 Mission
Audience: 5-8 Educators
Event Date: Nov. 13-16, 2012

DEADLINE EXTENDED: “TheWorld’s a Place of Living Things” Art Contest
Audience: Students in Grades 2-4
Entry Deadline: Nov. 16, 2012

2013 CanSat Competition
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: Nov. 30, 2012

2013 Texas HighSchool Aerospace Scholars
Audience: 9-12 Students
New Extended Deadline: Nov. 30, 2012

2013 NASA Unmanned Aerial SystemsChallenge
Audience: Higher Education Students and Faculty
Notice of Intent Deadline: Jan. 15, 2013

2012-2013 Game Changing EngineeringDesign Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Students and Faculty
Notice of Intent Deadline: Jan. 15, 2013

2013 Planetary Geology and GeophysicsUndergraduate Research Program
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 1, 2013

NASA Wavelength Online Science ResourceNow Available
Audience: All Educators and Students

Find NASA Education Resources With theNASA Materials Finder
Audience: All Educators

What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website
Audience: K-6 Educators

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Heat Transfer: MESSENGER — MyAngle on Cooling Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, theNASA Explorer Schools and the National Science Teachers Association are hostinga 90-minute Web seminar on Nov 1, 2012,at 6:30 p.m. EDT. Learn how the MESSENGER mission to Mercury takes advantage of passivecooling methods to keep the spacecraft functioning in a high-temperatureenvironment. You will also see how to use the mission’s Staying Cool activities tolead students through an examination of different solutions to the problem ofhow to deal with too much sunlight and energy.

This seminar will be repeated on Mar. 21, 2013.

For more informationand to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES3/webseminar11.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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NASA’s Digital Learning Network Presents Space Shuttle Atlantis”Roll Over” Celebration

NASA’s Digital Learning Network, or DLN, is hosting a special event on Nov. 2, 2012, at 1 p.m. EDT tocommemorate the departure of space shuttle Atlantis. JoinDLN hosts Rachel Power and Joshua Santora live at NASA’s Kennedy Space Centerin Florida as space shuttle Atlantis is transferred from the Vehicle AssemblyBuilding to its permanent home at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex.

The Space Shuttle Atlantis “Roll Over”Celebration will feature special guests including NASA Administrator and astronautCharles Bolden, members of the space shuttle’s processing team and members fromthe team responsible for the design of the new home for Atlantis.

For more information and to watch the webcast online, visit the DLN website at http://dln.nasa.gov.

Do you have a question you would like to see answered live during the webcast?Send questions to dlinfochannel@gmail.com.

Inquiries about this webcast should be directed to JoshuaSantora at Joshua.Santora@nasa.gov.

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NASA’sGlenn Research Center’s High School Shadowing Project

NASA’s Glenn ResearchCenter, or GRC, in Cleveland, Ohio, is accepting applications for its HighSchool Shadowing Project sessions for the 2012-2013 school year. Thisopportunity provides students with a one- to five-day career explorationexperience at Glenn Research Center.

The project provides highschool students with an opportunity to explore career possibilities in aresearch and development environment while under the guidance of a NASAscientist, engineer, technician or administrative professional that serves asthe student’s mentor. Students are provided information about various careers,career paths and Glenn Research Center educational resources and programs.

Applicants must be U.S.citizens and at least 16 years old by the application deadline. Four sessionsare scheduled for the 2012-2013 school year.

Session I —
Application Deadline: Nov.2, 2012
Session Date: Dec. 4, 2012

Session II —
Application Deadline: Jan.25, 2013
Session Date: Feb. 27, 2013

Session III —
Application Deadline: Feb.22, 2013
Session Date: March 26,2013

Session IV —
Application Deadline: Feb.22, 2013
Session Date: April 24,2013

For more information aboutthis opportunity, please visit https://www.nasa.gov/centers/glenn/education/ShadowingProgram_GRC.html.

Questions about the GRCHigh School Shadowing Project should be directed by email to GRC-Intern@mail.nasa.gov or bytelephone to 216-433-6656.

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Free Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series

Curious about our nearest star, moon rocks, volcanoesand other wonders of the universe? Come to the Smithsonian’s Stars, a series of10 lectures by Smithsonian researchers who are exploring the sun, the moon,planets, stars, galaxies and the universe. These speakers will sharebehind-the-scenes details about how their research is done and technologiesthat advance new discoveries at the Smithsonian Institution.

Each lecture begins at 5:15 p.m. and is followedby a question-and-answer session. A Discovery Station activity will take placeat 4 p.m. prior to each lecture. Stay after the lecture to visit theobservatory, weather permitting.

Nov. 3, 2012 — Moon Rocks and How They BecameFamous
In the late 1960s, Apollo astronauts collectedrocks from the moon and brought them back to Earth. Scientists studied theserocks, curators put them on display in museums around the world and PresidentNixon gave them as gifts to foreign heads of state. Teasel Muir-Harmony willexplore the wide-ranging roles that these rocks played.

Nov. 17, 2012 — The Dynamic Sun
The sun is even more dynamic, mysterious andbeautiful than you probably imagine. Astrophysicist Mark Weber will explorethis incredible star with observations from some of the most advancedtelescopes. Learn what scientists have discovered and what they are onlybeginning to understand.

Dec. 1, 2012 — AUniverse of Data
This century has seen stunning cosmic discoveries. The digital age hasgiven everyone free access to space data; the trick is to turn that data intoquantitative science and pictures that tell a story. Astrophysicist JonathanMcDowell will use images from the Chandra Space Telescope to help explain howastronomers study space in the computer age.

For more information about the Smithsonian’sStars Lecture Series and to see a full schedule of upcoming lectures, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/lectures/stars/index.cfm.

Questions about this lecture series should bedirected to the visitor service line at 202-633-1000.

The Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series is madepossible by a grant from NASA.

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NASA Hosts Social Media Event in D.C. WithAstronaut Joe Acaba

NASA invites its social media followers to a specialevent with astronaut Joe Acaba on Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2012, in Washington, D.C.Registration for the event is open to NASA social media followers and theirguests until 5 p.m. EST Monday, Nov. 5,2012. NASA will select 150 participants by lottery from those who registeronline. Additional applicants will be placed on a waiting list.

NASA Socials are in-person meetings with people who engage with the agencythrough Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and other social networks. This NASA Socialis an opportunity to meet and speak with Acaba, the people behind NASA’s socialmedia accounts and other space-exploration-minded participants.

Acaba launched to the International Space Station on a Russian Soyuz spacecrafton May 15, 2012. He spent 123 days aboard the orbiting laboratory as a flightengineer of the Expedition 31 and 32 crews. He returned to Earth on Sept. 17after four months off the planet.

Acaba participated in numerous scientific research experiments and performedregular maintenance and operational tasks aboard the orbiting complex. He alsofrequently tweeted on his Twitter account, @AstroAcaba, and participated in an#askStation TweetChat.

Acaba also flew aboard space shuttle Discovery in March 2009 during a spacestation assembly mission, during which he spent almost 13 hours performing twospacewalks.

To join and track the conversation online during the NASA Social, follow thehashtag #NASASocial. For more information on NASA Socials and to register,visit https://www.nasa.gov/social.

Acaba’s Twitter account is https://twitter.com/AstroAcaba.

Acaba’s biography is available at http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/acaba-jm.html.

For information about connecting and collaborating with NASA, visit https://www.nasa.gov/connect.

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Free Education Webinar Series from the Aerospace Education ServicesProject

The Aerospace Education Services Project is presenting a series of freewebinars throughout November 2012. All webinars can be accessed online. Joinaerospace education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans,educator guides and resources to bring NASA into your classroom.

Amusement Park Physics (Grades 6-12)
Nov. 5, 2012, 7 – 8 p.m. EST
Aerospace education specialist John Weis will provide participants with anintroduction to the “Amusement Park Physics With a NASA Twist”educator guide and classroom activities. These activities cover multiplephysics concepts including energy, describing motion, collisions and simple harmonicmotion.

Sun, Earth and Moon Relationships: Anatomy of an Eclipse (Grades 2-8)
Nov. 7, 2012, 4 – 5 p.m. EST
For centuries people have been amazed by the spectacle created by lunar andsolar eclipses. On Nov. 13, 2012, a total solar eclipse will occur in the SouthPacific. Join aerospace education specialist Rick Varner for a free webcast tolearn about eclipse-related NASA resources. Varner will also share a simpleactivity to simulate eclipses in the classroom.

Train Like an Astronaut (Grades 1-12)
Nov. 14, 2012, 2 – 3 p.m. EST
Aerospace education specialist Lester Morales will discuss the”Train Like an Astronaut” education materials. These activities use aphysical and inquiry-based approach to human health and fitness on Earth and inspace. Activities are modeled after the real-life training that astronauts doto prepare for exploring space. This webinar is part of the Department ofEducation’s Green Strides webinar series.

Here an Earth, There an Earth, Everywhere an Earth: The Kepler TelescopeSearch for Habitable Planets Beyond Our Solar System (Grades 5-12)
Nov. 15, 2012, 5 – 6 p.m. EST
Aerospace education specialist Steve Culivan will discuss NASA’s Keplertelescope and its search for Earth-like planets orbiting other stars.Participants will learn how to use Johannes Kepler’s Third Law and actualKepler telescope data to construct graphs to record and interpret data thatdetermine if a planet orbiting a star in another solar system is a possiblecandidate to support life.

Robotics on a Budget (Grades 5-12)
Nov. 28, 2012, 4:30 – 5:30 p.m. EST
Aerospace education specialist Steve Culivan will explore how to use robotics toenhance your students’ understanding of science, technology, engineering andmathematics, or STEM. Participants will also learn about NASA STEM roboticsmissions, curriculum and activities that are available.

For more information about these webinars, and to see a full list of webinarstaking place through December 2012, visithttp://neon.psu.edu/webinars/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to KatieHayden at Katie.S.Hayden@nasa.gov.

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Algebraic Equations: Calculator Controlled Robots WebSeminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, theNASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association arehosting a 90-minute Web seminar on Nov. 7,2012, at 6:30 p.m. EST. Discover a unique way of integrating robotictechnology into your algebra classes. Robotic missions engage students andprovide a unique way of bringing to life the concepts you are teaching. Learnto use programmable Texas Instruments, or TI, calculators and Norland ResearchRobots to solve problems requiring substituting values for variables informulas.

This seminar provides an overview of using robotics in algebra so you can makean informed decision about purchasing the robots and other equipment. You donot need to have a Norland Research Robot or programmable TI calculator toparticipate in this seminar, or know how to program the calculator.

For more information and to registeronline, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES3/webseminar12.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to the NASA Explorer Schools help deskat NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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NASA University Research Centers VirtualSymposium

NASA University Research Centers, or URC, ishosting a Virtual Symposium to highlight talented students within the NASA URCprogram and their recent experiences as interns or co-ops at NASA.

During a series of poster sessions held on Oct. 24-31, 2012,students presented virtual poster presentations of the research that wasconducted during their internship or co-op. During the sessions, participantshad the opportunity to ask questions, exchange information and ideas, andinteract with students and other event participants via the Facebook socialnetwork. A panel of NASA subject matter experts reviewed and scored the posterpresentations.

Top finalists will give oral presentations oftheir research during a virtual symposium on Nov. 8, 2012.

To learn more about the NASA URC Virtual Symposium,visit http://www.earthzine.org/nasa-urc-fall-2012-vpss/.

Questions about this event should be emailed toDaesha Roberts at daesha.d.roberts@nasa.gov.

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InternationalSpace Station EarthKAM Fall 2012 Mission

Middle school educators are invited tojoin NASA for the International Space Station EarthKAM Fall 2012 Mission from Nov.13-16, 2012. Find out more about this exciting opportunity thatallows students to take pictures of Earth from a digital camera aboard theInternational Space Station.

International Space Station EarthKAMis a NASA-sponsored project that provides stunning, high-quality photographs ofEarth taken from the space shuttle and the space station. Since 1996, EarthKAM students have taken hundredsof thousands of photographs of Earth by using the World Wide Web to direct adigital camera on select spaceflights and, currently, on the space station.

For more information about the projectand to register for the upcoming mission, visit the EarthKAM home page www.EarthKAM.ucsd.edu.

If you have questions about the EarthKAM project, please email ek-help@earthkam.ucsd.edu.

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DEADLINE EXTENDED: “The World’s a Place ofLiving Things” Art Contest

The Institute for Global EnvironmentalStrategies, or IGES, invites young scientists and artists to explorebiodiversity. There are many different types of life on Earth — from bacteriato insects to plants and animals. Biodiversity is everywhere. Students ingrades 2-4 are encouraged to learn more about the forms of life in a particularplace — what types of life can be seen? What types of life are hard to see? Dothe different types of life interact with each other?

Students should investigate these questions, andcreate a piece of artwork (no larger than 16″x20″) to show what theyhave learned. First-, second-, and third-place artists will receive a $100,$75, and $50 gift card, respectively, framed color certificates and theirartwork will be showcased on the IGES website.

Entries are due Nov. 16, 2012. Forfull details on the contest, resources on biodiversity and to download an entryform, visit http://www.strategies.org/artcontest.

Questions about this opportunity should be directedto info@strategies.org.

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2013 CanSat Competition

Applications currently are being accepted for the 2013 CanSat Competition.

This annual competition is open to university and college students from theUnited States, Canada, Mexico and other countries. Teams of three to 10students must design, build and launch a sensor payload called a CanSat. EachCanSat is slightly larger than a soda can and must be built according to thespecifications released by the competition organizing committee.

All teams entering the CanSat competition are required to have a facultyadviser. The faculty adviser will oversee and be responsible for the conduct ofthe team at all times during the competition. The advisor is stronglyencouraged to accompany the team to the competition.

Applications are due Nov. 30, 2012.

For more information about the competition and to download the application,visit http://www.cansatcompetition.com/.

Questions about this competition should be directed to questions@juno.nrl.navy.mil.

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DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2013 Texas High SchoolAerospace Scholars

The Texas High School Aerospace Scholars projectis an interactive, online learning experience. It is highlighted by a six-dayinternship where selected students are encouraged to study mathematics,science, engineering or computer science by interacting with engineers atNASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston.

The Texas High School Aerospace Scholars projectis open to high school juniors throughout Texas. Applicants must be U.S.citizens and have access to the Internet.

The application deadline has been extended to Nov. 30, 2012.

For additional information on the project and toapply online, visit http://has.aerospacescholars.org/.

Questions about this opportunity should bedirected to jsc-aeroscho@mail.nasa.gov.

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2013 NASA Unmanned Aerial SystemsChallenge

NASA invites college teams to take part in the 2013 NASA AeronauticsMission Directorate’s Unmanned Aerial Systems Challenge. Students are invitedto propose an unmanned aerial firefighting system to battle a wildfire ragingin a drought-stricken area. Design assessment will be based on projectedeffectiveness, cost, innovation, and ease of use and operation inside theNational Air Space.

The contest is open to teams of full-time students enrolled in higher educationinstitutions of the United States or its territories. This category includesuniversities, colleges, trade schools, community colleges, professionalschools, etc. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

A notice of intent is due Jan.15, 2013. Final entries are due May 3, 2013.

For more information and a complete list of rules, visit https://aero.larc.nasa.gov/competitions_univ.htm.

Questions about the challenge should be directed to Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.

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2012-2013 Game ChangingEngineering Design Challenge

NASA invites college student teams to enter the 2013 Game Changing EngineeringDesign Challenge. Student teams are asked to design a thermal control systemfor a manned space station in low lunar orbit. Designs must accommodate asix-person crew, maintain acceptable temperatures for avionics components, andprovide a healthy environment for the crew. Multidisciplinary teams areencouraged.

The contest is open to student teams from post-secondary institutions inthe United States or its territories. This category includes universities,colleges, trade schools, community colleges, professional schools, etc.

Finalists will be invited to present their work toNASA engineers and tour a NASA center.

A notice of intent is due Jan. 15, 2013.Final entries are due on April 29, 2013.

For more information and a complete list of rules, visit http://spacetech.larc.nasa.gov.

Questions about the challenge should be directed to Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.

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2013 Planetary Geology andGeophysics Undergraduate Research Program

The Planetary Geology and GeophysicsUndergraduate Research Program, or PGGURP,pairs qualified undergraduate students with NASA-funded investigators atresearch locations across the U.S. for eight weeks during the summer. Studentswill spend the summer at the NASA scientists’ home institutions. Selectedstudents receive a cost-of-living stipend and compensation for housing andtravel.

Undergraduate students interested in learning about research in planetarygeoscience are eligible to apply. Students graduating in 2013 who have notstarted graduate school yet are also eligible. Preference is given to U.S.citizens and permanent residents.

Applications are due Feb. 1, 2013.

For more information, visit http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/~tgregg/pggurp.html.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please email Robyn Wagner, PGGURPadministrator, at rlwagner@buffalo.edu.

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NASA Wavelength Online Science Resource Now Available

NASA has a new online science resource for teachersand students to help bring Earth, sun, the solar system, and the universe into theirschools and homes.

Called NASA Wavelength, the site features hundreds of resources organized bytopic and audience level from elementary to college, and out-of-school programsthat span the extent of NASA science. Educators at all levels can locate science-relatededucational resources through information on educational standards, subjectsand keywords and other relevant details, such as learning time required tocarry out a lesson or an activity, cost of materials and more.

NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, or SMD, funds a nationwide community ofeducation and outreach professionals that develop and deliver resources for alllevels of formal and informal education and public outreach activities usingNASA content, expertise and facilities.

NASA Wavelength features peer-reviewed science resources developed by thiscommunity, including award-winning curriculum tools, activities that allowstudents and teachers to learn about and participate in NASA missions, exhibitsand planetarium shows and more.

The site offers an innovative way to keep up with the latest developments inEarth and space science education. Users will be able to receive email updateson new content, and share the latest information through social media andemail.

Through featured selections highlighted on the homepage, educators can identifyscience resources relevant to specific themes, such as Mars-related activities,and lessons for educators interested in teaching about climate, theelectromagnetic spectrum or magnetism.

The Space Sciences Laboratory and Lawrence Hall of Science at the University ofCalifornia, Berkeley, the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies, andthe Adler Planetarium worked with educators across the country to define, testand launch NASA Wavelength. Scientists and educators who comprise SMD’seducation and public outreach community coordinate the continued developmentand upkeep of the site.

NASA’s Science Mission Directorate seeks new knowledge and understanding ofEarth, the sun, solar system and the universe from the vantage point of space.The directorate also constantly looks for inventive ways to reach out to thepublic using museums, classrooms, science centers and home schools.

For access to NASA Wavelength, visit http://nasawavelength.org.

For information on NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, visit http://science.nasa.gov/.

For information about NASA education programs, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education.

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Find NASA Education ResourcesWith the NASA Materials Finder

Are you looking for NASA educational resources to use in your classroom?Use the NASA Education Materials Finder search tool to find materials that fityour needs.

Search hundreds of NASA educational materials by grade level, type of materialand subject area. The ability to search by keyword is also available. Plus, thesubject areas include dozens of sub-category selections to allow you to better fine-tuneyour search.

In addition, all of these search criteria can be combined into one search,which allows you to restrict the results to exactly what you are looking for.

Click the link below to begin your search forNASA educational materials.

https://www.nasa.gov/education/materials

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What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website

Earth is a water world. Even ifwe live far from the ocean, we feel its effects. We feel it in the weather andclimate. We breathe in the oxygen produced by its plant life. We are cooler dueto the ocean’s ability to absorb some of the excess greenhouse gases we add tothe atmosphere. The ocean influences every aspect of our planet that make ithabitable. The Space Place website is about space out there and Earth down hereas studied from space out there. This month we pay tribute to the ocean and thetechnologies that help us understand it better.

What’s New on Space Place
When Earth first formed, it was very hot. Any liquid water would haveboiled away into space. So where did the ocean come from? Scientists thinkcomets may have provided an important water delivery service. But how can theyknow?

A new “Explore” article on the Space Place explains how even water hasfingerprints of sorts that can be used to trace its origin. Visit http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/comet-ocean.

Space Place en Español
Satellite images show the swirling, organized rotational cloudsystems of tropical storms and hurricanes. We can watch them in fascination –or fear, if they are headed our way. What is actually going on in the belly ofthese monsters? How do they begin and grow? What determines their severity andtheir paths? In both English and Spanish, the basics are explained. Check out¿Cómo se forman los huracanes? And see Space Place entirely in Spanish at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/sp, withtoggles to the English on every page.

Spotlight on …
“Missions to Planet Earth” is an online card game. It started out asa real card game, but we wanted everyone to be able to enjoy playing it andlearn about what it takes to build a space mission. The player competes withthe computer, but can tell the computer how “smart” to play. Sobeginners can succeed, too. The object is to gather all the necessarycomponents to complete the maximum number of missions — before the computeropponent does. This is a great game for the classroom when students have a fewminutes to spare. Go to http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/earth-card-game.

For the Classroom
Voyage on the High Seas: A Jason 1 Ocean Adventure is a real boardgame. Go to http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/posters/#high_seasto download a full-size game board (42.5 x 33 inches). You can have it printed– and perhaps laminated — at an office supply store. There are also gamecards to print on standard paper and cut apart, as well as a spinner and tinygame markers (research vessels). The game is a fun way for students to learnsome geography, oceanography and meteorology. The back side of the poster(printable on standard paper) has other related activities and articles aswell.

Forout-of-School (Cookie) Time
We leave the ocean theme for a moment to tell you of our new Oreo®cookies moon phases activity. It reduces the oft-confusing topic of moon phasesto its simplest — and sweetest — form. To make a new Moon, eat all the crèmefilling. To make a 1st or 3rd quarter Moon, scrape off half the filling. For afull Moon, alas, you must resist. Printable activity sheets make it easy for theactivity director. Go to http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/oreo-moon.

Special Days

Nov. 9, 1934: Carl Sagan was born.
Dr. Sagan helped pick the sounds and images for the Voyager spacecrafts’“Golden Record.” See and hear samples at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/voyager-to-stars.

Nov. 13, 1946: Vincent Joseph Schaefer made the first artificially inducedsnowstorm.
It’s easy to predict a snowstorm it you make it yourself. If nature makesit …not so much. Check out a little booklet that explains in the simplestpossible terms how to make a weather-prediction satellite. It’s at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/story-weather-satellite.The booklet is also in Spanish and Italian.

Nov. 29, 1803: Birthday of Christian Doppler
He described the Doppler effect, a good analogy for the expansion of spaceand understanding why the sky is dark at night. Check it out at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/classroom-activities#bluesky.

Dec. 14: Geminids Meteor Shower
Get tips on the best meteor viewing techniques at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/meteor-shower.

Dec. 25, 1642: Birthday of Isaac Newton
He understood how orbits work, and so can you by firing a cannon intospace. With enough gunpowder, you, too, can achieve orbit! Go to http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/how-orbits-work.

Dec. 31, 1705: First recorded sightingof Halley’s comet
Play “Comet Quest” and learn about comets at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/comet-quest.

Don’tForget…
You can find dozens of other ideas and rich resources for theclassroom and out-of-school time at our Parents & Educators page, http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/menu/parents-and-educators.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA.For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — August 23, 2012

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community.Full descriptions are listed below.

2012-2013 NASA’s University Student Launch Initiative
Audience: Higher Education Students
Proposal Deadline: Aug. 31, 2012

Become a NASA Galileo EducatorNetwork Fellow
Audience: K-12 Educator Professional Development Providers
Application Deadline: Aug. 31, 2012

Minorities Striving and Pursuing HigherDegrees of Success in Earth System Science
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Aug. 31, 2012

Presenters Neededfor 2013 Space Exploration Educators Conference
Audience: All Educators
Proposal Deadline: Sept. 6, 2012

NASA’s Science Mission Directorate Education Professional Development Survey
Audience: All Educators
Survey Deadline: Sept. 10, 2012

2013 NASA Lunabotics Mining Competition
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Limited to 50 Teams

Green Strides WebinarSeries
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Dates: Multiple dates through May 2013

New DIYPodcast Module Available — Recycling
Audience: 5-12 Educators and Students

New NASA eClips Videos Available
Audience: 6-12 Educators

What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website
Audience: K-6 Educators

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2012-2013 NASA’s University Student Launch Initiative

NASA’s University Student Launch Initiative, orUSLI, is a competition that challenges university-level students to design,build and launch a reusable rocket with a scientific or engineering payload toone mile above ground level. The project engages students in scientificresearch and real-world engineering processes with NASA engineers.

Once selected, teams design their rockets and payloads throughout the academicyear. USLI requires a NASA review of the teams’ preliminary and criticaldesigns. The project also requires flight and launch readiness reviews beforethe rockets and payloads are approved for launch. Teams complete a Post-LaunchAssessment Review to include conclusions from their science or engineeringexperiment and the overall flight performance. The Preliminary Design Review,Critical Design Review and Flight Readiness Review are conducted by a panel ofscientists and engineers from NASA, NASA contactors and external partners.

NASA’s Student Launch Projects are sponsored by ATK Aerospace Systems. Theannual launch event is hosted at Bragg Farms in Toney, Ala., and launchservices are provided by the National Association of Rocketry. The 2012-2013launch will be on April 20, 2013. Proposals are due Aug. 31, 2012.

The Statement of Work and instructions for submitting a proposal can be foundon the USLI website at http://education.msfc.nasa.gov/usli.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Julie Clift at julie.d.clift@nasa.gov.

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Becomea NASA Galileo Educator Network Fellow

The NASA Galileo Educator Network is accepting applications for a professional development institute in September 2012, atthe Adler Planetarium in Chicago, Ill.

The 15-hour institute will focus on the integration of science content, sciencepractices and the nature of science as outlined in thenational Framework for K–12 Science Education. The goal of this program is totrain participants to assist K-12 teachers with the implementation of the NextGeneration Science Standards, in the context of astronomy and space science.

Lodging support for out-of-town participants and stipends for all participantsare available.

Applications are due Aug. 31,2012.

For more information about the NASA Galileo Educator Network and to apply forthe professional development institute online, visit http://astrosociety.org/education/GEN/index.html.

Questions about this opportunity should be emailed to Brian Kruse at bkruse@astrosociety.org.

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MinoritiesStriving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Earth System Science

The Minorities Striving and Pursuing HigherDegrees of Success in Earth System Science, or MS PHD’S, initiative wasdeveloped by and for underrepresented minorities to facilitate increasedparticipation in earth system science. Each year, the initiative engages approximately 25 minorityundergraduate and graduate students in a series of activities.

The project starts with orientation and a broad earth system science andengineering exposure during MS PHD’S community-building activities at the American Geophysical Union fallmeeting in San Francisco, Calif.

Participants will engage in additional professional development activities atone of the MS PHD’S organizational partners’ meetings. These activities couldinclude attending meetings of the American Meteorological Society, the Associationfor the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography, the National Association ofBlack Geologists and Geophysicists, and the Ecological Society of America,among others. Each participant will attend the meeting that most closely alignswith his or her specific academic and professional interests.

The final phase will occur at the National Academies in Washington, D.C., whereparticipants will visit government agencies and engage in dialogs withprofessional society and foundation representatives. Each student will alsoreceive a scholarship award of up to $1,000 and participate in a tour of NASA’sGoddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

The deadline for submitting the online applicationis Aug. 31, 2012.

For more information about the MSPHD’S initiative and how to apply, visit http://www.msphds.org/.

Questions about this opportunity should be emailed to pdp@msphds.org.

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Presenters Needed for 2013 Space ExplorationEducators Conference

The 19th Annual Space Exploration EducatorsConference, or SEEC, is taking place Feb. 7-9, 2013, at Space Center Houston.The goal of SEEC is to encourage K-12 educators to use space to teach allsubjects in their classrooms. Over 700 educators gather for this event eachyear.

Conference organizers are looking for 170interactive sessions that present exciting classroom activities. All sessionsmust have a hands-on component; lecture sessions will not be accepted.Proposals are due Sept.6, 2012.

For more information, visit http://spacecenter.org/TeachersSEEC.html.

If you have any questions about the conference,please call 281-244-2149 or email seec@spacecenter.org.

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NASA’s Science Mission Directorate EducationProfessional Development Survey

NASA’s Science MissionDirectorate, or SMD, is strongly committed to enhancing the nation’s science,technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, education. As part of thatcommitment, each of the four divisions within the SMD established an Educationand Public Outreach, or E/PO, Forum. Each Forum consists of a team ofscientists and educators that coordinates activities using NASA sciencecontent, expertise and facilities.

One of the areas for the Forums is teacher professional development. In aneffort to continue offering the most valuable professional developmentexperience possible, the Forums are seeking your expert input.

Please fill in the survey found at the website listed below. The survey shouldtake less than 20 minutes. We are asking for your response by Sept. 10,2012.

http://bit.ly/NASAscienceteacher

Please email any questions about this survey toTheresa Schwerin at theresa_schwerin@strategies.org.

Thank you very much for your contribution to NASA Science E/PO Forums!

The NASA Science E/PO Forums
Cassie Soeffing, Institute for Global Environmental Strategies
Earth Science Forum

Lindsay Bartolone, Adler Planetarium
Astrophysics Forum

Ruth Paglierani, University of California, Berkeley
Heliophysics Forum

Sheri Klug Boonstra, Arizona State University
Planetary Science Forum

Liz Burck, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Wyle Information Systems, LLC
Earth Science Forum

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2013 NASA Lunabotics Mining Competition

NASA is challenging U.S.and international undergraduate and graduate student teams to design and builda telerobotic or autonomous excavator, called a Lunabot, that may result inclever ideas and solutions which could be applied to an actual lunar excavationdevice or payload. The lunabot must be able to mine and deposit a minimum of 10kilograms (22 pounds) of lunar simulant in 10 minutes.

Design teams must include one faculty advisor from a college or university andat least two undergraduate or graduate students. Universities may work incollaboration, and multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

Selected teams will compete in the Lunabotics Mining Competition at NASA’sKennedy Space Center in Florida on May 20-24, 2013. Registration is limited tothe first 50 approved teams. Registration is limited to one team per universitycampus. Internationally, registration is limited to five teams per country.

Registration will end when NASA approves 50applications.

For more information about the competition andto apply online, visit https://www.nasa.gov/lunabotics.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to Susan Sawyer at Susan.G.Sawyer@nasa.gov.

Like NASA Lunabotics on Facebook at www.facebook.com/Lunabotics.
Watch Lunabotics videos on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/user/Lunabotics.
Follow Lunabotics on Twitter at http://twitter.com/#!/NASALunabotics.

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Green Strides Webinar Series

The U.S. Department of Education presents theGreen Strides Webinar Series. These webinars feature experts from variousfederal programs. The webinars are free, and events are scheduled through theend of the 2012-2013 school year.

For more information and registration, visit http://www2.ed.gov/programs/green-ribbon-schools/webinar-series.doc.

Questions about this opportunity should be directedto Green.Ribbon.Schools@ed.gov.

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New DIY Podcast Module Available — Recycling

NASA’s Do-It-Yourself Podcast offers resources for educators and students tocreate podcasts using free NASA images, video footage and audio clips. Thenewest DIY Podcast topic module focuses on recycling. While recycling may be arelatively new task for humans, it is common practice for Mother Nature. Air andwater are constantly recycled by nature for use on Earth. NASA recycles too, onEarth and in space.

NASA centers recycle paper, plastic, batteries, excess materials fromconstruction and demolition projects, and other items. But what does NASArecycle in space?

NASA uses special purification systems on the space station to recycle water,sweat, urine and air so that astronauts have clean water to drink and use andhave fresh air to breathe.

Challenge your students to brainstorm about how to make recycling a common partof their lives. And then visit NASA’s DIY Podcast site today to integratepodcasting into your classroom. Encourage your students to mashup audio andvideo clips to develop informative and creative podcasts about recycling. Videoand audio clips feature interviews with astronauts and NASA specialists. Thesite also provides background information on recycling.

Additionally, educators may visit the DIY Podcast blog for tips and ideas onhow to use podcasting in your lessons.

For more information and to access the Recycling topic module, visit NASA’s DIYPodcast site today at https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/diypodcast/index.html.

If you have questions or comments about NASA’s DIY Podcast, please email educationpodcast@nasa.gov.

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NewNASA eClips Videos Available

Check out the new videos that NASA eClips™ has rolled out for August.

RealWorld: NASA Harnesses Half Life (Grades 6-8) — Learn about isotopes andradioactive decay. See how NASA uses the predictable decay of certain elementsto power spacecraft in remote locations. Find out why a Radioisotope PowerSystem, or RPS, provides dependable energy for the Mars Science Laboratory.
Launchpad:What Are Radioisotope Power Systems? (Grades 9-12) — NASA usesRadioisotope Power Systems, or RPS, to convert heat from radioactive decay toelectricity, creating predictable, continuous power for long missions inextreme environments. But learn how a next generation Radioisotope StirlingEngine will perform four times more efficiently and help NASA use even less ofa precious resource.
Launchpad:History, Benefits and Safety of Radioisotope Power Systems (Grades 9-12) –With safety designed from inside out and outside in, see how NASA has usedRadioisotope Power Systems, or RPS, for more than 20 missions over the last 50years. Discover the advantages of an RPS that allow spacecraft like Voyager todo important scientific maneuvers even after being in the extreme environmentof space for 30 years! Find out where an RPS could take us in the future.

To learn more about NASA eClips, visit www.nasa.gov/nasaeclips.

Follow NASA eClips on Facebook and Twitter!

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What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website

NASA’s Curiosity rover gears up tobegin its study of Mars just in time for the start of school. FollowingCuriosity’s adventures of exploration can help keep kids excited about scienceand space. The Space Place, along with our new mobile applications, can helptoo.

Introducing Space Place Prime!
Space Place Prime is a spinoff of The Space Place, but for the iPad and amultigenerational audience. It is a content presentation app, updated daily viawireless connection, which gathers some of the best and most recent offeringsfrom NASA. It taps timely educational and easy-to-read articles from thewebsite, as well as daily updates of NASA space and Earth images and the latestinformative videos.

The interface is a grid of images, which you can slide with your finger anywhich way to your heart’s content. Each feature is represented by a uniqueimage, labeled with an icon to show whether it is an image, video, article oractivity. Tapping on the image takes you to the feature.

For a more organized view, a list mode presents separate menus of images,videos and articles (including activity articles).

You can share the images and short videos with your class using a digitalprojector and a high-definition multimedia interface adapter for the iPad.

Space Place Prime is available free in the Apple App Store. See iTunes previewat http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/space-place-prime/id543935008?mt=8.

New Resource for Space Place enEspañol
This year has been an amazing one for daytime sky watchers. On May20, we had a solar eclipse, partial or annular, depending on your viewinglocation. And on June 5 (or 6), a very rare Venus transit occurred, which issimilar to an eclipse. Both of these events and the basic concept of eclipsesare explained in a new “Explore” page in both English and Spanish on The SpacePlace. Check it out at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/sp/venus-transit/.

Spotlight on Mars
“Let’s go to Mars!” The Mars adventure game gives kids the task ofpicking items that would be useful to take on a long trip to Mars. The player’sgame success depends on the usefulness and practicality of the items chosen.For example, dumb-bells wouldn’t be very useful for exercising in a weightlessenvironment. And potato chips take up too much space. But notepaper and somecrayons might come in handy, as would a first-aid kit. Blast off at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/mars-adventure/.

For the Classroom
What’s the difference between a comet and an asteroid? Most of usknow that a comet has a tail and maybe a certain level of predictability. Butwhat, fundamentally, distinguishes one from the other? Or is there a fuzzy areawhere either term could apply? Our new “Comets vs. Asteroids” four-page flyertells all with pictures, easy explanations, fun facts and even a word searchpuzzle. Download and print it at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/posters/#asteroids.

Forout-of-school time
Make Space Place t-shirts. Print our beautiful Space Place art oniron-on transfer paper you can buy at a crafts store. Iron the transfer ontoany t-shirt, old or new. You can also iron a colorful solar system transfergraphic onto the back of the shirt to help students (either the ones wearingthe shirt or the ones looking at their backs) learn the names of the planets.

Alternatively, Lands’ End® has created an embroidered Space Placeinsignia, which you can order on any Lands’ End® shirt, hat, bag or otherproduct. Either way, go to http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/t-shirt/to get started.

Special Days

Sept. 15: Respect for the Aged Day in Japan
(Why don’t we have such a holiday in the U.S.?) A fun way to observe thisday is to play the “How Old Do I Look?” game. Go to http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/whats-older/.

Sept. 16: Collect Rocks Day
You never know when the rock you pick up might have fallen from Mars oranother extraterrestrial locale. See what rock collecting did for one NASAscientist by watching a Space Place Live episode at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/space-place-live/#burnett.

Sept. 23, 1846: Johan G. Galle Discovered Neptune
This smallest of the gas giants would still hold 60 Earths! Find out moreabout Neptune and all the other planets by reading the interactive or .pdfstorybook, “The First Annual Planet Awards!” It’s at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/story-planet-awards/.

October: Energy Awareness Month
The “Power Up!” game on our sister website, NASA’s Climate Kids, will helpstudents become more aware of renewable energy sources. Go to http://climate.nasa.gov/kids/powerupcleanly/.

Oct. 13: Train Your Brain Day
Flex your memory muscles by playing “Spitzer Concentration.” Match spaceimages from the Spitzer Space Telescope. Go to http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/spitzer-concentration/.

Oct. 21: Orionids Meteor Shower Peaks
Find out all about meteor showers and the best way to watch them at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/meteor-shower/.

AReminder…
The Space Place monthly wall calendar for this school year isavailable to print at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/calendar/.Also, back issues of this newsletter are available, with timeless suggestionson using The Space Place to enrich classroom and out-of-school experiences forstudents. Check them out at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/educator-newsletter/.

iPad and iTunes are registered trademarks of Apple Inc.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For afull list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club:
https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub


NASA Education Express — July 12, 2012

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Mars Day! 2012 at the National Air and Space Museum
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: July 13, 2012

Free Education Webinar Series from the Aerospace Education Services Project
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Dates: Various Dates During July 2012

2012 Music and Astronomy Under the Stars Events

Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Dates: Multiple dates July 14 – Oct. 26, 2012

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Ready for Launch!
Audience: Grades 5-12
Event Date: July 16, 2012, 1 – 2.:30 p.m. EDT

Earth Science Information Partners Federation Summer Meeting 2012
Audience: Grades 6-12 Educators

Event Dates: July 17-18, 2012

SpaceFest: Teacher Professional Development Event
Audience: All Educators
Registration Deadline: July 17, 2012
Event Date:
July 20, 2012

Algebraic Skeletal System: Human Physiology in Space Web Seminar
Audience: 9-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: July 19, 2012, 11 a.m. EDT

NASA’s DEVELOP Program — 2012 Fall Session

Audience: 9-12 and Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: July 23, 2012

Have a Blast Learning About the Moon With New Selene Video Game
Audience: All Educators and Grade 5-Higher Education Students

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Mars Day! 2012 at the National Air and Space Museum

Mars Day! is an annual National Air and Space Museum event that celebrates the Red Planet with educational and fun family activities. Visitors can take part in a variety of activities, see a real meteorite that came from Mars, talk to scientists active in Mars research and learn about current and future missions.

Mars Day! 2012 will take place on Friday, July 13, 2012, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.

For more information, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/marsday/.

Questions about this event should be directed to the Visitor Service line at 202-633-1000.

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Free Education Webinar Series from the Aerospace Education Services Project

The Aerospace Education Services Project is presenting a series of free webinars throughout July 2012. All webinars can be accessed online. Join aerospace education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources to bring NASA into your classroom.

Looking at the Sun (Grades 2-8)
July 13, 2012, 3 – 4 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Rick Varner will present sun-Earth-moon models that help to explain the phases of the moon, and both lunar and solar eclipses. Additionally, the activity Kinesthetic Astronomy will be introduced for its explanation of the seasons.

Putting NEON to Work for You, Part 2 (Grades K-12)
July 14, 2012, noon – 1 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Anne Weiss explains how to use the NASA Educators Online Network, or NEON’s, most important feature: the interest groups. Participants will role-play several scenarios to find out how NEON’s various tools can be used to find NASA activities that align to state-specific standards.

Our Solar System: A Model Overview (Grades 4-9)
July 16, 2012, 11 a.m. – noon EDT
Aerospace education specialist Steve Culivan will present NASA inquiry activities that demonstrate remote sensing and scale models to better visualize our sun, planets, asteroids and other objects as a whole system.

Messenger’s Mission to Mercury (Grades K-12 and Informal)
July 17, 2012, 10 – 11 a.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Brandon Hargis will provide an overview of the Messenger Mission along with lessons and activities connected to the mission. Attendees will visit the Messenger Mission website to get a glimpse of available resources , investigate stratification of lava layers and take core samples to make observations and inferences.

I’m Signed up for NEON — Now What? (Grades K-12)
July 17, 2012, 6 – 7 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Anne Weiss will introduce participants to basic features of the NASA Educators Online Network, or NEON, professional/collaborative learning community. Participants will also learn how to use NEON to find appropriate NASA standards-aligned activities that satisfy state-specific teaching standards.

Kepler Mission: Searching for Earth-like Planets (Grades 6-12)
July 18, 2012, 7 – 8:15 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Tony Leavitt will discuss NASA’s Kepler Mission.  Kepler has been in space for three years searching for planets that are orbiting stars in the Milky Way galaxy. Participants will learn how transits are used to find planets and determine their sizes and distances from the stars they orbit.

Understanding Earth, Moon and Sun Connections (Grades K-12)
July 23, 2012, 2 – 3 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Sonya Williams will build on participants’ understanding of moon phases and the solar system to help them gain a better understanding of Earth, moon and sun connections. Participants will listen to a Native American/Western science story and take part in a hands-on activity.

Engineering Design Process Implementation (Grades K-12)
July 23, 2012, 6 – 7:30 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist John Weis will lead this webinar encouraging educators to share their experiences facilitating engineering design activities into their curriculum and assist them in creating an engineering design process activity within their specific content area.

Classroom Lunacy: Studying the Moon (Grades K-12 and Informal)
July 24, 2012, 10 – 11 a.m. EDT
Aerospace education Brandon Hargis will share NASA resources that will help participants develop lessons about the phenomena of moon phases and eclipses. Recent discoveries from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter and the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite missions will be shared during this activity.

Food for Thought (Grades 5-8)
July 24, 2012,
11 a.m. – noon EDT
Aerospace education Steve Culivan will share “Food for Thought,” a new NASA educator guide designed to explore space food and the nutritional needs of the astronauts. The guide includes a menu of inquiry activities and other resources to address this exciting topic.

Solar System Mission Exploration: Past, Present, Future (Grades 2-8)
July 24, 2012, 2 – 3 p.m.
EDT
Aerospace education specialist Rick Varner will discuss the process through which NASA researchers design missions to collect data from distant worlds. The presentation will briefly discuss the current and future exploration missions in our solar system and provide an activity that simulates remote sensing and sample return missions using simple materials.

Applying the Engineering Design Process to STEM Topics (Grades K-12)
July 24, 2012,
6 – 7 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist John Weis will lead this webinar where educators will discuss implementing the engineering design process as a method of problem solving in subject areas other than engineering.

Get Ready for the Landing of the Curiosity Rover (Grades K-12 and Informal)
July 25, 2012, 4 – 5 p.m. EDT
NASA’s newest Mars rover, Curiosity, is getting ready to land on Mars. Join aerospace education specialist Tom Estill to learn about Mars education resources available to formal and informal educators. Learn about Mars games, classroom activities, projects and e-learning opportunities, all to help you prepare for the upcoming Curiosity landing.

Living and Working in Space (Grades K-5)
July 26, 2012, 9 – 10 a.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Wil Robertson will introduce teachers to some of the obstacles humans face while traveling in space. The webinar will review the major difficulties and concerns of adapting to the space environment, from everyday living and personal hygiene to safety.

Our Solar System: A Model Overview (Grades 4-9)
July 26, 2012, 11 a.m. – noon EDT
Aerospace education specialist Steve Culivan will present NASA inquiry activities that demonstrate remote sensing and scale models to better visualize our sun, planets, asteroids and other objects as a whole system.

NASA Engineering Design Challenge: Can You Deliver? “Touchdown!” (Grades 5-10)
July 26, 2012, 7 – 8 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Tony Leavitt will share an activity that challenges students to safely deliver a cargo to the surface of Mars. This activity introduces students to the engineering design process, from brainstorming to writing a summary report. Given a particular set of materials, student teams design, build and test prototypes.

Putting NEON to Work for You, Part 2 (Grades K-12)
July 26, 2012, 9- 10 a.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Anne Weiss explains how to use the NASA Educators Online Network, or NEON’s, most important feature: the interest groups. Participants will role-play several scenarios to find out how NEON’s various tools can be used to find NASA activities that align to state-specific standards.


For more information about these webinars, and to see a full list of webinars taking place through August 2012, visit http://neon.psu.edu/webinars/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to
Gwendolyn Wheatle at Gwendolyn.H.Wheatle@nasa.gov.

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2012 Music and Astronomy Under the Stars Events

Join Dr. Donald Lubowich, coordinator of the Astronomy Outreach Program at Hofstra University, for a series of events bringing astronomy to the public. Concertgoers at several events this summer will get a glimpse of heavens along with their music.

This NASA-sponsored program will include optical and radio telescope observations of the Sun prior to the concerts. Observations of the moon, planets, multi-colored double stars, star clusters and nebulae will be featured at intermission and after the concerts. Videos, posters, hands-on activities and the sounds of the sun will also be available.

For more information and to see a full schedule of events, visit http://www.hofstra.edu/Academics/Colleges/HCLAS/PHYSIC/physic_underthestars.html.

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NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Ready for Launch!

Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network, or DLN, hosts Michael Hare and Damon Talley for a live interactive education event on July 16, 2012, at 2 p.m. EDT to celebrate the Soyuz launch of astronaut Suni Williams and the Expedition 32 crew. Students will learn about the upcoming mission to the International Space Station and meet an astronaut trainer that prepares astronauts and cosmonauts for their missions.

For more information and to watch the webcast online, visit the DLN website at http://dln.nasa.gov.

Inquiries about this webcast should be directed to Michael Hare at michael.w.hare@nasa.gov.


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Earth Science Information Partners Federation Summer Meeting 2012

The Federation of Earth Science Information Partners, or ESIP, invites teachers to attend a 1.5-day workshop on earth science education, with an integral strand dedicated to climate change education. Participants will be able to choose from several breakout sessions demonstrating ways that earth science tools and data can be used in science classrooms.

This summer’s workshop will take place July 17-18, 2012, at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. After the workshop, teachers are invited to stay for the ESIP conference plenary and poster reception.

Educators for grades 6-12 are eligible to receive a $200 time and travel stipend. Student registration rates and single-day registrations are also available. Those who are unable to attend in person may register to attend virtually.

To register for the workshop, please visit http://www.regonline.com/Register/Checkin.aspx?EventID=1078265.

To learn more about the ESIP summer conference, please visit http://esipfed.org/meetings.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to erinrobinson@esipfed.org.

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SpaceFest: Teacher Professional Development Event

Join fellow educators for an exclusive professional development event at the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum Complex, in New York City on Friday, July 20, 2012. This event coincides with SpaceFest, Intrepid Museum’s grand opening celebration for the new space shuttle Enterprise Pavilion.

Attendees will gain useful knowledge in areas of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Sessions will include hands-on demonstrations, activities and discussions with experts resulting in numerous take-aways for the classroom.

Pre-registration is required to attend. The deadline to register is July 17, 2012.

For more information and the event agenda, visit
http://www.intrepidmuseum.org/Spacefest-TeachersPD.aspx.

Questions about this event should be directed to
educationprograms@intrepidmuseum.org.

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Algebraic Skeletal System: Human Physiology in Space Web Seminar

NASA Explorer Schools and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on July 19, 2012, at 11 a.m. EDT.
The seminar focuses on human physiology. Obtain information about the effect microgravity has on the physiology of astronauts and learn about the countermeasures NASA uses to help overcome these effects when they return to Earth.

Outer space is an exciting part of our lives and promises to be an even more exciting part of the future for your students. It provides scientists with a unique laboratory, allowing scientific studies never possible in the history of civilization. Future space missions will continue to involve sending humans into space. But after extended stays in microgravity, astronauts must return safely to Earth and lead normal, healthy lives.

This seminar will provide instruction on how to integrate the Skeletal System: Human Physiology in Space lesson into your curriculum. There are two classroom activities in this lesson focusing on the effects of spaceflight on human physiology.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar26.aspx

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to the NASA Explorer Schools help desk at
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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NASA’s DEVELOP Program — 2012 Fall Session

DEVELOP is a NASA Science Mission Directorate Applied Sciences-sponsored internship that fosters the training and development of students in the atmospheric and geosciences. The DEVELOP Program extends the application of NASA Earth Science research and technology to meet societal needs.

Students conduct projects that focus on the practical application of NASA’s Earth Science research and demonstrate how results can benefit partner organizations and local communities. Advisors and mentors, from NASA and partner institutions, provide guidance and support for the program. Students gain experience using NASA science and technology in a professional setting.

Students from high school through doctoral levels are selected through a competitive application process. Students chosen by DEVELOP work on teams onsite at 10 locations nationwide. Activities are conducted during three 10-week terms per year: spring, summer and fall. To apply to a DEVELOP center at a NASA location, applicants must be a citizen of the U.S. However, international students currently registered at an accredited school in the U.S. are eligible to apply to DEVELOP regional locations. International applicants must already have a visa that permits them to work in the U.S.

Applications for the fall 2012 session are due July 23, 2012.

For more information about this unique internship opportunity, please visit the DEVELOP website at http://develop.larc.nasa.gov.

Questions about the DEVELOP Program should be directed by email to NASA-DL-DEVELOP@mail.nasa.gov or by telephone to 757-864-3761.

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Have a Blast Learning About the Moon With New Selene Video Game

Use your computer to journey back some 4.5 billion years, and prepare to blast away — you’re going to make a moon just like Earth’s. All you need to do is to register to play the award-winning “Selene” online video game from the Center for Educational Technologies, or CET. CET is the home of NASA-sponsored Classroom of the Future at Wheeling Jesuit University in Wheeling, W.Va.

In “Selene: A Lunar Construction Game,” you and your students learn about basic geological processes on Earth and in the solar system while helping educational researchers study how and when people learn through educational video games.

Funded by NASA and the National Science Foundation, “Selene” has won numerous awards, and research has shown that the game aids learning. But we need players. To register your students, email
selene@cet.edu with your contact info and times when you would be available for a short 30-minute orientation.

New for the 2012-2013 school year is a Spanish-language version of the game. The game is open to ages 9 and up and can be played anytime, anyplace. To learn more about “Selene,” read testimonials about it or see how it aligns with national and state science standards. Visit the “Selene” website at http://selene.cet.edu.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — June 21, 2012

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

New STEM on Station Page for Educators and Students
Audience: All Educators and Students

2012 Music and Astronomy Under the Stars Events
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Dates: Multiple dates June 23 – Oct. 26, 2012

Free Education Webinar Series from the Aerospace Education Services Project
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Dates: Various Dates During June 2012

2012 NASA’s Multiwavelength Universe Online Professional Development Course
Audience: 5-12 Educators and Higher Education Students
Event Dates: June 25 – July 13, 2012

2012 Pre-Service Teacher Institute at NASA’s Johnson Space Center
Audience: Higher Education Students
Applications are due June 27, 2012

Zero Robotics Video Challenge
Audience: All Educators and Students
Idea Submission Deadline: June 26, 2012

Graphing With MathTrax Web Seminar
Audience: 6-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: June 26, 2012

Human Body: Space Adaptations Web Seminar
Audience: 4-8 and Informal Educators
Event Date: June 28, 2012

Best of “Earth as Art” Contest from Landsat
Audience: All Educators and Students
Polls Close: July 6, 2012

NASA Office of Education Solicits Proposals for the NASA Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research, or EPSCoR
Audience: Higher Education Institutions in Eligible States
Notice of Intent Deadline: July 20, 2012
Proposal Deadline: Aug. 14, 2012

NASA’s DEVELOP Program — 2012 Fall Session
Audience: 9-12 and Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: July 23, 2012

Presenters Needed for 2013 Space Exploration Educators Conference
Audience: All Educators
Proposal Deadline: Sept. 6, 2012

2012 Gregory G. Leptoukh Online Giovanni Workshop
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Workshop Dates: Sept. 25-28, 2012

Celebrate World Space Week
Audience: All Educators
Event Date: Oct. 4-10, 2012

2013 NASA Space Settlement Design Contest
Audience: K-12 Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: March 15, 2013

Funding Selections Announced and Abstracts Available — NASA Research Announcement (NRA) Competitive Program for Science Museums and Planetariums Plus Opportunities for NASA Visitor Centers and Other Informal Education Institutions (CP4SMP+) (Announcement Number: NNH11ZHA004N, Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 43.008) — Available For Download
Audience: Informal Education Institutions
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New STEM onStation Page for Educators and Students

NASA Education is launching a new Web resource for students and educatorstitled STEM on Station. The new pages present videos that were filmed on the spacestation about science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM.Students can follow astronauts as they demonstrate principles such as Newton’sLaws of Motion, surface tension and advances in technology. NASA lesson plansand other resources supplement the STEM videos.

STEM on Station is part of the Teach Station site that is the platform forspace-station-focused education resources, science and research information forstudents and teachers, crew updates and current education news. Visit often andwatch for opportunities to connect with the expedition crew members and for otherNASA education opportunities.

Visit STEM on Station at https://www.nasa.gov/education/STEMstation.
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2012 Music andAstronomy Under the Stars Events

Join Dr. Donald Lubowich,coordinator of the Astronomy Outreach Program at Hofstra University, for aseries of events bringing astronomy to the public. Concertgoers at severalevents this summer will get a glimpse of heavens along with their music.

This NASA-sponsored program willinclude optical and radio telescope observations of the Sun prior to theconcerts. Observations of the moon, planets, multi-colored double stars, starclusters and nebulae will be featured at intermission and after the concerts.Videos, posters, hands-on activities and the sounds of the sun will also beavailable.

For more information and to seea full schedule of events, visit http://www.hofstra.edu/Academics/Colleges/HCLAS/PHYSIC/physic_underthestars.html.
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Free EducationWebinar Series from the Aerospace Education Services Project

The AerospaceEducation Services Project is presenting a series of free webinars through June2012. All webinars can be accessed online. Join aerospace education specialiststo learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources to bringNASA into your classroom.

Our Solar System: AModel Overview (Grades 4-9)
June 25, 2012, 11 a.m. -noon EDT
Aerospace educationspecialist Steve Culivan will present NASA inquiry activities that demonstrateremote sensing and scale models to better visualize our sun, planets, asteroidsand other objects as a whole system.

Our Solar System: AModel Overview (Grades 4-9)
June 25, 2012, 3 – 4p.m. EDT
Aerospace educationspecialist Steve Culivan will present NASA inquiry activities that demonstrateremote sensing and scale models to better visualize our sun, planets, asteroidsand other objects as a whole system.

For more information about thesewebinars, and to see a full list of webinars taking place through August 2012,visit http://neon.psu.edu/webinars/.

Questions about this series ofwebinars should be directed to Gwendolyn Wheatle at Gwendolyn.H.Wheatle@nasa.gov.
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2012 NASA’sMultiwavelength Universe Online Professional Development Course

In-service and pre-serviceteachers of middle- and high-school students are invited to register for anonline professional development course sponsored by several NASA missions thatare exploring the universe across the electromagnetic spectrum.

The course is offered foracademic or continuing education credit through Sonoma State University. In thecourse, participants will be shown how to use astronomical examples (images,phenomena, telescopes) to describe the nature of light and color in terms ofthe regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Participants will also learn whyNASA uses a variety of telescopes and space-based instruments to makeobservations of the universe. NASA resources for the classroom will be shared,and participants will learn how NASA resources can be used to address commonstudent misconceptions about the nature of light and color.

Formal presentations for thecourse will take place on four dates between June 25 and July 13, 2012, but will alsobe available for archival viewing. Homework for academic credit is due Aug. 17,2012.

Enrollment is limited to 25participants. Auditors are also welcomed, on a space-available basis.

For more information and toregister, visit http://epo.sonoma.edu/multiu.php.

Questions about this courseshould be directed to Lynn Cominsky at lynnc@universe.sonoma.edu.

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 Pre-Service Teacher Institute at NASA’s Johnson Space Center
 
ThePre-Service Teacher Institute has opened the July 2012 workshop and extendedthe deadline for more applications. This one-week residential session is forearly childhood and elementary education majors preparing to teach grades K-8.Participants will interface with NASA personnel and tour NASA facilities whilelearning to incorporate NASA’s research into lesson plans. Full-timeundergraduate students in their junior or senior year are invited to apply.Applications are due June 27, 2012.

Tolearn more and to participate in this opportunity, visit http://education.jsc.nasa.gov/psti/default.htm.
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ZeroRobotics Video Challenge

Kidsare always told to reach for the stars. Now, NASA is literally giving them achance to by providing middle and high school students with unprecedentedaccess to the International Space Station and letting them write the programsthat control state-of-the-art robots on the International Space Station — noPh.D. in astrophysics required!

The NASA Tournament Laboratory, established by NASA and Harvard University,along with the enabling capabilities of the TopCoder community, have partneredwith Tongal to hold a competition with cash prizes for winning ideas, pitchesand promotional videos to inspire tomorrow’s scientists to see mathematics asmore than just digits on a calculator, to further the study of outer space andto push the limits of human knowledge about the worlds (and the space) beyondour planet. The winning videos will help inspire middle and high schoolstudents to compete in the Zero Robotics Challenge, which is managed for NASAby the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, or MIT.

To learn more and to participate in this challenge, visit http://tongal.com/project/ZeroRobotics.

Important dates for the Zero Robotics Video Challengeare:

June 19 – 26, 2012:                      Ideaphase
July 2, 2012:                               Fivewinning ideas selected
July 2 – 16, 2012:                        Pitchphase
July 20, 2012:                             Fivewinning pitches selected
July 20, 2012 – Aug. 20, 2012:     Videophase
Aug. 27, 2012:                            Sevenwinning videos delivered to NASA


Note: TopCoder is a registered trademark of TopCoder, Inc. in the United States and othercountries. Tongal is a U.S. federal trademark held by Tongal, Inc.


Questions about the Zero Robotics Video Challenge should be directed to
info@tongal.com.

GraphingWith MathTrax Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, theNASA Explorer Schools project is hosting a 60-minute professional developmentWeb seminar for educators on June 26, 2012, at 8 p.m. EDT. Learn how touse a computer graphing tool to engage your students as they graph equations and data sets or experiment with physicssimulations. Help students explore the relationship between math equations andtheir application in the real world with roller coaster and rocketlaunch simulators.

For more information and to register online, visit https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-graphing-with-mathtrax/.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to the NES Help Desk at NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.
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Best of “Earth as Art” Contest from Landsat

To celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Landsat Program on July 23, 2012, NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey would like your help in selecting the top five “Earth as Art” images from the more than 120 scenes in our collection.

For 40 years Landsat satellites have been acquiring images of the land cover of the planet. The satellites have provided spectacular views of mountains, valleys, coastal areas, islands, volcanic fields, forests and patterns on the landscape. By highlighting some of those features and creatively crafting the colors, the series of “Earth as Art” perspectives reveal the artistic side of Landsat.

Voting closes on July 6, 2012. The Top five “Earth as Art” images will be announced on July 23 in Washington, D.C., at a special event commemorating the launch of the first Landsat satellite.

To view the images and vote for your favorites, visit https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/landsat/news/earth-as-art.html.
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Human Body: Space Adaptations Web Seminar

NASA Explorer Schools and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on June 28, 2012, at 2 p.m. EDT. Space is a harsh environment. When an astronaut goes into space, his or her body immediately begins to change, causing the astronaut to feel and even look slightly different. During this seminar, you will get information about the effects of microgravity on astronauts. You also will be guided through three student activities, which provide a first-hand look at the effects of reduced gravity on bones, the fluid shifts in the body and the amount of oxygen needed to survive.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar27.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to the NASA Explorer Schools help desk at NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.
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NASA Office of Education Solicits Proposals for the NASA Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research, or EPSCoR

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Office of Education, in cooperation with NASA’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD), Human Exploration & Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), and Science Mission Directorates (SMD), the Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT), and NASA’s ten Centers, solicits proposals for the NASA Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR). Each funded NASA EPSCoR proposal is expected to establish research activities that will make significant contributions to the strategic research and technology development priorities of one or more of the Mission Directorates or the OCT and contribute to the overall research infrastructure, science and technology capabilities, higher education, and economic development of the jurisdiction. If submitted, Notices of Intent are due on July 20, 2012, and proposals are due on Aug. 14, 2012.

Public Law 102-588, passed in 1992, authorized NASA to initiate NASA EPSCoR to strengthen the research capability of jurisdictions that have not in the past participated equably in competitive aerospace research activities. The goal of NASA EPSCoR is to provide seed funding that will enable jurisdictions to develop an academic research enterprise directed toward long-term, self-sustaining, nationally-competitive capabilities in aerospace and aerospace-related research. This capability will, in turn, contribute to the jurisdiction’s economic viability and expand the nation’s base for aerospace research and development. Since its inception, NASA EPSCoR has been closely linked to the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program (Space Grant).

While proposals can be accepted only from institutions for which the NASA EPSCoR Directors are currently serving, all institutions of higher education within the jurisdiction should be given the opportunity and must be made aware of the FY 2012 NASA EPSCoR CAN. The National Science Foundation (NSF) determines overall jurisdiction eligibility for NASA EPSCoR.

Details regarding general eligibility are available at http://www.nsf.gov/od/oia/programs/epscor/eligible.jsp.

The following jurisdictions are eligible to submit up to two proposals that must be submitted through the jurisdiction PI to this NASA EPSCoR solicitation: Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Vermont, West Virginia, and Wyoming.

South Carolina may submit up to three proposals, provided at least one of the proposals represents a project from the U.S. Virgin Islands (which currently falls under South Carolina’s jurisdiction).

For more information, visit http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId={36283FDE-A756-ED4D-426B-A7C0EA1FD9A3}&path=open.
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NASA’s DEVELOP Program — 2012 Fall Session

DEVELOP is a NASA Science Mission Directorate Applied Sciences-sponsored internship that fosters the training and development of students in the atmospheric and geosciences. The DEVELOP Program extends the application of NASA Earth Science research and technology to meet societal needs.

Students conduct projects that focus on the practical application of NASA’s Earth Science research and demonstrate how results can benefit partner organizations and local communities. Advisors and mentors, from NASA and partner institutions, provide guidance and support for the program. Students gain experience using NASA science and technology in a professional setting.

Students from high school through doctoral levels are selected through a competitive application process. Students chosen by DEVELOP work on teams onsite at 10 locations nationwide. Activities are conducted during three 10-week terms per year: spring, summer and fall. To apply to a DEVELOP center at a NASA location, applicants must be a citizen of the U.S. However, international students currently registered at an accredited school in the U.S. are eligible to apply to DEVELOP regional locations. International applicants must already have a visa that permits them to work in the U.S.

Applications for the fall 2012 session are due July 23, 2012.

For more information about this unique internship opportunity, please visit the DEVELOP website at http://develop.larc.nasa.gov.

Questions about the DEVELOP Program should be directed by email to NASA-DL-DEVELOP@mail.nasa.gov or by telephone to 757-864-3761.
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Presenters Needed for 2013 Space Exploration Educators Conference

The 19th Annual Space Exploration Educators Conference, or SEEC, is taking place Feb. 7-9, 2013, at Space Center Houston. The goal of SEEC is to encourage K-12 educators to use space to teach all subjects in their classrooms. Over 700 educators gather for this event each year.

Conference organizers are looking for 170 interactive sessions that present exciting classroom activities. All sessions must have a hands-on component; lecture sessions will not be accepted. Proposals are due Sept. 6, 2012.

For more information, visit http://spacecenter.org/TeachersSEEC.html.

If you have any questions about the conference, please call 281-244-2149 or email seec@spacecenter.org.
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2012 Gregory G. Leptoukh Online Giovanni Workshop

Join the NASA Goddard Earth Science Data and Information Services Center for the 2012 Gregory G. Leptoukh Online Giovanni Workshop taking place Sept. 25-28, 2012. This workshop will focus on the use of the pioneering data visualization and analysis tool, Giovanni. The online workshop will be organized around four main themes: Earth system research utilizing Giovanni; Giovanni applications (air quality, disaster management, environmental monitoring, etc.); planned and desired augmentation of Giovanni; and educational use of Giovanni.

The workshop will primarily consist of online author-led presentations coupled with real-time discussions about these presentations. Presentations and chat logs will be available online for review for those unable to participate in live sessions.

To learn more, visit http://disc.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/giovanni/additional/newsletters/gregory_leptoukh_2012_online_giovanni_workshop.

Questions about this workshop should be directed to Dr. James G. Acker at James.G.Acker@nasa.gov.
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Celebrate World Space Week

Join educators and space enthusiasts around the world to celebrate World Space Week, Oct. 4-10, 2012. This international event commemorates the beginning of the Space Age with the launch of Sputnik 1 on Oct. 4, 1957.

World Space Week is the largest public space event in the world, with celebrations in more than 50 nations. During World Space Week, teachers are encouraged to use space-themed activities. The theme for 2012, “Space for Human Safety and Security,” has been chosen to celebrate the many ways in which mankind’s activities in space improve our daily lives.

To find NASA educational resources that can be used during World Space Week, visit the Educational Materials Finder: http://search.nasa.gov/search/edFilterSearch.jsp?empty=true.

To learn more about World Space Week, search for events in your area and find educational materials related to the event, visit www.worldspaceweek.org.
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2013 NASA Space Settlement Design Contest

Design a space settlement! Space settlements are permanent communities in orbit, as opposed to being on the moon or other planets. Designing a space settlement involves physics, mathematics, space science, environmental science and many other disciplines.

The NASA Space Settlement Design Contest is intended for students in grades 6-12, although younger students may enter. Individual or teams from anywhere in the world may enter. Grade levels are judged separately, except for the grand prize. All participants will receive a certificate.

Submissions must be received by March 15, 2013.

For more information about the NASA Space Settlement Design Contest, visit http://settlement.arc.nasa.gov/Contest/.

If you have any questions about the contest, please email Al Globus at aglobus@mail.arc.nasa.gov.
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Funding Selections Announced and Abstracts Available — NASA Research Announcement (NRA) Competitive Program for Science Museums and Planetariums Plus Opportunities for NASA Visitor Centers and Other Informal Education Institutions (CP4SMP+) (Announcement Number: NNH11ZHA004N, Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 43.008) — Available For Download

Selections with abstracts for this NRA are available on the CP4SMP+ portal page on NSPIRES at URL: http://go.nasa.gov/NKC2V0.

The NASA June 18, 2012 press release is at URL: https://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2012/jun/HQ_12-205_Museum_Exhibits_Selected.html.

A competitive call for new CP4SMP+ proposals is anticipated for release in Fiscal Year 2013. While waiting for the 2013 CP4SMP+, potential proposers can review 1) the above referenced 2011 NRA; 2) NASA’s most current Guidebook for Proposers Responding to a NASA Research Announcement (NRA) or Cooperative Agreement Notice (CAN) at http://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/procurement/nraguidebook/ and 3) NASA’s Grant and Cooperative Agreement Handbook at http://prod.nais.nasa.gov/pub/pub_library/grcover.htm.

No further information is available about the 2013 NRA.
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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — May 3, 2012

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community.Full descriptions are listed below.

Astronaut Don Pettit Shares Space Physics “Science Off the Sphere”Videos
Audience: All Educators and Students

Free Education WebinarSeries from the Aerospace Education Services Project
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Dates: Various Dates during May 2012

Celebrate Space Day at the National Air and Space Museum
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: May 5, 2012

Engineering Design: Forces and Motion –Balloon Aerodynamics Challenge Web Seminar
Audience: 6-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: May 7, 2012

QuadraticFunctions: Exploring Space Through Math — Weightless Wonder Web Seminar
Audience: 9-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: May 9, 2012

Live Video Chat: How SpaceStation Research Affects Life onEarth
Audience: Grades 7-12
Event Date: May 11, 2012, 2-3 p.m. EDT

Pre-Service TeacherInstitutes at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: May 11, 2012
Institute Dates: July 14-27, 2012

For High School Juniorsand Seniors: 2012 Lunabotics University/College Recruitment Fair
Audience: 9-12 Students
Application Deadline: May 11, 2012
Event Date: May 26, 2012

2012-2013 NationalStudent Solar Spectrograph Competition
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Deadline to register and apply for build awards: Sept. 30, 2012

What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website
Audience: K-6 Educators

Additional FrequentlyAsked Questions — NASA Research Announcement (NRA) Competitive Program forScience Museums and Planetariums Plus Opportunities for NASA Visitor Centersand Other Informal Education Institutions (CP4SMP+) (Announcement Number:NNH11ZHA004N, Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 43.008) –Available For Download
Audience: Informal Education Institutions

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Astronaut Don Pettit Shares Space Physics”Science Off the Sphere” Videos

NASA astronaut and Expedition 31 crew member DonPettit continues to examine how microgravity affects scientific principlesthrough “Science Off the Sphere,” a video series featuring unique physicsexperiments performed on the International Space Station using everydayobjects.

NASA and the American Physical Society, or APS, have partnered to share thevideos with students, educators and science fans around the world.

In the short, downloadable videos, Pettit has used knitting needles and waterdroplets to examine static electricity, demonstrated capillary flow by creatinga zero-gravity tea cup, used thin water films to experiment with fluid motion,shared infrared imagery of Earth and more.

APS, the professional society for physicists, shares new “Science Off the Sphere” videos every other Thursday on itsoutreach website, Physics Central. The website also features educationalcontent on the physics topics demonstrated in space by Pettit and facilitates aphysics-oriented challenge based on the experiments. APS reviews the responsesand identifies a winner, who is recognized by Pettit in a future installment.

For more information and to view the science demonstrations, visit: http://www.physicscentral.com/sots.

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Free Education Webinar Series from the AerospaceEducation Services Project

The Aerospace Education Services Project ispresenting a series of free webinars through May 2012. All webinars can beaccessed online. Join aerospace education specialists to learn aboutactivities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources to bring NASA into yourclassroom.

NASA and Education Resource Access (Grades K-12)
May 3, 2012, 3:30 – 4:30 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Sonya Williamswill explain NASA’s mission directorates and their purposes. Learn about theK-12 educational materials created by each of the directorates and howeducators can access these materials free of charge. Learn about citizenscience opportunities, student design challenges and many other NASA resourcesthat educators can incorporate into their classrooms.

Animals in Space (Grades K-5)
May 3, 2012, 7 – 8 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Wil Robertsonwill demonstrate how teachers can use stuffed animals as props in telling thestory of the animals that preceded humans in space. The program is geared forteachers in K-5 with a special focus of aligning the topic with the CoreLiteracy Standards for elementary grades. Web resources will be provided.

Animals in Space (Grades K-5)
May 5, 2012, 9 – 10 a.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Wil Robertsonwill demonstrate how teachers can use stuffed animals as props in telling thestory of the animals that preceded humans in space. The program is geared forteachers in K-5 with a special focus of aligning the topic with the Core LiteracyStandards for elementary grades. Web resources will be provided.

Food for Thought: Space Food and Nutrition inthe Classroom (Grades 4-9)
May 5, 2012, 11 a.m. -noon EDT
Aerospace education specialist Steve Culivanwill share “Food for Thought,” a new NASA educator guide designed toexplore space food and the nutritional needs of astronauts that includes a menuof inquiry activities and other resources to address this exciting topic.

Rocket Scientists Write? (Grades K-12)
May 7, 2012, 6 – 7 p.m.EDT

Aerospace education specialist John Weis willdemonstrate language arts activities using NASA materials and lessons foundwithin NASA educator guides. Materials discussed will cover readingcomprehension and composition for grades K-12. Lesson plans and strategies willbe shared.

NASA’s S’COOL Program (Grades 4-12)
May 8, 2012, 3:30 – 4:30p.m.
Aerospace education specialist Les Gold willintroduce NASA’s Students’ Cloud Observations On-Line, or S’COOL, program. Theprogram engages students to make observations of cloud type and cover and thenshare it with NASA. Scientists use the data to assist their understanding ofglobal climate change. After sending in observations, teachers receivesatellite images for comparison to student data.

Free Planetarium Program for Your Computer(Grades K-12)
May 15, 2012, 3:30 -4:30 p.m.
Aerospace education specialist Les Gold willintroduce participants to a free planetarium program. Participants will learnhow to use the program to demonstrate day/night cycles, the sun’s changingposition in the sky, as well as seasons, phases of the moon, constellations andmore.

Looking at Our Earth From Above (Grades 4-9)
May 15, 2012, 6 – 7 p.m.
Aerospace education specialist Steve Culivanwill integrate science, technology, engineering, mathematics and geography, orSTEM-G, with Earth observations, remote sensing and maps. NASA curriculumproducts, missions and other resources will be utilized to demonstrate aninquiry-based teaching strategy to better understand Earth and the processesthat shape it.

Mars Uncovered: Revealing the Geologic Historyof Mars (Grades 5-12)
May 16, 2012, 7:30 -8:30 p.m.

Aerospace education specialist Tony Leavitt willshare an inquiry-based lesson that presents a critical-thinking approach ofstudying the surface of Mars. This process is similar to the approach used byNASA scientists. This lesson will teach students to examine geologic featuresof a planetary surface and use relative-age dating techniques to analyze theinformation and interpret the geologic history.

Rocket Scientists Write? (Grades K-12)
May 21, 2012, 6 – 7 p.m.EDT

Aerospace education specialist John Weis willdemonstrate language arts activities using NASA materials and lessons foundwithin NASA educator guides. Materials discussed will cover readingcomprehension and composition for grades K-12. Lesson plans and strategies willbe shared.

Toys in Space (Grades 4-9)
May 24, 2012, 7 – 8 p.m.EDT

Aerospace education specialist Steve Culivanwill share NASA’s Toys in Space videos and activities. In this program,astronauts took toys from around the world with them into space. Studentspredict, observe and record how the toys behave without the effects of Earth’sgravity, putting Newton’s Laws of Motion to the test. Participants will receivecopies of the astronaut videos for use in the classroom.

Sun-Earth-Moon Relationships (Grades K-8)
May 24, 2012, 7 – 8 p.m.EDT

Aerospace education specialist Rick Varner willintroduce sun-Earth-moon models that help to explain the phases of the moon andboth lunar and solar eclipses. Additionally, the activity “KinestheticAstronomy” will be introduced for its explanation of the seasons.

For more information about these webinars, andto see a full list of webinars taking place through June 2012, visit http://neon.psu.edu/webinars/.

Questions about this series of webinars shouldbe directed to Gwendolyn Wheatle at Gwendolyn.H.Wheatle@nasa.gov.

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Celebrate Space Day at the National Air andSpace Museum

Celebrate Space Day at the National Air andSpace Museum, on Saturday, May 5, 2012.This event is sponsored by Lockheed Martin.

Space Day is an annual favorite at the National Air and Space Museum. Visitorsenjoy hands-on activities; meet NASA astronauts, scientists and engineers; findout how space suits are made; design a mission patch; and learn about spacefrom museum experts.

Visit the Museum’s National Mall building in Washington, D.C. to see the BuzzLightyear action figure that flew in space. Or get an up-close look at spaceshuttle Discovery at the Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va.

For a list of scheduled events, visit http://www.nasm.si.edu/events/dateRange.cfm?date=5/5/2012.

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EngineeringDesign: Forces and Motion — Balloon Aerodynamics Challenge Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences foreducators, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science TeachersAssociation are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminarfor educators on May 7, 2012, at 6:30p.m. EDT. This Web seminar will introduce the Forces and Motion: BalloonAerodynamics Challenge for students. This activity provides first-handinformation about density, neutral buoyancy and drag, which is then used to solvea problem. The activity provides many opportunities for incorporating nationalmathematics, science and technology learning standards into your curriculum.

For more information and to registeronline, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar23.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to the NES Help Desk at NASA.Explorer.Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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Quadratic Functions: Exploring Space Through Math — Weightless Wonder

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences foreducators, the NASA Explorer Schools project is hosting a 60-minute Web seminaron May 9, 2012, at 8 p.m. EDT.Investigate the characteristics of quadratic functions to solve real-worldproblems involving the parabolic flight path of NASA’s Weightless Wonder C-9jet. Get an overview of a student investigation, solve related quadraticequations and evaluate and graph quadratic functions. A graphing calculatorwill be used to demonstrate concepts; however, you do not need a calculator forthis professional development seminar.

For more information and toregister online, visit https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-quadratic-functions/.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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Live Video Chat: How Space Station Research Affects Life on Earth

The NASA Explorer Schools project is offering students in grades 7-12 anopportunity to ask questions of Tara Ruttley, the associate program scientistfor the International Space Station. Join the video chat on May 11, 2012, from 2-3 p.m. EDT.Ruttley will answer questions submitted during this live video chat aboutconducting research on the space station and the benefits of this research toastronauts living and working in space and to life on Earth.

Students do not need to be in a school participating in the NASA ExplorerSchools project in order to ask questions during this video chat.

Submit questions during the chat through a chatwindow, or send them to NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

To learn more about NES, visit the explorerschools.nasa.gov website.

For more information and to view the video chat, visit https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/nes2/home/research-ruttley-chat.html.

If you have any questions about the video chat, contact NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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Pre-Service Teacher Institutes at NASA’sMarshall Space Flight Center

NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center has partneredwith Oakwood University to offer a two-week Pre-Service Teacher Institutetaking place July 14-27, 2012, in Huntsville, Ala. This residential session isfor education majors preparing to teach grades 4-8.

Participants will engage in hands-on learningexperiences designed to develop their skills for teaching science, technology,engineering and mathematics using NASA-developed curriculum resources.Full-time undergraduate students in their junior or senior year at minorityinstitutions are invited to apply. Housing, meals, travel assistance and astipend will be provided.

Applications must be postmarked by May 11, 2012.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/msfc/psti.

Please email any questions about thisopportunity to Marilyn Lewis at marilyn.h.lewis@nasa.gov.

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For High School Juniors and Seniors: 2012Lunabotics University/College Recruitment Fair

As part of NASA’s Third Annual Lunabotics MiningCompetition, a University/College Recruitment Fair will be held on May 26,2012, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Top colleges and universitiesfrom across the U.S. will be at the fair to share information about science,technology, engineering and mathematics opportunities at their schools. NASAscientists and engineers will be available to answer questions about specificmajors and technical career paths.

Students interested in attending this freerecruitment fair are asked to register online before May 11, 2012. Toregister, visit http://www.secorstrategies.com/nasa-lunabotics.

Inquiries about this event should be directed toMary Baker at Mary@SecorStrategies.com.

To learn more about NASA’s Lunabotics MiningCompetition, visit www.nasa.gov/lunabotics.

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2012-2013 National Student Solar SpectrographCompetition

The National Student Solar Spectrograph Competition is the Montana Space Grant Consortium’sEducation Program for NASA’s Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, or IRIS,mission. IRIS will use spectrography and imaging in ultraviolet wavelengths toreveal the dynamics of the sun’s chromospheres and transition region.

This yearly competition is open to undergraduate interdisciplinary teams fromcolleges and universities across the U.S. Teams are challenged to design andbuild a working ground-based solar spectrograph and demonstrate thecapabilities of the spectrograph as defined by their science goal. Typicalteams have three to six students and must have a faculty advisor.

Both substantial scholarship prizes and travel prizes will be given in fourcategories: best design, best build, best science observations and bestpresentation of results. Teams may apply for funding of $2,000 per team forproject materials. Priority for build funds will be given to minority-servinginstitutions, community colleges and institutions with less aerospace activity.

Applications for build awards and registrations are due on Sept. 30, 2012.

The competition will be held in Bozeman, Mont., in May 2013.

For more information and to register online, visit http://www.spacegrant.montana.edu/IRIS/index.html.

Please email any questions about this competition to RandyLarimer at rlarimer@ece.montana.edu.

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What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website

The Space Place is a NASA website for elementary school-aged kids, theirteachers and their parents.

     Space is harsh! It’s vicious!
     It reminds us every day.
     There‛s heat and cold and sun thatblasts
     All objects in its way,
     The zero-g, no gravity!
     A galactic cosmic ray!
     And not a whiff of air to breathe.
     Nor guide to show the way.

At the Space Place, we have plenty to remind you of the nature of nature whenyou leave Mother Earth.

New at spaceplace.nasa.gov
It was a dark and stormy August night in 1859 … solar stormy, that is. Asolar storm caused such bright Northern Lights that gold miners in the Rockieswere frying up bacon and eggs at 1 a.m. thinking the sun was up.

Violent storms on the sun blast out charged particles and radiation that candamage satellites, power grids, and communication and navigation systems. Inthe new game “Shields Up!” you are in charge of protecting threesatellites by putting them into safe mode whenever bad stuff is coming theirway. The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite – R Series, orGOES-R, monitors the sun’s surface and warns the other satellites when theyneed to get ready for the worst.

Put your “Shields Up!and save those satellites at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/shields-up.

Space Place en Español
Black Hole Rescue!,
enespañol, is a challenging game in which you must spell out black-hole-relatedvocabulary words by clicking on moving letter tiles that have been dropped intoa swirling vortex of matter that is slowly being devoured by a black hole. Talkabout a harsh environment. So time is of the essence!

This is a good language arts game for Spanish speakers or learners. Accentedletters must be matched too. No substituting an “n” for an “ñ” or an “e” for an“é.” Rescue words from the black hole at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/sp/black-hole-rescue.

New Space Place “Listmania®”
“Customers who bought this item also bought . . .” is a commonmarketing ploy on popular retail websites. Well, The Space Place team knows agood idea when we see one, and we are not above borrowing. You will now findrecommendations at the bottom of every Space Place article, game or activity.There’s a lot of cross-pollination on the site, so these suggestions shouldhelp visitors deepen their appreciation for any topic that engages theirinterest.

For the Classroom
What’s the weirdest, most alien place you can imagine? Well, nomatter how extreme your imaginary world, there’s probably something like itsomewhere in the universe, probably in our own galaxy. Even our own solarsystem has some real doozies. Methane rain on Saturn’s moon Titan? Crushingpressures in Jupiter’s atmosphere? A surface hot enough to melt lead on Venus?So, how do space scientists and engineers know what kinds of scienceinstruments (cameras, spectrometers, etc.) to put on spacecraft that aredestined for one of these strange places? The classroom activity “Designing forthe Barely Imaginable” explains these planetary science instruments asextensions of our five senses, with each type of instrument analogous to eyes,ears, noses, etc. The activity invites students to imagine and describe analien world, then design a pretend mission to explore that world and give theresults! This activity involves engineering design, physics, earth science andlanguage arts. Find it at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/classroom-activities/#alienworld.

Forout-of-school time
Here’s a classic physics experiment with a space exploration twist.Crush an aluminum can without even touching it. This version of the activity ispresented in the context of testing a new spacecraft material. How would thismaterial work in the harsh vacuum of space? The activity requires pouring asmall amount of boiling water into an empty soft-drink can, which an adult cando, but the rest is very doable by a child. And the result is a dramaticdemonstration (and explanation) of atmospheric pressure. It makes it look as ifwe ourselves withstand a measure of harshness under the weight of our ownatmosphere. It’s at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/soda-can-test.

Special Days

May 2, 1953: First Commercial Jet Flight
Why can’t we just fly into space? Read about a rocket that hitches anairplane ride for part of the trip to space. http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/galex-pegasus.

May 17: Pack Rat Day
You can’t afford to be a pack rat whenyou are packing for a trip to Mars. Trythis fun, geometry-oriented activity for your class. http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/classroom-activities/#marspacking

May 18, 1980: Mount St. Helens Erupted, Completely Blowing Off Its Top
Volcanoes look amazing from space. See Mount St. Helens and others at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/gallery-earth/#volcanos.

June 5: World Environment Day
How are satellites helping us understand and care for the environment? Oneway is by tracking migrating endangered animals. http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/migration

June 15: Nature Photography Day
Kids can make their own cameras and take awesome nature pictures whilelearning about light. http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/classroom-activities/#pinhole

June 16, 1914: Birthday of LymanSpitzer, Jr.
He was a great scientist, and the Spitzer Space Telescope is named for him.Read how it was invented to make a dream come true. http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/story-lucy

And anotherthing…
If you are taking a vacation from the classroom, have a wonderful,restorative summer. Before you let those kids go, however, remind them to visitThe Space Place in between their other screen-related activities!

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Additional Frequently Asked Questions — NASAResearch Announcement (NRA) Competitive Program for Science Museums andPlanetariums Plus Opportunities for NASA Visitor Centers and Other InformalEducation Institutions (CP4SMP+) (Announcement Number: NNH11ZHA004N, Catalog ofFederal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 43.008) — Available For Download

Four Frequently Asked Questions received afterthe proposal due date have been added to the CP4SMP+ portal page on NSPIRES atthe following URL:

http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId=%7b75AAC7BF-2F69-6C73-2980-B1DCF25EA665%7d&path=closed

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For afull list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:

For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — March 29, 2012

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community.Full descriptions are listed below.

New Space Station Page for Educators and Students
Audience: Grades K-12

NASA at the 2012 NSTAConference
Audience: All Educators
Conference Dates: March 29 – April 1, 2012

Visit NASA Explorer Schools at the 2012NSTA Conference
Audience: 4-12 Educators
Event Dates: March 29 – April 1, 2012

Free Education Webinar Series from the AerospaceEducation Services Project
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Dates: Various Dates for April 2012

Pythagorean Theorem: ExploringSpace Through Math — Lunar Rover Web Seminar
Audience: 9-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: April 2, 2012

Virtual Professional Development:Exploring NASA
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Dates: Sessions on April 2 and April 5, 2012

Electromagnetic Spectrum: Remote SensingIces on Mars Web Seminar
Audience: 8-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: April 3, 2012

Live Video Chat: One Giant Chargefor a Robot
Audience: Grades 8-12
Event Date: April 4, 2012, noon – 1 p.m. EDT

Properties ofLiving Things: Searching for Life on Mars Web Seminar
Audience: 4-8 and Informal Educators
Event Date: April 5, 2012

Airborne Research Experiences forEducators and Students Academy
Audience: 5-12 Educators
Application Deadline: April 16, 2012

Educator Workshop: Greenhouse Gases and Their Roles on Earth
Audience: Grade 6-12 Educators
Registration Deadline: April 17, 2012
Event Date: April 21, 2012

Free Lecture — John Glenn:Earning the Right Stuff as a Decorated Marine Aviator and Navy Test Pilot — Attendin Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: May 24, 2012


Free Lecture — NASA’s Legacy andFuture: Personal Reflections of a Space Flyer — Attend in Person or ViewOnline
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: June 27, 2012

2012Humans in Space Youth Art Competition
Audience: K-12 Students
Deadline: Oct. 21, 2012

New Brochure Available Online: International Space Station Benefits forHumanity
Audience: All Educators andStudents

Updated Rockets Guide Available Online
Audience: K-12 Educators

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New Space Station Page for Educators and Students

NASA Education is launching a new Web page for students and educators about theInternational Space Station.

Teach Station is the platform for space-station-focused education resources,science and research information for students and teachers, crew updates, andup-to-the minute education news. Visit often and watch for opportunities toconnect with the expedition crew members and other NASA educationopportunities.

Take a moment to visit the page “A Teacher in Space” and meet Joe Acaba. Readabout his experience as an astronaut and his transition from a classroomteacher to the astronaut corps. Acaba’s next assignment is flight engineer forExpedition 31. He will join the crew on the International Space Station in May2012.

Visit the new Web page at www.nasa.gov/education/teachstation.

Download a Teach Station bookmark at https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/Teach_Station_Bookmark.html.

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NASA at the 2012 NSTA Conference

Make NASA a part of your National ScienceTeachers Association, or NSTA, experience this year! The 2012 NSTA’s nationalconference is being held March29 – April 1, 2012, in Indianapolis, Ind. Dozens of NASApresentations, workshops and short courses are scheduled during the conference.To find NASA sessions that fit in your schedule, visit http://bit.ly/nsta2012.

Also, stop by the NASA exhibit booth (#2159) tolearn about exciting new NASA programs and products.

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VisitNASA Explorer Schools at the 2012 NSTA Conference

If you are attending the 2012National Science Teachers Association National Conference on Science Educationin Indianapolis on March 29 through April 1, be sure tostop by NASA’s exhibit booth #2159 in the exhibit hall. NASA Explorer Schools,or NES, representatives will be there to share information and answer yourquestions.

If you are not yet a participant in the NES project, you can obtain detailedinformation about NES by visiting the booth or attending a NES presentation.The session, “Teach STEM? NASA Explorer Schools Can Help!”, takesplace on Fri., March 30, from 11 a.m. -noon in the Cabinet Room of the Westin Indianapolis.

Everyone is invited to attend any of the additional NES lesson-relatedsessions:
— The “Virtual Lab and NASA Explorer Schools” session takes place onFriday, March 30, from 4 – 4:45 p.m.in room 142 of the Convention Center.
— The “NASA Engineering Design Challenge: Thermal Protection System”session takes place on Sat., March 31,from 9:30 – 10:30 a.m., in room 111/112 of the Convention Center.

Attend one of these presentations and see how NES helps teachers by packagingeverything needed to deliver an exciting NASA-related lesson to students!

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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FreeEducation Webinar Series from the Aerospace Education Services Project

Aerospace Education Services Project ispresenting a series of free webinars through June 2012. All webinars can beaccessed online. Join aerospace education specialists to learn aboutactivities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources to bring NASA into yourclassroom.

NASA Literature and Science (GradesK-5)
April 2, 2012, 4 – 5 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Lester Morales will share an array of NASA literatureto enrich students’ vocabulary and scientific skills. During this session Moraleswill review The Air we Breathe, Echo the Bat and Amelia the Pigeon. Participants will practice the scientific methodand remote sensing in both the city and in the wild.

Physics Resources for Secondary School (Grades 5-12)
April 2, 2012, 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. EDT.
Aerospace education specialist John Weis will demonstrate simple activities andresources for teaching physics at middle- and high-school levels. Topics andresources covered will include Newton’s Laws of Motion, energy, light and gravity.Lesson plans and modification strategies will be discussed.

Mass Versus Weight: A Heavy-Duty Concept (Grades 5-8)
April 3, 2012, 3 – 4:30 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Steve Culivan will discuss mass and weightand how these words that have a big difference in meaning often get usedincorrectly by students. This workshop will explore these terms using inquiryactivities and NASA resources, including a NASA video filmed on theInternational Space Station.

Physics Resources for Secondary School (Grades 5-12)
April 5, 2012, 4:30 – 5:30 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist John Weis will demonstrate simpleactivities and resources for teaching physics at middle- and high-school levels.Topics and resources covered will include Newton’s Laws of Motion, energy, lightand gravity. Lesson plans and modification strategies will be discussed.

Color Spinners: Understanding Light andColor (Grades 4-8)
April 6, 2012, 6 – 7 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Christina Comer will explain light and colorby constructing color spinners and observing the effects of rapid movementusing colors. This webinar will be a fun introduction illustrating howdifferent colors can be made and then changed.

NASA and Education Resource Access (Grades K-12)
April 11, 2012, 3:30 – 4:30 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Sonya Williams will explain NASA’s missiondirectorates and their purposes. Learn about K-12 educational materials createdby each of the directorates and how educators can access these materials freeof charge. Learn about citizen science opportunities, student design challengesand many other NASA resources that educators can incorporate into theirclassrooms.

Messenger’s Mission to Mercury (GradesK-12)
April 16, 2012, 5 – 6 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Brandon Hargis will provide an overview ofthe Messenger mission to the planet Mercury and will share lessons andactivities connected with the mission. Participants will learn where to findonline resources to bring the excitement of exploring Mercury into theclassroom. Attendees will learn about geological processes and create a labeledillustration of lava layering.

Start a Space Garden (Grades K-5)
April 18, 2012, 4 – 5 p.m. EDT

Aerospace education specialist Tom Estill will share how to start a schoolgarden using seeds from NASA’s Seeds in Space project and the Canadian SpaceAgency’s Tomatosphere project. Over the past 10 years, Tomatosphere has evolvedinto a regular component of the curriculum for more than 13,700 classrooms inCanada and the United States. At the end of the workshop, a NASA space seedssurprise awaits you.

Animals in Space (Grades K-5)
April 18, 2012, 6:30 – 7:30 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Wil Robertson will demonstrate how teachers can use stuffed animalsas props in telling the story of the animals that preceded humans in space. Theprogram is geared for teachers in K-5 with a special focus of aligning thetopic with the Core Literacy Standards for elementary grades. Web resourceswill be provided.

NASA Literature and Science (GradesK-5)
April 25, 2012, 4 – 5 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Lester Morales will share an array of NASA literatureto enrich students’ vocabulary and scientific skills. During this session Moraleswill review The Air we Breathe, Echo the Bat and Amelia the Pigeon. Participants will practice the scientific methodand remote sensing in both the city and in the wild.

For more information about the webinars listed above, and to see a full list ofwebinars taking place through May 2012, visit http://neon.psu.edu/webinars/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to GwendolynWheatle at Gwendolyn.H.Wheatle@nasa.gov.

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PythagoreanTheorem: Exploring Space Through Math — Lunar Rover WebSeminar

NASA Explorer Schools and the Learning Environments and Research Network, orLE&RN, projects are hosting a 60-minute live professional development Webseminar for educators on April 2, 2012,at 8 p.m. EDT. Learn to use the distance formula and the Pythagoreantheorem to determine the minimal path and minimal time for a lunar rover toperform tasks on the surface of the moon. Participants should have a basicknowledge of scale factor and application of the Pythagorean theorem. Havingaccess to a calculator is helpful but not necessary for session.

For more information and toregister online, visit https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-pythagorean-theorem/.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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VirtualProfessional Development: Exploring NASA

Science,technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, are the foundation forstudying clouds and seasons. Explore clouds and alleviate the misconception ofseasons. Learn how NASA researchers study the sun’senergy and how it effects Earth. Check out these virtual professionaldevelopment sessions to help you tilt students toward STEM.

If you’re interested in receiving professionaldevelopment activity units applicable toward license renewal, register andcomplete the two workshops in the series and the post activity to accumulate fiveworkshop hours.

The session dates of this workshop series are April 2, 2012 and April 5,2012.

Get registered to learn more https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/virginia-virtual-professional-development-form/.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Karen Ricks at Karen.Ricks@nasa.gov.

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ElectromagneticSpectrum: Remote Sensing Ices on Mars Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, theNASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association arehosting a 90-minute web seminar on April3, 2012, at 8:15 p.m. EDT. Learn how to use authentic NASA mission data toinvestigate the composition and distribution of ices in the high latituderegions of Mars through analysis of visible light, infrared light and gammarays. The seminar includes information about a unique student extensionactivity, where students access a free computer simulation illustrating howgamma rays are used to determine the chemical composition of Mars.

For more information and to registeronline, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar1.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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Live Video Chat: One Giant Charge for a Robot

The NASA Explorer Schools, or NES, project presents a live video chat with NASArobotics engineer Sandeep Yayathi. Sandeep Yayathi works on Robonaut, adexterous humanoid robot built and designed at NASA’s Johnson Space Center inHouston. On April 4, 2012, Yayathiwill answer student questions about his work with Robonaut, his career path andwhat the future holds for robotics. Robonaut 2, or R2, launched to theInternational Space Station on space shuttle Discovery as part of the STS-133mission. It is the first dexterous humanoid robot in space and the first U.S.-builtrobot at the space station.

Yayathi is developing a new power system including a battery backpack to allowRobonaut 2 to move about freely without having to be plugged into the spacestation’s power grid. Eventually, the new power system will allow an upgradedversion of the robot to work outside the station.

Submit questions during the chat through a chat window, or send them to NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

To learn more about NES, visit the explorerschools.nasa.gov website.

For more information and to view the video chat, visit https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/nes2/home/robonaut-chat.html.

If you have any questions about the video chat, contact NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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Properties of Living Things: Searching for Life on Mars Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, theNASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association arehosting a 90-minute Web seminar for educators on April 5, 2012, at 6:30 p.m. EDT. Review criteria for determining ifsomething is alive and learn how students can apply the criteria in a hands-onactivity. A video will be shown that connects the activity to a NASA mission. Collaboratewith other participants about ways of using and adapting the activity.Extension activities for students interested in the topic will be provided.

For more informationand to register online, visit URL http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar7.aspx

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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AirborneResearch Experiences for Educators and Students Academy

The NASA Airborne Research Experiences forEducators and Students, or AREES, program is recruiting science, technology,engineering and mathematics, or STEM, educators of students in grades 5-12 toparticipate in a two-week residential Academy in Palmdale, Calif. The Academywill be offered June 18-29, 2012. The dynamic trainingprogram provides research-based experiences for educators using NASA’s uniqueflight platforms. Participants will engage as science practitioners by becominginvolved in a NASA earth science mission.

The workshop is designed to combine research-based opportunities for educatorswith NASA content-based curriculum and student-focused design challenges in aprogram that focuses on three education goals:
1.  Engage participants in NASA’s unique,airborne research-based missions.
2.  Increase educators’ core scientificand research knowledge bases.
3.  Develop NASA’s airborneresearch-based curriculum and student activities.

Experiences will include technical content instruction by scientists andengineers, hands-on learning of airborne data collection methods andoperations, and a field site investigation to collect ground truth data fromthe Elkhorn Slough in Monterey Bay, Calif., for comparison to data collectedfrom NASA’s ER-2 high-altitude airborne science aircraft. Further, participantsmay attend pedagogic workshops in problem-based learning, engineering design,inquiry-based instruction and integration of technology and data-focusedcurricula into the classroom. Experiences will be translated into classroompractice through the development of STEM action plans utilizing NASA thematic,curriculum modules based on the foundation that AREES provides and in contextwith on-going research.

Applications are due April 16, 2012.

For more information, visit http://www.aeroi.org. Questions about thisopportunity should be directed to Shaun Smith at shaun.smith@nasa.gov.

The AREES program is sponsored by NASA’s Teaching from Space project, NASA’sDryden Flight Research Center and NASA’s Airborne Science Program, andadministered through a partnership with the Aerospace, Education, Research andOperations Institute in Palmdale, Calif., the U.S. Geological Survey’s NationalWetlands Research and CNL World in Nebraska.

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Educator Workshop: Greenhouse Gases and TheirRoles on Earth

Greenhouse gases are both naturally occurring and man-made gases that trap heatin Earth’s atmosphere and play a vital role in maintaining a habitable climate.However, human activity is quickly increasing the concentration of these gaseson Earth and causing concern about the future of our planet.

On April 21, 2012, NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, or JPL, in Pasadena,Calif., will host an educator workshop that will examine the role ofgreenhouse gases in our complex global system, and explore the ways that mediadeliver science content and discusses climate change. The workshop is open toformal and informal educators teaching grades 6 through 12. Attendees will takepart in a group discussion, science presentations and a hands-onactivity/discussion on the media’s portrayal of science and climate change.Teachers will receive a certificate for continuing education hours.

Registration for this workshop closes on April17, 2012. A $30 registration fee includes continental breakfast, beverages,snacks, a box lunch and incidentals.

For more information, directions to the workshop location and to registeronline, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/education/index.cfm?page=318.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Mary K. Kuehn at Mary.K.Kuehn@jpl.nasa.gov.

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FreeLecture — John Glenn: Earning the Right Stuff as a Decorated Marine Aviatorand Navy Test Pilot — Attend in Person or View Online

How did John Glenn get “the right stuff?” Beforehe was an astronaut, John Glenn earned six Distinguished Flying Crosses as a UnitedStates Marine Corps aviator in World War II and the Korean conflict, and alsoflew as a naval test pilot.

On May 24, 2012, National Air andSpace Museum Director Jack Dailey will join Glenn for a discussion of hiscareer-defining moments. The lecture begins at 8 p.m. at the National Air andSpace Museum in Washington, D.C. Admission is free, but tickets are requiredand will be distributed via a drawing. For those unable to attend in person, thelecture will be webcast live.

For more information, visit http://www.airandspace.si.edu/events/eventDetail.cfm?eventID=3734.

Questions about this lecture should be directed to nasmpubliclectures@si.edu.

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FreeLecture — NASA’s Legacy and Future: Personal Reflections of a Space Flyer — Attendin Person or View Online

On June27, 2012, NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden Jr. will be the speaker for the2012 John H. Glenn Lecture. Administrator Bolden will reflect on his career asa Marine aviator, a space shuttle pilot and commander and his leadership ofAmerica’s space agency. His insights will provide a timely window into his ownexperiences and the future of space exploration.

The lecture begins at 8 p.m. at the National Air and Space Museum inWashington, D.C. Admission is free, but tickets are required. For those unableto attend in person, the lecture will be webcast live.

For more information, visit http://www.nasm.si.edu/events/eventDetail.cfm?eventID=3735.

Questions about this lecture should be directed to nasmpubliclectures@si.edu.

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2012 Humans in Space Youth Art Competition

The international 2012 Humans in Space Youth ArtCompetition invites students ages 10-18 to express their ideas about the futureof human space exploration through visual, literary, musical or digital art.

Artwork submissions will be judged on creativity, skill and demonstration ofmeaning relevant to expressing “How will humans use science and technology toexplore space, and what mysteries will we uncover?”

Winning art will be showcased at displays and multimedia performances worldwidefrom 2013 to 2014, as well as in an online gallery. Submissions must bereceived by Oct. 21, 2012.

For additional information and a complete list of guidelines, visit www.humansinspaceart.org.

Inquiries about this opportunity should be directed to Jancy McPhee at jancy.c.mcphee@nasa.gov.

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New Brochure Available Online: InternationalSpace Station Benefits for Humanity

The International Space Station enables researchers from all over the world toperform innovative experiments that could not be done anywhere else. Thisunique laboratory environment produces advancements in science and technologythat benefit everyday life on Earth. Download this brochure to learn more aboutthese innovations and share them with your students

The International Space Station Benefits for Humanity brochure is a collectionof in-depth descriptions about benefits from research on the space station. Thebenefits outlined serve as examples of the space station’s potential as agroundbreaking scientific research facility.

This collection was developed collaboratively by the members of the CanadianSpace Agency, European Space Agency, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, NASAand the Russian Federal Space Agency.

To view the brochure, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/ISS_Benefit_for_Humanity.html.

The Educational Materials section of NASA’s website offers classroomactivities, educator guides, posters and other types of resources that areavailable for use in the classroom. Materials are listed by type, grade leveland subject. For more NASA-related education resources, visit http://search.nasa.gov/search/edFilterSearch.jsp?empty=true.

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Updated Rockets Guide Available Online

Few classroom topics generate as much excitementas rockets. The scientific, technological, engineering and mathematicalfoundations of rocketry provide exciting classroom opportunities for authentichands-on, minds-on experimentation. The activities and lesson plans containedin this educator guide emphasize hands-on science, prediction, data collectionand interpretation, teamwork, and problem solving. The guide also containsbackground information about the history of rockets and basic rocket science.The rocket activities in this guide support national curriculum standards forscience, mathematics and technology.

The guide contains new and updated lessons and activities from the originalRockets Educator Guide.

https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/Rockets.html

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For afull list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — Feb. 2, 2012

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community.Full descriptions are listed below.

EngineeringDesign Challenge: Thermal Protection System Web Seminar
Audience: 8-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Feb. 6, 2012

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Webcast Series — Flying ThroughAfrican-American History With the Tuskegee Airmen
Audience: K-12 Educators and Students
Event Dates: Multiple Dates Throughout February 2012

Live Video Chat: In Celebration of Black History Month
Audience: 4-12 Educators and Students
Event Date: Feb. 8, 2012, 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. EST

Ultraviolet Radiation and Yeast:Radiation Biology Web Seminar
Audience: 9-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Feb. 8, 2012

Registration Open for the 19th Annual NASA Great Moonbuggy Race
Audience: 9-12 & Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Deadline for U.S. Teams: Feb. 10, 2012

2012 NASA StudentAirborne Research Program
Audience: Higher Education Educators andStudents
Application Deadline: Feb. 10, 2012

Student Climate Research CampaignWorkshop Series
Audience: K-12 Educators
Workshop Dates: Feb. 18 and March 17, 2012

NASA’s Digital LearningNetwork Webcast — National African American History Month and Engineers Week
Audience: K-12 Educators and Students
Event Date: Feb. 22, 2012

2012 Army-Navy Bridge Design Challenge
Audience: Grade 6-7 Students
Deadline: March 1, 2012

Challenge toInnovate: Gaming Challenge
Audience: All Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: March 5, 2012

Smart Skies Releases New Air TrafficControl Game — Sector 33
Audience: 5-12 Educators and Students

New Space Science Educational Materials Available at NASA.gov
Comet Mystery Boxes — Grades K-8
A Dusty Dilemma — Grades 8-10
Signals and Noise Ratio — Grades 6-8
Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) Educational Kit –Grades 6-8

Earth Calling… Activity From New Horizons— Grades 6-8
Star-forming Nebula NGC 3603 Lithograph and In Search of Stellar EvolutionEducation Activity — Grades 11-12

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EngineeringDesign Challenge: Thermal Protection System Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences foreducators, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science TeachersAssociation are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminarfor educators on Feb. 6, 2012, at 6:30p.m. EST. Learn about the science of heat transfer and heat dissipationrelated to NASA vehicles, and receive an introduction to the associated engineeringdesign challenge, Thermal Protection System. This activity challenges studentsto design a thermal protection system and test it using a propane torch.

For more information and toregister online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar10.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to the NASA Explorer Schools helpdesk at NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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NASA’s Digital Learning Network Webcast Series — Flying ThroughAfrican-American History With the Tuskegee Airmen

In honor of National African American History Month, NASA’s DigitalLearning Network is hosting a webcast series titled Flying ThroughAfrican-American History With the Tuskegee Airmen. The webcast series willfocus on this elite group of African-American pilots who fought war and racismin World War II and the challenges faced by early African-American aviators.

Technology Advances the Tuskegee Airmen
Feb. 7, 2012, 1-2 p.m. EST
The onset of World War II spurred the aerospace industry, one of America’smost notable accomplishments. Aircrafts were plentiful, but pilots were scarce.Technology supported the Tuskegee Airman’s victory over Nazism and Fascism inthe European skies and racism on American soil.

Engineering a Proud Heritage
Feb. 14, 2012, 1-2 p.m. EST
Moton Field in Tuskegee, Alabama became the historic site that launchedproof that African-Americans could fly and maintain sophisticated combataircraft. Engineering schools such as the Tuskegee Institute provided the edgeneeded for African-Americans to make a significant impact during World War II.

Mathematics Fuels the Tuskegee Airmen
Feb. 21, 2012, 1-2 p.m. EST
Over 900 men graduated as pilots from the Tuskegee Institute pilot trainingprogram. The elite class of airmen was granted the opportunity to fuel flightsuccess with calculated risks.

Teachers interested in having their classes participate in the live audienceshould visit the DLN website for details to register. Requests will be taken ona first-come, first-served basis.

Classes not chosen to participate in the live audience may still join thewebcast via live streaming on the DLN website.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/dln/special/TuskegeeAirmen.html.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Karen.Ricks@nasa.gov.

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Live Video Chat: In Celebration of Black HistoryMonth

In celebration of National Black History Month, a panel of five outstandingAfrican-American engineers and scientists at NASA’s Langley Research Centerwill answer students’ questions about their paths to NASA and theircontributions to the projects and missions they work on.Meet Erica Alston, a researchscientist; Monica Barnes, an electronics engineer; Samuel James, a mechanical engineering technician; Luther Jenkins,an aerospace research engineer; and Byron Meadows, a laser systems engineer.

The hourlong live video chat event takes place on Feb. 8, 2012, at 1:30 p.m. EST.

Submit questions during the chat through a chat window, or send them to NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

To learn more about NES, visit the explorerschools.nasa.gov website.

To view the video chat or for more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/nes2/home/black-history-month-chat.html.

If you have any questions about the video chat, contact NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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UltravioletRadiation and Yeast: Radiation Biology Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences foreducators, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science TeachersAssociation are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminarfor educators on Feb. 8, 2012, at 6:30p.m. EST. The student activity featured in this seminar demonstrates theeffects of radiation on living organisms. Participants will learn howsun-screening materials protect live yeast cells from harmful ultraviolet, orUV, radiation and countermeasures for UV radiation and discuss phenotypicchanges in yeast as a result of radiation damage. Participants will learn howdifferent sun protection materials may be used to expand the range of itemstested in this lab. See how you can bring a real-world connection betweenscience and education to your students.

For more information and toregister online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar11.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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Registration Open for the 19th Annual NASA Great Moonbuggy Race

Registration is open for the 19th Annual NASA Great Moonbuggy Race. High schooland college students are challenged to design and build a vehicle thataddresses a series of engineering problems similar to those faced by theoriginal lunar-roving vehicle team. Each school may enter up to two teams.International teams are limited to 10 teams per country. The race will takeplace April 13-14, 2012, in Huntsville, Ala., at the U.S. Space & RocketCenter.

U.S. teams must register by Feb. 10, 2012.

For more information about the competition and to register online, visit http://moonbuggy.msfc.nasa.gov/index.html.

U.S. teams with questions should contact Diedra Williams at Diedra.A.Williams@nasa.gov.

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2012 NASA Student Airborne Research Program

The NASA Airborne Science Program invites highlymotivated junior and senior undergraduate and early graduate students to applyfor the NASA Student Airborne Research Program, also known as SARP, 2012. Theprogram provides students with hands-on research experience in all aspects of amajor scientific campaign, from detailed planning on how to achieve missionobjectives to formal presentation of results and conclusions to peers andothers. Students will assist in the operation of airborne instruments onboardthe NASA P-3 aircraft.

The program takes place in summer 2012. Preparatoryinformation and data analysis will take place at the University of California,Irvine. Instrument and flight preparations, and the research flightsthemselves, will occur at NASA’s Dryden Aircraft Operations Facility inPalmdale, Calif.

Successful applicants will be awarded a $3,000stipend and $2,500 meals allowance for eight weeks of participation in theprogram. Round-trip travel to California, housing and transportation will beprovided.

The deadline for all applications is Feb. 10, 2012.

For more information and to download the programapplication, visit http://www.nserc.und.edu/learning/SARP2012.html.

Specific questions about the program should bedirected to SARP2012@nserc.und.edu.

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StudentClimate Research Campaign Workshop Series

Join NASA’s Langley Research Center and the Virginia Air and Space Center forthe Student Climate Research Campaign Workshop series. These free workshops forK-12 educators will take place at the Virginia Air and Space Center in Hampton,Va. Each workshop will provide approximately 5.5 hours of professionaldevelopment.

Phenology and Climate — Feb. 18, 2012
This workshop will focus on phenology and climate, and introduce participantsto the following Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment,or GLOBE, field campaigns: Great Global Investigation of Climate, and Climateand Land Cover IntensiveObserving Period. Participants willbecome certified in green-up and green-down, budburst and temperature protocols.

Land Cover andClimate — March 17, 2012
This workshop will focus on land cover and climate,and will prepare participants for the next GLOBE Climate and Land Cover Intensive ObservingPeriod field campaign. Participants will becomecertified in the following GLOBE protocols: biometry, land cover site and theModified UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and CulturalOrganization) Classification scheme.

To register for the workshops and to learn more about the GLOBE program, visit http://science-edu.larc.nasa.gov/GLOBE/training-1.php.

Questions about the Student Climate Research Campaign Workshop Series should bedirected Jessica Taylor at larc-globe-partner@lists.nasa.gov.

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NASA’s Digital Learning Network Webcast –National African American History Month and Engineers Week

In observance of National African AmericanHistory Month and Engineers Week in February, the Office of Education at NASA’sGoddard Space Flight Center in Maryland will host a live webcast for teachersand students in grades K-12.

On Feb.22, 2012, from 1-2 p.m. EST, students will interact live withAfrican-American engineers and scientists who will share how they use science,technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, in their careers. Presenterswill discuss what sparked their career choices and how students can prepare forfuture careers in STEM fields. The event will be streamed on the DigitalLearning Network “DLiNfo” webcast channel, and during the eventstudents can submit questions for the scientists to answer via an email addressthat will be provided by the on-air host.

Also during the month of February, GSFC willrelease two videos featuring Dr. Aprille Ericsson and James Fraction. Thesevideos will give an inside look at what engineers do during the day. This is agreat opportunity for educators and students to learn more about engineeringcareers at NASA.

For more information on these events and how toparticipate, please visit the DLiNfo webcast section at the Digital LearningNetwork site, http://dln.nasa.gov.

Questions about these opportunities should bedirected to Trena Ferrell at Trena.M.Ferrell@nasa.gov.

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2012Army-Navy Bridge Design Challenge

The U.S. Military Academy and the U.S. Naval Academy are proud to announce thefirst-ever Army-Navy Bridge Design Contest. This competition is a specialedition of the national West Point Bridge Design Contest, created specificallyfor 6th- and 7th-grade students. The contest provides students with a realisticintroduction to engineering through an engaging, hands-on design experience.

Students may work as individuals or in teams of two. There’s no cost to enterthe competition. Contestants may compete on behalf of either the Army or theNavy. Students must enter this contest through a teacher sponsor. No individualsubmissions will be accepted.

Design submissions are due March 1, 2012.Top designs will advance to semifinal competitions. The top Army semifinalistand the top Navy semifinalist will compete in a final round competition at WestPoint in May 2012.

For more information about this competition, visit http://bridgecontest.usma.edu/armynavy.htm.

Questions about this competition should be directed to wpbedc1@gmail.com.

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Challenge to Innovate: Gaming Challenge

Do you have an idea for how interactive technology and game-based learning canimprove teaching and learning? Enter your idea in the Challenge to Innovate, orC2i: Gaming Challenge.

Proposed ideas must effectively incorporate game-based learning. Registeredparticipants can review, comment and vote on submitted ideas. At the end of thereview period, up to 10 ideas will receive $1,000 cash awards from the NationalEducation Association’s NEA Foundation.

Submissions must be received by March 5,2012.

The C2i: Gaming Challenge can be found on the U.S. Department of Education’sOpen Innovation Portal. Co-sponsored by the White House Office of Science andTechnology Policy, this Portal has been developed as an online forum where keystakeholders in education can share their innovative ideas and collaborate toturn those ideas into a new reality. The Department of Education will play arole as convener of these diverse ideas and facilitator of partnerships.

For more informationand to submit your ideas online, visit https://innovation.ed.gov/challenges/gaming/show.

Email any questions about this opportunity to Jeff Howard at C2i@nea.org.

C2i: Gaming Challenge is sponsored by the NEAFoundation and Microsoft — US Partners in Learning.

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SmartSkies Releases New Air Traffic Control Game — Sector 33

NASA’s Smart Skies team announces a newapplication available for iPad®, iPhone®, and iPod touch®. Sector 33 is an airtraffic control mobile game designed to interest students inaeronautics-related careers and to connect mathematics and problem solving tothe real world.

In Sector 33, the player role-plays as an air traffic controller and guides twoto five airplanes through a sector of airspace by changing the planes’ routesand speeds. The challenge is to get the planes through the sector in thefastest time possible, with the player’s performance scored according to theplanes’ final spacing. The game consists of four levels and is played in livemode without a pause feature.

The app is free and available for download from the App StoreSM. AnAndroid™ version of the app is currently under development and will be madeavailable in the Android Marketplace once it’s ready for release.

Sector 33 was developed as a companion piece to NASA’s Smart Skies LineUp WithMath, an educational product used in formal middle school classrooms. LineUpWith Math teaches students to solve distance-rate-time problems in the contextof air traffic control. Problem solving, decision-making, and proportionalreasoning are skills that students apply in LineUp With Math as they learn tosolve distance-rate-time problems using both paper-and-pencil activities and a Web-basedair traffic control simulator. The Sector 33 app serves as an extension to the LineUpWith Math air traffic control simulator by taking on a game-like quality andgiving players both a stronger role-playing experience and a greaterproblem-solving challenge.

To learn more about Sector 33, visit https://www.nasa.gov/Sector33.

iPad, iPhone, and iPod touch are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in theU.S. and other countries. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc.
Android is a registered trademark of Google Inc.

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New Space Science Educational MaterialsAvailable at NASA.gov

The Educational Materials section of NASA’s Web site offers classroomactivities, educator guides, posters and other types of resources that areavailable for use in the classroom. Materials are listed by type, grade leveland subject. The following space science-related items are now available fordownloading.

Comet Mystery Boxes — Grades K-8


Introduce students to the physical characteristics of comets by using a tactilelearning experience. Using only their hands, students reach into a series ofboxes and feel the variety of materials and structures within. Each boxcontains an object that represents a quality of comets.

https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/Comet_Mystery_Boxes.html

A Dusty Dilemma — Grades 8-10

In this lesson, students learn the concepts of averages, standard deviationfrom the mean, and error analysis. Students explore the concept of standarddeviation from the mean before using data from the Student Dust Counter, aninstrument aboard the NASA New Horizons mission to Pluto. This data is used todetermine the issues associated with taking data, including error and noise.Questions are deliberately open-ended to encourage exploration.

https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/Dusty_Dilemma.html

Signals and Noise Ratio — Grades 6-8

Students are introduced to the terms “signal” and “noise” in the context of spacecraftcommunication. This hands-on activity includes an online interactive to explorethe Signal-to-Noise Ratio, a fundamental concept in spacecraft communication.The lesson’s pencil-and-paper component addresses relevant topics such asproportions and ratios.

https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/Signals_and_Noise_Ratio.html

Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) Educational Kit– Grades 6-8

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter is a spacecraft orbiting the moon. The primaryinstrument on LRO for analyzing the moon’s radiation environment is the CosmicRay Telescope for the Effects of Radiation, or CRaTER. This educator guideincludes lessons to introduce to students to cosmic rays and their effects onhumans.

https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/CRaTER.html

Earth Calling… Activity from New Horizons — Grades 6-8

Some spacecraft return to Earth with valuable data as part of their cargo, butall require some periodic remote communications as they travel. And for thosespacecraft that do not return to Earth, the communication system is the onlylink to the valuable data collected during its journey. In this activity,students simulate spacecraft radio communication concepts, including the speedof light and the time-delay for signals sent to and from spacecraft.

https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/Earth_Calling.html

Star-forming Nebula NGC 3603 Lithograph and In Search of Stellar EvolutionEducation Activity — Grades 11-12

Some of the heftiest known stars in the universe reside in the nebula NGC 3603,a large gas cloud in the Milky Way galaxy. The image of the nebula is on thefirst page of the lithograph and background information is on the second page.The lithograph includes a Level One Inquiry activity entitled “In Search of … Stellar Evolution” in which studentsresearch how stars form.

https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/Star-forming_Nebula.html

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a fulllist of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub


NASA Education Express — Jan. 26, 2012

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community.Full descriptions are listed below.

New NASA Kids’ Club Activity: Window to Earth
Audience: K-4 Educators and Students

New DIY Podcast Module Available — Micro-g
Audience: 5-12 Educators and Students

NASA’s Orion Spacecraft to Land in Texas andAlabama
Audience: All Educators and Students
Tour Stop in Dallas, Texas: Jan. 27-29, 2012
Tour Stop in Huntsville, Ala.: Feb. 1-2, 2012

AlgebraicEquations: Calculator Controlled Robots Web Seminar
Audience: Algebra Teachers and Informal Educators
Event Date: Jan. 30, 2012


NASA’s DEVELOP Program– 2012 Summer Session
Audience: 9-12 and Higher Education Educators and Students
Summer Session Deadline: Jan. 30, 2012

Host a Real TimeConversation With Crewmembers Onboard the International Space Station
Audience: All Educators
Proposal Deadline: Jan. 30, 2012

Scholarship Announcement: 2011 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award Video Contest
Audience: Grade 3-12 Students
Video Submission Deadline: Jan. 31, 2012

International Space Apps Challenge
Audience: All Educators and 9-Higher Education Students
Submission Deadline: Jan. 31, 2012

Distance/Rate/Time Problems: Smart Skies Web Seminar
Audience: 5-9 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Feb. 1, 2012

NASA’s DigitalLearning Network Webcast Series — Flying Through African-American History Withthe Tuskegee Airmen
Audience: K-12 Educators and Students
Event Dates: Multiple Dates StartingFeb. 2, 2012

Engineering Design: Forces andMotion — The Great Boomerang Challenge Web Seminar
Audience: 9-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Feb. 2, 2012

Join the Worldwide GLOBEat Night 2012 Campaign
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Now through April 20, 2011

Women In STEM High School AerospaceScholars
Audience: 9-12 Educators and Students
Deadline: Feb. 15, 2012

NASA’s DigitalLearning Network Webcast — National African American History Month andEngineers Week
Audience: K-12 Educators and Students
Event Date: Feb. 22, 2012

OSSI: SOLAR — Summer 2012 Opportunities
Audience: Higher Education Students
Deadline: March 16, 2012

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New NASA Kids’ Club Activity: Window to Earth

Astronauts have a spectacular view of Earth from space. Move through the pagesof Window to Earth and see images taken from space of these geographicalfeatures: peninsula, glacier, lake, desert, cape, island, upheaval dome,strait, waterfall, reef and volcano.

To take a peek and see how Earth looks from space, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forkids/kidsclub/flash/clubhouse/Window_to_Earth.html

For more fun activities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub.

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New DIY Podcast Module Available — Micro-g

The newest Do-It-Yourself, or DIY, Podcast module, Micro-g, is live and ready for use.

This module includes four NASA experts explaining microgravity and how to livein it. Nancy Hall is a microgravity researcher on Earth. Mike Fincke is theU.S. astronaut who has spent the most total time in orbit (more than a year).And we have footage of flight engineers Nicole Stott and Bob Thirsk from theInternational Space Station.

Several video clips and images on the photo index page show microgravitydemonstrations on Earth and objects and astronauts floating through the spacestation.

Other DIY Podcast topic modules are:
— Fitness
— Lab Safety
— Newton’s Laws
— Robots
— Rocket Science
— Solar Arrays
— Spacesuits
— Sports Demo

Students use the video clips, pictures and audio clips to build podcastepisodes and other multimedia projects.

A companion blog offers tips andsuggestions for incorporating the DIY Podcast into the classroom.

To learn more and to start building podcasts, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/diypodcast/index.html.

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NASA’s Orion Spacecraft to Land in Oklahoma,Texas and Alabama

A test version of NASA’s Orion spacecraft soonwill make a cross-country journey, giving residents the chance to see afull-scale test version of the vehicle that will take humans into deep space.

The crew module will make stops during a tripfrom the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico to the Kennedy Space Center inFlorida. The planned stops include Jan.27-29 at Victory Park and the American Airlines Center in Dallasand Feb. 1-2 at the U.S.Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Ala. Engineers, programofficials, astronauts and NASA spokespeople will be available to speak with themedia and the public.

The full-scale test vehicle was used by groundcrews in advance of the launch abort system flight test that took place in NewMexico in 2010. Orion will serve as the vehicle that takes astronauts beyondlow-Earth orbit, and the first orbital flight test is scheduled for 2014.

To see photos of the pad abort test, visit https://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/mpcv/gallery/abort_test/index.htm.

For more information on the each of the sites,visit

American Airlines Center: http://www.americanairlinescenter.com.

U.S. Space and Rocket Center: http://www.ussrc.com.

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Algebraic Equations: Calculator Controlled Robots Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, theNASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association arehosting a 90-minute Web seminar on Jan.30, 2012, at 6:30 p.m. EST. Discovera unique way of integrating robotic technology into your algebra classes.Robotic missions engage students and provide a unique way of bringing to lifethe concepts you are teaching. Learn to use programmable Texas Instruments, orTI, calculators and Norland Research Robots to solve problems requiringsubstituting values for variables in formulas.

You do not need to have a Norland Research Robot or programmable TI calculatorto participate in this seminar, or know how to program the calculator. Thisseminar provides an overview of using robotics in algebra so you can make aninformed decision about purchasing the robots and other equipment.

For more information and to registeronline, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar8.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to the NASA Explorer Schools helpdesk at NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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NASA’s DEVELOP Program — 2012 Summer Session

DEVELOP is a NASA Science Mission DirectorateApplied Sciences-sponsored internship that fosters the training and developmentof students in the atmospheric and earth sciences. The DEVELOP Program extendsthe application of NASA earth science research and technology to meet societalneeds.

Students conduct projects that focus on thepractical application of NASA’s earth science research and demonstrate howresults can benefit partner organizations and local communities. Advisors andmentors, from NASA and partner institutions, provide guidance and support forthe program. Students gain experience using NASA science and technology in aprofessional setting.

Students from high school through doctorallevels are selected through a competitive application process. Students chosenby DEVELOP work on teams onsite at 10 locations nationwide. Activities areconducted during three 10-week terms per year: spring, summer and fall. Toapply to a DEVELOP center at a NASA location, applicants must be a citizen ofthe U.S. However, international students currently registered at an accreditedschool in the U.S. are eligible to apply to DEVELOP regional locations.International applicants must already have a visa that permits them to work inthe U.S.

Applications for the summer 2012 session are dueJan. 30, 2012.

For more information about this uniqueinternship opportunity, please visit the DEVELOP website at http://develop.larc.nasa.gov.

Questions about the DEVELOP Program should bedirected by email to NASA-DL-DEVELOP@mail.nasa.govor by telephone to 757-864-3761.

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Host a Real Time Conversation With CrewmembersOnboard the International Space Station

NASA is now accepting proposals from U.S.schools, museums, science centers and community youth organizations to host anAmateur Radio on the International Space Station, or ARISS, contact betweenJuly 15, 2012, and Jan. 15, 2013. To maximize these radio contactopportunities, NASA is looking for organizations that will draw large numbersof participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed education plan.Proposals are due Jan.30, 2012.

Using amateur radio, students can ask astronauts questions about life inspace and other space-related topics. Students fully engage in the ARISScontact by helping set up an amateur radio ground station at the school andthen using that station to talk directly with a crew member on the InternationalSpace Station for approximately 10 minutes. The technology is easier to acquirethan ever before. ARISS has a network of mentors to help you obtain thetechnology required to host this once in a lifetime opportunity for yourstudents.

Interested parties should contact Teaching FromSpace, a NASA Education office, to obtain complete information including howthe technology works, what is expected of the host organization and how toobtain the proposal/application form by sending an email to JSC-TFS-ARISS@mail.nasa.gov or bycalling 281-244-1919.

Additional information can be found at https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/teachingfromspace/students/ariss.html.

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Scholarship Announcement: 2011 OPTIMUS PRIMESpinoff Award Video Contest

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center is pleased toannounce that the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, or ASME, Foundationis offering scholarships to the winners of the 2011 NASA OPTIMUS PRIME SpinoffContest. These scholarships, with a combined value of $25,000, will be awardedby the ASME Foundation to students whose video submissions best represent aselected NASA spinoff technology featured in the Agency’s 2010 Spinoffpublication.

Featuring OPTIMUS PRIME, the leader of thepopular TRANSFORMERS brand, the 2011 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award Contest highlightsspinoffs from NASA technologies that are used on Earth. The goal is to helpstudents understand the benefits of NASA technology to their daily lives. Lastyear’s contest was open to students in grades 3-8 and resulted in 76 videosubmissions from over 190 students in 31 states.

For the 2011, the OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award Contest has been expanded toinclude students in grades 3-12. Each student, or group of students, willsubmit a three- to five-minute video on a selected NASA spinoff technologylisted in NASA’s 2010 “Spinoff” publication. Videos must demonstrate anunderstanding of the NASA spinoff technology and the associated NASA mission,as well as the commercial application and public benefit associated with thespinoff technology.

Video entries are due Jan. 31, 2012.

Video entries will be posted on the NASA YouTube channel, and the public willbe responsible for the first round of judging. The top five submissions fromeach of the three grade groups (Elementary [3rd-5th], Middle [6th-8th] and HighSchool [9th-12th]) will advance for final judging. A NASA panel will select awinning entry from each group. Among other prizes, a crystal OPTIMUS PRIMESpinoff Award Trophy will be given to winners at a special awards ceremonybeing held in Florida in April 2012. The innovators associated with the NASAtechnology highlighted in the winning videos also will receive trophies, aswill their commercial partners.

The NASA OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Contest is brought about through a collaborationbetween NASA and Hasbro. For more information, visit the OPTIMUS PRIME SpinoffAward website at http://ipp.gsfc.nasa.gov/optimus.

Questions about this contest should be directedto Darryl Mitchell at Darryl.R.Mitchell@nasa.gov.

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International Space Apps Challenge

NASA is working with the Open Government Partnership, or OGP, and internationalspace agencies to coordinate an International Space Apps Challenge. The competitionwill culminate in an event taking place in April 2012 that will enable thegovernment to use the expertise and entrepreneurial spirit of citizens to helpaddress global challenges.

Through the end of January, NASA and the event partners will receive anddevelop ideas for potential projects via the online platform. During the eventin April, NASA representatives and officials from international space agencieswill gather with scientists and citizens to use publicly released scientificdata to create solutions for issues, such as weather impact on the globaleconomy and depletion of ocean resources.

The deadline to submit ideas is Jan. 31,2012.

The OGP is a new, multilateral initiative that aims to secure concretecommitments from governments to promote transparency, empower citizens, fightcorruption and harness new technologies. NASA’s participation in the UnitedStates Domestic Plan will promote innovation through internationalcollaboration.

NASA is a leader in the U.S. Open Government Initiative. The president’s fiscalyear 2012 budget request focuses NASA’s efforts on a vigorous path ofinnovation and technological development. The path leads to an array ofchallenging and inspiring missions to destinations with incredible potentialfor discovery, increasing knowledge about our solar system, developingtechnologies to improve life on Earth, expanding our presence in space,increasing space commerce and engaging the public.

To learn more about the International Space Apps Competition, get the latestupdates and submit your ideas, visit http://open.nasa.gov/appschallenge.

To learn more about the Open Government Partnership, visit http://www.opengovpartnership.org/.

If you have questions about the International Space Apps Competition, please visithttp://open.nasa.gov/appschallenge/contact/.

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Distance/Rate/TimeProblems: Smart Skies Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, the NASAExplorer Schools project is hosting a 60-minute professional development Webseminar for educators on Feb. 1, 2012,at 8 p.m. EST. Learn how to use an innovative air traffic control simulatorto engage your students as they explore the mathematics involved in the role ofan air traffic controller. In the three-plane problem featured in this lesson,the challenge is to change routes and speeds to line up the planes safely, withproper spacing, at a given route intersection.

For more information and to registeronline, visit https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-distanceratetime/.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

E-mail any questions about this opportunity to the NES Help Desk at NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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NASA’s Digital Learning Network Webcast Series — Flying ThroughAfrican-American History With the Tuskegee Airmen

In honor of National African American HistoryMonth, NASA’s Digital Learning Network is hosting a webcast series titledFlying Through African-American History With the Tuskegee Airmen. The webcastseries will focus on this elite group of African-American pilots who fought warand racism in World War II and the challenges faced by early African-Americanaviators.

The Tuskegee Airmen Balance Warfare WithScience
Feb. 2, 2012, 1-2 p.m. EST
Learn more about the Tuskegee Airmen and their pivotal role during WorldWar II. These pilots fought war and racism with one of World War II’s greatestweapons, the science of the P-51 Mustang fighter aircraft.

Technology Advances the Tuskegee Airmen
Feb. 7, 2012, 1-2 p.m. EST
The onset of World War II spurred the aerospace industry, one of America’smost notable accomplishments. Aircrafts were plentiful, but pilots were scarce.Technology supported the Tuskegee Airman’s victory over Nazism and Fascism inthe European skies and racism on American soil.

Engineering a Proud Heritage
Feb. 14, 2012, 1-2 p.m. EST
Moton Field in Tuskegee, Alabama became the historic site that launchedproof that African-Americans could fly and maintain sophisticated combataircraft. Engineering schools such as the Tuskegee Institute provided the edgeneeded for African-Americans to make a significant impact during World War II.

Mathematics Fuels the Tuskegee Airmen
Feb. 14, 2012, 1-2 p.m. EST
Over 900 men graduated as pilots from the Tuskegee Institute pilot trainingprogram. The elite class of airmen was granted the opportunity to fuel flightsuccess with calculated risks.

Teachers interested in having their classes participate in the live audienceshould visit the DLN website for details to register. Requests will be taken ona first-come, first-served basis.

Classes not chosen to participate in the live audience may still join thewebcast via live streaming on the DLN website.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/dln/special/TuskegeeAirmen.html.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Karen.Ricks@nasa.gov.

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EngineeringDesign: Forces and Motion — The Great Boomerang Challenge Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professionaldevelopment experiences, the NASAExplorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association arehosting a 90-minute professional development Web seminar for educators on Feb. 2, 2012, at 8:15 p.m. EST. Learnhow NASA aerodynamics research can be applied to boomerang design to increaseperformance. During the session, participants will be introduced to theBoomerang Design Challenge and learn how to incorporate this activity intoscience classes. The seminar also includes information about two uniqueextensions. In the first, students access a free computer simulationillustrating the airflow around an airfoil to determine the correct flowequation, and a second extension uses an interactive simulation to determinethe airflow around various shapes of airfoils.

For more information and toregister online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar24.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to the NES Help Desk at NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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Join the Worldwide GLOBE at Night 2012 Campaign

GLOBE at Night is a worldwide, hands-on scienceand education program for primary and secondary schools. The GLOBE at Nightproject encourages citizen-scientists worldwide to record the brightness of thenight sky. During four select sets of dates, children and adults match theappearance of a constellation (Orion or Leo in the northern hemisphere, andOrion and Crux in the southern hemisphere) with seven star charts ofprogressively fainter stars. The map is located at http://www.globeatnight.org. Participants then submit their choice of star chartonline with their date, time and location to help create a light-pollution mapworldwide.

The GLOBE at Night 2012 campaign dates are Feb. 12-21, March 13-22 and April 11-20,2012. Over 68,000 measurements have been contributed from more than 115countries over the last six years of two-week campaigns.

Children and adults can submit theirmeasurements in real time if they have a smart phone or tablet. To do this, usethe Web application at http://www.globeatnight.org/webapp/. With smart phones and tablets, the location, dateand time are put in automatically. And if you do not have a smart phone ortablet, there are user-friendly tools on the GLOBE at Night report page to findlatitude and longitude.

Through GLOBE at Night, students, teachers,parents and community members are amassing a data set from which they canexplore the nature of light pollution locally and across the globe. Make a differenceand join the GLOBE at Night efforts in 2012. Activity packets, one-page flyersand postcards advertising the campaign are available at http://www.globeatnight.org.

Please email any questions about GLOBE at Nightto globeatnight@noao.edu.

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WomenIn STEM High School Aerospace Scholars

Engineer your dream job. The Women in STEM High School Aerospace Scholars projectoffers a one-of-a-kind experience for female high school juniors to jump-start theirfutures and explore the possibilities of a major or career in science, technology,engineering and mathematics. Participants begin their adventure in an onlinecommunity. The project culminates with a summer experience at NASA’s JohnsonSpace Center in Houston, Texas. Collaborate with girls from across the countryand female NASA engineers and interns.

Applications are due Feb. 15, 2012.

For more information and to download the application, visit http://wish.aerospacescholars.org/.

Questions should be directed to JSC-NHAS@mail.nasa.gov.

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NASA’s Digital Learning Network Webcast — National African American History Month and Engineers Week

In observance of National African AmericanHistory Month and Engineers Week in February, the Office of Education at NASA’sGoddard Space Flight Center in Maryland will host a live webcast for teachersand students in grades K-12.

On Feb. 22, 2012, from 1-2 p.m. EST,students will interact live with African-American engineers and scientists whowill share how they use science, technology, engineering and mathematics, orSTEM, in their careers. Presenters will discuss what sparked their careerchoices and how students can prepare for future careers in STEM fields. Theevent will be streamed on the Digital Learning Network “DLiNfo”webcast channel, and during the event students can submit questions for thescientists to answer via an email address that will be provided by the on-airhost.

Also during the month of February, GSFC will release two videos featuring Dr.Aprille Ericsson and James Fraction. These videos will give an inside look at whatengineers do during the day. This is a great opportunity for educators andstudents to learn more about engineering careers at NASA.

For more information on these events and how to participate, please visit theDLiNfo webcast section at the Digital Learning Network site, http://dln.nasa.gov.

Questions about these opportunities should be directed to Trena Ferrell at Trena.M.Ferrell@nasa.gov.

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OSSI:SOLAR — Summer 2012 Opportunities

The NASA One Stop Shopping Initiative, or OSSI,strives to provide students at all institutions of higher education access to aportfolio of internship, fellowship and scholarship opportunities offered byNASA mission directorates and centers.

Visit the OSSI LaunchPad to find information on internship, fellowship andscholarship opportunities. The site features the OSSI: Student OnlineApplication for Recruiting Interns, Fellows and Scholars, or SOLAR. This innovativesystem allows students to search and apply for all types of higher-educationNASA internship, fellowship and scholarship opportunities in one location. Asingle application places the student in the applicant pool for considerationby all NASA mentors.

Applications for summer 2012 opportunities are due March 16, 2012.

To find available opportunities and to fill out a SOLAR application, visit http://intern.nasa.gov/index.html.

Inquiries about the OSSI: SOLAR should be directed to Mabel Matthews at Mabel.Matthews@nasa.gov.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For afull list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club:
https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclu

NASA Education Express — Jan. 19, 2012

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Weather and Climate: Satellite Meteorology Web Seminar

Audience: 7-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Jan. 23, 2012

Voting Open — YouTube Space Lab Competition
Audience: All Educators and Students
Voting Deadline:
Jan. 24, 2012

Geometry: Space Math Problems — Solar Storms Web Seminar
Audience: Algebra Teachers and Informal Educators
Event Date: Jan. 24, 2012

Live Video Chat:
Sea Level Rising
Audience: 4-9 Educators and Students
Event Date: Jan. 25, 2012, noon EST

Educator Resource Showcase Webcast — New Microgravity Website and Activities
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Date: Jan. 25, 2012

Analyzing Solar Energy Graphs: MY NASA DATA Web Seminar

Audience: 9-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Jan 25, 2012

RealWorld-InWorld Engineering Design Challenge
Audience: 7-12 Educators and Students
Deadline: Jan. 27, 2012

National Spaced Out Sports Design Challenge
Audience: 5-8 Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: Mar. 16, 2012


2011-2012 NASA Aeronautics High School Contest
Audience: 9-12 Students
Deadline: March 19, 2012

RockOn 2012 University Rocket Science Workshop
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Deadline: May 1, 2012
Workshop Dates: June 16-21, 2012

2010-2011 Green Aviation University Engineering Contest
Audience: Higher Education Students
Deadline: May 7, 2012

What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website
Audience: K-6 Educators

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Weather and Climate: Satellite Meteorology Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute professional development Web seminar for educators on Jan. 23, 2012, at 6:30 p.m. EST.

Participants will learn to use the data from NASA’s research satellite program in their meteorology lessons. This Web seminar features “Monitoring the Global Environment,” one of eight modules within the Satellite Meteorology course. The activities within this module incorporate the use of authentic data acquired by NASA’s Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites and Polar Operational Environmental Satellites. Attendees will learn how to locate and download satellite data, create graphs and learn how to interpret them.

For more information and to register online, visit URL http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar5.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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Voting Open — YouTube Space Lab Competition

Vote in the YouTube Space Lab Competition!

NASA has collaborated with Space Adventures©, Google, and BioServe Space Technologies to conduct student-designed life sciences and physics experiments on the International Space Station later this year through the YouTube Space Lab Competition.

Until Jan. 24, 2012, you can vote for your favorites from the 60 finalists selected from 2,000 submissions representing over 80 countries. This is even better than American Idol® because the ideas all came from middle and high school students wanting to do real science in microgravity!

Check out the finalist videos at
https://www.youtube.com/user/spacelab/spacelab and vote for the best entries once a day. The winners get an experience that is truly out of this world, whether they choose to watch their experiments launch from Japan or take cosmonaut training in Russia when they turn 18.

Do your part to help inspire the next generation of space scientists!


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Geometry: Space Math Problems — Solar Storms Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, the NASA Explorer Schools and Learning Environments and Research Network projects are hosting a 60-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on Jan 24, 2012, at 8 p.m. EST. Solar Storms provides teachers with a unique opportunity to have students use their knowledge of geometry and trigonometry to analyze NASA images of a solar tsunami. During this seminar, participants will get an overview of the problem sets, preview a video about solar storms, get suggestions for implementing best practices and some learn about some extension activities.

For more information and to register online, visit https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-geometry-space-math/.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit
http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.


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Live Video Chat: Sea Level Rising

Students have the opportunity to ask questions of a NASA oceanographer and climate scientist. Dr. Josh Willis is an oceanographer and climate scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Having served as the deputy project scientist and member of the science team on Jason 1 and 2 projects, Willis currently serves as the lead project scientist for the Jason 3 project.

One result of global climate change is the melting of ice sheets around the world. Over the past century, many mountain glaciers and large portions of the ice sheets in both Greenland and Antarctica have lost mass. During this video chat, Willis will answer student questions about the effects of sea-level rise and climate change caused by greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.

The live video chat will take place on Jan. 25, 2012, at noon EST.

Submit questions during the chat through a chat window, or send them to
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

To learn more about NES, visit the
explorerschools.nasa.gov
website.

To view the video chat or for more information, visit
https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/nes2/home/chat-sea-level.html.

If you have any questions about the video chat, contact
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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Educator Resource Showcase Webcast — New Microgravity Website and Activities

Join host Elaine Lapka and presenters Teresa Sindelar and Dynae Fullwood from NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, for an hourlong, free webcast on Jan. 25, 2012, at 3 p.m. EST.

This webcast will provide a virtual tour of NASA’s new Microgravity Education website. Use the resources on this new website to learn about NASA’s microgravity laboratories on Earth and in space. The webcast hosts will also demonstrate an inquiry-based student activity that K-12 educators can use to investigate the microgravity environment.

For more information and to view the webcast, visit
https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/dln/index.html.

Check out the Microgravity Education website at
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/microgravity/home/index.html
.

If you have any questions about the webcast, please email them to Renee Elias at
RElias@lcjvs.net
.

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Analyzing Solar Energy Graphs: MY NASA DATA Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute Web seminar for educators on Jan 25, 2012, at 8:15 p.m. EST.

Become familiar with the MY NASA DATA activity, “Solar Cell Energy Availability From Around the Country.” Compare monthly averages of downward radiation in locations around the U.S. and analyze areas where conditions would be conducive to having solar panels. Access data on the NASA Live Access Server as you “journey” around the U.S. to determine the amount of solar radiation and analyze overlay plots to compare data from NASA satellites.

For more information and to register online, visit
http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar6.aspx.


To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

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RealWorld-InWorld Engineering Design Challenge

There is still time to submit entries to RealWorld-InWorld, or RWIW, NASA’s engineering design challenge. The activity encourages students in grades 7-12 to explore and build skills essential for successful science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, careers through a RealWorld (face-to-face) and an InWorld (unique online virtual reality) phase of project-based learning and team competition.

RealWorld (Phase 1): Teams of middle- and high-school-aged students with support of their sponsoring adult work collaboratively as engineers and scientists to explore and design solutions related to the James Webb Space Telescope and Robonaut 2.

NOTE: The RealWorld Phase can be completed by teams in about two weeks.

RealWorld Phase ends: Jan. 27, 2012. To be considered to move to the InWorld phase, all RealWorld work must be submitted by this deadline.

Recognition: Submitted final project solutions will be featured on the RWIW website, and teams will receive recognition for their work once they complete the RealWorld challenge and InWorld registration.

InWorld (Phase 2): Participating college students select teams of two to four middle- and high-school-aged students who have completed the RealWorld phase to build their InWorld teams. Participation is limited to U.S. citizens. Teams work in a 3-D virtual environment using 21st century tools to refine designs and to create 3-D models of their design solutions.

InWorld Phase begins: Jan. 28, 2012.
InWorld Phase ends: April 20, 2012.

Recognition: InWorld teams will compete for cash awards ($1,000 per member, including team leader, for each winning team). Contest rules apply.

To learn more about the challenge and to register for online resources for this free and flexible project, visit www.nasarealworldinworld.org.

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National Spaced Out Sports Design Challenge

Students in grades 5-8 throughout the United States are invited to participate in Spaced Out Sports, a national design challenge that applies Newton’s Laws of Motion by designing a game for the International Space Station astronauts to play in space. The goal is for students to learn the science behind the game on Earth and in microgravity.

Students will submit game demonstrations via a playbook and video. Submissions will be accepted from schools, home school groups, after-school or enrichment programs. Awards include: First Place — NASA school-wide or program-wide celebration (U.S. teams only); top three teams — games played on the space station and recorded for a future broadcast; all contributing schools and programs — opportunity to participate in a Digital Learning Network webcast with astronauts on the space station.

Entries are due March 16, 2012.

Spaced Out Sports student and educator resources include posters, bookmarks, curriculum guides, career videos and Digital Learning Network modules. All include NASA astronauts, engineers and celebrity sports figures engaging students in relevant space-sports connections by explaining and demonstrating the science behind their work and/or games. Featured are: former astronaut and NASA Associate Administrator for Education Leland Melvin and astronaut Nicole Stott; Olympic gymnast Nastia Liukin; NASCAR’s Juan Pablo Montoya; basketball’s Temeka Johnson; football/Super Bowl champions New Orleans Saints; and hockey’s Ryan O’Reilly and the Colorado Avalanche.

Spaced Out Sports is managed by NASA’s Stennis Space Center Education through the Teaching From Space Office at NASA’s Johnson Space Flight Center in Houston.

For more information and to register for the challenge, visit
http://education.ssc.nasa.gov/spacedoutsports.

If you have questions about Spaced Out Sports, please email inquiries to
SpacedOutSports@nasa.gov.


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2011-2012 NASA Aeronautics High School Contest

The Environmentally Responsible Aviation project invites students in grades 9-12 to submit a well-documented research paper up to 12 pages to demonstrate understanding of the environmental impact of aircraft noise and emissions. Specific topics are listed on the contest website.

Participants must be enrolled in an accredited high school, secondary school or home school.
International students may participate but are not eligible for cash prizes. The deadline to enter is March 19, 2012.

For more information about the contest, visit
http://aero.larc.nasa.gov/competitions_high_era.htm.

Questions about the contest should be directed to Dr. Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.


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RockOn 2012 University Rocket Science Workshop

U.S. university faculty and students are invited to a weeklong workshop to learn how to build and launch a scientific experiment into space. NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia is hosting the RockOn 2012 workshop June 16-21, 2012, in partnership with the Colorado and Virginia Space Grant Consortia. The registration deadline for the workshop is May 1, 2012.

The hands-on workshop teaches participants to build experiments that fly on sounding rockets. During the week, participants will work together in teams of three to construct and integrate a sounding rocket payload from a kit. On the fifth day of the workshop, the experiments will fly on a sounding rocket expected to reach an altitude of more than 70 miles.

Each experiment will provide valuable scientific data, analyzed as part of the student-led science and engineering research. The program engages faculty and students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics skills critical to NASA’s future engineering, scientific and technical missions.

For more information about RockOn and to register online, visit
http://spacegrant.colorado.edu/rockon/2012/index_2011.html.

Questions about the workshop or the registration process should be directed to Chris Koehler by email at
koehler@colorado.edu or by telephone at 303-492-3141.


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2011-2012 Green Aviation University Engineering Contest

The Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project invites undergraduate and graduate students to submit a well-documented design paper for a large cargo aircraft that produces less noise, fewer emissions and is more fuel efficient than current models.

Participants, either teams or individuals, must be enrolled full time in an accredited college or university. International students may participate but are not eligible for cash prizes or student internships. Entries are due May 7, 2012.

For more information about the contest, visit http://aero.larc.nasa.gov/era_univ/competitions_univ_era.htm.

Questions about the contest should be directed to Dr. Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.


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What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website

Science and technology permeate all our activities from driving a car to cooking to writing poetry. So when we study science and technology, why not incorporate some of those other activities? Why not use interests like art and music to think about and express our understanding of nature? The Space Place has lots of cross-disciplinary opportunities to help make nature unforgettable.


New at spaceplace.nasa.gov
Get the key to the treasure chest! The new “Go with the Flow” game at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/ocean-currents/en/
has you playing with salinity and heat, which have opposing effects on vertical water movement. Using heat and salt as tools, as well as horizontal currents and walls, you set up flow patterns that your little submarine can follow in order to reach the key that will open the treasure chest and get the gold.

After playing “Flow,” students are not likely to forget the roles that heat and salinity play on ocean currents. These are important principles to learn in order to understand the potential effects of climate change.


Space Place en español

¡Haz un mapa topográfico! But first, make a clay sculpture of a mountain. This hands-on arts and crafts activity shows how 3-D topography can be represented very accurately on a 2-D map. Using clay (or our recipe for modeling dough), dental floss, paper, pencil, ruler and toothpicks, students make a mountain of any shape, slice it horizontally using dental floss and outline the slices on a piece of paper. It could be an art project or a geography project. Either way, it’s lots of fun, and clearly explains the mystery of topo maps, which many people never understand. Go to http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/sp/topomap-clay.

Spotlight on Music
Music is science and technology in the service of art. At least that’s one way to look at it. See (and hear) an example at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/violins
. Musical instruments are technologies. The most exquisite-sounding instruments represent technological excellence. But what makes the best instrument sound better than the second best instrument? In the case of Stradivarius violins, it’s believed to be the unique density of the wood, which grew only during a certain period of history. Why? Because of a lack of sunspots!

Another example of technology as a delivery mechanism for art is the Golden Records on each of the two Voyager spacecraft, now nearing interstellar space. These records are meant as messages from Earth in the event that intelligent alien beings someday encounter the probes. Students can see some of the photos of Earth and try to guess the identity of some of the sounds on the records at
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/voyager-to-stars.


For the classroom
Drumming is a form of music, but it can also be a form of precise verbal communication.

When people figured out how to add meaning to an electromagnetic wave, which is essentially a rhythm, a universe of possibilities opened up. Speaking in Phases is a classroom activity that demonstrates the difference between amplitude modulated (AM), frequency modulated (FM) and phase modulated signals. It’s not as hard as you might think. In this case, all that’s required is something to beat on — like drums or desks — and maybe a metronome or electronic keyboard that can make a steady beat.

Students learn the basics of how information is added to a carrier signal. Then they add their own meaning to the signal and communicate with each other using only the timing of beats. It truly teaches the most basic concept underlying all electronic communication, including radio, TV, phones, satellites and spacecraft far away in deep space. See
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/classroom-activities/#phases.


For out-of-school time
Almost everyone loves to eat. Why not make it even more fun by combining snack preparation with space exploration? The Space Place has several projects you can make, and then eat.

One project is Asteroid Potatoes, spaceplace.nasa.gov/asteroid-potatoes. To cut down on mess, you can make the mashed potatoes ahead of time, and let the kids do the sculpting, baking (with supervision) and eating.

Another creative activity is making edible spacecraft or rockets. Tortillas make a wonderful base. You can even paint them (or paint small, cut-out pieces) with food coloring. Also provide colorful vegetables and fruits of many kinds, olives, cream cheese (for glue), chips and anything else you can think of that’s good to eat. Take pictures before they’re gobbled up. See some examples and recipes at
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/tortilla-spacecraft.


Special Days

January is National Whale Watching Month
Some species are endangered. See how satellites can help, and play “Migration Concentration” at
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/migration
.

Jan. 6: Take a Poet to Lunch Day
Try writing some cosmic poetry such as the poems at
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/art
.

Jan. 17, 1706: Benjamin Franklin’s Birthday
He learned a lot about electricity flying a kite during a lightning storm. You can learn about electricity using a balloon (and without risking your life) at
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/ion-balloons
.

Feb. 12, 1809: Charles Darwin’s Birthday
Darwin is known for his theory of the evolution of species. Play with the “Emoticonstructor” and see one way evolution works at
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/emoticonstructor
.

Feb. 22: Thinking Day
Exercise your brain by going “Vec
àTouring” at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/vec-touring
.

Feb. 25: Quiet Day
Even the most violent events in space make no sound. Make a Sound Cone to hear even very quiet sounds. See how at
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/sound-cone
.

Last words . . .
Have a wonderful and productive 2012. We hope you continue to find The Space Place helpful in your important work.


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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators:
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students:
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club:
https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub