NASA Education Express — March 24, 2011

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

PBS Design Squad Nation: ‘One Giant Leap’
Audience: 5-12 and Informal Educators

NASA Explorer Schools Live Video Chat: Women at NASA
Audience: K-12 Educators and Students
Event Date: March 29, 2011

Join the Worldwide GLOBE at Night 2011 Campaign
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Now through April 6, 2011

$5,000 Grants Available for 2012 University Student Launch Initiative
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Informational Videoconference: April 6, 2011
Application Deadline: May 31, 2011

NASA LEARN and NES Offering Webinars
Audience: 5-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: April 6, April 13, April 20, April 27 and May 4, 2011

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PBS Design Squad Nation: ‘One Giant Leap’

A new full-length episode of PBS Design Squad Nation is now available online. In this episode, engineers Judy and Adam invite Felipe — an accomplished 15-year-old pilot from Miami, Fla. — to compete in the 2010 Red Bull Flugtag competition. Together, they team up with NASA to design and build a human-powered flying machine. With their NASA-inspired glider design, Team One Giant Leap soars off a 30-foot high deck, impressing the judges with distance and style.

Click the links below to view the episode online.
Part One:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bLYzD4ukQ4s
Part Two:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5w7zluiYt2Q

For more information and to find more Design Squad Nation videos and resources, visit
http://pbskids.org/designsquad/.

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NASA Explorer Schools Live Video Chat: Women at NASA

NASA Explorer Schools invites students in grades K-12 from across the U.S. and Department of Defense schools to participate in a live video chat with three outstanding women at NASA. The event will take place on March 29, 2011, at 2 p.m. EDT. Students and teachers can submit questions to Erika Alvarez, Mallory M. Johnston and Monsi C. Roman during this hour-long chat. The women will answer students’ questions about their careers in science and engineering.

Go to the chat page on the NASA Explorer Schools Virtual Campus website to participate in the webchat. You do not need to be a participant of the NASA Explorer Schools project to join the chat. To learn more about NES, please visit explorerschools.nasa.gov and click on the What Is NES? video or the About NES link.

To learn more about the women participating in the webchat, visit https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/nes2/home/live-chat-women-at-nasa.html.

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Join the Worldwide GLOBE at Night 2011 Campaign

GLOBE at Night encourages citizen-scientists worldwide to record the brightness of the night sky. During 2 weeks of moonless evenings, children and adults match the appearance of a constellation (Leo in the northern hemisphere and Crux or Leo in the southern hemisphere) with 7 star charts of progressively fainter stars found at http://www.globeatnight.org. Participants then submit their choice of star chart online with their date, time and location to help create a light pollution map worldwide.

The GLOBE at Night 2011 campaign dates are March 22-April 4, 2011, (for the Northern Hemisphere) and March 24-April 6, 2011, (for the Southern Hemisphere). Over 60,000 measurements have been contributed from more than 100 countries over the last 5 years of two-week campaigns.

This year children and adults can submit their measurements in real-time if they have a smart phone or tablet. To do this, use the web application at http://www.globeatnight.org/webapp/. With smart phones and tablets, the location, date and time are put in automatically. And if you do not have a smart phone or tablet, there are user-friendly tools on the GLOBE at Night report page to find latitude and longitude.

Through GLOBE at Night, students, teachers, parents and community members are amassing a data set from which they can explore the nature of light pollution locally and across the globe. Make a difference and join the GLOBE at Night efforts in 2011. Activity packets, one-page flyers and postcards advertising the campaign are available at http://www.globeatnight.org.

Please email any questions about GLOBE at Night to Connie Walker at cwalker@noao.edu.

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$5,000 Grants Available for 2012 University Student Launch Initiative

The NASA Minority Innovation Challenges Institute, or MICI, will be offering Minority Serving Institutions the opportunity to apply for a $5,000 grant to assist the school in entering the 2012 NASA University Student Launch Initiative. USLI is a competition that challenges university-level students to design, build and launch a reusable rocket with a scientific or engineering payload to one mile above ground level. The project engages students in scientific research and real-world engineering processes with NASA engineers. It culminates in an actual launch competition near NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.

Those interested in this grant opportunity should visit
http://nasamici.com/?p=450 to register for a free, live videoconference on April 6, 2011, at 3 p.m. EDT in which MICI organizers will explain how to apply. Additional video conference sessions concerning USLI will be held during the remainder of the month of April. These sessions will include Dr. Clement Allen explaining how to create a Senior Design Course around USLI; the 2010 Florida A&M Student USLI team describing their experience at the contest; and NASA representatives from USLI explaining how the contest works and how to prepare in advance. Dates and times for all of these sessions will be posted at http://nasamici.com/?p=450.

Applications are due May 31, 2011.

Please email any questions about the grant opportunity and informational videoconferences to Mary Baker at mary@nasamici.com.

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NASA LEARN and NES Offering Webinars

NASA Learning Environments and Research Network, or LEARN, and NASA Explorer Schools have teamed up to offer exciting webinars featuring NASA educational resources for educators. Below are four offerings in April 2011 and the first May 2011 event. The webinars are presented from 9-10 p.m. EST to ensure educators on both the East Coast and West Coast can participate. And, don’t worry about the technology. We have tech support ready to walk you through viewing and participating in the webinars.

You can register for each of the webinars by clicking on these website links:

Black Hole Math — April 6, 2011, 9 p.m. EST
This session provides teachers with information about one of the most exciting yet misunderstood space phenomenon — black holes. Learn about black hole structure and behavior, and get information on some common misconceptions about black holes.
https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-black-hole-math/

Engineering Design Challenge: Lunar Plant Growth Chamber — April 13, 2011, 9 p.m. EST
Plant growth will be an important part of space exploration in the future. This webinar will highlight the science of the lunar environment, basic plant needs, the current focus of NASA’s plant research and the systems that are being developed for future missions.
https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-plant-growth/

Engineering Design Challenge: Water Filtration — April 20, 2011, 9 p.m. EST
This webinar will highlight the water recovery and management function of the Environmental Control and Life Support System, or ECLSS, on the International Space Station. Students will design, build, test and measure the performance of a water filtration device, analyze the data collected and use this information to work toward an improved filtration design.
https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-water-filtration/

Exploring Space Through Math — April 27, 2011, 9 p.m. EST
During this unique webinar, you’ll learn how to get your students to investigate the characteristics of quadratic functions to solve real-world problems involving the parabolic flights of NASA’s “Weightless Wonder” microgravity jet.
https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-exp-space-through-math/

GENESIS: What Are We Made of? The Sun, Earth and You — May 4, 2011, 9 p.m. EST
By counting elements extracted from a simulated Genesis sample, students learn how the extraction of atoms from the Genesis samples help scientists have a better understanding of the abundance of elements from the solar wind.
https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-genesis/

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub


NASA Education Express Message — March 17, 2011

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

NASA Launches Women@NASA Website
Audience: All Educators and Students

NASA Webchat — Data Mining Digs up Clues for Aviation Safety
Audience: 9-Higher Education Educators and Students
Event Date: March 23, 2011


Free Webcasts — Physics Phundamentals
Audience: 5-12 Educators and Students
Event Date: March 24, 2011

Free Exploring Space Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators and 9-Higher Education Students
Event Dates: Monthly March 24 – June 9, 2011

2011 Heliophysics Educator Ambassador Program
Audience: 6-8 Educators
Application Deadline: March 25, 2011


Center for Astronomy Education Teaching Excellence Workshops
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Event Dates: Multiple Dates March 26 – July 17, 2011

NASA Seeks Partners To Manage Night Rover, Nano-Sat Launcher Challenges
Audience: U.S. Non-Profit Organizations

Night Rover Challenge Proposal Deadline: April 22, 2011
Nano-Satellite Launcher Challenge Proposal Deadline: May 6, 2011

Airborne Research Experiences for Educators and Students
Audience: 6-9 Educators

Application Deadline: April 29, 2011


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NASA Launches Women@NASA Website

To celebrate Women’s History Month, NASA recently unveiled a new website that features women in NASA careers telling their stories in their own words. The website has 32 video interviews with women of diverse backgrounds who represent different aspects of the agency’s work. Subjects include NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver, astronauts, engineers and scientists. They discuss their accomplishments and offer encouragement to women and girls considering technical careers so they can become the trailblazers of tomorrow. The site also provides information about NASA internships and career opportunities.

To watch the interviews and learn more, visit
http://women.nasa.gov.

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NASA Webchat — Data Mining Digs up Clues for Aviation Safety

When an airplane flies through the air, hundreds of data streams — pilot reports, incident reports, control positions, instrument positions and warning modes — fly from it every second. There’s so much data, it has been difficult for airlines to do anything other than search for the cause of something that has already happened.

Enter the data mining detectives from NASA. Data mining involves analyzing mountains of data and summarizing it into useful information. (Popular search engines do this every second.) NASA’s is using data mining to search for clues that could predict safety issues.

On March 23, 2011, at 2 p.m. EDT, join a live webchat with NASA data mining expert Ashok Srivastava and Southwest Airlines’ Flight Safety Director Jeff Hamlett to find out what makes data mining so hard and how airlines are using data mining “gold” to make flying safer.

To learn more about the chat and how to participate visit
https://www.nasa.gov/connect/chat/data_mining_chat.html.

(NOTE: Both chat guests will also talk about data mining on “The Leading Edge,” which streams live on NASA TV at
www.nasa.gov on March 23, from 11 a.m.-noon EDT. To read more about “The Leading Edge,” visit http://www.aeronautics.nasa.gov/leading_edge_data_mining.htm.)

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Free Webcasts — Physics Phundamentals

Join educators Rachel Power and Joshua Santora from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida as they explore what happens when physics and fun collide. Become a virtual member of the audience at Busch Gardens Tampa during this full velocity Physics Phundamentals show, which is offered exclusively to Physics Day students.

Each 30-minute show is designed to show students how physics is something that is encountered constantly. Topics such as action/reaction (Newton’s Third Law), combustion/propulsion, kinetic/potential energy, states of matter/phase change, inelastic collisions and sound waves will be covered in each show.

Four webcasts will take place on March 24, 2011. Shows will begin at 9:30 a.m. EDT, 10:30 a.m. EDT, 11:30 a.m. EDT, and 12:30 p.m. EDT.

For more information and to watch the webcasts, visit
http://dln.nasa.gov/dln/.

Questions about the Physics Phundamentals webcasts should be e-mailed to Rachel Power at
Rachel.B.Power@nasa.gov.

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Free Exploring Space Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online

The 2011 Exploring Space Lectures will feature world-class scholars discussing the incredibly diverse worlds that make up our solar system. The lectures will be held at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C., and are free to attend. Tickets are required. The lectures will be webcast live for free viewing online. Lecture videos will be archived.

The Solar Dynamics Observatory: The Sun Up Close and Personal
NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, is designed to help us better understand how the sun works and how it influences our lives. Project Scientist Dean Pesnell will discuss how SDO will change how we see the sun inside and out in this lecture illustrated with spectacular images and video.

The lecture will take place on March 24, 2011, at 8 p.m. Come early to see a free film and to meet the lecturer.

For more information, visit
http://www.nasm.si.edu/events/eventDetail.cfm?eventID=2768.

Mars: A Dynamic World
A camera on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter captures images of Mars in greater detail than ever before and records the effects of active processes shaping the surface. Alfred McEwen of the University of Arizona
will discuss the dynamic activity on Mars and its implications for possible life, including visitors from Earth.

The lecture will take place on April 7, 2011, at 8 p.m. Come early to see a free film and to meet the lecturer.

For more information, visit
http://www.nasm.si.edu/events/eventDetail.cfm?eventID=2769.

Exploring Mercury by Spacecraft: The MESSENGER Mission
Until recently, Mercury was the least explored of the terrestrial planets, visited only by Mariner 10 in the 1970s. In March 2011, the MESSENGER spacecraft goes into orbit around Mercury. Principal Investigator Sean Solomon will guide attendees through the latest images and mission results.

The lecture will take place on May 12, 2011, at 8 p.m. Come early to see a free film and to meet the lecturer.

For more information, visit
http://www.nasm.si.edu/events/eventDetail.cfm?eventID=2770.

The Early Solar System: Dawn at Vesta
In July 2011, the Dawn spacecraft will begin to orbit Vesta, the second most massive object in the asteroid belt. Just weeks before the spacecraft arrives at this previously unseen world, join Co-Investigator Carle Pieters as she discusses the Dawn spacecraft and how we will study the surface of Vesta.

The lecture will take place on June 9, 2011, at 8 p.m. Come early to see a free film and to meet the lecturer.

For more information, visit
http://www.nasm.si.edu/events/eventDetail.cfm?eventID=2771.

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2011 Heliophysics Educator Ambassador Program


The 2011 NASA Heliophysics Educator Ambassador Program is currently accepting applications. The program kicks off with a weeklong teacher professional development workshop July 18-22, 2011, at the Adler Planetarium in Chicago, Ill.

The workshop will focus on in-depth learning experiences in Earth, space and physical science topics for educators teaching in middle school grades. The goal of this program is for participants to gain a better understanding of these content areas and develop the capacity to train other teachers on NASA Heliophysics science and educational resources.

Lodging support for out-of-town participants and stipends for all participants are available.

Applications are due March 25, 2011.

For more information about the Heliophysics Educator Ambassador Program and how to apply, visit
http://www.adlerplanetarium.org/educate/pd.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to
learn@adlerplanetarium.org.

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Center for Astronomy Education Teaching Excellence Workshops

The Center for Astronomy Education announces a series of educator workshops for astronomy educators. Advanced workshops are available for participants who have taken part in previous CAE workshops.

The overarching goal of these workshops is for participants to become familiar with research-validated active engagement teaching strategies and assessment materials, as well as how to implement them in their college courses, through role-playing, modeling, practice, and more! To accomplish this goal, participants will learn how to create productive learning environments beginning with a brief review of research on the nature of teaching and learning. Most workshop time will be spent with participants playing the roles of student, instructor, and critical friend to practice implementing active engagement strategies such as interactive lectures, Think-Pair-Share, interactive demonstrations and videos, collaborative groups, Lecture-Tutorials and Ranking Tasks.

One-day Regional Teaching Exchanges are also available. The Regional Exchanges bring past workshop participants, as well as those local to a particular region who were not able to participate in a past workshop, the opportunity to network with their local community of instructors.

March 26, 2011 — New Palz, N.Y.
NASA CAE Northeast Regional Teaching Exchange

April 15-16, 2011 — El Paso, Texas
Improving the College Introductory Courses Through Active Engagement
: A Tier I (Introductory) Workshop

April 16, 2011 — Seattle, Wash.
NASA CAE Northwest Regional Teaching Exchange

May 21-22, 2011 — Boston, Mass.
Improving the College Introductory Astronomy Survey Course for Non-Science Majors Through Active Engagement: A Tier I (Introductory) Workshop

May 22, 2011 — Boston, Mass.
NASA CAE Tier II (Advanced) Special Topics Workshop: Using Technology in the Classroom

July 16-17, 2011 — Hilo, Hawai’i

Effective Implementation of Interactive Instructional Strategies to Improve Learning in Earth and Space Science Introductory Classrooms: A Tier I (Introductory) Workshop

For more information and to register for workshops online, visit
http://astronomy101.jpl.nasa.gov/workshops/index.cfm.

Inquiries about this series of workshops should be directed to
Gina Brissenden at
gbrissenden@as.arizona.edu.

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NASA Seeks Partners To Manage Night Rover, Nano-Sat Launcher Challenges

NASA is seeking partner organizations to manage the agency’s upcoming Night Rover and Nano-Satellite Launcher Centennial Challenges.

NASA’s Centennial Challenges are prize competitions for technological achievements by independent teams who work without government funding. The challenges are extended to individuals, groups and companies working outside the traditional aerospace industry. Unlike most contracts or grants, awards only are made after solutions are successfully demonstrated.

Teams competing in the Night Rover Challenge will need to demonstrate a solar-powered exploration vehicle that can operate in darkness, using its own stored energy. NASA is offering a prize purse of $1.5 million for the rover challenge. The Nano-Satellite Launcher Challenge is to place a small satellite into Earth orbit, twice in one week, with a prize purse of $2 million.

The objective of the Night Rover Challenge is to stimulate innovations in energy storage technologies of value in extreme space environments, such as the surface of the moon, or for electric vehicles and renewable energy systems on Earth. Currently, the solar-powered Mars rovers “go to sleep” during the Martian night. NASA hopes the Night Rover Challenge will generate new ideas that will allow planetary rovers the ability to take on a night shift, and possibly create new energy storage technologies for applications on our home planet.

The Nano-Satellite Launcher Challenge goal is to stimulate innovations in low-cost launch technology for frequent access to Earth orbit while encouraging creation of commercial nano-satellite delivery services. Decreasing the cost of reliably sending small payloads to Earth orbit in a timely manner could create entire new markets for U.S. businesses and provide opportunities for students and researchers to harness the environment of space for technology development and innovative problem solving.

Centennial Challenge events typically include media and public audiences, and may be televised on NASA Television or streamed online. NASA’s agency website also covers the competitions. The competitions provide high-visibility opportunities to partner organizations and sponsors for public outreach.

NASA will choose U.S. non-profit organizations to manage the contests from proposals in response to agency opportunity notices available at
http://go.usa.gov/40P and http://go.usa.gov/49N.

The organizations that will manage the challenges also will seek sponsors and teams, and conduct publicity and administration of the actual contests. Once selected, the allied organizations will collaborate with NASA to announce challenge rules and details on how teams may enter.

Allied organizations generally seek sponsorships of all monetary sizes and in-kind contributions while providing public recognition to competition sponsors. Arrangements for competition sponsorships will be negotiated directly between the allied organizations and the sponsors and may include competition naming rights for significant contributors.

NASA also is seeking private and corporate sponsors for the Strong Tether, Power Beaming, Green Flight and Sample Return Robot Challenges. NASA is looking for companies, organizations or individuals interested in sponsoring the non-profit allied organizations that manage the prize competitions.

Potential sponsors include for-profit companies and corporations, universities and other non-profit or educational organizations, professional or public organizations, and individuals. Those interested in discussing sponsorship opportunities should respond to a Request for Information at
http://go.usa.gov/459.

For more information about NASA’s Centennial Challenges Program, visit https://www.nasa.gov/challenges.

For more information about NASA’s Office of the Chief Technologist, visit https://www.nasa.gov/oct.

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Airborne Research Experiences for Educators and Students

The NASA Airborne Research Experiences for Educators and Students, or AREES, program is recruiting science, technology, engineering, mathematics, or STEM, and language arts pre-service and in-service educators of students in grades 6-9 to participate in a three-day experiential workshop in Palmdale, Calif. Workshops will be offered July 13-15 and July 27-29, 2011. Participants will learn how NASA conducts airborne science and flight research via NASA interactive, technology-rich learning module for teachers and students.

The workshop is designed to:
1.  Increase educators’ core scientific and research knowledge bases.
2.  Model and promote use of scientific inquiry through problem-based learning.
3.  Provide STEM teachers with a variety of alternative instructional strategies.
4.  Increase commitment and competency to teaching interactive, technology-rich curricula.
5.  Foster use of interdisciplinary teams.

The AREES workshop anchors pre-service and in-service educators in a community of scientific practice through interactions with NASA engineers and scientists. Attendees also visit NASA’s Dryden Flight Research Center in Edwards, Calif., and NASA’s Dryden Aircraft Operations Facility in Palmdale, Calif. Further, educators will learn how to participate in an innovative, emergent teacher-student design challenge: Plan a Flight Mission — Improving Earthquake Monitoring. Select teams and individuals who participate in the challenge may be able to participate in a real airborne research experience in 2012!

Applications will be accepted through April 29, 2011, or until workshops are filled. Applications received after that date will receive consideration as space permits. Teams of two to four teachers are encouraged to apply.

For more information, visit
http://www.aeroi.org/K6.php. Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Shaun Smith at shaun.smith@nasa.gov.

The AREES program is offered through the Aerospace, Education, Research and Operations Institute in Palmdale, Calif., and California State University, Fullerton, in partnership with NASA’s Dryden Flight Research Center and the Teaching From Space program at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators:
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students:
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club:
https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — March 10, 2011

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community.Full descriptions are listed below.

Teaching From Space Seeks Educators to DefyGravity
Audience: K-12 Educators
Proposal Deadline: March 14, 2011

Women In STEM High School AerospaceScholars
Audience: 9-12 Educators and Students
Deadline: March 14, 2011

NASA Explorer Schools Live Video Chat:Aquarius Habitat — Analog to the International Space Station
Audience: K-12 Educators and Students
Event Date: March 15, 2011

DLiNFocus:NASA Careers ‘What’s in Your Future?’ Special Event Series — Special Women’sHistory Month Editions
Audience: 5-12 Educators and Students
Event Dates: Each Wednesday at 2 p.m. EDT

NASA DLN PlanetaryWebcast Series
Audience: 5-8 Educators and Students
Event Dates: March 17 – April 21, 2011

Sun-Earth Day 2011: Ancient Mysteries –Future Discoveries
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: March 19, 2011

Pre-Service Teacher Institutes atNASA’s Johnson Space Center
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: March 22, 2011
Institute Dates: June 19-24 and July 24-29, 2011

International Space StationEarthKAM Spring 2011 Mission
Audience: 5-8 Educators
Event Date: April 5-8, 2011

Host a Downlink With the Space Station
Audience: All Educators
Proposal Deadline: April 29, 2011

2011 INSPIRE Project
Audience: 9-12 Educators and Students
Application Deadline: June 30, 2011

NASA’sTeaching From Space Office Unveils New Website
Audience: All Educators

Spiders in Space Experiment andTeacher’s Guide
Audience: All Educators

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Teaching From Space Seeks Educators to Defy Gravity

Teaching From Space, a NASA Education office, in partnership with theReduced Gravity Education Flight Program announces the opportunity foreducators across the country to conduct research in a unique reduced-gravityenvironment. For the first time, this incredible opportunity is open to anycurrent K-12 classroom teacher in the United States. Participants must also beU.S. citizens.

This experience will enable selected educator teams to propose, design andfabricate a reduced-gravity experiment and subsequently test and evaluate theirexperiment aboard a microgravity aircraft. This aircraft flies approximately 30roller-coaster-like climbs and dips to produce periods of micro- andhyper-gravity, ranging from 0 g’s to2 g’s.

Fourteen teams of four to five educators will be selected from this applicationprocess to travel to NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. Educatorswill participate in Reduced Gravity Flight Week June 24 – July 2, 2011, and fly their own experiments aboard NASA’sReduced Gravity Aircraft.

Educator teams interested in testing an experiment in this unique environmentneed to submit a proposal no later than March 14, 2011. For moreinformation, check out http://microgravityuniversity.jsc.nasa.gov/tfs or send an e-mail to jsc-rgeducator@nasa.gov.

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Women In STEM High School Aerospace Scholars

Engineer your dream job. The Women in STEM High School Aerospace Scholars projectoffers a one-of-a-kind experience for female high school juniors to jump-start theirfutures and explore the possibilities of a major or career in science, technology,engineering and mathematics. Participants begin their adventure in spring 2011with an online community. The project culminates with a summer experience atNASA’s Johnson Space Center. Collaborate with girls from across the country andfemale NASA engineers and interns.

Applications are due March 14, 2011.

For more information and to download the application, visit http://wish.spacegrant.org.

Questions should be directed to JSC-NHAS@mail.nasa.gov.

This opportunity is provided by Teaching FromSpace, a NASA education project. Teaching From Space promotes learningopportunities and builds partnerships with the education community using theunique environment of space and NASA’s human spaceflight program.

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NASA Explorer Schools Live Video Chat: Aquarius Habitat– Analog to the International Space Station

NASA Explorer Schools invites students in grades K-12 from acrossthe U.S. and Department of Defense schools to participate in a live video chatwith NASA engineer aquanaut Tara Ruttley. The event will take place on March 15, 2011, at 1 p.m. EDT.Students and teachers can submit questions to Dr. Ruttley during this hour-longchat. Ruttley will answer questions about participating in the NEEMO 6 projectand her career as an engineer aquanaut and Associate International SpaceStation Program Scientist.

Go to the chatpage on the NASA Explorer Schools Virtual Campus website to participate inthe webchat. You’ll find background information aboutRuttley and links to NEEMO. You do not need to be a participant of the NASAExplorer Schools project to join the chat. To learn more about NES, pleasevisit the explorerschools.nasa.govwebsite and click on the What Is NES? video or the About NES link.

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DLiNFocus: NASA Careers ‘What’sin Your Future?’ Special Event Series — Special Women’s History Month Editions

Various subject matter experts from different NASA centers will bein the Digital Learning Network studios for a series of webcasts focusing oncareers. Selected classrooms will be able to interact live with the scientiststhrough the DLN cameras. Each event will be webcast to allow students from allover the world to watch the interviews. Any student can interact by sendingquestions via e-mail.

Experts will share their academic experiences from elementary through collegeand talk about what motivated them to pursue their careers. They will discusswhere those career paths lead. Students and teachers will have an opportunityto learn about the variety of career choices at NASA — astronauts aren’t theonly folks who work here! The schedule of events through March 2011 includes:

— March 16: Multiple NASA centers featuring Debbie Goodenow-Messman, electricaland nuclear engineer; Heather Hickman, aerospace engineer; and Amy Stalker,mechanical engineer.
— March 23: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center featuring Katie Collins, researchanalyst with the Global Inventory Monitoring and Mapping Studies branch.

Each hour-long webcast event begins at 2 p.m. EDT.

Sign up today to become a part of this exciting opportunity to meet NASAemployees live! For more information, visit the DLN website at http://dln.nasa.gov and click the Special Events button.

Inquiries about the DLiNFocus series should be directed to Caryn Long at Caryn.Long@nasa.gov.

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NASA DLNPlanetary Webcast Series

NASA’s Digital Learning Network announces a series of monthlywebcasts. Join Dr. Joel Levine each month as he features a different topic ofplanetary study and talks about what NASA has done to help us better understandour home planet and neighbors in our solar system. This series is designed totarget middle school students.

Mars: Up Close and Personal
March 17, 2011, 1-2 p.m.EDT
Join Dr. Joel Levine to learn more about the RedPlanet. Today, Mars is a cold, dry, inhospitable planet with a very thinatmosphere. Scientists believe that early Mars was very hospitable withabundant surface water and atmospheric pressure similar to Earth’s. Thiswebcast will explore Mars’ past and what makes Mars and Earth so differenttoday.

The Heat Is On: Global Warming — Causes andConsequences
April 21, 2011, 1-2 p.m.EDT
Join Dr. Joel Levine to learn more about globalwarming and how it is affecting our planet. The temperature of the surface ofEarth and the other planets is controlled by incoming solar radiation and theoutgoing thermal or infrared radiation generated at the surface by theabsorption of the incoming solar radiation. This webcast will discuss thecauses and consequences of global warming.

NASA’s Digital Learning Network allows the nextgeneration of explorers to connect with scientists, engineers and researcherswithout leaving the classroom. The network provides distance-learning eventsdesigned to educate through demonstrations and real time interactions with NASAexperts.

For more information about this series ofwebcast events, visit http://dln.nasa.gov/dln/.

If you have any questions about this webcastseries, please contact Caryn Long at Caryn.Long@nasa.gov.

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Sun-Earth Day 2011: Ancient Mysteries –Future Discoveries

Join NASA in celebrating Sun-Earth Day on March 19, 2011.

Sun-Earth Day comprises a series of programs and events that occur throughoutthe year, culminating with a celebration on or near the spring equinox. Thisyear’s theme, “Ancient Mysteries — Future Discoveries,” opens the door to amuch deeper understanding of the sun and its impact across the ages.

Over the past 10 years, the NASA Sun-Earth Day team has sponsored andcoordinated education and public outreach events to highlight NASA heliophysicsresearch and discoveries. The SED team’s strategy involves using celestialevents, such as total solar eclipses and the transit of Venus, as well asSun-Earth Day during the March equinox, to engage K-12 schools and the publicin space science activities, demonstrations and interactions with spacescientists.

On March 19, 2011, join theSun-Earth Day team for a live Sun-Earth Day webcast. For this webcast, the teamwill combine forces with the award-winning NASA EDGE team known for theiroffbeat, funny and informative look behind the NASA curtain. The webcast willfocus on sites in the United States and Mexico that present uniqueopportunities to develop cultural connections to Native Americans, highlightingthe importance of the sun across the ages.

You can participate in this year’s celebration through Twitter! Over 100participants will be attending a tweetup at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Centerin Greenbelt, Md. Everyone talking about the webcast and tweetup will add #SED2011 or #NASATweetup to the end of their tweet. Don’t miss outon a variety of very lively conversations! To learn how to host your owntweetup, visit http://sunearthday.nasa.gov/2011/about/launchinfo.php.

For more information, educational resources and social media connections, visitthe Sun-Earth Day website at http://sunearthday.nasa.gov/2011.

Questions about Sun-Earth Day events should be e-mailed to sunearthday@gmail.com.

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Pre-Service Teacher Institutes at NASA’sJohnson Space Center

The Pre-Service Teacher Institute is a one-week summer residentialsession for early childhood and elementary education majors preparing to teachin an elementary or middle school classroom. Two institutes will take placethis year: June 19-24 and July 24-29, 2011. Both events will take place at NASA’sJohnson Space Center in Houston.

College students from diverse backgrounds will be exposed to aerospace,mathematics and science enrichment activities. Pre-service teachers are able tointerface with NASA personnel and tour Johnson Space Center facilities whilelearning to incorporate NASA’s cutting-edge research into lesson plans forelementary and intermediate school students.

Full-time undergraduate students in their junior or senior year are invited toapply.

The application period closes on March 22, 2011.For more information, visit http://education.jsc.nasa.gov/psti/default.htm.

Please e-mail any questions about this opportunity to Sharon Griffin at sharon.v.griffin@nasa.gov.

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International Space Station EarthKAM Spring 2011 Mission

Middle school educators are invited tojoin NASA for the International Space Station EarthKAM Spring 2011 Mission fromApril 5-8, 2011. Find out more about this exciting opportunitythat allows students to take pictures of Earth from a digital camera aboard theInternational Space Station.

International Space Station EarthKAMis a NASA-sponsored project that provides stunning, high-quality photographs ofEarth taken from the space shuttle and the space station. Since 1996, EarthKAM students have taken thousandsof photographs of Earth by using the World Wide Web to direct a digital cameraon select spaceflights and, currently, on the space station.

For more information about the projectand to register for the upcoming mission, visit the EarthKAM home page www.EarthKAM.ucsd.edu.

If you have questions about the EarthKAM project, please e-mail ek-help@earthkam.ucsd.edu.

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Host a Downlink With the SpaceStation

NASA is seeking formal and informal education institutions andorganizations, individually or working together, to host a live, in-flighteducation downlink during Expeditions 29 and 30 (approximately from September2011 to March 2012). To maximize these downlink opportunities, NASA is lookingfor organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integratethe downlink into a well-developed education plan. The deadline to submit aproposal is April 29, 2011.

Downlinks are approximately 20 minutes in length and allow students andeducators to interact with the astronauts through a question-and-answersession. A downlink is a modified video conference in which participants seeand hear the crew members live from space, but the crew does not see theaudience. Downlinks afford education audiences the opportunity to learnfirst-hand from astronauts what it is like to live and work in space. Downlinksare broadcast live on NASA TV and are streamed on the NASA website. Due to thenature of human spaceflight, organizations must demonstrate the flexibility toaccommodate changes in downlink dates and times.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/teachingfromspace/students/downlinks.html.

Interested parties should contact Teaching From Space to obtain informationrelated to expectations, content, format, audience, application guidelines andforms by sending an e-mail to JSC-Teaching-From-Space@mail.nasa.gov or by calling 281-244-7608.

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2011 INSPIRE Project

U.S. high school students are invitedto participate in NASA’s Interdisciplinary National Science ProgramIncorporating Research Experience, or INSPIRE, through an online learningcommunity. INSPIRE is designed to encourage students in ninth through 12thgrades to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Applications are being accepted through June30, 2011. NASA will make selections for the program in September. Theselected students and their parents will participate in an online learningcommunity with opportunities to interact with peers, NASA engineers andscientists. The online community also provides appropriate grade leveleducational activities, discussion boards and chat rooms for participants togain exposure to careers and opportunities available at NASA.

Students selected for the program also will have the option to compete forunique grade-appropriate experiences during the summer of 2012 at NASAfacilities and participating universities. The summer experience providesstudents with a hands-on opportunity to investigate education and careers inthe STEM disciplines.

INSPIRE is part of NASA’s education strategy to attract and retain students inthe STEM disciplines critical to NASA’s missions. For more information aboutINSPIRE, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/INSPIRE.

To apply for the program, visit https://inspire.okstate.edu/index.cfm?liftoff=login.LoginForm.

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NASA’s Teaching From SpaceOffice Unveils New Website

Teaching From Space is a team of former classroom teachers devoted tohelping educators make science, technology, engineering and mathematics, orSTEM, come alive for learners. Each experience and resource offered throughTeaching From Space is intended to be unique and accessible and to providereal-life connections to the world of STEM.

Teaching From Space recently unveiled a new website. This site providesinformation on many opportunities available through the Teaching From SpaceOffice. Opportunities range from capturing images of Earth by remotelyprogramming a camera aboard the International Space Station to launching anexperiment on a NASA weather balloon. Teaching From Space even can put you intouch with astronauts aboard the International Space Station to answerquestions related to your classroom studies.

The new site also features a section devoted to women and female students whoserve as role models for future generations. Celebrate Women’s History Month byreading about some of the women at NASA and the paths they followed to achievetheir goals.

In addition to hands-on activities, the website features electronic resourcesdesigned with busy educators in mind. Quickly and easily find everythingneeded, from short video clips to lesson plans, to infuse your classroom withNASA-unique content.

To find available opportunities and to learn more about Teaching From Space,visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/tfs.

Questions about Teaching From Space should be directed to JSC-Teaching-From-Space@mail.nasa.gov.

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Spiders in Space Experiment and Teacher’s Guide

In April 2011, an orb weaver spider will join the STS-134 crewaboard space shuttle Endeavour for a trip to the International Space Station.Once on board the space station, the spider will star in an exciting experimentto observe its behaviors in microgravity. The spider will live in a safe environmentthat provides food and water. The special habitat allows the spider to bemonitored continuously. Real-time photos and video of the spider will betransmitted from the space station back to Earth and made available on the“Spiders in Space” Mission page.

Baylor College of Medicine in Houston has created a complete curricular module.It will allow students and teachers worldwide to conduct their own classroominvestigations comparing ground-based spiders with those living in microgravityon the space station. The teacher’s guide for the Spiders in Space module isfree. Visit the link below to register and download the module guide. Itprovides information on the orb weaver spider, housing and care for a spider,and setting up a classroom-based investigation with your students.

To learn more and download the guide, visit http://bioedonline.org/space/STS_Mission_134S.cfm.

Questions about the Spiders in Space module should bedirected to Greg Vogt at vogt@bcm.edu.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available fromNASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub


NASA Education Express – March 3, 2011

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Early Birds … Tune in to NASA TV Tomorrow Morning for Education Downlink
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: March 4, 2011

NASA at the 2011 NSTA Conference
Audience: All Educators
Conference Dates: March 10-13, 2011

2011 Race to the Top High School Commencement Challenge
Audience: 9-12 Educators and Students
Deadline: March 11, 2011

Women In STEM High School Aerospace Scholars
Audience: 9-12 Educators and Students
Deadline: March 14, 2011

2011 Lunar Workshops for Educators
Audience: 6-12 Educators
Workshop Dates: Multiple dates June-August 2011
Application Deadlines Begin: April 1, 2011

NASA Launches 2011 Nationwide Technology Space Competition
Audience: 9-12 Educators
Deadline: April 30, 2011

New NASA eClipsTM Videos Available
Audience: K-12 Educators

NASA and You — NASA y Tú Website
Audience: 5-12 and Informal Educators and Students

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Early Birds … Tune in to NASA TV Tomorrow Morning for Education Downlink

Tune in to NASA TV on March 4 at 6:08 a.m. CST to watch STS-133 and Expedition 26 crew members hold an in-flight education downlink with the NASA Educational Technology Services team and student interns located at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. The NETS team has used social media and NASA Education’s new Taking Up Space blog (https://www.nasa.gov/education/takingupspace) to allow high school and college students the opportunity to select questions to ask astronauts in orbit. NETS is a crosscutting NASA Education project that prepares and delivers educational content on the NASA website. Following the live event, NETS plans to use the downlink video to develop resources for NASA Education websites, allowing the downlink to continue to inspire and engage students.

To watch NASA TV online, visit https://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html.

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NASA at the 2011 NSTA Conference

Make NASA a part of your NSTA experience this year! The 2011 National Science Teachers Association’s national conference is being held March 10-13, 2011, in San Francisco, Calif. Dozens of NASA presentations, workshops and short courses are scheduled during the conference. To find NASA sessions that fit in your schedule, visit
http://bit.ly/faqRgN.

Also, stop by the NASA exhibit booth (#729) in Moscone Center South to learn about exciting new NASA programs and products.

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2011 Race to the Top High School Commencement Challenge

Applications are open for the 2011 Race to the Top Commencement Challenge. The Commencement Challenge invites public high school students across the country to demonstrate how their school best prepares them for college and a career, helping America win the future by out-educating our competitors and achieving President Obama’s goal of having the highest proportion of college graduates in the world by 2020.

The application includes essay questions and statistical information that illustrate how schools are promoting college and career readiness for all students while establishing a culture of student success and academic excellence.

Applications must be submitted no later than Friday, March 11 at 11:59 p.m. EST.

The winning school will host President Obama as its 2011 commencement speaker.

For more information and to submit an application, visit
http://www.whitehouse.gov/commencement.

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Women In STEM High School Aerospace Scholars

Engineer your dream job. The Women in STEM High School Aerospace Scholars project offers a one-of-a-kind experience for female high school juniors to jump-start their futures and explore the possibilities of a major or career in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Participants begin their adventure in spring 2011 with an online community. The project culminates with a summer experience at NASA’s Johnson Space Center. Collaborate with girls from across the country and female NASA engineers and interns.

Applications are due March 14, 2011.

For more information and to download the application, visit
http://wish.spacegrant.org.

Questions should be directed to JSC-NHAS@mail.nasa.gov.

This opportunity is provided by Teaching From Space, a NASA education project. Teaching From Space promotes learning opportunities and builds partnerships with the education community using the unique environment of space and NASA’s human spaceflight program.

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2011 Lunar Workshops for Educators

NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, mission is sponsoring a series of workshops for educators of students in grades 6-12. These workshops will focus on lunar science, exploration and how our understanding of the moon is evolving with the new data from current and recent lunar missions.

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has allowed scientists to measure the coldest known place in the solar system, map the surface of the moon in unprecedented detail and accuracy, find evidence of recent lunar geologic activity, characterize the radiation environment around the moon and its potential effects on future lunar explorers and much, much more!

Workshop participants will learn about these and other recent discoveries, reinforce their understanding of lunar science concepts, interact with lunar scientists and engineers, work with real LRO data and learn how to bring these data and information to their students using hands-on activities aligned with local, state and national standards. Laptops are strongly encouraged for those participating in this workshop.

Workshops will take place in the following locations:
— June 20-24, 2011 — Herrett Center for Arts and Science, Twin Falls, Idaho
— June 27-July 1, 2011 — Hinds Community College, Utica Campus, Utica, Miss.
— June 27-July 1, 2011 — McAuliffe-Shepard Discovery Center, Concord, N.H.
— July 25-29, 2011 — John Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Md.
— Aug. 1-5, 2011 — Arizona State University, Tempe, Ariz.

Applications for three workshops are due April 1, 2011. Applications for other workshops are due at a later date.

For more information and to register for the workshops, visit
http://lunar.gsfc.nasa.gov/lwe/index.html.

Questions about these workshops should be directed to
Andrea.J.Jones@nasa.gov.

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NASA Launches 2011 Nationwide Technology Space Competition

A do-it-yourself technology space competition sponsored by NASA’s Emerging Commercialization Space Office kicked off recently.

Make Magazine, a do-it-yourself publication for technology, is partnering with Teachers in Space to help develop space science kits that high-school teachers can build and fly on suborbital flights. The project’s ultimate goal is to develop the next generation of technology leaders.

The NASA-Make competition will be the first of what many hope will be an annual event. It is designed to inspire curiosity and create interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics among classroom teachers and their students. Contenders are invited to submit ideas, concepts, and prototypes for kits that teachers can build for future spaceflights. Teachers in Space announced the contest at the Next Generation Suborbital Research Conference in Orlando, Fla.

Competition rules are simple. Kits should use components that are likely to be available at most high schools, and submitted experiments must be self-contained and fit in a standard Cubesat container (an international standard for small space-science payloads). To make kits accessible to students nationwide, part of the challenge is to be able to build these kits for under $100, the kind of funds that could be raised by a school bake sale.

Entries are due April 30, 2011.

The first experiment kits to be selected will fly aboard the Excelsior STEM mission, a commercial unmanned suborbital mission sponsored by Teachers in Space and scheduled to fly in 2011. Experiment kits for the Excelsior STEM mission will be assembled by teachers at a Suborbital Flight Experiment Workshop to be held Aug. 1-5, 2011 at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center’s AERO Institute in Palmdale, Calif.

This workshop and the Excelsior STEM mission provide a historic opportunity for high-school teachers to gain hands-on experience with space-flight hardware.

The winner of the NASA-Make Challenge will be honored at the Bay Area Maker Faire, May 21-22, 2011 in San Mateo, Calif.

For more information about the NASA-Make Challenge, visit
http://makezine.com/space.

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New NASA eClipsTM Videos Available

NASA eClips
ä has rolled out three new videos to captivate your students’ minds and inspire their imaginations.

This month NASA eClips
ä presents:
— Our World:
What is the Solar System? (grades K-5)
— Real World:
Centripetal Force (grades 6-8)
— Launchpad:
Astrobiology (grades 9-12)

Our World has a new educator’s guide available online.
Shower Clock allows students to think and act like engineers and scientists as they follow the five steps of the Design Process to complete a team challenge successfully. Within this work, students design, measure, build, test and re-design a shower clock. Once the shower clock is built, students discuss ways to conserve and recycle water.

To learn more about NASA eClipsä, such as how the program can benefit your classroom, visit NASA eClipsä on the Web.

Follow NASA eClips
ä on Facebook and Twitter.

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NASA and You — NASA y Tú Website

NASA and Univision Communications Inc. have launched an on-air and online initiative to help engage Hispanic students. The NASA and You website inspires Hispanic students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM. The site features videos and information in both Spanish and English. The website also includes information on educational opportunities for students.

To view the “NASA and You” website, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/nasaandyou/home/index.html.

Inquiries about the website should be directed to Ivelisse Gilman at Ivelisse.R.Gilman@nasa.gov.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express – Feb. 24, 2011

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

NASA at the 2011 NSTA Conference
Audience: All Educators
Conference Dates: March 10-13, 2011

NASA History Symposium — 1961/1981: Key Moments in Human Spaceflight
Audience: All Educators and Grades 9-Higher Education Students
Event Date: April 26-27, 2011

RockOn! 2011 University Rocket Science Workshop
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Deadline: May 3, 2011
Workshop Dates: June 18-23, 2011

Pennsylvania Space Grant Workshops
Audience: 5-12 Educators
Workshop Dates: Multiple dates June-August 2011

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NASA at the 2011 NSTA Conference

Make NASA a part of your NSTA experience this year! The 2011 National Science Teachers Association’s national conference is being held March 10-13, 2011, in San Francisco, Calif. Dozens of NASA presentations, workshops and short courses are scheduled during the conference. To find NASA sessions that fit in your schedule, visit
http://bit.ly/faqRgN.

Also, stop by the NASA exhibit booth (#729) in Moscone Center South to learn about exciting new NASA programs and products.


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NASA History Symposium — 1961/1981: Key Moments in Human Spaceflight

The NASA History Program Office and the National Air and Space Museum’s Division of Space History are pleased to announce a symposium marking four significant anniversaries in the history of human spaceflight in 1961 and 1981. This event will take place April 26-27, 2011, at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC. The symposium is free and open to the public.

This Key Moments in Human Spaceflight symposium marks the 50th anniversaries of Yuri Gagarin’s first human spaceflight, Alan Shepard’s first U.S. human spaceflight, and President John F. Kennedy’s “urgent national needs” speech before Congress, all in the spring of 1961. The symposium also marks the 30th anniversary of the first flight of the space shuttle in spring 1981.

In addition to featuring a variety of engaging panels, the symposium will include a keynote speech by Dr. Michael Robinson from the University of Hartford on the theme of exploration in space. Dr. George Herring from the University of Kentucky will be the keynote speaker for the second day, addressing the Cold War context of the space race during the 1960s.


For more information about this opportunity and to register online, visit
http://history.nasa.gov/1961-1981conf/index.html.

Inquiries about this symposium should be directed to
histinfo@nasa.gov.

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RockOn! 2011 University Rocket Science Workshop

U.S. university faculty and students are invited to a weeklong workshop to learn how to build and launch a scientific experiment into space. NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia is hosting the RockOn! 2011 workshop June 18-23, in partnership with the Colorado and Virginia Space Grant Consortia. The registration deadline for the workshop is May 3, 2011.

The hands-on workshop teaches participants to build experiments that fly on sounding rockets. During the week, participants will work together in teams of three to construct and integrate a sounding rocket payload from a kit. On the fifth day of the workshop, the experiments will fly on a sounding rocket expected to reach an altitude of more than 70 miles.

Each experiment will provide valuable scientific data, analyzed as part of the student-led science and engineering research. The program engages faculty and students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics skills critical to NASA’s future engineering, scientific and technical missions.

For more information about RockOn! and to register online, visit:
http://spacegrant.colorado.edu/rockon.

Questions about the workshop or the registration process should be directed to Chris Koehler by e-mail at
koehler@colorado.edu or by telephone at 303-492-3141.

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Pennsylvania Space Grant Workshops

Keep pace with the latest science research, engage in standards-based classroom activities and explore ways to make science fun while working with Penn State faculty during these summer workshops for in-service science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, educators. Network with peers and earn graduate credits. Workshops are aligned with the national science education standards and Pennsylvania standards for science and technology.

All workshops take place in State College, Pa. Grants are awarded to all participants to cover in-state tuition, lodging, parking, some meals and partial travel.


Ancient Global Warming (Grades 6-12) — June 15-17, 2011
Venture back 55 million years to learn about a major global warming event and what it can teach us about the potential effects of future global warming on the environment and life on Earth. Hands-on activities will include computer modeling and processing of ancient samples.
http://teachscience.psu.edu/workshops/global_warming.html

Engaging Students in Astronomy (Grades 5-9) — July 18-22, 2011
Learn how to use the Starry Night software package, which allows users to simulate the behavior of the night sky and the motion of objects in the solar system. Participants also will learn to analyze student work in order to contribute to research into how students’ understanding of astronomy changes over time.
http://teachscience.psu.edu/workshops/astronomy.html

Hands-on Particle Astrophysics (Grades 9-12) — July 25-29, 2011
This workshop will feature hands-on explorations of high-energy messengers from extreme cosmic phenomena, such as galactic supernova blast waves. Instructors will highlight leading Penn State experiments in Antarctica, the Argentine Pampas and the upper reaches of Earth’s atmosphere.
http://teachscience.psu.edu/workshops/particle_astrophysics.html

Astrobiology: The Interdisciplinary Search for Life in the Cosmos (Grades 5-12) — Aug. 1-5, 2011
Join faculty from the Penn State Astrobiology Research Center to examine how scientists work to detect and characterize life on the early Earth, in extreme environments and in extraterrestrial settings. The latest research and related hands-on activities will be highlighted.
http://teachscience.psu.edu/workshops/astrobiology.html

Black Holes: Gravity’s Fatal Attraction (Grades 6-12) — Aug. 1-5, 2011
Delve deep inside black holes and modern ideas about gravity, space, time and solar system formation. Current ideas might surprise you!
http://teachscience.psu.edu/workshops/black_holes.html

Questions about the Pennsylvania Space Grant workshops should be directed to
teachscience@psu.edu.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators:
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students:
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club:
https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express – Feb. 17, 2011

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Learn How to Apply for a NASA Internship
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Live Presentations: Feb. 17, 2011 and Feb. 22, 2011
Application Deadline: March 1, 2011


NASA DLN CubeSats Webcast
Audience: 9-Higher Education Educators and Students
Event Date: Feb. 22, 2011

Educator Resource Showcase Webcast — Earth Observatory Online
Audience: 5-12 Educators
Event Date: Feb. 23, 2011

Thrill of Discovery Workshop
Audience: All Educators
Registration Deadline: March 1, 2011
Event Date: March 19, 2011

NASA LEARN and NES Offering Webinars
Audience: 5-12 Educators
Event Date: March 2, March 9, March 23 and March 30, 2011

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Learn How to Apply for a NASA Internship

The NASA Minority Innovation Challenges Institute, also known as MICI, is offering free interactive video sessions which guide undergraduate and graduate students through the step-by-step process of applying for a NASA internship. Applications are due March 1, 2011. The video sessions also provide information about scholarships, fellowships, and other NASA opportunities.

A recorded session featuring Cathalina Juarez, NASA Recruitment Coordinator is available for viewing now. On Feb. 17, 2011, at 2 p.m. EST, MICI will feature a live interactive presentation from Juan Carlos Lopez, a NASA MUST Scholar. This will be followed by a presentation on Feb. 22, 2011, at 3 p.m. EST, from Denisse Aranda, a NASA Student Ambassador.

Visit
http://nasamici.com/2011-nasa-summer-internships.html to learn how to access this free content.

Questions about the MICI video sessions should be directed to Theresa Martinez at
Theresa.C.Martinez@nasa.gov.

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NASA DLN CubeSats Webcast

Students and satellites go together like NASA and space. NASA’s Launch Services Program is partnering with universities to launch small satellites called CubeSats as part of the Educational Launch of Nanosatellites, or ELaNa, mission. Nicknamed CubeSats, because of their shape, they were built by college teams from Montana State University, the University of Colorado and Kentucky Space, a consortium of state universities.

Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network for a webcast on Feb. 22, 2011, from 1-2 p.m. EST, to meet the teams as they describe their experiences and to learn more about the project and how you can get involved in launching satellites with NASA.

For more information about this webcast, visit
http://dln.nasa.gov/dlnapp/webcast/webcast.do.

If you have any questions about this webcast, please contact Christopher Blair at Christopher.E.Blair@nasa.gov.

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Educator Resource Showcase Webcast — Earth Observatory Online

Join host Renee Elias from the Central Operation of Resources for Educators and special guest Holli Riebeek from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center for an hour-long, free webcast on Feb. 23, 2011, at 4 p.m. EST. This webcast will focus on how the Earth Observatory website can be used as a resource in formal and informal education.

The Earth Observatory site features images and stories about climate and the environment and how NASA’s research — including satellite missions, field research and climate models — contributes to our understanding of Earth. The site contains nearly 10,000 images with descriptive captions and over 350 feature articles.

For more information and to view the webcast, visit
https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/dln/index.html.

Visit the Earth Observatory website at
http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/.

If you have any questions about the webcast, please e-mail them to Renee Elias at
nasa_renee@lcjvs.net.

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Thrill of Discovery Workshop

Celebrate NASA’s Year of the Solar System by attending a Thrill of Discovery workshop.

NASA’s Discovery and New Frontiers missions are traveling vast distances to find answers to age-old questions. These robotic spacecraft are celestial detectives, revealing how our solar system formed and evolved — doing brilliant science utilizing cool technologies.

The Thrill of Discovery workshop will be taking place on March 19, 2011, in four locations.
            — NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
            — NASA’s Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas
            — Jackson Middle School Observatory, Champlin, Minn.
            — Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Md.

Events at all four sites will include special speakers, hands-on activities with break-out sessions for K-12 and out-of-school-time educators, and resource packets full of educational resources and goodies.

The Thrill of Discovery is offering a webinar option for those who are unable to attend at one of the workshop sites. The webinar will allow interested parties to watch the speaker presentations in real time. These presentations will be the only portion of the Thrill of Discovery workshop available by webinar.

Participants must register by March 1, 2011. The cost of the workshop is $25. Lunch and snacks will be provided.

For more information, visit
http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/discovery/thrill_of_discovery.asp.

Please direct questions about the Thrill of Discovery workshop to Mary Cullen at
mcullen@mcrel.org or 303-632-5547.

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NASA LEARN and NES Offering Webinars

NASA Learning Environments and Research Network, or LEARN, and NASA Explorer Schools have teamed up to offer exciting webinars featuring NASA educational resources for educators. Below are four offerings in March 2011. The webinars are presented from 9-10 p.m. EST to ensure educators on both the East Coast and West Coast can participate. And, don’t worry about the technology. We have tech support ready to walk you through viewing and participating in the webinars.

You can register for each of the webinars by clicking on these website links:

Exploring Space Through Math — March 2, 2011, 9 p.m. EST
During this unique webinar, you’ll learn how to get your students to investigate the characteristics of quadratic functions to solve real-world problems involving the parabolic flights of NASA’s “Weightless Wonder” microgravity jet.
https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-exp-space-through-math/

GENESIS: What Are We Made of? The Sun, Earth and You — March 9, 2011, 9 p.m. EST
By counting elements extracted from a simulated Genesis sample, students learn how the extraction of atoms from the Genesis samples help scientists have a better understanding of the abundance of elements from the solar wind.
https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-genesis/

Rockets Educator Guide — March 23, 2011, 9 p.m. EST
During this webinar, receive an overview of the Rocketry activity, explore the NASA connections, share tips and tricks for implementing this lesson in the classroom, watch videos of students engaged in the lesson and discuss possible modifications or extensions.
https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-nasa-rockets-guide/

Smart Skies — March 30, 2011, 9 p.m. EST
Learn how to use an innovative air traffic control simulator to engage your students as they explore the mathematics involved in being an air traffic controller.
https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-smart-skies/

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub


NASA Education Express – Feb. 3, 2011

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Vote Now for NASA OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award
Audience: All Educators and Students
Voting Ends: Feb. 6, 2011


Teaching From Space Seeks Educators to Defy Gravity
Audience: K-12 Educators
Proposal Deadline: March 14, 2011

2010-2011 Green Aviation Student Competitions
Audience: 9-Graduate Students
High School Deadline: March 15, 2011
University Deadline: May 2, 2011

2010-2011 NASA Future of Flight Art Contest
Audience: 9-Higher Education Students
Deadline: April 15, 2011

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Vote Now for NASA OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award

NASA has opened online voting for the agency’s OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award student video contest. The public is invited to vote for its favorite videos, made by students in grades three through eight, developed to help educate America’s youth about the benefits of NASA’s technologies.

NASA is using the correlation between Hasbro’s TRANSFORMERS property and commercialized agency spinoffs to help students understand how technology developed for space and aeronautics transforms into products and technologies used on Earth.

More than 190 children from 31 states have submitted creative videos describing their favorite agency technology from NASA’s “Spinoff 2009” publication. The students also documented why their videos should be selected to win the NASA OPTIMUS PRIME trophy.

Voting closes on Feb. 6, 2011.

To watch the videos and to cast a vote for your favorites, visit
http://ipp.gsfc.nasa.gov/optimus/voting.php.

The top five submissions from each of two groups (third through fifth and sixth through eighth grades) will advance for final judging. A panel of NASA judges will select the winners in each of the two grade categories. The winning students, associated spinoff companies and NASA innovators will be announced in February.

NASA intends to make this an annual competition. Students can begin thinking about next year’s competition by deciding which spinoffs they like best from NASA’s recently published “Spinoff 2010.”

For more information about the NASA OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Award,
visit:
http://ipp.gsfc.nasa.gov/optimus

For more information about NASA spinoffs and technology transfer,
visit:
http://www.sti.nasa.gov/tto/

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Teaching From Space Seeks Educators to Defy Gravity


Teaching From Space, a NASA Education office, in partnership with the Reduced Gravity Education Flight Program announces the opportunity for educators across the country to conduct research in a unique reduced-gravity environment. For the first time, this incredible opportunity is open to any current K-12 classroom teacher in the United States. Participants must also be U.S. citizens.

This experience will enable selected educator teams to propose, design and fabricate a reduced-gravity experiment and subsequently test and evaluate their experiment aboard a microgravity aircraft. This aircraft flies approximately 30 roller-coaster-like climbs and dips to produce periods of micro- and hyper-gravity, ranging from 0 g’s to 2 g’s.

Educator teams interested in testing an experiment in this unique environment need to submit a proposal no later than March 14, 2011. For more information, check out http://microgravityuniversity.jsc.nasa.gov/tfs or send an e-mail to jsc-rgeducator@nasa.gov.

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2010-2011 Green Aviation Student Competitions

The Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project invites students from high school grades through graduate school to research and design a large passenger aircraft that is less noisy, less harmful to the environment, and more fuel-efficient than current models. The competition has two divisions: High School and College/University. Teams or individuals may enter. At the college level, inter-institutional partnerships are permitted and interdisciplinary collaboration is encouraged.

High school participants must be enrolled in an accredited high school, secondary school or home school. For the high school division, the deadline for papers is March 15, 2011.

Undergraduate and graduate participants must be enrolled full time in an accredited college or university. For the college and university division, the deadline for design papers is May 2, 2010.

International students may participate, but they are not eligible for cash prizes or student internships.

For more information about the contest, visit http://aero.larc.nasa.gov/competitions.htm.

Questions about the contest should be directed to Dr. Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.

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2010-2011 NASA Future of Flight Art Contest

NASA’s Future of Flight Art Contest invites students to imagine what spaceships, rockets or aircraft will look like 100 years from now. High school and college students from all areas of study are encouraged to enter. Artists are encouraged to collaborate with science and engineering students. Any full-time student can enter, regardless of major or area of study. Team entries are accepted, but team size is limited to eight students.

Entries will be accepted in the following categories: two-dimensional art, three-dimensional art, digital (including music and video) and literature (poetry and short stories). Entries will be evaluated on creativity and artistic qualities. Prizes include awards and exhibit opportunities. Entries are due April 15, 2011.

For more information about the NASA Future of Flight Art Contest, visit http://artcontest.larc.nasa.gov/.

Questions about the contest should be directed to Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub


NASA Education Express — Jan. 27, 2011

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

DLiNFocus: NASA Careers ‘What’s in Your Future?’ Special Event Series
Audience: 5-12 Educators and Students
Event Dates: Each Wednesday at 2 p.m. EST


Online Professional Development Workshop: Enrichment Problems in Space and Earth Science XXVII

Audience: 5-12 Educators
Event Date: Feb. 3, 2011

Call for Abstracts: 62nd International Astronautical Congress
Audience: Higher Education Students
Deadline: Feb. 28, 2011

2011 Graduate Student Researchers Project
Audience: Higher Education Students
Deadline: March 1, 2011

3rd Annual NASA STEM Educators Workshop Series
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: March 1-3, 2011

2011 Simulation-Based Aerospace Engineering Teacher Professional Development Program
Audience: Middle and High School STEM Educators
Application Deadline: March 7, 2011

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DLiNFocus: NASA Careers ‘What’s in Your Future?’ Special Event Series

Various subject matter experts from different NASA centers will be in the Digital Learning Network studios for a series of webcasts focusing on careers. Selected classrooms will be able to interact live with the scientists through the DLN cameras. Each event will be webcast to allow students from all over the world to watch the interviews. Any student can interact by sending questions via e-mail.

Experts will share their academic experiences from elementary through college and talk about what motivated them to pursue their careers. They will discuss where those career paths lead. Students and teachers will have an opportunity to learn about the variety of career choices at NASA — astronauts aren’t the only folks who work here! The schedule of events through February 2011 includes:

Feb. 2: NASA’s Kennedy Space Center featuring Dr. Philip Metzger, research physicist and founder of the Granular Materials and Regolith Operations Lab.
Feb. 9: NASA’s Langley Research Center featuring Jennifer Keyes, aerospace engineer.
Feb. 16: NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center featuring Dr. Bill Cooke, head of NASA’s Meteoroid Environment Office.
Feb. 23: NASA’s Stennis Space Center featuring Tom Nicolaides, systems engineer supporting Propulsion Test Projects.

Each hour-long webcast event begins at 2 p.m. EST.

Sign up today to become a part of this exciting opportunity to meet NASA employees live! For more information, visit the DLN website at
http://dln.nasa.gov and click the Special Events button.

Inquiries about the DLiNFocus series should be directed to Caryn Long at
Caryn.Long@nasa.gov.

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Online Professional Development Workshop: Enrichment Problems in Space and Earth Science XXVII

John Ensworth at the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies and the NASA Science Mission Directorate invite you to attend an upcoming online professional development workshop.

Topic: Enrichment Problems in Space and Earth Science
XXVII

In the 27th bi-monthly installment of these mission- and inquiry-oriented mathematics problems, Dr. Sten Odenwald will supply background for and lead participants through problems from his “Problems in Space and Earth Science” series. Space Math @ NASA has posted four new math problems based on exciting new press releases from NASA that were posted at the beginning of the month. In this webinar, we will work through the following problems:

Problem 396: Kepler 10b — A Matter of Gravity (Grades 8-10)
In this problem, students use the measured properties of the Earth-like planet Kepler 10b to estimate the weight of a human on its surface. Topics include evaluating formulas; mass = density x volume; volume of a sphere; and scientific notation.

Problem 395: Death Stars (Grades 6-9)
Some stars create super-flares that are capable of eliminating life on planets that orbit close to the star. Students learn about these flares on common red-dwarf stars and compare them to flares on our own sun. Topics include scientific notation; percentages; and rates of change.

Problem 394: Probing the Lunar Core Using Seismology (Grades 9-10)
Students learn about the geometry needed to determine the diameter of the lunar core using a simplified model. Topics include geometry and properties of inscribed arcs.

Problem 393: Taking a Stroll Around a Martian Crater! (Grades 6-8)
Students use a recent photograph of a crater on Mars to estimate its circumference and the time it will take NASAs Opportunity Rover to travel once around its edge. Topics include scale model; distance = speed x time; and metric measure.

The goal of these problems is to teach students about space weather by using mathematics. Each problem begins with real world questions, missions and situations, and applies the necessary mathematics for a solution. Participants may ask questions and work along in this fully interactive Webinar environment.
http://spacemath.gsfc.nasa.gov

Date: Thursday, Feb. 3, 2011

Time: 3:00 p.m., EST (Greenwich Mean Time -05:00, New York)

You will need a computer, a good internet connection and a telephone to participate.

Participants must first register for this meeting. There is no cost for this event.
Note: Only the first 150 registrants will be accepted. Register ASAP!

If this meeting is full, you will receive an e-mail that reads:
“Your registration for this meeting is denied.”
In that case, we ask you to please join us in the next workshop!
If you do miss this event, we will send you the link to a video archive of the workshop so you will still be able to benefit from the exercises.

Please join the meeting 15-20 minutes before start to make sure your computer is prepared to run the Webex software. You may also pre-install the Webex plug-in following the instructions at the bottom of this e-mail.

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Where to
register for this meeting
—————————————————–
1. Go to
https://nasa.webex.com/nasa/j.php?ED=162247537&RG=1&UID=0&RT=MiMxMQ%3D%3D.
2. Register for the meeting.
Once the host approves your request, you will receive a confirmation e-mail with instructions for joining the meeting.

To view in other time zones or languages, visit
https://nasa.webex.com/nasa/j.php?ED=162247537&RG=1&UID=0&ORT=MiMxMQ%3D%3D.

——————————————————-
Closed Captioning is available during the Webinar. A link to this will be provided closer to meeting time.
——————————————————-
For assistance
——————————————————-
1. Go to
https://nasa.webex.com/nasa/mc
2. Click “Assistance”.
3. Click “Support”.

For more information, contact John Ensworth by e-mail at
john_ensworth@strategies.org or by telephone at 703-312-0563.

IMPORTANT NOTICE: This WebEx service includes a feature that allows audio and any documents and other materials exchanged or viewed during the session to be recorded. By joining this session, you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to the recording, do not join the session. This video and earlier product videos will be available via a Web-based archive tool will soon be located at:
http://www.strategies.org/education/index.aspx?sub=education&sub2=professional and http://video.strategies.org.

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To check the setup of your computer and pre-install the plug-in software, use the following links:

Downloads

WebEx will automatically setup Meeting Manager for Windows the first time you join a meeting. To save time, you can setup prior to the meeting by clicking this link: https://nasa.webex.com/nasa/meetingcenter/mcsetup.php.

The host requests that you check for compatibility of rich media players for Universal Communications Format (UCF) before you join the session. UCF allows you to view multimedia during the session. To check now, click the following link: https://nasa.webex.com/nasa/systemdiagnosis.php.

Meeting Manager for Microsoft® Windows® – MSI Installer

— Meeting Center automatically downloads, installs and configures Meeting Manager for Windows the first time you start or join a meeting. However, you may choose to download and run the Meeting Manager Installer before starting or joining a meeting. You must have administrator privileges on your computer to use this installer.
— Download Meeting Manager Installer for Internet Explorer
https://nasa.webex.com/client/T25L/atmcie.msi
— Download Meeting Manager Installer for Mozilla Firefox/Netscape Navigator https://nasa.webex.com/client/T25L/atmcns.msi

Meeting Manager for Mac® OS X (PowerPC)

— Meeting Manager for Mac OS X (PowerPC) is set up automatically the first time you start or join a meeting. The Installer for Mac OS X (PowerPC) can be used to manually install or uninstall Meeting Manager for Mac OS X (PowerPC).

Download Meeting Manager Installer for Mac OS X (PowerPC)
https://nasa.webex.com/client/T25L/mac/powerpc/webexinstaller.hqx.

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Call for Abstracts: 62nd International Astronautical Congress

NASA announces its intent to participate in the 62nd International Astronautical Congress, or IAC, and requests that full-time graduate students attending U.S. universities or colleges respond to this “Call for Abstracts.” The IAC — which is organized by the International Astronautical Federation, or IAF; the International Academy of Astronautics, or IAA; and the International Institute of Space Law, or IISL, — is the largest space-related conference worldwide and selects an average of 1000 scientific papers every year. The upcoming IAC will be held Oct. 3-7, 2011, in Cape Town, South Africa. NASA’s participation in this event is an ongoing effort to continue to connect NASA with the astronautical and space international community.

This “Call for Abstracts” is a precursor to a subsequent submission of a final paper, which may be presented at the 62nd IAC. Student authors are invited to submit an abstract regarding an original, unpublished paper that has not been submitted in any other forum. A NASA technical review panel of scientists and/or officials will select abstracts. Many students and professors are involved in NASA-related research. Persons submitting abstracts are strongly encouraged to seek advice from professors who are conducting NASA research and/or from NASA scientists and engineers.

Abstract Preparation
— Abstracts must be 400 words or less.
— Abstracts must be written in English.
— Abstracts cannot include formulas, tables or drawings.
— Select the symposium and session in which you wish to post your abstract. Please view the IAC brochure at
http://iac2011.com/sites/default/files/pdf/iac2011-call-for-papers.pdf for list of sessions and more details.

Abstracts must be related to NASA’s ongoing vision for space exploration and fit into one of the following categories:
Science and Exploration — Systems sustaining missions including life, microgravity, space exploration, space debris and Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence, or SETI.
Applications and Operations — Ongoing and future operational applications, including Earth observation, communication, navigation, human space endeavors and small satellites.
Technology — Common technologies to space systems including astrodynamics, structures, power and propulsion.
Infrastructures — Systems sustaining space missions including space systems, transportation, future systems and safety.
Space and Society — Interaction of space with society including education, policy and economics, history, and law.

The full text of the abstract must be submitted electronically in the prescribed format at
http://iac.nasaprs.com no later than 11:59:59 p.m. EST on Feb. 28, 2011 and to the IAC website at http://iac2011.com by March 2, 2011.

If you have a question or concern about the programmatic or the electronic submission of your abstract, please e-mail abstract@nasaprs.com, and you will receive a response within two (2) business days.

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2011 Graduate Student Researchers Project


Applications are being accepted for NASA’s Graduate Student Researchers Project. Through GSRP, NASA awards fellowships for graduate study leading to research-based master’s or doctoral degrees in science, technology, mathematics and engineering fields related to NASA research and development. In 2011, NASA is expanding GSRP to include students interested in becoming teachers or education administrators.

Applicants must be currently enrolled or accepted as full-time students at an accredited U.S. college or university. Applicants also must be U.S. citizens.

All application materials must be received no later than March 1, 2011. For more information, visit
https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/descriptions/Graduate_Student_Researchers_Project.html.

To apply for this fellowship online, visit the OSSI: SOLAR (One Stop Shop Initiative: Student On-Line Application for Recruiting Interns, Fellows and Scholars) website
http://intern.nasa.gov.

Please e-mail any questions about this opportunity to Linda Rodgers at Linda.L.Rodgers@jpl.nasa.gov.

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3rd Annual NASA STEM Educators Workshop Series

The 3rd Annual NASA STEM Educators Workshop Series will explore engineering design challenges, problem-based learning activities, distance learning modules, inquiry-based lessons and hands-on projects. Each workshop will be led by experienced educators and education public outreach specialists who will model pedagogical techniques and methods to foster problem-based learning, science as inquiry, technology integration and best practices. Workshops target in-service, informal and pre-service teachers who serve the K-12 education community.

The workshop series will take place March 1-3, 2011, in Charlotte, N.C.

For more information and to register for the workshops, visit
http://aesp.psu.edu/register/.

If you have any questions about the workshops, please contact Brandon Hargis at 757-864-9570 or
Brandon.Hargis@nasa.gov.

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2011 Simulation-Based Aerospace Engineering Teacher Professional Development Program

Applications are currently available for the 2011 Simulation-Based Aerospace Engineering Teacher Professional Development Program. This program will provide 32 select middle and high school STEM teachers the opportunity to attend a two-week, paid internship-based workshop at a NASA facility.

During the workshop, teachers will attend presentations by NASA engineers and education specialists, tour NASA facilities and work side-by-side with mentors. At the conclusion of the workshop teachers will have developed an innovative modeling and simulation lesson plan relevant to the mentor’s research area that they will be able to use in their classrooms and share with other educators across the nation.

Applications are due March 7, 2011.

For more information about this opportunity and to download the application materials, visit
https://simaero.rti.org.

Inquiries about the 2011 Simulation-Based Aerospace Engineering Teacher Professional Development Program should be directed to Olivia Rice at
simaero@rti.org or 919-541-7011.

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators:
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students:
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club:
https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub


NASA Education Express — Jan. 13, 2011

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Education Opportunities in NASA STEM Workshop
Audience: Higher Education Institutions
Event Date: Jan. 20, 2011

NASA DLN Planetary Webcast Series
Audience: 5-8 Educators and Students
Event Dates: Jan. 20 – April 21, 2011

Free Webcast — Space Operations in 2011
Audience: 5-8 Educators
Event Date: Jan. 26, 2010

Space Exploration Educators Conference
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Date: Feb. 3-5, 2011

2011 ACCESS Internships for Students With Disabilities

Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 11, 2011

2011 Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships

Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 22, 2011

No Boundaries Project and Student Competition
Audience: 5-12 Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: April 1, 2011

Education Innovation — Google Science Fair
Audience: 5-12 Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: April 4, 2011

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Education Opportunities in NASA STEM Workshop

The NASA Office of Education will be accepting proposals under the Education Opportunities in NASA STEM (EONS) NASA Research Announcement. This new announcement is an umbrella announcement for opportunities under the Minority University Research and Education Program, or MUREP, and includes calls for proposals in the following program elements for Fiscal Year 2011:

— Curriculum Improvement Partnership Award for the Integration of Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum, or CIPAIR.
— Innovations in Global Climate Change Education, or IGCCE.
— MUREP Space Projects, or MSP.
— NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center Center-Unique Projects.
— NASA’s Stennis Space Center Center-Unique Projects.

Eligibility Information: Proposals will be accepted from Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Hispanic Serving Institutions, Tribal Colleges and Universities, and other minority-serving institutions including those with high Hispanic enrollment. For some program elements, community colleges are also eligible. Public school districts and nonprofit organizations that reach a large number of under-represented and/or under-served audiences are also eligible. In some cases, NASA centers and other organizations may apply through partnership with the lead organization.

Interested parties may attend the EONS Workshop on Jan. 20, 2011, at the Westin Washington D.C. City Center. Onsite registration begins at 7:45 a.m. Participation is not required to submit a proposal.

For more information regarding this opportunity, please visit the EONS page on the NSPIRES website. Go to http://nspires.nasaprs.com and click on Solicitations, then on Open Solicitations.

Please e-mail any questions about this opportunity to NASAEONS2011@nasaprs.com.

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NASA DLN Planetary Webcast Series

NASA’s Digital Learning Network announces a series of monthly webcasts. Join Dr. Joel Levine each month as he features a different topic of planetary study and talks about what NASA has done to help us better understand our home planet and neighbors in our solar system. This series is designed to target middle school students.

The Earth and Other Planets: A Tour
Jan. 20, 2011, 1-2 p.m. EST
Join Dr. Joel Levine on a tour of the planets. This webcast will explore the surface features, atmospheric structure and composition, and moon and ring systems of the planets. Did you know the planets may be divided into two distinct groups? Learn more about the properties that distinguish the terrestrial planets from the gaseous outer planets.

The Earth: Up Close and Personal
Feb. 17, 2011, 1-2 p.m. EST
Join Dr. Joel Levine to learn more about our home planet. This webcast will explore the
components of the Earth system. The lithosphere (the solid planet), the hydrosphere (the water), the atmosphere (the air) and the biosphere (life) will be discussed. Various processes on the Earth system, such as volcanism and the water cycle, also will be discussed.

Mars: Up Close and Personal
March 17, 2011, 1-2 p.m. EST
Join Dr. Joel Levine to learn more about the Red Planet. Today, Mars is a cold, dry, inhospitable planet with a very thin atmosphere. Scientists believe that early Mars was very hospitable with abundant surface water and atmospheric pressure similar to Earth’s. This webcast will explore Mars’ past and what makes Mars and Earth so different today.


The Heat Is On: Global Warming — Causes and Consequences
April 21, 2011, 1-2 p.m. EST
Join Dr. Joel Levine to learn more about global warming and how it is affecting our planet.
The temperature of the surface of Earth and the other planets is controlled by incoming solar radiation and the outgoing thermal or infrared radiation generated at the surface by the absorption of the incoming solar radiation. This webcast will discuss the causes and consequences of global warming.

NASA’s Digital Learning Network allows the next generation of explorers to connect with scientists, engineers and researchers without leaving the classroom. The network provides distance-learning events designed to educate through demonstrations and real time interactions with NASA experts.

Three schools per time slot will be allowed to join Levine for this lecture series. All others may join via webcast.

For more information about this series of webcast events, visit
http://dln.nasa.gov/dln/.

If you have any questions about this webcast series, please contact Caryn Long at Caryn.Long@nasa.gov.

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Free Webcast — Space Operations in 2011

Astronauts and cosmonauts will continue to work on the International Space Station after the retirement of the space shuttle. Join Carla Rosenberg for an hourlong webcast on Jan. 26, 2011, at 4 p.m. EST, to find out what is next for human space exploration in 2011. The new NASA educational product for middle school grades called “Station Simulation” also will be discussed.

For more information and to view the webcast, visit
http://dln.nasa.gov.

Please e-mail any questions about this opportunity to Renee Elias at
nasa_renee@lcjvs.net.

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Space Exploration Educators Conference, Feb. 3-5, 2011

Register today for the 17th Annual Space Exploration Educators Conference, to be held Feb. 3-5, 2011, at Space Center Houston. This conference is for all K-12 educators. Activities presented use space-related themes to teach across the curriculum and can be used for science, language arts, mathematics, history and more.

Attend sessions hosted by scientists and engineers working on the International Space Station, Mars exploration and the planets beyond. Hear from astronauts who will be leading the charge in exploration. Attend sessions presented by educators and receive ready-to-implement classroom ideas. Attendees can earn up to 24 hours of continuing professional education credit.

For more information and to register for the conference, visit
http://spacecenter.org/TeachersSEEC.html.

If you have any questions about the conference, please call 281-244-2149 or e-mail seec@spacecenter.org.

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2011 ACCESS Internships for Students With Disabilities

Applications are now being accepted for the Achieving Competence in Computing, Engineering and Space Science project, also known as ACCESS. This 10-week, paid internship at NASA centers around the U.S. is designed for undergraduate and graduate students with disabilities.

Applicants should have strong backgrounds in science, a GPA of 3.0 or higher, and a desire to pursue technical careers. Students who are chosen will work with scientists and engineers in an area compatible with their skills and interests.

Applications for placement at NASA are due Feb. 11, 2011.

For more information, visit
https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/descriptions/Achieving_Competence.html.

Please e-mail any questions about this opportunity to
Laureen Summers at
lsummers@aaas.org.

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2011 Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships

Caltech’s Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships, or SURF, project introduces undergraduate students to research under the guidance of seasoned mentors at Caltech or NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Students experience the process of research as a creative intellectual activity and gain a more realistic view of the opportunities and demands of a professional research career.

SURF is modeled on the grant-seeking process. Students collaborate with potential mentors to define and develop a project and to write research proposals. Caltech faculty or JPL staff review the proposals and recommend awards. Students work over a 10-week period in the summer, mid-June to late August. At the conclusion of the project, they submit a technical paper and give a SURF Seminar Day oral presentation.

All application materials must be received no later than Feb. 22, 2011. For more information, visit http://www.surf.caltech.edu/.

Please e-mail any questions about this opportunity to the Caltech Student-Faculty Programs office at sfp@caltech.edu.

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No Boundaries Project and Student Competition

Encourage your classes to participate in the No Boundaries National Competition, a joint educational initiative created by NASA and USA TODAY Education. This competition is designed to help students explore careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. The effort also offers students the opportunity to learn more about NASA.

When people hear the word “NASA,” they often think of astronauts’ amazing journeys. While astronauts are the public face of NASA, thousands of people at the space agency collaborate to send astronauts into space.

The goal of this project is for students to work in small groups to develop a creative project (website, video, podcast, song, etc.) that markets careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics to teens. These student groups then will present their projects to their classmates and a class of younger peers.

The No Boundaries website includes a Teacher Toolkit and step-by-step instructions for teachers to implement the project in the classroom. Background information and links to websites with career information also are provided.

After presenting their projects, groups are encouraged to enter them in the No Boundaries National Competition. All contest entries must be submitted to USA TODAY Education no later than April 1, 2011. Winning teams can win $2,000, passes to a VIP NASA experience and the chance to present their project to NASA.

To learn more about the project and to enter the competition, visit
www.noboundaries-stemcareers.com.

Please e-mail any questions about the No Boundaries Competition to
Marcie Peck at mpeck@usatoday.com.

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Education Innovation — Google Science Fair

On Jan. 11, 2011, Google launched the inaugural Google Science Fair. Google has partnered with CERN, National Geographic, Scientific American and the LEGO Group to create this new STEM competition. This is a global competition open to any student aged 13-18, and students may enter as individuals or as teams of up to three. There is no entry fee. Registrations and submissions will be made online. The Science Fair will culminate in a celebratory event at Google headquarters in California in July 2011, where finalists will compete for internships, scholarships and prizes in front of a panel of celebrity scientist judges, including Nobel Laureates and household names.

Submissions are due by April 4, 2011. To sign up for free resource kits for your classroom or school, please visit the Global Science fair website at
http://www.google.com/sciencefair.

________________________________________________________________

Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators:
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students:
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club:
https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub


NASA Education Express — Jan. 6, 2011

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Deadline Extended: OSSI:SOLAR Student Application
Audience: Higher Education Students
New Deadline: March 1, 2011

Free Webcast — Mass vs. Weight: What’s the Big Difference Anyway?
Audience: 5-8 Educators
Event Date: Jan. 13, 2011

International Space Station EarthKAM Winter 2011 Mission
Audience: 5-8 Educators
Event Date: Jan. 18-21, 2011

FY 2011 Research Announcement for the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR)
Audience: Higher Education Institutions
Proposal Deadline: Jan. 28, 2011

2011 Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program
Audience: Higher Education Students
Deadline: Jan. 28, 2011

NASA History Division Summer 2011 Internships
Audience: Higher Education Students
Deadline: Feb. 1, 2011

Comets and Asteroids Educator Conference at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Audience: All Educators and 9-Higher Education Students
Registration Deadline: Feb. 1, 2011
Event Date: Feb. 5, 2011

Electronic Professional Development Network Courses
Audience: 5-12 Educators
Using Robotics to Enhance STEM Learning: Feb. 2 – March 15, 2011
Project-Based Inquiry Learning: Feb. 23 – March 29, 2011

NASA Notice of Intent (NOI) to Release Cooperative Agreement Notice (CAN) Entitled 2011 Summer of Innovation Project

Audience: All Educators
Proposal Deadline: Feb. 18, 2011

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OSSI:SOLAR Student Application Deadline Extension Announcement:


The HQ Office of Education has decided to extend the student application deadline in OSSI:SOLAR for the Summer 2011 session from February 1 to March 1, 2011. This change will enable 2 items:

-More students to fully complete their applications
-More time for Mentors to submit their opportunities and search the applicant pool

To view available opportunities and to submit an application online, visit http://intern.nasa.gov/.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Mabel Matthews at Mabel.J.Matthews@nasa.gov.

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Free Webcast — Mass vs. Weight: What’s the Big Difference Anyway?

The Aerospace Education Services Project, or AESP, is presenting a free webcast on Thursday, Jan. 13, 2011, at 4:30 p.m. EST. During this hourlong webcast, Stennis Space Center aerospace education specialist Steve Culivan will discuss “mass” and “weight,” two terms that differ in meaning and that often are used incorrectly. This webcast will integrate Newton’s Laws of Motion and microgravity to explore these two terms and demonstrate their difference by focusing on education video filmed by astronauts on the International Space Station. NASA education resources and inquiry activities, developed from the space station video, will be used in this workshop. Come enjoy this “heavy duty” topic.

For more information and to view the webcast, visit http://neon.psu.edu/13jan2011.

If you have any questions about the webcast, please contact Steve Culivan at Stephen.P.Culivan@nasa.gov. Or visit the “Mass vs. Weight” website at http://education.ssc.nasa.gov/massvsweight.asp.

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International Space Station EarthKAM Winter 2011 Mission

Middle school educators are invited to join NASA for the International Space Station EarthKAM Winter 2011 Mission from Jan. 18-21, 2011. Find out more about this exciting opportunity that allows students to take pictures of Earth from a digital camera aboard the International Space Station.

International Space Station EarthKAM is a NASA-sponsored project that provides stunning, high-quality photographs of Earth taken from the space shuttle and the space station. Since 1996, EarthKAM students have taken thousands of photographs of Earth by using the World Wide Web to direct a digital camera on select spaceflights and, currently, on the space station.

For more information about the project and to register for the upcoming mission, visit the EarthKAM home page www.EarthKAM.ucsd.edu.

If you have questions about the EarthKAM project, please e-mail ek-help@earthkam.ucsd.edu.

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NASA Announces the Release of FY 2011 Research Announcement for the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) have released the FY 2011 Research Announcement for the NASA Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR). Each funded NASA EPSCoR proposal is expected to establish research activities that will make significant contributions to the strategic research and technology development priorities of one or more of NASA’s four Mission Directorates — Aeronautics Research, Exploration Systems, Science, and Space Operations –, the Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT), and NASA’s ten Centers and contribute to the overall research infrastructure, science and technology capabilities, higher education, and economic development of the proposing jurisdiction.

Public Law 102-58, passed in 1992, authorized NASA to initiate NASA EPSCoR to strengthen the research capability of jurisdictions that have not in the past participated equably in competitive aerospace research activities. The National Science Foundation (NSF) determines overall jurisdiction eligibility for NASA EPSCoR. The following NASA EPSCoR jurisdictions may respond to this NASA EPSCoR solicitation: Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Vermont, West Virginia, and Wyoming. Jurisdictions responding to this CAN may submit up to two proposals.

This solicitation may be accessed through the NASA Solicitation and Proposal Integrated Review and Evaluation System (NSPIRES) at http://nspires.nasaprs.com.

The deadline for submitting proposals is Jan. 28, 2011.


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2011 Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program

The Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program pairs qualified undergraduate students with NASA-funded investigators at research locations across the U.S. for eight weeks during the summer. Students will spend the summer at the NASA scientist’s home institution. Selected students receive a cost-of-living stipend and compensation for housing and travel.

Undergraduate students interested in learning about research in planetary geoscience are eligible to apply. Students graduating in 2011 who have not started graduate school yet are also eligible. Preference is given to U.S. citizens and permanent residents.

Applications are due Jan. 28, 2011.

For more information, visit http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/~tgregg/pggurp.html. If you have questions about this opportunity, please e-mail Robyn Wagner, PGGURP administrator, at rlwagner@buffalo.edu.

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NASA History Division Summer 2011 Internships

The NASA History Division is seeking undergraduate and graduate students for summer 2011 internships. The History Division maintains archival materials to answer research questions from NASA personnel, journalists, scholars, students at all levels and others from around the world. The division also edits and publishes several books and monographs each year. It maintains a large number of websites on NASA history.

Students of all majors are welcome to apply. While detailed prior knowledge of the aeronautics and space fields is not necessary, a keen interest and some basic familiarity with these topics are needed. Strong research, writing, and editing skills are essential. Experience with computers, especially HTML formatting, is a plus.

Intern projects are flexible. Typical projects include handling a wide variety of information requests, editing historical manuscripts, doing research and writing biographical sketches, updating and creating websites, and identifying and captioning photos.

Applications are due Feb. 1, 2011. For more information, visit http://history.nasa.gov/interncall.htm.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please contact Steve Garber at stephen.j.garber@nasa.gov.

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Comets and Asteroids Educator Conference at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Join the Stardust-NExT mission and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory Education Office for an education conference being held Feb. 5, 2011, near Pasadena, Calif. The conference will focus on comets, asteroids and protoplanets. These objects are the leftover building blocks of planets, which may have contributed water and organic material to ancient Earth, thus aiding the start of life. By observing these small bodies up close, scientists better understand the formation and evolution of our solar system and how life came to exist here on Earth.

This daylong conference will feature a series of presentations, as well as introduction to hands-on activities mainly targeted for grades 5-8. However, activities can be adapted for both lower and higher grade levels. Instructional materials and resources will be shared and hands-on activity materials will be provided.

This conference is open to all formal and informal educators interested in Earth and space science and exploration. Students in high school and college also may attend.

Pre-registration is required. Participants must register by Feb. 1, 2011. Walk-up registration will not be possible for this conference.

For more information, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/education/index.cfm?page=110.

For registration questions, please call the JPL Education Office at 818-393-0561. For other questions, please call the JPL Educator Resource Center at 909-397-4420.

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Electronic Professional Development Network Courses


NASA’s Learning Environments and Research Network and the Georgia Institute of Technology have teamed up to create the ePDN, an initiative dedicated to preparing K-12 teachers to engage their students in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) through the use of NASA-developed learning materials and resources.

If you are looking for a way to enhance your instructional skills, meet your professional development goals, or find new and exciting resources to use in your learning environments, apply to one of our free courses today!

Applications are now open for the following courses starting in February:

Using Robotics to Enhance STEM Learning — Feb. 2 – March 15, 2011
Learn how to build and program LEGO Mindstorm robots and use them to promote student engagement and conceptual understanding of mathematics, science and engineering. Explore robotic manipulators and end effectors like the ones NASA uses on the International Space Station, and integrate multiple sensors into your robot to allow for systematic control. Join your colleagues in the Grand Challenge to design, build and program a robot to explore an environment and return with a sample for investigation.

Project-Based Inquiry Learning: Science Teaching and Learning for the 21st Century — Feb. 23 – March 15, 2011
Develop your skills in designing and using project-based inquiry learning, or PBIL, to enhance conceptual understanding, critical thinking, scientific reasoning, and problem solving in standards-based classrooms. Experience and analyze two NASA-oriented PBIL projects firsthand; learn PBIL curriculum design strategies and methods; and design a PBIL unit for use in your classroom. Use e-PDN’s suite of online tools to collaborate, connect and create with other course participants.

To learn more about these free courses and to apply online, visit https://www.nasaepdn.gatech.edu/nasaepdn_application.php.

For more information on the e-PDN and the resources it offers to K-12 teachers, visit www.nasaepdn.gatech.edu.

Questions about these courses should be directed to Fran Ruskin at fran.ruskin@dlpe.gatech.edu.

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NASA Notice of Intent (NOI) to Release Cooperative Agreement Notice (CAN) Entitled 2011 Summer of Innovation Project

General Information
==========================
Solicitation Number: NNC11ZCE009C
NAIS Posted Date: January 12, 2011
Response Date: N/A
Classification Code: N/A
Internet Address: nspires.nasaprs.com

Office Address
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NASA Educational Programs Office, NASA Glenn Research Center, MS 7-4, Cleveland, OH 44135

Description
==========================
NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden has identified improvement of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) teaching and learning as a national need. To address this need, in 2010 NASA piloted the Summer of Innovation Project.

Summer of Innovation (SoI) is an intensive STEM teaching and learning program that targets middle school students (as defined by NASA for these purposes as students enrolled in grades 4-9 for the pending school year) and middle school teachers. In recruiting students, specific emphasis should be paid to girls, minorities and low income students.

Offerors shall include a summer engagement component and follow-on efforts designed to keep students involved in NASA-themed STEM activities during the academic year. Offerors will be required to partner with schools, school districts or state departments of education. A key aspect of SoI is the participation of certified teachers in the delivery of high quality content to middle school students in summer programming and sustained engagement during the school year. Offerors are encouraged to solicit the involvement, participation, and/or contributions of interested public/private partners including other federal agencies, non-profit organizations, foundations, for-profit organizations, universities, museums, planetariums and science centers with relevant experience and ability to accomplish the goals of SoI.

Expected outcomes of this project are increased student interest in STEM concepts and careers, improved student performance in STEM learning for student participants, increased teacher confidence and competency to deliver STEM content to middle school students and increased capacity for awardees to sustain their SoI projects beyond the scope and timeline of NASA funding. On an annual basis each awardee is expected to engage a minimum of 2500 students in summer programming and subsequent student engagement and involve at least 150 certified teachers in the delivery of content to students and sustained professional development activities.

Evaluation Criteria
==========================
Proposal evaluation criteria will be focused on Implementation, Evaluation Plan, Strategic Partnerships, Intrinsic Merit, Sustainability, and Cost.

Anticipated Timeline
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ITEM                                                                           Proposed Date
Notice of Intent to Proposers                                   Dec. 30, 2010
Release 2011 Summer of Innovation CAN *         Jan. 12, 2011
Pre-Proposal Teleconference                                 Jan. 19, 2011
Non-binding NOI to Propose Due                           Jan. 26, 2011
Proposals Due                                                          Feb. 18, 2011
Award Announcement                                              April 18, 2011

*NOTE: The Summer of Innovation CAN will be posted on or about January 12, 2011.
Timeline is subject to change; current information will be posted on NASA NSPIRES and Grants.Gov

Critical Elements for Offerors
==========================

— A detailed plan to grow capacity and expand network over a performance period of 48 months
— Ability to infuse a minimum of 40 hours of NASA content into existing summer programs and to sustain student engagement by providing an additional 40 hours of NASA content either in classroom or other out-of school settings during the school year
— Demonstrated ability to recruit and retain female, minority and/or low income middle school students for purposes of tracking academic performance and changes in attitudes towards STEM over the 48 month period of performance
— Demonstrated ability to recruit certified STEM middle school teachers to support the design and delivery of SoI summer and sustained student engagement activities
— Ability to partner with NASA and its contractors who provide professional development to certified teachers using NASA content and STEM topics
— Capacity to provide unique and innovative experiential STEM learning opportunities to students
— Demonstrated understanding of the development, administration and implementation of high quality STEM programs and projects
— Capacity to sustain STEM education programs on an ongoing basis
— Partnerships with industry, academia, and accredited schools, school districts or state departments of education to support project recruitment, implementation, sustainability and scalability
— Proven ability to work with formal educational structures (schools, school districts,etc.)
— Ability to make timely submittals of all reports and financial data required; and to make timely payments to all sub contractors and/or partners

Anticipated Award
==========================
Contingent upon the availability of funding, NASA intends to select up to ten (10) awards that may be up to $750,000 each with a period of performance of 48 months for awardees. Funds will be awarded through a graduated distribution system. To retain financial strength and support on an ongoing basis, awardees are strongly encouraged to leverage monetary opportunities through collaborations and partnerships with entities that share resolve for a successful, ongoing SoI project.

Point of Contact
==========================
Name: Robert Lasalvia
Title: 2011 Summer of Innovation, Project Manager-Acting, NASA GRC
E-mail:
grc-2011summerofinnovation@mail.nasa.gov

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub