NASA Education Express — March 31, 2011

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Watch the 18th Annual NASA Great Moonbuggy Race Live on UStream April 1-2, 2011
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: April 1-2, 2011


Voting Open for Original Songs to Awaken STS-134 Crew
Audience: All Educators and Students
Deadline: April 19, 2011

2011 Space Tech Engineering Design Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Students
Deadline: June 1, 2011

NASA Research Announcement for Competitive Program for Science Museums and Planetariums Plus Opportunities for NASA Visitor Centers and Other Informal Education Institutions (CP4SMP+)
Audience: Informal Education Institutions
Proposal Due Date: June 29, 2011

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Watch the 18th Annual NASA Great Moonbuggy Race Live on UStream April 1-2, 2011

Watch the 18th annual NASA Great Moonbuggy Race live on UStream — a one-stop shop for video and Twitter updates! The race will be held April 1-2, 2011, at the U.S. Space & Rocket Center in Huntsville, Ala. On April 1, the race and the 40th anniversary celebration of the first use of the Lunar Roving Vehicle on the moon will be streamed on the web starting at 7 a.m. CDT at
http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-msfc .

The event honors the men and women who designed, tested, built and piloted the original lunar rovers — many of whom are expected to take part in the celebration. On April 2, the awards ceremony also will be available on the NASA UStream channel at 5 p.m. CDT.

The winners of the NASA Great Moonbuggy Race will be posted April 2 to
NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center Newsroom website:
https://www.nasa.gov/centers/marshall/news.

Moonbuggy enthusiasts also can follow the NASA Great Moonbuggy Race on Facebook (
http://www.facebook.com/moonbuggyrace) and Twitter (http://www.twitter.com/moonbuggyrace) April 1-2. NASA will “Tweet” updates throughout the race, including total race times for each team and the race winners.

More than 80 high school, college and university student teams from 22 states and Puerto Rico, and international challengers from six countries, including returning teams from Canada, India and Germany and — for the first time — racers from Ethiopia, Pakistan and Russia will battle through a challenging course of moon-like terrain at the Space & Rocket Center.

The NASA Great Moonbuggy Race began in 1994, inspired by the original lunar rovers developed for the Apollo moon missions in the 1970s by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Boeing and General Motors engineers. This year marks the 40th anniversary of the first lunar rover rolling across the moon’s surface. The race is one of dozens of educational projects and initiatives led by the Marshall Center each year to attract and engage America’s next generation of scientists, engineers and explorers — those who will carry on the nation’s mission of exploration to uncharted destinations in the solar system.

For more event details, race rules, information on the course and photos from previous competitions, visit
http://moonbuggy.msfc.nasa.gov.

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Voting Open for Original Songs to Awaken STS-134 Crew

NASA is inviting the public to vote for its favorite original song to wake up space shuttle Commander Mark Kelly and his five crewmates during their STS-134 mission to the International Space Station. Voting runs through launch day, which currently is targeted for April 19, 2011.

Electronic voting is open to the public on NASA’s Space Rock website, which includes the songs, inspiration and biographical information about the 10 finalists. https://songcontest.nasa.gov/.

Songwriters and performers from around the world submitted 1,350 songs, including 693 from 47 states, 105 from Canada, and 552 from 61 other countries. The song contest began Aug. 20, 2010 and ended Jan. 31. The finalists were notified on Feb. 18.

Below are the original song finalists (alphabetical by song title):
“Boogie Woogie Shuttle,” by Ryan McCullough (Savannah, Ga.)
“Dreams You Give,” by Brian Plunkett (Halfway, Mo.)
“Endeavour, It’s a Brand New Day,” by Susan Rose Simonetti (Cocoa Beach, Fla.)
“I Need My Space,” by Stan Clardy (Statesville, N.C.)
“I Want to Be an Astronaut,” by Michael J. Kunes (Phoenix)
“Just Another Day in Space,” by Kurt Lanham (Jacksonville, Fla.)
“Rocket Scientist,” by Tray Eppes (Cullen, Va.)
“Spacing Out,” by Jeremy Parsons (Nashville, Tenn.)
“Sunrise Number 1,” by Jorge Otero (Ovideo, Spain)
“The Countdown Blues (Hymn for Tim),” by Sharon Riddell (Nashville, Tenn.)

The two songs with the most votes will be the first original songs chosen by the public to be played as wakeup music for a shuttle crew. The STS-134 Original Song Contest ran concurrently with the Top 40 Song Contest for shuttle Discovery’s STS-133 mission. The Top 40 Song Contest ended earlier this month.

The song contests join the ongoing “Face in Space” project offering the opportunity to send a picture to space via an electronic transfer. During Discovery’s mission, more than 194,000 images flew in space. So far, almost 117,000 images have been submitted to fly aboard shuttle Endeavour’s STS-134 flight. To send your face to space aboard Endeavour, or Atlantis on the STS-135 mission targeted for June, visit http://faceinspace.nasa.gov.

The 14-day mission will be the 36th flight to the space station and the 25th, and final, flight for Endeavour. Pilot Greg H. Johnson and mission specialists Mike Fincke, Drew Feustel, Greg Chamitoff and Roberto Vittori of the European Space Agency will join Kelly. They will deliver the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, a particle physics detector designed to search for various types of unusual matter by measuring cosmic rays. The crew also will deliver the Express Logistics Carrier-3, a platform that carries spare parts to sustain station operations once the shuttles are retired later this year.

For more information on the Space Shuttle Program and Endeavour’s final mission, visit https://www.nasa.gov/shuttle.

For more information about the International Space Station, visit https://www.nasa.gov/station.

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2011 Space Tech Engineering Design Challenge

NASA has invited college students to take part in the 2011 Space Tech Engineering Design Challenge. Students are invited to design a technology that will help further space exploration and development. Designs may relate to autonomous operations; entry, descent and landing; human factors; power/propulsion including for operation in space and on other planetary bodies; or robotics (not related to in-situ lunar samples). Students entering other NASA contests, such as Lunabotics or RASC-ALs, may not submit the same entry or technology that they used for the other contests. All entries must be original and must be the work of students, not faculty or corporate partners.

The contest is open to any full-time student enrolled in an accredited post-secondary institution in the United States. This category includes universities, colleges, trade schools, community colleges, professional schools, etc. Interdisciplinary teams are encouraged.

A notice of intent is requested as soon as possible. Final entries are due June 1, 2011.

For more information and a complete list of rules, visit http://spacetech.larc.nasa.gov.

Questions about the challenge should be directed to Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.

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NASA Research Announcement for Competitive Program for Science Museums and Planetariums Plus Opportunities for NASA Visitor Centers and Other Informal Education Institutions (CP4SMP+)

The NASA Office of Education invites proposals from museums, science centers, planetariums, NASA Visitor Centers, and other informal education institutions via this 2011 NASA Research Announcement: Competitive Program for Science Museums and Planetariums Plus Opportunities for NASA Visitor Centers and Other Informal Education Institutions (CP4SMP+), Announcement Number NNH11ZHA004N. Proposals must be submitted electronically via the NASA proposal data system NSPIRES or Grants.gov.

Proposers may request a grant or cooperative agreement to support NASA-themed science, technology, engineering or mathematics informal education, including exhibits, within these congressionally directed topics: space exploration, aeronautics, space science, Earth science or microgravity. CP4SMP+ is a competitive, high-quality, national program to recruit NASA’s flagship investment in the Office of Education’s Outcome Goal 3: Build strategic partnerships and linkages between STEM formal and informal education providers that promote STEM literacy and awareness of NASA’s mission. Eligible informal education institutions do not need to have the words “museum,” “science” or “planetarium” in their official name. Proposals from entities outside the U.S. will not be considered. Review the NRA for detailed eligibility requirements and proposal limitations and check the NSPIRES website once a week to see if amendments or frequently asked questions have been added. Amendments and FAQs will be announced via the NASA Education Express listserv.

Do not submit a Notice Of Intent (NOI).

Full proposals are due June 29, 2011.

For more information about this opportunity, visit
http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId={75AAC7BF-2F69-6C73-2980-B1DCF25EA665}&path=open.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NRA.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — March 24, 2011

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

PBS Design Squad Nation: ‘One Giant Leap’
Audience: 5-12 and Informal Educators

NASA Explorer Schools Live Video Chat: Women at NASA
Audience: K-12 Educators and Students
Event Date: March 29, 2011

Join the Worldwide GLOBE at Night 2011 Campaign
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Now through April 6, 2011

$5,000 Grants Available for 2012 University Student Launch Initiative
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Informational Videoconference: April 6, 2011
Application Deadline: May 31, 2011

NASA LEARN and NES Offering Webinars
Audience: 5-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: April 6, April 13, April 20, April 27 and May 4, 2011

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PBS Design Squad Nation: ‘One Giant Leap’

A new full-length episode of PBS Design Squad Nation is now available online. In this episode, engineers Judy and Adam invite Felipe — an accomplished 15-year-old pilot from Miami, Fla. — to compete in the 2010 Red Bull Flugtag competition. Together, they team up with NASA to design and build a human-powered flying machine. With their NASA-inspired glider design, Team One Giant Leap soars off a 30-foot high deck, impressing the judges with distance and style.

Click the links below to view the episode online.
Part One:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bLYzD4ukQ4s
Part Two:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5w7zluiYt2Q

For more information and to find more Design Squad Nation videos and resources, visit
http://pbskids.org/designsquad/.

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NASA Explorer Schools Live Video Chat: Women at NASA

NASA Explorer Schools invites students in grades K-12 from across the U.S. and Department of Defense schools to participate in a live video chat with three outstanding women at NASA. The event will take place on March 29, 2011, at 2 p.m. EDT. Students and teachers can submit questions to Erika Alvarez, Mallory M. Johnston and Monsi C. Roman during this hour-long chat. The women will answer students’ questions about their careers in science and engineering.

Go to the chat page on the NASA Explorer Schools Virtual Campus website to participate in the webchat. You do not need to be a participant of the NASA Explorer Schools project to join the chat. To learn more about NES, please visit explorerschools.nasa.gov and click on the What Is NES? video or the About NES link.

To learn more about the women participating in the webchat, visit https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/nes2/home/live-chat-women-at-nasa.html.

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Join the Worldwide GLOBE at Night 2011 Campaign

GLOBE at Night encourages citizen-scientists worldwide to record the brightness of the night sky. During 2 weeks of moonless evenings, children and adults match the appearance of a constellation (Leo in the northern hemisphere and Crux or Leo in the southern hemisphere) with 7 star charts of progressively fainter stars found at http://www.globeatnight.org. Participants then submit their choice of star chart online with their date, time and location to help create a light pollution map worldwide.

The GLOBE at Night 2011 campaign dates are March 22-April 4, 2011, (for the Northern Hemisphere) and March 24-April 6, 2011, (for the Southern Hemisphere). Over 60,000 measurements have been contributed from more than 100 countries over the last 5 years of two-week campaigns.

This year children and adults can submit their measurements in real-time if they have a smart phone or tablet. To do this, use the web application at http://www.globeatnight.org/webapp/. With smart phones and tablets, the location, date and time are put in automatically. And if you do not have a smart phone or tablet, there are user-friendly tools on the GLOBE at Night report page to find latitude and longitude.

Through GLOBE at Night, students, teachers, parents and community members are amassing a data set from which they can explore the nature of light pollution locally and across the globe. Make a difference and join the GLOBE at Night efforts in 2011. Activity packets, one-page flyers and postcards advertising the campaign are available at http://www.globeatnight.org.

Please email any questions about GLOBE at Night to Connie Walker at cwalker@noao.edu.

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$5,000 Grants Available for 2012 University Student Launch Initiative

The NASA Minority Innovation Challenges Institute, or MICI, will be offering Minority Serving Institutions the opportunity to apply for a $5,000 grant to assist the school in entering the 2012 NASA University Student Launch Initiative. USLI is a competition that challenges university-level students to design, build and launch a reusable rocket with a scientific or engineering payload to one mile above ground level. The project engages students in scientific research and real-world engineering processes with NASA engineers. It culminates in an actual launch competition near NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.

Those interested in this grant opportunity should visit
http://nasamici.com/?p=450 to register for a free, live videoconference on April 6, 2011, at 3 p.m. EDT in which MICI organizers will explain how to apply. Additional video conference sessions concerning USLI will be held during the remainder of the month of April. These sessions will include Dr. Clement Allen explaining how to create a Senior Design Course around USLI; the 2010 Florida A&M Student USLI team describing their experience at the contest; and NASA representatives from USLI explaining how the contest works and how to prepare in advance. Dates and times for all of these sessions will be posted at http://nasamici.com/?p=450.

Applications are due May 31, 2011.

Please email any questions about the grant opportunity and informational videoconferences to Mary Baker at mary@nasamici.com.

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NASA LEARN and NES Offering Webinars

NASA Learning Environments and Research Network, or LEARN, and NASA Explorer Schools have teamed up to offer exciting webinars featuring NASA educational resources for educators. Below are four offerings in April 2011 and the first May 2011 event. The webinars are presented from 9-10 p.m. EST to ensure educators on both the East Coast and West Coast can participate. And, don’t worry about the technology. We have tech support ready to walk you through viewing and participating in the webinars.

You can register for each of the webinars by clicking on these website links:

Black Hole Math — April 6, 2011, 9 p.m. EST
This session provides teachers with information about one of the most exciting yet misunderstood space phenomenon — black holes. Learn about black hole structure and behavior, and get information on some common misconceptions about black holes.
https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-black-hole-math/

Engineering Design Challenge: Lunar Plant Growth Chamber — April 13, 2011, 9 p.m. EST
Plant growth will be an important part of space exploration in the future. This webinar will highlight the science of the lunar environment, basic plant needs, the current focus of NASA’s plant research and the systems that are being developed for future missions.
https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-plant-growth/

Engineering Design Challenge: Water Filtration — April 20, 2011, 9 p.m. EST
This webinar will highlight the water recovery and management function of the Environmental Control and Life Support System, or ECLSS, on the International Space Station. Students will design, build, test and measure the performance of a water filtration device, analyze the data collected and use this information to work toward an improved filtration design.
https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-water-filtration/

Exploring Space Through Math — April 27, 2011, 9 p.m. EST
During this unique webinar, you’ll learn how to get your students to investigate the characteristics of quadratic functions to solve real-world problems involving the parabolic flights of NASA’s “Weightless Wonder” microgravity jet.
https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-exp-space-through-math/

GENESIS: What Are We Made of? The Sun, Earth and You — May 4, 2011, 9 p.m. EST
By counting elements extracted from a simulated Genesis sample, students learn how the extraction of atoms from the Genesis samples help scientists have a better understanding of the abundance of elements from the solar wind.
https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-genesis/

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub


NASA Leaders to Mentor New York Students on March 22

NASA is hosting a March 22 forum in New York City to share the excitement of space exploration and encourage students — especially girls — to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

NASA’s Deputy Administrator Lori Garver and NASA’s Associate Administrator for Education Leland Melvin, a former astronaut, will attend the event and meet with 200 middle school and high school students from the Women’s Academy of Excellence; the Promise Academy; the New York City Housing Authority; and the General D. Chappie James Middle School of Science.

Fashion designer Donna Karan’s Urban Zen Foundation and the Foundation for Advancing Women Now, founded by singer Mary J. Blige are co-hosts of the event, which will take place from 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. EDT at the Stephen Weiss Studio, 705 Greenwich Street, New York.

At 10:15 a.m., the students also will participate in a question-and-answer session with NASA astronaut Cady Coleman who is orbiting 220 miles above the Earth. She has been living aboard the International Space Station for the past three months. NASA Television and the agency’s website will carry the downlink live.

The downlink is one in a series with educational organizations in the U.S. and abroad to improve STEM teaching and learning. It is an integral component of Teaching From Space, a NASA Education office. The office promotes learning opportunities and builds partnerships with the education community using the unique environment of microgravity and NASA’s human spaceflight program.

The events also will be streamed live at http://www.livestream.com/urbanzen.

NASA Television will air video from the space station during the event. For NASA TV downlink, schedule and streaming video information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/ntv.

For information about NASA’s education programs, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education.

For information about the International Space Station, visit https://www.nasa.gov/station.

NASA Education Express – March 3, 2011

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Early Birds … Tune in to NASA TV Tomorrow Morning for Education Downlink
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: March 4, 2011

NASA at the 2011 NSTA Conference
Audience: All Educators
Conference Dates: March 10-13, 2011

2011 Race to the Top High School Commencement Challenge
Audience: 9-12 Educators and Students
Deadline: March 11, 2011

Women In STEM High School Aerospace Scholars
Audience: 9-12 Educators and Students
Deadline: March 14, 2011

2011 Lunar Workshops for Educators
Audience: 6-12 Educators
Workshop Dates: Multiple dates June-August 2011
Application Deadlines Begin: April 1, 2011

NASA Launches 2011 Nationwide Technology Space Competition
Audience: 9-12 Educators
Deadline: April 30, 2011

New NASA eClipsTM Videos Available
Audience: K-12 Educators

NASA and You — NASA y Tú Website
Audience: 5-12 and Informal Educators and Students

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Early Birds … Tune in to NASA TV Tomorrow Morning for Education Downlink

Tune in to NASA TV on March 4 at 6:08 a.m. CST to watch STS-133 and Expedition 26 crew members hold an in-flight education downlink with the NASA Educational Technology Services team and student interns located at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. The NETS team has used social media and NASA Education’s new Taking Up Space blog (https://www.nasa.gov/education/takingupspace) to allow high school and college students the opportunity to select questions to ask astronauts in orbit. NETS is a crosscutting NASA Education project that prepares and delivers educational content on the NASA website. Following the live event, NETS plans to use the downlink video to develop resources for NASA Education websites, allowing the downlink to continue to inspire and engage students.

To watch NASA TV online, visit https://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html.

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NASA at the 2011 NSTA Conference

Make NASA a part of your NSTA experience this year! The 2011 National Science Teachers Association’s national conference is being held March 10-13, 2011, in San Francisco, Calif. Dozens of NASA presentations, workshops and short courses are scheduled during the conference. To find NASA sessions that fit in your schedule, visit
http://bit.ly/faqRgN.

Also, stop by the NASA exhibit booth (#729) in Moscone Center South to learn about exciting new NASA programs and products.

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2011 Race to the Top High School Commencement Challenge

Applications are open for the 2011 Race to the Top Commencement Challenge. The Commencement Challenge invites public high school students across the country to demonstrate how their school best prepares them for college and a career, helping America win the future by out-educating our competitors and achieving President Obama’s goal of having the highest proportion of college graduates in the world by 2020.

The application includes essay questions and statistical information that illustrate how schools are promoting college and career readiness for all students while establishing a culture of student success and academic excellence.

Applications must be submitted no later than Friday, March 11 at 11:59 p.m. EST.

The winning school will host President Obama as its 2011 commencement speaker.

For more information and to submit an application, visit
http://www.whitehouse.gov/commencement.

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Women In STEM High School Aerospace Scholars

Engineer your dream job. The Women in STEM High School Aerospace Scholars project offers a one-of-a-kind experience for female high school juniors to jump-start their futures and explore the possibilities of a major or career in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Participants begin their adventure in spring 2011 with an online community. The project culminates with a summer experience at NASA’s Johnson Space Center. Collaborate with girls from across the country and female NASA engineers and interns.

Applications are due March 14, 2011.

For more information and to download the application, visit
http://wish.spacegrant.org.

Questions should be directed to JSC-NHAS@mail.nasa.gov.

This opportunity is provided by Teaching From Space, a NASA education project. Teaching From Space promotes learning opportunities and builds partnerships with the education community using the unique environment of space and NASA’s human spaceflight program.

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2011 Lunar Workshops for Educators

NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, mission is sponsoring a series of workshops for educators of students in grades 6-12. These workshops will focus on lunar science, exploration and how our understanding of the moon is evolving with the new data from current and recent lunar missions.

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has allowed scientists to measure the coldest known place in the solar system, map the surface of the moon in unprecedented detail and accuracy, find evidence of recent lunar geologic activity, characterize the radiation environment around the moon and its potential effects on future lunar explorers and much, much more!

Workshop participants will learn about these and other recent discoveries, reinforce their understanding of lunar science concepts, interact with lunar scientists and engineers, work with real LRO data and learn how to bring these data and information to their students using hands-on activities aligned with local, state and national standards. Laptops are strongly encouraged for those participating in this workshop.

Workshops will take place in the following locations:
— June 20-24, 2011 — Herrett Center for Arts and Science, Twin Falls, Idaho
— June 27-July 1, 2011 — Hinds Community College, Utica Campus, Utica, Miss.
— June 27-July 1, 2011 — McAuliffe-Shepard Discovery Center, Concord, N.H.
— July 25-29, 2011 — John Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Md.
— Aug. 1-5, 2011 — Arizona State University, Tempe, Ariz.

Applications for three workshops are due April 1, 2011. Applications for other workshops are due at a later date.

For more information and to register for the workshops, visit
http://lunar.gsfc.nasa.gov/lwe/index.html.

Questions about these workshops should be directed to
Andrea.J.Jones@nasa.gov.

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NASA Launches 2011 Nationwide Technology Space Competition

A do-it-yourself technology space competition sponsored by NASA’s Emerging Commercialization Space Office kicked off recently.

Make Magazine, a do-it-yourself publication for technology, is partnering with Teachers in Space to help develop space science kits that high-school teachers can build and fly on suborbital flights. The project’s ultimate goal is to develop the next generation of technology leaders.

The NASA-Make competition will be the first of what many hope will be an annual event. It is designed to inspire curiosity and create interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics among classroom teachers and their students. Contenders are invited to submit ideas, concepts, and prototypes for kits that teachers can build for future spaceflights. Teachers in Space announced the contest at the Next Generation Suborbital Research Conference in Orlando, Fla.

Competition rules are simple. Kits should use components that are likely to be available at most high schools, and submitted experiments must be self-contained and fit in a standard Cubesat container (an international standard for small space-science payloads). To make kits accessible to students nationwide, part of the challenge is to be able to build these kits for under $100, the kind of funds that could be raised by a school bake sale.

Entries are due April 30, 2011.

The first experiment kits to be selected will fly aboard the Excelsior STEM mission, a commercial unmanned suborbital mission sponsored by Teachers in Space and scheduled to fly in 2011. Experiment kits for the Excelsior STEM mission will be assembled by teachers at a Suborbital Flight Experiment Workshop to be held Aug. 1-5, 2011 at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center’s AERO Institute in Palmdale, Calif.

This workshop and the Excelsior STEM mission provide a historic opportunity for high-school teachers to gain hands-on experience with space-flight hardware.

The winner of the NASA-Make Challenge will be honored at the Bay Area Maker Faire, May 21-22, 2011 in San Mateo, Calif.

For more information about the NASA-Make Challenge, visit
http://makezine.com/space.

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New NASA eClipsTM Videos Available

NASA eClips
ä has rolled out three new videos to captivate your students’ minds and inspire their imaginations.

This month NASA eClips
ä presents:
— Our World:
What is the Solar System? (grades K-5)
— Real World:
Centripetal Force (grades 6-8)
— Launchpad:
Astrobiology (grades 9-12)

Our World has a new educator’s guide available online.
Shower Clock allows students to think and act like engineers and scientists as they follow the five steps of the Design Process to complete a team challenge successfully. Within this work, students design, measure, build, test and re-design a shower clock. Once the shower clock is built, students discuss ways to conserve and recycle water.

To learn more about NASA eClipsä, such as how the program can benefit your classroom, visit NASA eClipsä on the Web.

Follow NASA eClips
ä on Facebook and Twitter.

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NASA and You — NASA y Tú Website

NASA and Univision Communications Inc. have launched an on-air and online initiative to help engage Hispanic students. The NASA and You website inspires Hispanic students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM. The site features videos and information in both Spanish and English. The website also includes information on educational opportunities for students.

To view the “NASA and You” website, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/nasaandyou/home/index.html.

Inquiries about the website should be directed to Ivelisse Gilman at Ivelisse.R.Gilman@nasa.gov.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express – Feb. 3, 2011

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Vote Now for NASA OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award
Audience: All Educators and Students
Voting Ends: Feb. 6, 2011


Teaching From Space Seeks Educators to Defy Gravity
Audience: K-12 Educators
Proposal Deadline: March 14, 2011

2010-2011 Green Aviation Student Competitions
Audience: 9-Graduate Students
High School Deadline: March 15, 2011
University Deadline: May 2, 2011

2010-2011 NASA Future of Flight Art Contest
Audience: 9-Higher Education Students
Deadline: April 15, 2011

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Vote Now for NASA OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award

NASA has opened online voting for the agency’s OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award student video contest. The public is invited to vote for its favorite videos, made by students in grades three through eight, developed to help educate America’s youth about the benefits of NASA’s technologies.

NASA is using the correlation between Hasbro’s TRANSFORMERS property and commercialized agency spinoffs to help students understand how technology developed for space and aeronautics transforms into products and technologies used on Earth.

More than 190 children from 31 states have submitted creative videos describing their favorite agency technology from NASA’s “Spinoff 2009” publication. The students also documented why their videos should be selected to win the NASA OPTIMUS PRIME trophy.

Voting closes on Feb. 6, 2011.

To watch the videos and to cast a vote for your favorites, visit
http://ipp.gsfc.nasa.gov/optimus/voting.php.

The top five submissions from each of two groups (third through fifth and sixth through eighth grades) will advance for final judging. A panel of NASA judges will select the winners in each of the two grade categories. The winning students, associated spinoff companies and NASA innovators will be announced in February.

NASA intends to make this an annual competition. Students can begin thinking about next year’s competition by deciding which spinoffs they like best from NASA’s recently published “Spinoff 2010.”

For more information about the NASA OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award,
visit:
http://ipp.gsfc.nasa.gov/optimus

For more information about NASA spinoffs and technology transfer,
visit:
http://www.sti.nasa.gov/tto/

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Teaching From Space Seeks Educators to Defy Gravity


Teaching From Space, a NASA Education office, in partnership with the Reduced Gravity Education Flight Program announces the opportunity for educators across the country to conduct research in a unique reduced-gravity environment. For the first time, this incredible opportunity is open to any current K-12 classroom teacher in the United States. Participants must also be U.S. citizens.

This experience will enable selected educator teams to propose, design and fabricate a reduced-gravity experiment and subsequently test and evaluate their experiment aboard a microgravity aircraft. This aircraft flies approximately 30 roller-coaster-like climbs and dips to produce periods of micro- and hyper-gravity, ranging from 0 g’s to 2 g’s.

Educator teams interested in testing an experiment in this unique environment need to submit a proposal no later than March 14, 2011. For more information, check out http://microgravityuniversity.jsc.nasa.gov/tfs or send an e-mail to jsc-rgeducator@nasa.gov.

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2010-2011 Green Aviation Student Competitions

The Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project invites students from high school grades through graduate school to research and design a large passenger aircraft that is less noisy, less harmful to the environment, and more fuel-efficient than current models. The competition has two divisions: High School and College/University. Teams or individuals may enter. At the college level, inter-institutional partnerships are permitted and interdisciplinary collaboration is encouraged.

High school participants must be enrolled in an accredited high school, secondary school or home school. For the high school division, the deadline for papers is March 15, 2011.

Undergraduate and graduate participants must be enrolled full time in an accredited college or university. For the college and university division, the deadline for design papers is May 2, 2010.

International students may participate, but they are not eligible for cash prizes or student internships.

For more information about the contest, visit http://aero.larc.nasa.gov/competitions.htm.

Questions about the contest should be directed to Dr. Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.

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2010-2011 NASA Future of Flight Art Contest

NASA’s Future of Flight Art Contest invites students to imagine what spaceships, rockets or aircraft will look like 100 years from now. High school and college students from all areas of study are encouraged to enter. Artists are encouraged to collaborate with science and engineering students. Any full-time student can enter, regardless of major or area of study. Team entries are accepted, but team size is limited to eight students.

Entries will be accepted in the following categories: two-dimensional art, three-dimensional art, digital (including music and video) and literature (poetry and short stories). Entries will be evaluated on creativity and artistic qualities. Prizes include awards and exhibit opportunities. Entries are due April 15, 2011.

For more information about the NASA Future of Flight Art Contest, visit http://artcontest.larc.nasa.gov/.

Questions about the contest should be directed to Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub


NASA Education Express — Jan. 27, 2011

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

DLiNFocus: NASA Careers ‘What’s in Your Future?’ Special Event Series
Audience: 5-12 Educators and Students
Event Dates: Each Wednesday at 2 p.m. EST


Online Professional Development Workshop: Enrichment Problems in Space and Earth Science XXVII

Audience: 5-12 Educators
Event Date: Feb. 3, 2011

Call for Abstracts: 62nd International Astronautical Congress
Audience: Higher Education Students
Deadline: Feb. 28, 2011

2011 Graduate Student Researchers Project
Audience: Higher Education Students
Deadline: March 1, 2011

3rd Annual NASA STEM Educators Workshop Series
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: March 1-3, 2011

2011 Simulation-Based Aerospace Engineering Teacher Professional Development Program
Audience: Middle and High School STEM Educators
Application Deadline: March 7, 2011

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DLiNFocus: NASA Careers ‘What’s in Your Future?’ Special Event Series

Various subject matter experts from different NASA centers will be in the Digital Learning Network studios for a series of webcasts focusing on careers. Selected classrooms will be able to interact live with the scientists through the DLN cameras. Each event will be webcast to allow students from all over the world to watch the interviews. Any student can interact by sending questions via e-mail.

Experts will share their academic experiences from elementary through college and talk about what motivated them to pursue their careers. They will discuss where those career paths lead. Students and teachers will have an opportunity to learn about the variety of career choices at NASA — astronauts aren’t the only folks who work here! The schedule of events through February 2011 includes:

Feb. 2: NASA’s Kennedy Space Center featuring Dr. Philip Metzger, research physicist and founder of the Granular Materials and Regolith Operations Lab.
Feb. 9: NASA’s Langley Research Center featuring Jennifer Keyes, aerospace engineer.
Feb. 16: NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center featuring Dr. Bill Cooke, head of NASA’s Meteoroid Environment Office.
Feb. 23: NASA’s Stennis Space Center featuring Tom Nicolaides, systems engineer supporting Propulsion Test Projects.

Each hour-long webcast event begins at 2 p.m. EST.

Sign up today to become a part of this exciting opportunity to meet NASA employees live! For more information, visit the DLN website at
http://dln.nasa.gov and click the Special Events button.

Inquiries about the DLiNFocus series should be directed to Caryn Long at
Caryn.Long@nasa.gov.

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Online Professional Development Workshop: Enrichment Problems in Space and Earth Science XXVII

John Ensworth at the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies and the NASA Science Mission Directorate invite you to attend an upcoming online professional development workshop.

Topic: Enrichment Problems in Space and Earth Science
XXVII

In the 27th bi-monthly installment of these mission- and inquiry-oriented mathematics problems, Dr. Sten Odenwald will supply background for and lead participants through problems from his “Problems in Space and Earth Science” series. Space Math @ NASA has posted four new math problems based on exciting new press releases from NASA that were posted at the beginning of the month. In this webinar, we will work through the following problems:

Problem 396: Kepler 10b — A Matter of Gravity (Grades 8-10)
In this problem, students use the measured properties of the Earth-like planet Kepler 10b to estimate the weight of a human on its surface. Topics include evaluating formulas; mass = density x volume; volume of a sphere; and scientific notation.

Problem 395: Death Stars (Grades 6-9)
Some stars create super-flares that are capable of eliminating life on planets that orbit close to the star. Students learn about these flares on common red-dwarf stars and compare them to flares on our own sun. Topics include scientific notation; percentages; and rates of change.

Problem 394: Probing the Lunar Core Using Seismology (Grades 9-10)
Students learn about the geometry needed to determine the diameter of the lunar core using a simplified model. Topics include geometry and properties of inscribed arcs.

Problem 393: Taking a Stroll Around a Martian Crater! (Grades 6-8)
Students use a recent photograph of a crater on Mars to estimate its circumference and the time it will take NASAs Opportunity Rover to travel once around its edge. Topics include scale model; distance = speed x time; and metric measure.

The goal of these problems is to teach students about space weather by using mathematics. Each problem begins with real world questions, missions and situations, and applies the necessary mathematics for a solution. Participants may ask questions and work along in this fully interactive Webinar environment.
http://spacemath.gsfc.nasa.gov

Date: Thursday, Feb. 3, 2011

Time: 3:00 p.m., EST (Greenwich Mean Time -05:00, New York)

You will need a computer, a good internet connection and a telephone to participate.

Participants must first register for this meeting. There is no cost for this event.
Note: Only the first 150 registrants will be accepted. Register ASAP!

If this meeting is full, you will receive an e-mail that reads:
“Your registration for this meeting is denied.”
In that case, we ask you to please join us in the next workshop!
If you do miss this event, we will send you the link to a video archive of the workshop so you will still be able to benefit from the exercises.

Please join the meeting 15-20 minutes before start to make sure your computer is prepared to run the Webex software. You may also pre-install the Webex plug-in following the instructions at the bottom of this e-mail.

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Where to
register for this meeting
—————————————————–
1. Go to
https://nasa.webex.com/nasa/j.php?ED=162247537&RG=1&UID=0&RT=MiMxMQ%3D%3D.
2. Register for the meeting.
Once the host approves your request, you will receive a confirmation e-mail with instructions for joining the meeting.

To view in other time zones or languages, visit
https://nasa.webex.com/nasa/j.php?ED=162247537&RG=1&UID=0&ORT=MiMxMQ%3D%3D.

——————————————————-
Closed Captioning is available during the Webinar. A link to this will be provided closer to meeting time.
——————————————————-
For assistance
——————————————————-
1. Go to
https://nasa.webex.com/nasa/mc
2. Click “Assistance”.
3. Click “Support”.

For more information, contact John Ensworth by e-mail at
john_ensworth@strategies.org or by telephone at 703-312-0563.

IMPORTANT NOTICE: This WebEx service includes a feature that allows audio and any documents and other materials exchanged or viewed during the session to be recorded. By joining this session, you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to the recording, do not join the session. This video and earlier product videos will be available via a Web-based archive tool will soon be located at:
http://www.strategies.org/education/index.aspx?sub=education&sub2=professional and http://video.strategies.org.

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To check the setup of your computer and pre-install the plug-in software, use the following links:

Downloads

WebEx will automatically setup Meeting Manager for Windows the first time you join a meeting. To save time, you can setup prior to the meeting by clicking this link: https://nasa.webex.com/nasa/meetingcenter/mcsetup.php.

The host requests that you check for compatibility of rich media players for Universal Communications Format (UCF) before you join the session. UCF allows you to view multimedia during the session. To check now, click the following link: https://nasa.webex.com/nasa/systemdiagnosis.php.

Meeting Manager for Microsoft® Windows® – MSI Installer

— Meeting Center automatically downloads, installs and configures Meeting Manager for Windows the first time you start or join a meeting. However, you may choose to download and run the Meeting Manager Installer before starting or joining a meeting. You must have administrator privileges on your computer to use this installer.
— Download Meeting Manager Installer for Internet Explorer
https://nasa.webex.com/client/T25L/atmcie.msi
— Download Meeting Manager Installer for Mozilla Firefox/Netscape Navigator https://nasa.webex.com/client/T25L/atmcns.msi

Meeting Manager for Mac® OS X (PowerPC)

— Meeting Manager for Mac OS X (PowerPC) is set up automatically the first time you start or join a meeting. The Installer for Mac OS X (PowerPC) can be used to manually install or uninstall Meeting Manager for Mac OS X (PowerPC).

Download Meeting Manager Installer for Mac OS X (PowerPC)
https://nasa.webex.com/client/T25L/mac/powerpc/webexinstaller.hqx.

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Call for Abstracts: 62nd International Astronautical Congress

NASA announces its intent to participate in the 62nd International Astronautical Congress, or IAC, and requests that full-time graduate students attending U.S. universities or colleges respond to this “Call for Abstracts.” The IAC — which is organized by the International Astronautical Federation, or IAF; the International Academy of Astronautics, or IAA; and the International Institute of Space Law, or IISL, — is the largest space-related conference worldwide and selects an average of 1000 scientific papers every year. The upcoming IAC will be held Oct. 3-7, 2011, in Cape Town, South Africa. NASA’s participation in this event is an ongoing effort to continue to connect NASA with the astronautical and space international community.

This “Call for Abstracts” is a precursor to a subsequent submission of a final paper, which may be presented at the 62nd IAC. Student authors are invited to submit an abstract regarding an original, unpublished paper that has not been submitted in any other forum. A NASA technical review panel of scientists and/or officials will select abstracts. Many students and professors are involved in NASA-related research. Persons submitting abstracts are strongly encouraged to seek advice from professors who are conducting NASA research and/or from NASA scientists and engineers.

Abstract Preparation
— Abstracts must be 400 words or less.
— Abstracts must be written in English.
— Abstracts cannot include formulas, tables or drawings.
— Select the symposium and session in which you wish to post your abstract. Please view the IAC brochure at
http://iac2011.com/sites/default/files/pdf/iac2011-call-for-papers.pdf for list of sessions and more details.

Abstracts must be related to NASA’s ongoing vision for space exploration and fit into one of the following categories:
Science and Exploration — Systems sustaining missions including life, microgravity, space exploration, space debris and Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence, or SETI.
Applications and Operations — Ongoing and future operational applications, including Earth observation, communication, navigation, human space endeavors and small satellites.
Technology — Common technologies to space systems including astrodynamics, structures, power and propulsion.
Infrastructures — Systems sustaining space missions including space systems, transportation, future systems and safety.
Space and Society — Interaction of space with society including education, policy and economics, history, and law.

The full text of the abstract must be submitted electronically in the prescribed format at
http://iac.nasaprs.com no later than 11:59:59 p.m. EST on Feb. 28, 2011 and to the IAC website at http://iac2011.com by March 2, 2011.

If you have a question or concern about the programmatic or the electronic submission of your abstract, please e-mail abstract@nasaprs.com, and you will receive a response within two (2) business days.

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2011 Graduate Student Researchers Project


Applications are being accepted for NASA’s Graduate Student Researchers Project. Through GSRP, NASA awards fellowships for graduate study leading to research-based master’s or doctoral degrees in science, technology, mathematics and engineering fields related to NASA research and development. In 2011, NASA is expanding GSRP to include students interested in becoming teachers or education administrators.

Applicants must be currently enrolled or accepted as full-time students at an accredited U.S. college or university. Applicants also must be U.S. citizens.

All application materials must be received no later than March 1, 2011. For more information, visit
https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/descriptions/Graduate_Student_Researchers_Project.html.

To apply for this fellowship online, visit the OSSI: SOLAR (One Stop Shop Initiative: Student On-Line Application for Recruiting Interns, Fellows and Scholars) website
http://intern.nasa.gov.

Please e-mail any questions about this opportunity to Linda Rodgers at Linda.L.Rodgers@jpl.nasa.gov.

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3rd Annual NASA STEM Educators Workshop Series

The 3rd Annual NASA STEM Educators Workshop Series will explore engineering design challenges, problem-based learning activities, distance learning modules, inquiry-based lessons and hands-on projects. Each workshop will be led by experienced educators and education public outreach specialists who will model pedagogical techniques and methods to foster problem-based learning, science as inquiry, technology integration and best practices. Workshops target in-service, informal and pre-service teachers who serve the K-12 education community.

The workshop series will take place March 1-3, 2011, in Charlotte, N.C.

For more information and to register for the workshops, visit
http://aesp.psu.edu/register/.

If you have any questions about the workshops, please contact Brandon Hargis at 757-864-9570 or
Brandon.Hargis@nasa.gov.

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2011 Simulation-Based Aerospace Engineering Teacher Professional Development Program

Applications are currently available for the 2011 Simulation-Based Aerospace Engineering Teacher Professional Development Program. This program will provide 32 select middle and high school STEM teachers the opportunity to attend a two-week, paid internship-based workshop at a NASA facility.

During the workshop, teachers will attend presentations by NASA engineers and education specialists, tour NASA facilities and work side-by-side with mentors. At the conclusion of the workshop teachers will have developed an innovative modeling and simulation lesson plan relevant to the mentor’s research area that they will be able to use in their classrooms and share with other educators across the nation.

Applications are due March 7, 2011.

For more information about this opportunity and to download the application materials, visit
https://simaero.rti.org.

Inquiries about the 2011 Simulation-Based Aerospace Engineering Teacher Professional Development Program should be directed to Olivia Rice at
simaero@rti.org or 919-541-7011.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators:
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students:
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club:
https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub


NASA Education Express — Jan. 20, 2011

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

NES Chat With NASA Scientist Joel Levine
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Date: Jan. 21, 2011

NASA Web Chat: Taking the “Boom” Out of Booms
Audience: 5-Higher Education Educators and Students
Event Date: Jan. 25, 2011

2011 Langley Aerospace Research Summer Scholars
Audience: Higher Education Students
Deadline: Feb. 1, 2011


NASA LEARN and NES Offering Webinars
Audience: 5-12 Educators
Event Date: Feb. 2, Feb. 9, Feb. 16 and Feb. 23, 2011

Balloonsat High Altitude Flight Student Competition
Audience: 9-12 Educators and Students
Proposal Deadline: Feb. 11, 2011

2011 Harriett G. Jenkins Predoctoral Fellowship
Audience: Higher Education Students
Deadline: March 1, 2011


Student Spaceflight Experiments Program Opportunity
Audience: 5-12 Educators and Students

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NES Chat With NASA Scientist Joel Levine

NASA Explorer Schools invites you to join a live chat on Jan. 21, 2011, from 2-3 p.m. EST, to ask Dr. Joel S. Levine, Chief Scientist of the ARES Mars Airplane Mission, questions about the development of a robotic, rocket-powered airplane that will fly through the atmosphere of Mars to search for evidence of life by looking for trace gases of biogenic origin.

For more information, visit
https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/nes2/home/live-chat-Levine.html.

If you have any questions about the webcast, please contact John Entwistle at John.D.Entwistle@nasa.gov.
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NASA Web Chat: Taking the “Boom” Out of Booms

Loud sonic booms are a barrier to being able to fly over land at supersonic speeds some day. Noise regulations in most countries would not allow supersonic planes to fly over land because of the sonic booms they would generate. NASA is testing ways to take some of the “boom” out of sonic booms. On Tuesday, Jan. 25, 2011, at 3 p.m. EST, join a live web chat with NASA’s sonic boom “guru,” Ed Haering.

To ever be able to enjoy the benefits of flying people or cargo over land at super-fast speeds, we have to figure out how to turn down the volume on sonic booms.

NASA has been doing flight tests and simulations and ground experiments — with cool names like “Quiet Spike,” “SonicBOBS,” “SonicBREW,” “LaNCETS,” “House VIBES,” “Low Boom/No Boom” — to help find answers.

For more information about the chat and how to participate, visit
https://www.nasa.gov/connect/chat/sonic_boom_chat.html.

If you have any questions about the webcast, please contact Karen Rugg at Karen.L.Rugg@nasa.gov.

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2011 Langley Aerospace Research Summer Scholars

Langley Aerospace Research Summer Scholars, or LARSS, is a 10-week summer internship at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va. Internships are available for rising undergraduate juniors, seniors and graduate students who are pursuing degrees in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, materials science, atmospheric science and other aerospace-related fields that lend support to NASA’s mission. Students with other majors also are invited to apply.

The 10-week internship includes doing a research project under the supervision of a researcher, attending technical lectures by prominent engineers and scientists, and presenting project results at a poster session. Additional elements include tours of Langley wind tunnels, computational facilities and laboratories, as well as several networking activities.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens. Applications are due Feb. 1, 2011.

For more information and to apply online, visit http://www.nianet.org/larss/.

Please e-mail any questions about this opportunity to Debbie Murray at
Deborah.B.Murray@nasa.gov or Sarah Pauls at Sarah.E.Pauls@nasa.gov.

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NASA LEARN and NES Offering Webinars

NASA LEARN, or Learning Environments and Research Network, and NASA Explorer Schools have teamed up to offer exciting webinars featuring NASA educational resources for educators. Below are four offerings in February 2011. The webinars are presented from 9-10 p.m. EST to be sure educators on both the East Coast and West Coast can participate. And don’t worry about the technology. We have tech support ready to walk you through viewing and participating in the webinars.

You can register for each of the webinars by clicking on these website links:

Smart Skies — Feb. 2, 2011, 9 p.m. EST
Learn how to use an innovative air traffic control simulator to engage your students as they explore the mathematics involved in being an air traffic controller.
https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-smart-skies/

Black Hole Math — Feb. 9, 2011, 9 p.m. EST
This session provides teachers with information about one of the most exciting yet misunderstood space phenomenon — black holes. Learn about black hole structure and behavior, and get information on some common misconceptions about black holes.
https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-black-hole-math/

Engineering Design Challenge: Lunar Plant Growth Chamber — Feb. 16, 2011, 9 p.m. EST
Plant growth will be an important part of space exploration in the future. This webinar will highlight the science of the lunar environment, basic plant needs, the current focus of NASA’s plant research and the systems that are being developed for future missions.
https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-plant-growth/

Engineering Design Challenge: Water Filtration — Feb. 23, 2011, 9 p.m. EST
This webinar will highlight the water recovery and management function of the Environmental Control and Life Support System, or ECLSS, on the International Space Station. Students will design, build, test and measure the performance of a water filtration device, analyze the data collected and use this information to work toward an improved filtration design.
https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-water-filtration/

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Balloonsat High Altitude Flight Student Competition

NASA is inviting student teams to design and build experiments the agency will fly into the stratosphere, a near-space environment, more than 100,000 feet above Earth.

NASA’s second annual Balloonsat High-Altitude Flight competition is open to student teams in ninth to 12th grades from the United States and its territories. Each team of four or more students must submit an experiment proposal to NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland by Feb. 11, 2011. Student teams may propose experiments on a wide range of topics, from bacteria studies to weather observations.

A panel of NASA engineers and scientists will evaluate the submissions based on mission objectives, technical planning and team organization. The top eight proposals will be announced on March 4, 2011.

The top four teams will receive up to $1,000 to develop their flight experiments and travel to Glenn Research Center May 18-20, 2011. During their visit, they will have an opportunity to tour the center, watch as NASA helium weather balloons carry their experiments to the edge of space, recover the experiments and present their results at Glenn’s Balloonsat Symposium.

The other four teams also will receive up to $1,000 to develop their flight experiments and will participate via the Internet when NASA scientists and engineers launch and recover their payloads during the week of May 23, 2011.

For more Balloonsat information, registration forms and project ideas, visit: http://www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/balloonsat.

This competition and similar educational programs help NASA attract and retain students in the areas of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. These disciplines are critical to the agency’s future programs and missions.

The Balloonsat High-Altitude Flight competition is sponsored by Glenn’s Educational Programs Office and is funded by the Teaching From Space Office at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. For information about the TFS education program, visit: https://www.nasa.gov/education/tfs.

If you have questions about Balloonsat, please contact William.T.Dedula@nasa.gov


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2011 Harriett G. Jenkins Predoctoral Fellowship

Applications are now being accepted for the Harriett G. Jenkins Predoctoral Fellowship. Up to 20 fellows will be selected to receive support for graduate education in NASA-related STEM disciplines. The fellowship is open to women, minority and disabled full-time graduate students studying science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Students are selected for fellowships that include financial support and opportunity for hands-on research experience at a NASA center. Fellowship tenure is three years for candidates seeking either a master’s or doctoral degree in NASA-related fields.

Applications for this opportunity are due March 1, 2011.

For more information about the fellowship, visit http://www.uncfsp.org/JPFP and
https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/descriptions/Jenkins_Predoctoral_Fellowship_Project.html.

To apply for this fellowship online, visit the OSSI: SOLAR (One Stop Shop Initiative: Student On-Line Application for Recruiting Interns, Fellows and Scholars) website http://intern.nasa.gov.

Please e-mail any questions about this opportunity to Brenda Collins at
Brenda.J.Collins@nasa.gov.

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Student Spaceflight Experiments Program Opportunity

Student Experiments on Space Shuttle Endeavour Flight Attract National Attention in Bold New STEM Education Program

Private Sector Effort Also Offers Potential New Space Shuttle Atlantis Opportunity for 100,000 Students to Participate

The Student Spaceflight Experiments Program (SSEP, http://ssep.ncesse.org), launched June 2010 by the National Center for Earth and Space Science Education (NCESSE, http://ncesse.org) in partnership with NanoRacks LLC (http://www.nanoracks.us/), has selected 16 grade 5-12 student microgravity science experiments to fly on STS-134, the final flight of Shuttle Endeavour currently set to launch April 2011.

Responding to a national announcement of opportunity by NCESSE in June 2010, 16 communities joined the program. Each community was provided an experiment slot in a private sector microgravity research laboratory flying on Endeavour, and which had also flown on seven past Shuttle missions. An experiment design competition in each community, open to up to 3,200 students, allowed student teams to design real experiments vying for their reserved slot on this historic flight. Additional SSEP programming leverages the flight design competition to engage the community, embracing a Learning Community Model for STEM education.

A total of 20,000 students were given the opportunity to participate for STS-134, with 447 proposals submitted by student teams, 293 put forward to preliminary review boards in each of the communities, and 43 finalists put forward to a National SSEP Review Board. The 16 experiments selected for flight include studies of cell biology, life cycles, seed germination, food preservation, and crystal growth.

SSEP is the first pre-college STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) education program that is both a U.S. national initiative and implemented as an on-orbit commercial space venture. SSEP is enabled through NanoRacks LLC, which is working in partnership with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the utilization of the International Space Station as a National Laboratory. “SSEP is immersing students in real science, and inspiring our next generation of scientists and engineers so that America can compete in the 21st century,” says Jeffrey Manber, Managing Director of NanoRacks.

“SSEP is designed to empower the student as scientist, and within the real-world context of science. Student teams design a real experiment, propose for a real flight opportunity, experience a formal proposal review process, go through a flight safety review, and have their own science conference, where they are immersed in their community of researchers,” said Dr. Jeff Goldstein, creator of SSEP and NCESSE Center Director in recent video interview on StemStream TV on the TV Worldwide Network. ”Science is more than a way of thinking and interacting with the natural world. Science is also a complex social landscape filled with challenges, and the need for successful communication with one’s peers. SSEP is about introducing real science to our children.”

The vision for SSEP is to provide routine student access to space via commercial payloads, and to leverage the power of such access into STEM education delivered across an entire school district, and serving a national, even international network of such communities.

Given the interest in this first flight opportunity, the National Center for Earth and Space Science Education is now announcing a Student Spaceflight Experiments Program opportunity for STS-135, the final flight of Atlantis, and the final flight of the U.S. Shuttle program, assuming Congress authorizes this additional mission. The STS-135 opportunity is available to school districts across the U.S. as well as Canada, and has been expanded to include U.S. 2-year community colleges. The Center expects that up to 50 communities will participate, engaging 100,000 grade 5-14 students in this historic adventure.

NCESSE and NanoRacks are now planning the details of a post-shuttle SSEP initiative utilizing the unique hardware of the International Space Station (ISS) U.S. National Laboratory, with participation open to the ISS partner nations. “The SSEP is a model program for engaging students in the NASA mission in a hands-on manner. The real-world experience these student scientists will gain by developing actual flight experiments will be invaluable to their STEM educational development,” says Mark Severance, NASA Education Projects Manager for the ISS National Laboratory. “We look forward to working with NCESSE and NanoRacks to host future iterations of SSEP on the NanoRacks Platform onboard the International Space Station.”

Links:
SSEP Home Page: http://ssep.ncesse.org

SSEP Overview PDF: http://ssep.ncesse.org/overview

SSEP Participating Communities: http://ssep.ncesse.org/communities

Student Proposals Selected for Flight on Shuttle Endeavour:
http://ssep.ncesse.org/communities/selected-experiments-on-sts-134/

SSEP In the News: http://ssep.ncesse.org/communities/in-the-news/

STEM Learning Community Model: http://ncesse.org/about/learning-community-model/

Testimonials: http://ssep.ncesse.org/communities/in-our-own-words/


About NCESSE
The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education (NCESSE) creates and oversees national initiatives addressing science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education, with a focus on earth and space. Programs are designed to provide an authentic window on science as a human endeavor. Central objectives of the Center’s programs are to help ensure a scientifically literate public and a next generation of U.S. scientists and engineers—both of which are of national importance in an age of high technology. NCESSE is a Project of the Tides Center. http://ncesse.org

About NanoRacks
NanoRacks, LLC designed and operates research platforms onboard the ISS U.S. National Laboratory that permits low-cost research using payloads in the CubeSat form factor. The company also is planning space station hardware that will permit low-cost, in-orbit analysis of microgravity research. The company brings together entrepreneurs, scientists and engineers who share a passion for entrepreneurial space including our utilization of low-earth orbit. NanoRacks currently enjoys a backlog of over 60 payloads from research, commercial and educational customers. http://www.nanoracks.us/


If you have questions about this
Student Spaceflight Experiments Program opportunity, please contact Dr. Jeff Goldstein, Center Director, NCESSE, at jeffgoldstein@ncesse.org or 301-395-0770.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators:
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students:
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club:
https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub