NASA Education Express — Oct. 13, 2011

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Engineering Design Challenge: Spacecraft Structures Web Seminar
Audience: 5-9 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Oct. 17, 2011

Mathematical Models: Black Holes Web Seminar
Audience: 9-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Oct. 19, 2011

NASA NPP Educator Launch Conference
Audience: K-12 and Informal educators
Event date: Oct 26-27, 2011

DEADLINE APPROACHING — NASA Endeavor Science Teaching Certificate Project:  K-12 Educator Fellowships
Audience: K-12 Educators
Deadline: Oct. 31, 2011

International Space Station EarthKAM Fall 2011 Mission
Audience: 5-8 Educators
Event Date: Nov. 1-4, 2011

2012 Virginia Aerospace Science and Technology Scholars
Audience: 9-12 Students
Application Deadline: Nov. 4, 2011

2012 National Community College Aerospace Scholars Program
Audience: Higher Education Students

Application Deadline: Nov. 15, 2011

YouTube Space Lab Experiment Design Challenge
Audience: 9-12 Students
Entry Deadline: Dec. 7, 2011

2012 Texas High School Aerospace Scholars
Audience: 9-12 Students
Application Deadline: Dec. 9, 2011

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Engineering Design Challenge: Spacecraft Structures Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on Oct. 17, 2011, at 6:30 p.m. EDT. Learn how to incorporate the excitement of rocketry into your classroom during this Web seminar and receive an overview of the student engineering design challenge, Spacecraft Structures, where students design and construct a strong, but lightweight, structure that can withstand the launch of a water bottle “rocket.”

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar14.aspx .

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit
http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov
.

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Mathematical Models: Black Holes Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, the NASA Explorer Schools and Learning Environments and Research Network, or LEARN, projects are hosting a 60-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on Oct. 19, 2011, at 8 p.m. EDT. Misconceptions about black holes will be addressed, as you get background information about the structure and behavior of one of our universe’s most mysterious and spectacular bodies. You will see how to derive the equations used in the Black Hole Math problem set for your students to better understand the physics of black holes.

For more information and to register online, visit https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-mathematical-models/.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit
http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.


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NASA NPP Educator Launch Conference

Attend this education conference in California on Oct. 26-27, 2011, to witness the launch of NASA’s next-generation weather and earth science mission NPP, short for NPOESS (National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System) Preparatory Project.

This conference will provide close-up viewing of the powerful Delta-II launch vehicle on the launch pad before and during launch, as well as hands-on practical educator workshops and presentations by principal investigators from NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA, and other practitioners.

Conference attendees will attend a dinner at the Vandenberg Air Force Base Officers’ Club where they can interface one-on-one with formal and informal STEM educators, scientists and engineers.

To learn more about the conference and to register online, visit
http://endeavourinstitute.org/launch_conference.html.

The NPP mission will help link the current generation of Earth-observing satellites called the Earth Observing System to a next-generation of operational polar-orbiting environmental satellites called the Joint Polar Satellite System, managed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

NPP’s data products will help meteorologists improve weather forecasts and advance earth and climate science. The remote-sensing instruments aboard NPP will measure Earth’s atmospheric and sea surface temperatures, humidity and pressure profiles, land and ocean biological activity and cloud and aerosol properties. NOAA meteorologists will incorporate the data into their weather and climate prediction models to produce accurate life-saving forecasts and warnings. NPP will also help emergency responders monitor and react to natural disasters.

To learn more about NPP and for educational resources about the mission, visit
http://npp.gsfc.nasa.gov/nppy.html.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Steve Kliewer at
director@endeavourinstitute.org.

________________________________________________________________

DEADLINE APPROACHING — NASA Endeavor Science Teaching Certificate Project: K-12 Educator Fellowships

NASA’s Endeavor Science Teaching Certificate Project awards 12-18-month fellowships each year to 50 formal educators. Cohort 4 begins in January 2012. NASA Endeavor Fellows take five online graduate courses in an innovative, live format from the comfort of their homes or schools. In these courses, participants gain STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) professional development and mastery of STEM pedagogical strategies. They learn to apply these strategies and cutting-edge STEM content to their classroom contexts while becoming part of a network of like-minded educators across the nation.

Endeavor Fellows earn and are awarded a NASA Endeavor Certificate in STEM Education from Teachers College, Columbia University. Fifteen graduate credits are awarded from regionally accredited higher education partners.

Collaborating with the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, Endeavor has arranged for an option whereby fellows may put their work from the STEM certificate toward becoming nationally board certified in mathematics or science.

Applications for Cohort 4 will be accepted through
Oct. 31, 2011.

For more information, visit http://www.us-satellite.net/nasa/endeavor/index.cfm.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to
nasa_endeavor@us-satellite.net.

________________________________________________________________

International Space Station EarthKAM Fall 2011 Mission

Middle school educators are invited to join NASA for the International Space Station EarthKAM Fall 2011 Mission from Nov. 1-4, 2011. Find out more about this exciting opportunity that allows students to take pictures of Earth from a digital camera aboard the International Space Station.

International Space Station EarthKAM is a NASA-sponsored project that provides stunning, high-quality photographs of Earth taken from the space shuttle and the space station. Since 1996, EarthKAM students have taken thousands of photographs of Earth by using the World Wide Web to direct a digital camera on select spaceflights and, currently, on the space station.

For more information about the project and to register for the upcoming mission, visit the EarthKAM home page
www.EarthKAM.ucsd.edu.

If you have questions about the EarthKAM project, please email
ek-help@earthkam.ucsd.edu.

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2012 Virginia Aerospace Science and Technology Scholars


The Virginia Aerospace Science and Technology Scholars, or VASTS, program is a free interactive online science, technology, engineering and mathematics learning experience highlighted by a seven-day residential summer academy at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va. Students selected to participate are immersed in NASA-related research through interaction with scientists, engineers and technologists. Participating students earn up to four college credits.

The VASTS program is
open to high school juniors throughout Virginia. Applicants must have a minimum GPA of 2.7 and have access to the internet.

The application deadline is Nov. 4, 2011.

For additional information on the Virginia Aerospace Science and Technology Scholars program and to apply online, visit
www.vasts.spacegrant.org.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to
info@vasts.spacegrant.org.

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2012 National Community College Aerospace Scholars Program

National Community College Aerospace Scholars is an interactive, online learning experience featuring engineering career possibilities. It is highlighted by an on-site experience where selected students are encouraged to study mathematics, science, engineering or computer science by interacting with engineers at NASA.

The only cost to participants is a $30 registration fee. NASA covers travel, food and lodging. NCAS is open to community college students throughout United States. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and have access to the internet.

Applications are due Nov. 15, 2011.

For more information and to apply online, visit
http://ncas.aerospacescholars.org/

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to
jsc-ncas@mail.nasa.gov.

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YouTube’s Space Lab Challenges Students to Design an Experiment for the International Space Station

NASA has partnered with Space Adventures and YouTube on a global competition that challenges 14- to 18-year-old students to design a science experiment that can be performed in space. The winning experiment will be conducted aboard the space station in 2012.

Students, either alone or in groups of up to three, are invited to submit a video describing their experiments to YouTube.com/SpaceLab. Six regional finalists will gather in the United States in March 2012 to experience a zero-gravity flight and receive other prizes. From the finalists, two global winners will be announced and will see their experiments performed in space and streamed online that summer. Additionally, the global winners will get to choose a unique space experience as a prize: either a trip to Japan to watch their experiment blast off to the space station, or a trip to Star City, Russia, for an authentic space training experience at the Russian cosmonaut facility.

Videos will be accepted through Dec. 7, 2011.

For more information about the challenge, visit
https://www.youtube.com/spacelab.

For more information on NASA education programs, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education.

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2012 Texas High School Aerospace Scholars


The Texas High School Aerospace Scholars project is an interactive, online learning experience. It is highlighted by a six-day internship where selected students are encouraged to study mathematics, science, engineering or computer science by interacting with engineers at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston.

The Texas High School Aerospace Scholars project is
open to high school juniors throughout Texas. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and have access to the Internet.

The application deadline is Dec. 9, 2011.

For additional information on the project and to apply online, visit
http://has.aerospacescholars.org/.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to
jsc-aeroscho@mail.nasa.gov.

________________________________________________________________

Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators:
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students:
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club:
https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — Oct. 6, 2011

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Celebrate Earth Science Week 2011
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Dates: Oct. 7-15, 2011


Derivatives: Math and Science @ Work — Space Shuttle Auxiliary Power Units Web Seminar
Audience: Calculus Teachers and Informal Educators
Event Date: Oct. 11, 2011

Electrolysis of Water: Math and Science @ Work — A Breath of Fresh Air Web Seminar
Audience: 9-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Oct. 12, 2011

NASA Explorer Schools Live Video Chat: Honoring Hispanic Heritage — Sí se Puede: del Barrio Hasta la NASA
Audience: 4-12 Educators and Students
Event Date: Oct. 13, 2011, Noon – 1 p.m. EDT

DEADLINE APPROACHING — NASA Endeavor Science Teaching Certificate Project: K-12 Educator Fellowships
Audience: K-12 Educators
Deadline: Oct. 31, 2011

2011 NASA Postdoctoral Program
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: Nov. 1, 2011

GRAIL Spacecraft Naming Contest
Audience: K-12 Students
Entry Deadline: Nov. 11, 2011

2012 Space Exploration Educators Conference
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Date: Feb. 2-4, 2012

NASA to Seek Applicants for Next Astronaut Candidate Class
Audience: All Educators and Higher Education Students

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Celebrate Earth Science Week 2011

Earth Science Week, or ESW, 2011 is almost here! Check out the list of related events below to help bring this international event into your classroom.

Friday, Oct. 7, 2011 — ESW Introduction/Promo Video: This video provides information about the Earth Science Week Kit. http://climate.nasa.gov/esw2011

Monday, Oct. 10, 2011 — ESW Introduction/Promo Video: This video provides information about the Earth Science Week Kit. http://climate.nasa.gov/esw2011

Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2011 — Set to launch later this month, the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System Preparatory Project, also known as NPP, will play a key role in studying climate change.
To learn more about NPP and its polar bear mascot NPPy, visit http://npp.gsfc.nasa.gov/kids.html.

Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2011 — Check out two webcast events geared toward earth science.

Our Ever-Changing Earth: NASA’s Power of Perspective — DLN Webcast with NASA’s Chief Scientist, Waleed Abdalati — Oct. 12, 2011, 1-2 p.m.
Join NASA Goddard Space Flight Center live for an educational event as scientists share how NASA’s space-based perspective provides a window on changes within the earth system on a global scale. Middle and high school students are invited to view this webcast and learn how earth science is all around!

Earth Science and You! — Oct. 12, 2011, 1-2 p.m.
Earth is a dynamic system that, like the human body, includes diverse parts interacting in complex ways. Join NASA specialists live on Oct. 12, 2011, at 1 p.m. EDT for an hourlong educational event as NASA scientists share how NASA’s space-based perspective provides a window on changes and interactions within the earth system on a global scale! This special event will explore topics such as Earth’s atmosphere, the Texas drought and other recent weather phenomena, and climate change. The event will be webcasted and available for students and teachers on the DLiNfo Channel, and participants will be able to submit questions for the guests to answer during the program!

For more information on these events, please visit the DLiNfo Channel at http://dln.nasa.gov.

Thursday, Oct. 13, 2011 — Female earth scientists: Check out these profile articles on the NASA education website at https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html. The Institute for Global Environmental Strategies produced these profiles as part of the NASA Earth and Space Science Explorers series.

Cynthia Rosenzweig, NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies — Rosenzweig is a senior research scientist at the GISS where she heads the Climate Impacts Group. She is a co-editor of the report “Climate Change and Cities: First Assessment Report of the Urban Climate Change Research Network (ARC3).” A recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, she joins impact models with climate models to predict future outcomes of both land-based and urban systems under altered climate conditions.

Erika Podest, NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory — Originally from Panama, Podest is a scientist with the Water and Carbon Cycles Group in JPL´s Earth Science Division and a visiting associate researcher in the Joint Institute for Regional Earth System Science and Engineering at UCLA. Her research focuses on using Earth-observing satellites for characterizing and monitoring wetland ecosystems and seasonal freeze/thaw dynamics in the northern high latitudes as related to the global carbon and water cycles and climate change.

Erica Alston, NASA’s Langley Research Center — Alston grew up in North Carolina. She works with the Chemistry and Dynamics Branch of the Science Directorate at Langley. Her work focuses on national fisheries resources and atmospheric science, including air quality.

Claire Parkinson, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center — Claire Parkinson has been project scientist for the Aqua mission (formerly PM-1) since the spring of 1993. She’s a climatologist at Goddard, where she has worked since July 1978, with a research emphasis on sea ice and its role in the global climate system.

Friday, Oct.14, 2011 — Archived Earth Science Week Events: Did you miss an event from earlier in the week? Visit this site to find an archive of events from this year and years past. http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/Gallery/EarthScienceEducation.html

More information about Earth Science Week, along with educational guides and activities, can be found at http://climate.nasa.gov/esw2011/.

Questions and feedback about Earth Science Week should be submitted at http://climate.nasa.gov/feedback/index.cfm?ReferPg=ESW.

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Derivatives: Math and Science @ Work — Space Shuttle Auxiliary Power Units Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, the NASA Explorer Schools and Learning Environments and Research Network, or LEARN, projects are hosting a 60-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on Oct. 11, 2011, at 8 p.m. EDT. The Space Shuttle Auxiliary Power Units student activity featured in this seminar is a problem set from the Mission Control series of NASA’s Math and Science @ Work project. Participants will assume the role of a student. Attendees will work the problem set, score their results and share best practices with other participants for implementing this problem set into the classroom.

For more information and to register online, visit https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-derivatives/.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.


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Electrolysis of Water: Math and Science @ Work — A Breath of Fresh Air Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, NASA Explorer Schools and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on Oct. 12, 2011, at 6:30 p.m. EDT. Learn how to implement a chemistry lab activity called A Breath of Fresh Air where students create their own electrolysis apparatus to generate oxygen and use a TI-Nspire calculator to collect data during the activity. Participants do not need to have a TI-Nspire calculator during this Web seminar.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar13.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

________________________________________________________________

NASA Explorer Schools Live Video Chat: Honoring Hispanic Heritage — Sí se Puede: del Barrio Hasta la NASA

Mark your calendar for Oct. 13, 2011, from noon – 1:00 p.m. EDT when Félix Soto Toro joins NASA Explorer Schools for their first ever bilingual chat! The first half of the chat will be in English, and the second half will be in Spanish! Tune in and have your students find out what it was like for this astronaut applicant and electrical engineer to grow up in Puerto Rico with few advantages and what inspired him to pursue a career with NASA.

You do not need to be a participant of the NASA Explorer Schools, or NES, project to participate in the video chat.

To learn more about NES, please visit the
explorerschools.nasa.gov website.

For more information about this NES live video chat, visit
https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/nes2/home/chat-index.html.

If you have any questions about the webcast, contact
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

________________________________________________________________

DEADLINE APPROACHING — NASA Endeavor Science Teaching Certificate Project: K-12 Educator Fellowships

The NASA Endeavor Science Teaching Certificate Project awards 12-18-month fellowships each year to 50 formal educators. Cohort 4 begins in January 2012.

In partnership with state departments of education, Endeavor Fellows take five graduate courses in an innovative, online format from the comfort of their homes or schools. In these courses, participants gain science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, professional development. Participants learn to apply research-based pedagogical strategies and cutting-edge STEM content to their classroom contexts while becoming part of a network of like-minded educators across the nation.

Endeavor Fellows earn and are awarded a NASA Endeavor Certificate in STEM Education from Teachers College, Columbia University. Fifteen graduate credits are awarded from regionally accredited higher education partners.

Collaborating with the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, Endeavor has arranged for an option whereby fellows may put their work from the STEM certificate toward becoming nationally board certified in mathematics or science.

Applications for Cohort 4 will be accepted through
Oct. 31, 2011.

For more information, visit
http://www.us-satellite.net/nasa/endeavor/index.cfm.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to
nasa_endeavor@us-satellite.net.

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2011 NASA Postdoctoral Program

The NASA Postdoctoral Program, or NPP, offers scientists and engineers unique opportunities to conduct research at a NASA Center or other location stipulated by the program. NPP serves as a source of talent to ensure the continued quality of the NASA research workforce. Each fellowship opportunity is designed to advance NASA research in a specific project related to space science, earth science, aeronautics, space operations, exploration systems, lunar science or astrobiology. Applicants apply for a specific research opportunity and, if selected by NPP’s competitive process, are offered one- to three-year fellowship appointments.

Applicants must have a Ph.D. or an equivalent doctorate degree before beginning the fellowship. Applicants must have U.S. citizenship, Lawful Permanent Resident status, an Employment Authorization Document with pending LPR status, or a J-1 Visa status as a Research Scholar before beginning the fellowship. An H-1B Visa status is not acceptable because the NPP is not an employment program.

Stipend rates for Postdoctoral Fellows start at $50,000 per year. Moderate supplements are given for high cost-of-living areas and for certain academic specialties. Limited relocation assistance is provided and health insurance is available through the program. Fellows also receive $8,000 per appointment year to support travel to conferences, meetings and other activities (i.e., travel to field sites or observatories to collect data or for required training) that directly support their research projects.

The next round of applications is due Nov. 1, 2011.

For further information about this opportunity and to apply online, visit http://nasa.orau.org/postdoc/description/index.htm. Questions regarding this opportunity may be submitted by email to nasapostdoc@orau.org.

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GRAIL Spacecraft Naming Contest

Launched on Sept. 10, 2011, the Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory mission, also known as GRAIL, will allow scientists to study the moon like never before. Using two twin spacecraft orbiting the moon at very precise distances, the GRAIL mission is designed to create a gravity map of the moon. This map will enable scientists to learn about the moon’s internal structure and composition, and give scientists a better understanding of the moon’s origin. Accurate knowledge of the moon’s gravity could also be used to help choose future landing sites on the moon.

Now that they’re on their way to the moon, the two robotic spacecraft, currently dubbed GRAIL-A and GRAIL-B, need real names — ones that capture the spirit and excitement of lunar exploration. And NASA is looking for students to help with the naming duties.

U. S. students in grades K-12 are eligible. Entries should include the chosen names for the spacecraft, along with an explanation of why those names should be selected. Justification can be any length, from a short paragraph to a 500-word essay.

Entries are due Nov. 11, 2011. All entries must be submitted by teachers.


For more information about the GRAIL mission and to submit entries via the online entry form, visit
http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/grail/namingcontest.cfm.

If you have questions about the GRAIL Naming Contest, please email
grailcontest@jpl.nasa.gov.

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2012 Space Exploration Educators Conference

Make plans to attend the 18th Annual Space Exploration Educators Conference, to be held Feb. 2-4, 2012, at Space Center Houston. This conference is for all K-12 educators. Activities presented use space-related themes to teach across the curriculum and can be used for science, language arts, mathematics, history and more.

Attend sessions hosted by scientists and engineers working on the International Space Station, Mars exploration and the planets beyond. Hear from astronauts who will be leading the charge in exploration. Attend sessions presented by educators and receive ready-to-implement classroom ideas. Attendees can earn up to 24 hours of continuing professional education credit.

For more information, visit http://spacecenter.org/TeachersSEEC.html.

If you have any questions about the conference, please call 281-244-2149 or email seec@spacecenter.org.

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NASA to Seek Applicants for Next Astronaut Candidate Class

In early November, NASA will seek applicants for its next class of astronaut candidates who will support long-duration missions to the International Space Station and future deep space exploration activities.

A bachelor’s degree in engineering, science or mathematics and three years of relevant professional experience are required in order to be considered. Typically, successful applicants have significant qualifications in engineering or science, or extensive experience flying high-performance jet aircraft.

After applicant interviews and evaluations, NASA expects to announce the final selections in 2013 and training to begin that August.

For more information, visit
http://astronauts.nasa.gov/.

Additional information about the Astronaut Candidate Program is available by calling the Astronaut Selection Office at 281-483-5907.

________________________________________________________________

Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — Sept. 29, 2011

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Solar System Ambassadors Program Accepting Applications
Audience: All Educators
Application Deadline: Sept. 30, 2011

Ultraviolet Radiation and Yeast: Radiation Biology Web Seminar
Audience: 9-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Oct. 3, 2011

NASA Explorer Schools Live Video Chat: Robots Digging Up Martian Geology
Audience: 4-9 Educators and Students
Event Date: Oct. 5, 2011

Online Professional Development Workshop: Enrichment Problems in Space and Earth Science XXIX
Audience: 5-8 Educators
Event Date: Oct. 5, 2011

Properties of Living Things: Fingerprints of Life Web Seminar
Audience: 5-8 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Oct. 5, 2011

Linear Regression: Exploring Space Through Math – Space Shuttle Ascent Web Seminar
Audience: Algebra Teachers and Informal Educators
Event Date: Oct. 6, 2011

2012 Alan Shepard Technology in Education Awards
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: Jan. 16, 2012

GRAIL MoonKAM

Audience: 5-8 Educators and Students
Observations Begin in 2012

International Space Apps Challenge

Audience: All Educators and 9-Higher Education Students
Culmination Event to Take Place in 2012

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Solar System Ambassadors Program Accepting Applications

The NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory Solar System Ambassadors, or SSA, Program, a nationwide network of space enthusiast volunteers, is accepting applications through Sept. 30, 2011.

Highly motivated individuals will be given the opportunity to represent NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory as volunteer Solar System Ambassadors to the public for a one-year, renewable term beginning Jan. 1, 2012.

While applications are being sought nationwide, interested parties from the following states are especially encouraged to apply: Alaska, Delaware, District of Columbia, Hawaii (Kauai), Iowa, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont, West Virginia and Wyoming.

To learn more about the Solar System Ambassador program and to apply online, visit
http://www2.jpl.nasa.gov/ambassador/.

If you have questions about this opportunity, contact Kay Ferrari, SSA Coordinator, by email at
ambassad@jpl.nasa.gov.


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Ultraviolet Radiation and Yeast: Radiation Biology Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on Oct. 3, 2011, at 6:30 p.m. EDT. The student activity offered in this seminar demonstrates the effects of radiation on living organisms. Students use yeast as a model system to explore the effects of radiation on cells. Yeast contains genes for DNA repair similar to human genes with the same function.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar11.aspx .

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit
http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov
.

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Live Video Chat: Robots Digging Up Martian Geology

NASA Explorer Schools invites students in grades 4-9 from across the U.S. and Departments of Defense and State schools to participate in a live video webchat with Paulo Younse, a robotics engineer at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, in Pasadena, Calif. Younse will answer student questions about a career as a robotics engineer and the soon-to-be launched Martian rover, Curiosity, that has 10 scientific instruments aboard. Curiosity is about twice as long and more than five times as heavy as any previous rover.

The hourlong video chat begins at noon EDT on Oct 5, 2011.

You do not need to be a participant of the NASA Explorer Schools project to participate in the chat.

For background information about Curiosity, visit
https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/index.html.

Watch a live Curiosity Cam video feed to observe NASA’s Curiosity Mars Rover being assembled in a clean room at JPL.
https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/building_curiosity.html

To learn more about NES, please visit the
explorerschools.nasa.gov website.

For more information about this NES live video chat, visit
https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/nes2/home/younse-chat.html.

If you have any questions about the webcast, contact
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

________________________________________________________________

Online Professional Development Workshop: Enrichment Problems in Space and Earth Science XXIX

John Ensworth at the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies and the NASA Science Mission Directorate invite you to attend an upcoming online professional development workshop.

Topic: Enrichment Problems in Space and Earth Science
XXIX

In the 29th installment of these mission- and inquiry-oriented mathematics problems, Dr. Sten Odenwald will supply background for and lead participants through problems from his “Problems in Space Science” series. The goal of these problems is to teach students about space and Earth science by using mathematics. Each problem begins with real world questions, missions and situations, and applies the necessary mathematics to arrive at a solution. Participants may ask questions and work along in this fully interactive Webinar environment.
http://spacemath.gsfc.nasa.gov.

Date: Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2011

Time: 4:00 p.m., EDT (Greenwich Mean Time -04:00, New York)

Problems to be covered (at least in part) include:

Problem 431: Space Shuttle Atlantis — Launch Speed

Students use a sequence of images from a video of a space shuttle launch to determine speed from the time interval between the images, and the scale of each image.
[Grade: 6-8 | Topics: scale, metric measurement, speed=distance/time]

Problem 433: Space Shuttle Atlantis — Plume Speed

Students use a sequence of images from a video of a space shuttle launch to determine speed from the time interval between the images, and the scale of each image.
[Grade: 6-8 | Topics: scale, metric measurement, speed=distance/time]

Problem 438: The Last Flight of the Space Shuttle Endeavor
Students use tabular data and graphing to determine the launch speed and acceleration of the space shuttle from the launch pad.
[Grade: 6-8 | Topics: tabular data, graphing, metric measurement, speed=distance/time]

Problem 434: Dawn Spacecraft Sees Asteroid Vesta Up-Close!
Students use an image of the asteroid Vesta to determine the diameters of craters and mountains using a millimeter ruler and the scale of the image in meters per millimeter.
[Grade: 6-8 | Topics: scale, metric measurement]

You will need a computer, a good internet connection and a telephone to participate.

Participants must first register for this meeting. There is no cost for this event.
Note: Only the first 150 registrants will be accepted. Register ASAP!

If this meeting is full, you will receive an e-mail that reads:
“Your registration for this meeting is denied.”
In that case, we ask you to please join us in the next workshop!
If you do miss this event, we will send you the link to a video archive of the workshop so you will still be able to benefit from the exercises.

Please join the meeting 15-20 minutes before start to make sure your computer is prepared to run the Webex software. You may also pre-install the Webex plug-in following the instructions at the bottom of this e-mail.

—————————————————–
Where to register for this meeting
—————————————————–
1. Go to
https://nasa.webex.com/nasa/j.php?ED=176432822&RG=1&UID=0&RT=MiMxMQ%3D%3D.
2. Register for the meeting.

Once the host approves your request, you will receive a confirmation e-mail with instructions for joining the meeting.

To view in other time zones or languages, visit
https://nasa.webex.com/nasa/j.php?ED=176432822&RG=1&UID=0&ORT=MiMxMQ%3D%3D.

——————————————————-
Closed Captioning is available during the Webinar. A link to this will be provided closer to meeting time.
——————————————————-
For assistance
——————————————————-
1. Go to
https://nasa.webex.com/nasa/mc
2. Click “Support” in the left navigation bar.

For more information, contact John Ensworth by email at
john_ensworth@strategies.org or by telephone at 703-312-0563.

IMPORTANT NOTICE: This WebEx service includes a feature that allows audio and any documents and other materials exchanged or viewed during the session to be recorded. By joining this session, you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to the recording, do not join the session. This video and earlier product videos will be available via a Web-based archive tool will soon be located at:
http://www.strategies.org/education/index.aspx?sub=education&sub2=professional and http://video.strategies.org.

——————————————————-

To check the setup of your computer and pre-install the plug-in software, use the following links:

Downloads

WebEx will automatically setup Meeting Manager for Windows the first time you join a meeting. To save time, you can setup prior to the meeting by clicking this link: https://nasa.webex.com/nasa/meetingcenter/mcsetup.php.

The host requests that you check for compatibility of rich media players for Universal Communications Format (UCF) before you join the session. UCF allows you to view multimedia during the session. To check now, click the following link:
https://nasa.webex.com/nasa/systemdiagnosis.php.

Meeting Manager for Microsoft® Windows® – MSI Installer

— Meeting Center automatically downloads, installs and configures Meeting Manager for Windows the first time you start or join a meeting. However, you may choose to download and run the Meeting Manager Installer before starting or joining a meeting. You must have administrator privileges on your computer to use this installer.
–Download Meeting Manager Installer for Internet Explorer
https://nasa.webex.com/client/T25L/atmcie.msi
— Download Meeting Manager Installer for Mozilla Firefox/Netscape Navigator https://nasa.webex.com/client/T25L/atmcns.msi

Meeting Manager for Mac® OS X (PowerPC)

— Meeting Manager for Mac OS X (PowerPC) is set up automatically the first time you start or join a meeting. The Installer for Mac OS X (PowerPC) can be used to manually install or uninstall Meeting Manager for Mac OS X (PowerPC).

Download Meeting Manager Installer for Mac OS X (PowerPC)
https://nasa.webex.com/client/T25L/mac/powerpc/webexinstaller.hqx.

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Properties of Living Things: Fingerprints of Life Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on Oct. 5, 2011, at 6:30 p.m. EDT. The student activity featured in this seminar will introduce grades 5-8 students to the exciting world of astrobiology. The seminar will review criteria for determining if something is alive — or not alive — and apply those criteria to determine if anything is living in any of three different soil samples. This type of analysis is similar to what the Viking landers used on Mars when looking for life.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar12.aspx .

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit
http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov
.

________________________________________________________________

Linear Regression: Exploring Space Through Math – Space Shuttle Ascent Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, the NASA Explorer Schools and Learning Environments and Research Network, or LEARN, Projects are hosting a 60-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on Oct. 6, 2011, at 8 p.m. EDT. Discover how you can use the Space Shuttle Ascent activity to construct a knowledge bridge for your students between the algebra concepts they learn in your classroom and space exploration.

For more information and to register online, visit https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-linear-regression/.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit
http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

________________________________________________________________

2012 Alan Shepard Technology in Education Awards

Do you know K-12 teachers or district-level administrators who are making a difference in education through the use of technology? Recognize their achievements by nominating them for the Alan Shepard Technology in Education Award. The Astronauts Memorial Foundation, in partnership with NASA and the Space Foundation, will recognize the accomplishments of one outstanding individual and his or her contributions to lifelong learning through the application of technology in the classroom or professional development of teachers.

Technology personnel and K-12 classroom teachers who have demonstrated exemplary use of technology to enhance learning are eligible for this award. School principals, superintendents or associate superintendents may nominate eligible candidates. The award will be presented in April 2012 at the 28th National Space Symposium in Colorado Springs, Colo. The deadline for applications is Jan. 16, 2012.

Applications and more information are available online at
http://www.amfcse.org/Alan%20Shepard%20Award/alan_shepard_award.htm.

Questions about this award should be directed to
amfreg@amfcse.org.

________________________________________________________________

GRAIL MoonKAM

On Sept. 8, 2011, NASA’s
Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory, or GRAIL, mission launched to the moon. This mission will use twin spacecraft in a tandem orbit to measure the moon’s gravity in unprecedented detail.

The GRAIL Moon Knowledge Acquired by Middle school students, or MoonKAM, project is an
exciting opportunity that allows middle school students to take pictures of the lunar surface from cameras mounted on the twin spacecraft. Visit the site to find student activities, teacher guides and related educational resources. Observations will begin in March 2012.


For more information about the project and to register for the upcoming mission, visit the GRAIL MoonKAM home page
https://moonkam.ucsd.edu/home.

If you have questions about the MoonKAM project, please visit
https://moonkam.ucsd.edu/contact.

GRAIL MoonKAM is a NASA-sponsored project in coordination with Sally Ride Science and the University of California San Diego.

________________________________________________________________

International Space Apps Challenge

In support of the Open Government Partnership, or OGP, NASA is announcing the International Space Apps Challenge. The competition will culminate in a two-day event held next year that will enable the government to use the expertise and entrepreneurial spirit of citizens to help address global challenges.

Over the next several months, NASA and the event partners will receive and develop ideas for potential projects via the online platform. During the event, NASA representatives and officials from international space agencies will gather with scientists and citizens to use publicly released scientific data to create solutions for issues, such as weather impact on the global economy and depletion of ocean resources.

The OGP is a new, multilateral initiative that aims to secure concrete commitments from governments to promote transparency, empower citizens, fight corruption and harness new technologies. NASA’s participation in the United States Domestic Plan will promote innovation through international collaboration.

NASA is a leader in the U.S. Open Government Initiative. The president’s fiscal year 2012 budget request focuses NASA’s efforts on a vigorous path of innovation and technological development. The path leads to an array of challenging and inspiring missions to destinations with incredible potential for discovery, increasing knowledge about our solar system, developing technologies to improve life on Earth, expanding our presence in space, increasing space commerce and engaging the public.

To learn more about the International Space Apps Competition, get the latest updates and submit your ideas, visit
http://open.nasa.gov/appschallenge.

To learn more about the Open Government Partnership, visit
http://www.opengovpartnership.org/.

If you have questions about the International Space Apps Competition, please visit
http://open.nasa.gov/appschallenge/contact/.


________________________________________________________________

Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators:
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students:
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club:
https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — Sept. 22, 2011

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Temperature and Earth Climate: Modeling Hot and Cold Planets Web Seminar
Audience: 7-9 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Sept. 26, 2011

NASA Explorer Schools Live Video Chat: Active Response Gravity Offload System, or ARGOS
Audience: 9-12 Educators and Students
Event Date: Sept. 27, 2011

Quadratic Functions: Exploring Space Through Math — Weightless Wonder Web Seminar

Audience: 9-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Sept. 27, 2011

Educator Resource Showcase Webcast — MY NASA DATA
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Date: Sept. 28, 2011

Engineering Design Challenge: Thermal Protection System Web Seminar
Audience: 8-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Sept. 28, 2011

Solar System Ambassadors Program Accepting Applications
Audience: All Educators
Application Deadline: Sept. 30, 2011

2012 Team America Rocketry Challenge
Audience: U.S. Students in Grades 7-12
Registration Deadline: Nov. 30, 2011

Plants in Space Student Research Project on the Space Station
Audience: All Educators

Additional Frequently Asked Questions — NASA Research Announcement (NRA) Competitive Program for Science Museums and Planetariums Plus Opportunities for NASA Visitor Centers and Other Informal Education Institutions (CP4SMP+) (Announcement Number: NNH11ZHA004N, Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 43.008) — Available For Download
Audience: Informal Education Institutions

________________________________________________________________

Temperature and Earth Climate: Modeling Hot and Cold Planets Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, the NASA Explorer Schools project is hosting a 90-minute Web seminar on Sept. 26, 2011, at 6:30 p.m. EDT. Use NASA mission data collected from NASA satellites to see how a planet’s climate is determined. Attend this session and discover how you can incorporate authentic NASA data into your classroom to provide a real-world connection for your students.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar9.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit
http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov
.

________________________________________________________________

Live Video Chat: Active Response Gravity Offload System, or ARGOS

NASA Explorer Schools invites students in grades 9-12 from across the U.S. and Departments of Defense and State schools to participate in a special live video web chat with Larry Dungan, project manager and electrical engineer designer for the Active Response Gravity Offload System. Dungan will answer student questions about ARGOS, a computer-controlled overhead crane system that allows a human test subject to move in a simulated reduced-gravity environment, such as the moon, Mars or space.

This hourlong video webchat begins at 2 p.m. EDT on Sept 27, 2011.

You do not need to be a participant of the NASA Explorer Schools project to participate in the chat.

For background information about ARGOS, visit
https://www.nasa.gov/centers/johnson/engineering/integrated_environments/active_response_gravity/index.html.

To learn more about NES, please visit the
explorerschools.nasa.gov website.

For more information about this NES live video chat, visit
https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/nes2/home/argos-chat.html.

If you have any questions about the webcast, contact
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

________________________________________________________________

Quadratic Functions: Exploring Space Through Math — Weightless Wonder Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, the NASA Explorer Schools project is hosting a 60-minute Web seminar on Sept. 27, 2011, at 8 p.m. EDT. Investigate the characteristics of quadratic functions to solve real-world problems involving the parabolic flight path of NASA’s Weightless Wonder C-9 jet. Get an overview of a student investigation, solve related quadratic equations and evaluate and graph quadratic functions. A graphing calculator will be used to demonstrate concepts; however, you do not need a calculator for this professional development seminar.

For more information and to register online, visit https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-quadratic-functions/.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit
http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov
.

________________________________________________________________

Educator Resource Showcase Webcast — MY NASA DATA

Join host Renee Elias from the Central Operation of Resources for Educators and special guests Preston Lewis and Susan Moore from MY NASA DATA for an hour-long, free webcast on Sept. 28, 2011, at 3 p.m. EDT. This webcast will focus on how the MY NASA DATA website can be used as a resource in formal and informal education.

The MY NASA DATA website works to make NASA earth science data accessible to the K-12 community. A growing collection of lesson plans on the site helps teachers to incorporate authentic data use in their classrooms. This webcast will focus on how teachers can use the MY NASA DATA website to connect to the Live Access Server and manipulate data parameters from Earth-observing satellites. With visualization options, students can look at data in a whole new light.

For more information and to view the webcast, visit
https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/dln/index.html.

Visit the MY NASA DATA website at
http://mynasadata.larc.nasa.gov/.

If you have any questions about the webcast, please email them to Renee Elias at
RElias@lcjvs.net.


________________________________________________________________

Engineering Design Challenge: Thermal Protection System Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on Sept. 28, 2011, at 6:30 p.m. EDT. Learn about the science of heat transfer and heat dissipation related to NASA vehicles, and receive an introduction to the associated engineering design challenge, Thermal Protection System. Students are challenged to design a thermal protection system and test it using a propane torch.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar10.aspx .

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit
http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov
.

________________________________________________________________

Solar System Ambassadors Program Accepting Applications

The NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory Solar System Ambassadors, or SSA, Program, a nationwide network of space enthusiast volunteers, is accepting applications through Sept. 30, 2011.

Highly motivated individuals will be given the opportunity to represent NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory as volunteer Solar System Ambassadors to the public for a one-year, renewable term beginning Jan. 1, 2012.

While applications are being sought nationwide, interested parties from the following states are especially encouraged to apply: Alaska, Delaware, District of Columbia, Hawaii (Kauai), Iowa, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont, West Virginia and Wyoming.

To learn more about the Solar System Ambassador program and to apply online, visit
http://www2.jpl.nasa.gov/ambassador/.

If you have questions about this opportunity, contact Kay Ferrari, SSA Coordinator, by email at
ambassad@jpl.nasa.gov.


________________________________________________________________

2012 Team America Rocketry Challenge

Registration is open for the Team America Rocketry Challenge 2012, a national model rocket competition for U.S. students in grades 7-12. Thousands of students compete each year, making TARC the world’s largest model rocket contest.

Teams of three to 10 students are challenged to design, build and fly a model rocket that will climb to 800 feet with a payload of two raw eggs and stay aloft for 43 to 47 seconds. The payload must then return to earth unbroken. Cash prizes are awarded to the top finishers. NASA invites top teams to participate in their Student Launch Initiative, an advanced rocketry program.

Participation is limited to the first 1,000 teams who register by Nov. 30, 2011. For more information, visit
http://www.rocketcontest.org/. Questions about this contest should be sent to rocketcontest@aia-aerospace.org.

________________________________________________________________

Plants in Space Student Research Project on the Space Station

You and your students can participate in an exciting investigation taking place in space and on Earth. The Plants in Space project will examine plant-root growth in microgravity. You and your students can grow ground-based control plants in your classroom, download hourly photographs from the International Space Station and design your own experiments using the data from space. The live experiments began on Sept. 19, 2011. However, all images will be archived on this site, so you can conduct your investigation whenever, and as often, as you like.

To learn more and register for the free teacher guide, visit
http://www.bioedonline.org/space/STS_Mission_134P.cfm.

Plants in Space is a collaboration of NASA with
the National Space Biomedical Research Foundation, BioServe Space Technologies and the Center for Educational Outreach at Baylor College of Medicine. Additional support comes from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Houston Endowment Inc.

Questions about the Plants in Space module should be directed to Greg Vogt at
vogt@bcm.edu.

________________________________________________________________

Additional Frequently Asked Questions — NASA Research Announcement (NRA) Competitive Program for Science Museums and Planetariums Plus Opportunities for NASA Visitor Centers and Other Informal Education Institutions (CP4SMP+) (Announcement Number: NNH11ZHA004N, Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 43.008) — Available For Download

Two Frequently Asked Questions received after the proposal due date of June 29, 2011, have been added to the CP4SMP+ portal page on NSPIRES at the following URL:

Visit:
http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId={75AAC7BF-2F69-6C73-2980-B1DCF25EA665}&path=closed.

________________________________________________________________

Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators:
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students:
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club:
https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — Sept. 15, 2011

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Properties of Living Things: Searching for Life on Mars Web Seminar
Audience: 4-8 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Sept. 16, 2011

Global Water Experiment Webcast
Audience: K-12 Educators and Students
Event Date: Sept. 22, 2011

Distance/Rate/Time Problems: Smart Skies Web Seminar
Audience: 5-9 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Sept. 22, 2011

Space Farm 7 Outreach Event
Audience: K-12 Educators and Students

Event Dates: Sept. 23-24, 2011

100 Year Starship Study Public Symposium
Audience: All Educators & 9-Higher Education Students
Event Date: Sept. 30 – Oct. 2, 2011

________________________________________________________________

Properties of Living Things: Searching for Life on Mars Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute Web seminar for educators on Sept. 16, 2011, at 6:30 p.m. EDT. Review criteria for determining if something is alive and learn how students can apply the criteria in a hands-on activity. A video will be shown that connects the activity to a NASA mission. Attendees will collaborate with other participants about ways of using and adapting the activity. Extension activities for students interested in the topic will be provided.

For more information and to register online, visit URL http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar7.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

E-mail any questions about this opportunity to John Entwistle at NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.


________________________________________________________________

Global Water Experiment Webcast

During the International Year of Chemistry 2011, students around the world are invited to explore one of Earth’s most critical resources, water. The results of their investigations will contribute to a global experiment, which will possibly become the biggest chemistry experiment ever.

Join specialists from NASA and the American Chemical Society, on Sept. 22, 2011, at 1 p.m. EDT, as they discuss this experiment and how water filtration affects our lives on Earth and in space.

Check out the webcast at
http://dln.nasa.gov.

To learn more about the experiment, visit
http://water.chemistry2011.org/web/iyc.

________________________________________________________________

Distance/Rate/Time Problems: Smart Skies Web Seminar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, the NASA Explorer Schools project is hosting a 60-minute Web seminar on Sept. 22, 2011, at 8 p.m. EDT. Learn how to use an innovative air traffic control simulator to engage your students as they explore the mathematics involved in the role of an air traffic controller. In the three-plane problem featured in this lesson, the challenge is to change routes and speeds to line up the planes safely, with proper spacing, at a given route intersection.

For more information and to register online, visit https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-distanceratetime/.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

Email any questions about this opportunity to NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov
.

________________________________________________________________

Space Farm 7 Outreach Event

NASA’s Kennedy Space Center is partnering with The Rock Ranch in central Georgia to celebrate 50 years of human space exploration. Educational activities, planetarium shows and astronaut presentations are scheduled for students, teachers and the public. The Rock Ranch will open its corn maze designed in the shape of an astronaut.

NASA educational activities will be held Sept. 23-24, 2011. The event is open to the public. Saturday, Sept. 23 is School Assembly Day. Schools are requested to call 706-647-6374 to register for the activities.

The Rock Ranch is a family destination located one hour south of Atlanta, Ga. Details can be found online at www.therockranch.com.

This event is part of the Space Farm 7 outreach project celebrating NASA’s achievements with seven agritourism events taking place throughout the United States. The goal of the project is to educate and inspire one million children.

For more information about this event, contact Beth Smith at beth.b.smith@nasa.gov.

________________________________________________________________

100 Year Starship Study Public Symposium

NASA’s Ames Research Center in California and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency will host a public symposium for the 100 Year Starship Study. The symposium will take place Sept. 30 – Oct. 2, 2011, in Orlando, Fla. Registration to attend the symposium is free and open to the public.

The 100 Year Starship Study aims to stimulate students, academia, industry, researchers and the public to consider possibilities and issues surrounding long-duration, long-distance spaceflight.

This endeavor will require an understanding of questions such as: how do organizations evolve and maintain focus and momentum for 100 years or more; what models have supported long term technology.

The 100 YSS public symposium will feature presentations of papers and panel discussion in seven relevant tracks related to interstellar travel:

— Time-Distance Solutions — Propulsion, time/space manipulation and/or dilation, near speed of light navigation, faster than light navigation, observations and sensing at near speed of light or faster than light
Track Chair: Dr. Jim Benford

— Habitats and Environmental Science — To have gravity or not, space and radiation effects, environmental toxins, energy collection and use, agriculture, self-supporting environments, optimal habitat sizing
Track Chair: Dr. Chris McKay |

— Biology and Space Medicine — Physiology in space, psychology in space, human life suspension (e.g., cryogenic), medical facilities and capabilities in space, on-scene (end of journey) spawning from genetic material
Track Chair: Dr. Neal Pellis

— Education, Social, Economic and Legal Considerations — Education as a mission, who goes, who stays, to profit or not, economies in space, communications back to Earth, political ramifications, round-trip legacy investments — assets left behind
Track Chair: Dr. Mae Jemison

— Destinations — Criteria for destination selection, what do you take, how many destinations and missions, probes versus journeys of faith
Track Chair: Dr. Jill Tarter

— Philosophical and Religious Considerations — Why go to the stars, moral and ethical issues, implications of finding hospitable worlds, implications of finding life elsewhere, implications of being left behind
Track Chair: Mr. Stewart Brand

— Communication of the Vision — Storytelling as a means of inspiration, linkage between incentives, payback and investment, use of movies, television and books to popularize long-term research, long-term journeys
Track Chair: Dr. Harry Kloor

In addition, the symposium will feature a science fiction authors’ panel discussion, special social events and an exhibit hall.

For more information about the 100 Year Starship Study and the public symposium, please visit the website at: http://www.100yss.org.

If you have questions about the study or the public symposium, please email your inquiries to info@100yss.org.

________________________________________________________________

Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — Sept. 1, 2011

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Follow the Desert RATS Team During Analog Testing
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Dates: Through Sept. 4, 2011

Engineering Design Process: On the Moon Webinar
Audience: 6-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Sept. 6, 2011

NASA Digital Learning Network Webcast — GRAIL Mission

Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Sept. 7, 2011

Weather and Climate: Satellite Meteorology Webinar
Audience: 7-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Sept. 8, 2011

4th Digital Media and Learning Competition Kick-Off Event
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Sept. 15, 2011

Space Farm 7 Outreach Event

Audience: K-12 Educators and Students
Event Dates: Sept. 23-24, 2011

100 Year Starship Study Public Symposium
Audience: All Educators & 9-Higher Education Students
Event Date: Sept. 30 – Oct. 2, 2011

NASA Aeronautics Scholarship Program
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: Jan. 15, 2012

Solving the Challenges of Space in the RealWorld and InWorld

Audience: 7-12 Educators and Students
Deadline: Jan. 27, 2012

What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website
Audience: K-6 Educators

________________________________________________________________

Follow the Desert RATS Team During Analog Testing

The NASA Desert Research and Technology Studies team, also known as Desert RATS, marks its fourteenth annual field test and the first time a mission to an asteroid will be simulated. While NASA has landed astronauts on the moon and rovers on Mars, the agency is only beginning to tackle the challenges of visiting an asteroid. Desert RATS team members will conduct simulated human and robotic space exploration test activities in extreme Arizona terrain to investigate and develop realistic technical and mission-driven operations similar to those of an asteroid mission.

The public is invited to follow along during the simulated mission. The Desert RATS team will use Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Ustream to share their experience online.

Check out the following live streamed events on the
Desert RATS Ustream channel.

Live Streaming From the Field
Sept. 1, 2011 from 4:45-5:45 p.m. EDT

Watch live streaming video from Test Day 3 as two crew members explore from the space exploration vehicle and one from the deep space habitat.

Q&A Session With NASA’s Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center
Sept. 1, 2011 at 6 p.m. EDT
The Kennedy Space Center visitor complex will host a Skype session allowing visitors to ask the crew questions.

High School Q&A With Crew Member Kjell N. Lindgren
Sept. 2, 2011 at 11 a.m. EDT

NASA astronaut and crew member Kjell N. Lindgren will connect with Webber Junior High School in Fort Collins, Colo,. for a Q&A session with students in the Webber Aerospace Ventures in Education program.


Live Streaming From the Field
Sept. 2, 2011 from 12-1 p.m. EDT and 4:45-5:45 p.m. EDT
Watch live streaming video from Test Day 4 as three crew members explore from the space exploration vehicle and one from the deep space habitat.


Q&A Session With NASA’s Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center
Sept. 2, 2011 at 6 p.m. EDT
The Kennedy Space Center visitor complex will host a Skype session allowing visitors to ask the crew questions.

Live Streaming From the Field
Sept. 4, 2011 from 12-1 p.m. EDT and 4:45-5:45 p.m. EDT
Watch live streaming video from Test Day 6 as three crew members explore from the space exploration vehicle and one from the deep space habitat.


Q&A Session With NASA’s Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center
Sept. 4, 2011 at 6 p.m. EDT
The Kennedy Space Center visitor complex will host a Skype session allowing visitors to ask the crew questions.

Visit the
Desert RATS Facebook page to find video clips from team members as they discuss upcoming field activities and answer questions from Facebook and Twitter followers.

To learn more about the Desert RATS project, visit https://www.nasa.gov/exploration/analogs/desertrats/index.html.

Follow the latest Desert RATS mission by visiting the following sites.
Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/NASA.DRATS
Twitter:
http://twitter.com/#!/DESERT_RATS
You Tube:
https://www.youtube.com/user/NASAanalogTV#p/c/7C4E0E50595B6B13
Ustream:
http://www.ustream.tv/channel/desertrats

________________________________________________________________

Engineering Design Process: On the Moon Webinar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute webinar on Sept. 6, 2011, at 6:30 p.m. EDT. This webinar showcases two lessons from the On the Moon educator guide: On Target and Feel the Heat. Participants will learn how they can use the engineering design process to challenge students to solve problems related to exploring the moon. This session will fully prepare attendees to implement these activities in the classroom.

For more information and to register online, visit URL http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar4.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

E-mail any questions about this opportunity to John Entwistle at
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

________________________________________________________________

NASA Digital Learning Network Webcast — GRAIL Mission

NASA’s Launch Services Program, or LSP, is busy launching satellites throughout our solar system including the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory, or GRAIL, mission to Earth’s moon. Join host Damon Talley and LSP outreach specialist Christopher Blair as they discuss GRAIL with special guests and engineers. Plus, learn how students can take pictures of the moon using MoonKAM, the first educational instrument on a NASA planetary mission.

To view this hourlong webcast on Sept. 7th, 2011, at 2 p.m. EDT., visit
http://dln.nasa.gov/dlnapp/webcast/webcast.do.

Please submit questions to
dlinfochannel@gmail.com for a chance to have them answered live during the webcast.

For more information about this webcast event, please contact Christopher Blair at
Christoper.E.Blair@nasa.gov.

________________________________________________________________

Weather and Climate: Satellite Meteorology Webinar


As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute webinar on Sept 8, 2011, at 6:30 p.m. EDT. Participants will learn to use the data from NASA’s research satellite program in their meteorology lessons. This webinar features “Monitoring the Global Environment,” one of eight modules within the Satellite Meteorology course. The activities within this module incorporate the use of authentic data acquired by NASA’s Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites and Polar Operational Environmental Satellites. Attendees will learn how to locate and download satellite data, create graphs and learn how to interpret them.

For more information and to register online, visit URL http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar5.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

E-mail any questions about this opportunity to John Entwistle at
NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

________________________________________________________________

4th Digital Media and Learning Competition Kick-Off Event

Today learning happens anytime, anyplace, at any age. How can 21st-century learners demonstrate their knowledge and skills? Digital badges can inspire learning, unlock jobs, encourage educational and civic opportunities, and open new pipelines for talent.

The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, in collaboration with Mozilla and HASTAC, invites you to an event on Sept. 15, 2011, to explore the potential of Badges for Lifelong Learning. Badges are a new assessment tool that will help identify skills mastered in formal and informal settings; virtually and in physical spaces; and in schools, workplaces and communities.

Featured speakers include:
— The Honorable Arne Duncan, Secretary, U.S. Department of Education.
— Charles F. Bolden Jr., Administrator, NASA.
— Emily Stover DeRocco, President, The Manufacturing Institute and the National Center for the American Workforce.
Mark Surman, Executive Director, Mozilla Foundation.

The event will feature the announcement of the 4th Digital Media and Learning Competition, which will provide up to $2 million in grants for innovations in the use of Badges for Learning.

To watch a live video stream of the event from the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 15, 2011, from 9 a.m-10:30 a.m. EDT, visit
http://hastac.org/DML-competition-launch.

For more information about the 4th Digital Media and Learning Competition, visit
http://www.dmlcompetition.net/.

________________________________________________________________

Space Farm 7 Outreach Event

NASA’s Kennedy Space Center is partnering with The Rock Ranch in central Georgia to celebrate 50 years of human space exploration. Educational activities, planetarium shows and astronaut presentations are scheduled for students, teachers and the public. The Rock Ranch will open its corn maze designed in the shape of an astronaut.

NASA educational activities will be held Sept. 23-24, 2011. The event is open to the public. Saturday, Sept. 23 is School Assembly Day. Schools are requested to call 706-647-6374 to register for the activities.

The Rock Ranch is a family destination located one hour south of Atlanta, Ga. Details can be found online at
www.therockranch.com.

This event is part of the Space Farm 7 outreach project celebrating NASA’s achievements with seven agritourism events taking place throughout the United States. The goal of the project is to educate and inspire one million children.

For more information about this event, contact Beth Smith at
beth.b.smith@nasa.gov.

________________________________________________________________

100 Year Starship Study Public Symposium

NASA’s Ames Research Center in California and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency will host a public symposium for the 100 Year Starship Study. The symposium will take place Sept. 30 – Oct. 2, 2011, in Orlando, Fla. Registration to attend the symposium is free and open to the public.

The 100 Year Starship Study aims to stimulate students, academia, industry, researchers and the public to consider possibilities and issues surrounding long-duration, long-distance spaceflight.

This endeavor will require an understanding of questions such as: how do organizations evolve and maintain focus and momentum for 100 years or more; what models have supported long term technology.

The 100 YSS public symposium will feature presentations of papers and panel discussion in seven relevant tracks related to interstellar travel:

— Time-Distance Solutions — Propulsion, time/space manipulation and/or dilation, near speed of light navigation, faster than light navigation, observations and sensing at near speed of light or faster than light
Track Chair: Dr. Jim Benford

— Habitats and Environmental Science — To have gravity or not, space and radiation effects, environmental toxins, energy collection and use, agriculture, self-supporting environments, optimal habitat sizing
Track Chair: Dr. Chris McKay |

— Biology and Space Medicine — Physiology in space, psychology in space, human life suspension (e.g., cryogenic), medical facilities and capabilities in space, on-scene (end of journey) spawning from genetic material
Track Chair: Dr. Neal Pellis

— Education, Social, Economic and Legal Considerations — Education as a mission, who goes, who stays, to profit or not, economies in space, communications back to Earth, political ramifications, round-trip legacy investments — assets left behind
Track Chair: Dr. Mae Jemison

— Destinations — Criteria for destination selection, what do you take, how many destinations and missions, probes versus journeys of faith
Track Chair: Dr. Jill Tarter

— Philosophical and Religious Considerations — Why go to the stars, moral and ethical issues, implications of finding hospitable worlds, implications of finding life elsewhere, implications of being left behind
Track Chair: Mr. Stewart Brand

— Communication of the Vision — Storytelling as a means of inspiration, linkage between incentives, payback and investment, use of movies, television and books to popularize long-term research, long-term journeys
Track Chair: Dr. Harry Kloor

In addition, the symposium will feature a science fiction authors’ panel discussion, special social events and an exhibit hall.

For more information about the 100 Year Starship Study and the public symposium, please visit the website at:
http://www.100yss.org.

If you have questions about the study or the public symposium, please email your inquiries to
info@100yss.org.

________________________________________________________________

NASA Aeronautics Scholarship Program

NASA’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate is accepting scholarship applications from graduate and undergraduate students for the 2012 academic year. The application deadline is Jan. 15, 2012.

Graduate students must apply under a specific research topic to align with NASA’s aeronautics research programs. The list of available topics is posted online.

NASA expects to award 20 undergraduate and five graduate scholarships to students in aeronautics or related fields. Undergraduate students entering their second year of study will receive up to $15,000 per year for two years and the opportunity to receive a $10,000 stipend by interning at a NASA research center during the summer.

Graduate students will receive up to $35,000 per year for up to three years, with an opportunity to receive a $10,000 stipend interning at a NASA research center for up to two consecutive summers.

Students not committed to a specific academic institution or program still may apply. If accepted, they must be admitted by fall 2012 into an aeronautical engineering program or related field of study at an accredited U.S. university. Applicants must be U.S. citizens. Scholarship money may be used for tuition and other school-related expenses.

NASA’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate conducts cutting-edge, fundamental and integrated systems research in traditional and emerging disciplines. The intent is to help transform the nation’s air transportation system and to support development of future air and space vehicles.

Its goals include improving airspace capacity and flexibility; aviation safety and aircraft performance; reducing overall noise, engine emissions and fuel usage.

For details about this scholarship program, a list of available research topics and the application process, visit
http://nasa.asee.org/.

For more information about aeronautics research at NASA, visit: http://www.aeronautics.nasa.gov

Questions about this scholarship should be directed to
nasa.asp@asee.org.

________________________________________________________________

Solving the Challenges of Space in the RealWorld and InWorld

The RealWorld-InWorld NASA Engineering Design Challenge encourages students in grades 7-12 to explore and build skills essential for successful careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics through two phases of project-based learning and team competition.

RealWorld (Phase 1): Teams of middle- and high-school-aged students with support of their teachers/coaches/parents work collaboratively as engineers and scientists to explore and design solutions related to the James Webb Space Telescope and Robonaut 2.

RealWorld Phase begins: September 1, 2011.
RealWorld Phase ends: January 27, 2012. To be considered to move to the InWorld phase, all RealWorld work must be submitted by this deadline.

Recognition: Submitted final project solutions will be featured on the RealWorld-InWorld website, and teams will receive recognition for their work once they complete the RealWorld challenge and InWorld registration.

InWorld (Phase 2): Participating college students select teams of two to four middle- and high-school-aged students who have completed the RealWorld phase to build their InWorld teams. Participation is limited to U.S. citizens. Teams work in a 3-D virtual online environment using 21st Century tools to refine designs and to create 3-D models of their design solutions.

InWorld Phase begins: January 28, 2012.
InWorld Phase ends: April 20, 2012.

Recognition: InWorld teams will compete for cash awards ($1,000 per member, including team leader, for each winning team). Contest rules apply.

NASA scientists and engineers visit and “chat” virtually throughout both phases of the challenge.

To learn more about the challenge and to register for online resources for this free and flexible project, visit
www.nasarealworldinworld.org.

________________________________________________________________

What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website

Appearances can be deceiving. But that’s not the case with the
Space Place website. Our pizzazzy new look only enhances the appeal, accessibility and navigability of our quality resources. The new Space Place includes all the compelling, fun and educational content it always has. Explore. Enjoy!

New at spaceplace.nasa.gov
As we promised in the March – April issue this year, the “new and improved” Space Place is here! It is reorganized, revamped, rebuilt and recommitted as a fun, free, fulfilling and fantastic NASA website for kids, teachers and parents. It makes use of the newest Web development tools and techniques to provide a more dynamic, interactive, educational and enjoyable experience.

The menus are filterable on subject or type of activity. Searches of any word, term or NASA mission produce customized menus. Dozens of educational and compelling games have been reframed as intrinsic parts of the site (no pop-ups or new contextually isolated windows or tabs). Many images and illustrations are enlargeable with a mouse click, and all videos run seamlessly within the page with no external video players or plug-ins needed. All pages are printer friendly.

The site includes over 150 separate modules intrinsic to the site, plus links to other valuable NASA kids’ sites for our grades-4-6 target audience. The modules and links are classified under the categories of Space, Earth, Sun, Solar System, People & Technology and Parents & Teachers.

Check it out. Let us know what you think. E-mail your feedback to
info@spaceplace.nasa.gov.

Space Place en español
The vast majority of the modules (games, activities, fun facts) on the new and improved Space Place are also available in Spanish, as are the menus and other navigation features. As before, you can toggle back and forth between English and Spanish versions of these pages. The content and images on the two versions are identical. It’s an ideal design for English learners or Spanish learners.

Focus on Space Place Live!
Kate and Kyo may not be slick, professional talk show hosts, but they do an entertaining job of finding out about the careers and interests of happy and passionate NASA scientists and engineers. Their most recent guest, Dr. Merav Opher, is a scientist on the distinguished Voyager mission, with its two spacecraft still alive and well after 34 years in space. They are now approaching the very boundary between the solar system and interstellar space. Dr. Merav talks about what Voyager is finding out there, her passion for physics . . . and opera! Watch this new episode at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/space-place-live.

For the classroom
Want to see all the image galleries on The Space Place? Just type “gallery” into the search box, and you’ll get a custom menu with links to our Solar System, Earth, Space, Sun, and People & Technology galleries.

Each gallery shows a page of thumbnails with short captions. Mouse over a thumbnail and you’ll see a tiny “Do” icon. Click on it to display the image and its large-font caption to print and post in the classroom. Or, just click on the thumbnail image itself to display a larger image and caption in a slide show format. Keep clicking “Next” or “Prev” to move through all the images on the page. Go to
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/search/?q=gallery, or just try the search box.

For out of school time
Stars look like tiny twinkling white lights on a black background. But, if you look carefully, you will see that they aren’t all white. Some are red, blue or yellow.

Why? Your kids and you can find out while making crispy, delicious star cookies that shine in all these colors. You will also find out how un-star-shaped real stars are. It’s the light distortion caused by our turbulent atmosphere that gives them their twinkling, pointy shapes.

And how can you tell whether a star has planets?

Have fun baking, tasting and exploring stars at
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/star-cookies.

Special Days
Sept. 6: Read a Book Day
Get back into the swing of school. Choose from five fun, spacey story books, all of which can be read in a few minutes. Go to
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/search/?q=storybook.

Sept. 13: Positive Thinking Day

Think positive when you rub balloon on your head. Although it may be negative ions that rub off and pick up little pieces of paper, it will leave you feeling more positive. Try the “Ions in action” experiment at
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/ion-balloons.

Sept. 18, 1977: Voyager 1 took the first picture of Earth and the moon together.

Now Voyager 1 is about to reach interstellar space. If it finds aliens, what will they learn about us? Find out
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/voyager-to-stars.

Oct. 5, 1882: Robert Hutchings Goddard was born.

Goddard is known as the “Father of the Space Age,” because, in 1926, he built and successfully launched the first liquid-fueled rocket. Launch a bubble-fueled rocket at
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/pop-rocket.

Oct. 13: Train Your Brain Day

Ozone Trap-n-Zap is a great game for training your brain to recognize good ozone from bad ozone. You will also help the planet. Play at
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/ozone.

Oct. 26, 1959: Earth people see far side of the moon for the first time.

The Lunik 3 spacecraft (Soviet Union) takes the first photo of the far side of the moon. See lots of pictures of all sides of the moon at
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/gallery-earth/#moon.

Last words . . .

            We wish you and your students a wonderful and productive year.

________________________________________________________________

Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators:
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students:
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club:
https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub


NASA Education Express — Aug. 25, 2011

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Meteorology: How Clouds Form Webinar
Audience: 5-8 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Aug. 30, 2011

High Power Microscopes: The Virtual Lab Webinar
Audience: 9-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Aug. 31, 2011


DEADLINE APPROACHING: 2011 SPHERES Zero Robotics Challenge
Audience: 9-12 Educators and Students
Registration Deadline: Sept. 5, 2011

Teaching From Space Office Seeks Educators to Experience Microgravity
Audience: K-12 Educators
Proposal Deadline: Sept. 21, 2011

________________________________________________________________

Meteorology: How Clouds Form Webinar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute webinar on Aug. 30, 2011, at 6:30 p.m. EDT. Learn about the relationships between air pressure, temperature, volume and cloud formation. The presenter will provide an overview of the necessary conditions for cloud formation and then show how to apply them to making a cloud in a bottle. Information will be provided about an extension activity, the S’COOL Project, which involves student participation in authentic science.

For more information and to register online, visit URL http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar2.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

E-mail any questions about this opportunity to John Entwistle at NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

________________________________________________________________

High Power Microscopes: The Virtual Lab Webinar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute webinar on Aug. 31, 2011, at 6:30 p.m. EDT. Learn to use a computer program simulating three high-power virtual microscopes: an atomic force microscope, a scanning electron microscope and a fluorescence light microscope. Viewing specimens include one-celled organisms, human tissue, computer chips, insects, and fungi. Participants will get an overview of the software, watch videos of students exploring specimens and learn how to use the Virtual Lab website and software.

For more information and to register online, visit URL http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar3.aspx.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

E-mail any questions about this opportunity to John Entwistle at NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

________________________________________________________________

DEADLINE APPROACHING: 2011 SPHERES Zero Robotics Challenge

NASA, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and MIT’s Space Systems Laboratory are offering high school students the opportunity to design experiments that will be tested in space.

The 2011 Zero Robotics challenge is a continuation and expansion of a science, technology, engineering and mathematics education program using bowling ball-sized spherical satellites aboard the International Space Station.

The Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES, are used inside the station to test maneuvers for spacecraft performing autonomous rendezvous and docking. The three satellites that make up SPHERES fly in formation inside the station’s cabin. Each is self-contained with power, propulsion, computing and navigation equipment. Test results support satellite servicing, vehicle assembly and spacecraft that fly in formation.

The SPHERES Zero Robotics Challenge requires high school student teams to write their own algorithm to fly the satellites in the station. Teams must register before Sept. 5, 2011, at
http://zerorobotics.mit.edu/.

Entries will be evaluated using simulations. Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass., will host a ground test 2D competition in October. Two elimination rounds in the 3D online simulation will be held in November. The top 27 teams will have their code sent to the station, where an astronaut will program the SPHERES satellites to run their tests.

The Zero Robotics challenge, facilitated by MIT, TopCoder and Aurora Flight Sciences, continues the STEM focus of the SPHERES program. The 2011 challenge expands on a pilot program performed in 2009 and 2010. By making the benefits and resources of the space program tangible to high school students, Zero Robotics is designed to inspire future scientists and engineers. Students will have the opportunity to push their limits and develop skills in STEM. This program builds critical engineering skills for students such as problem solving, design thought process, operations training, team work and presentation skills.

MIT’s Space Systems Laboratory developed SPHERES in 2006 to provide DARPA, NASA and other researchers with a long-term test bed for validating technologies critical to the operation of future satellites, docking missions and satellite autonomous maneuvers. The satellites provide opportunities to test a wide range of hardware and software at an affordable cost.

For additional information about NASA and MIT’s Zero Robotics program, visit
http://go.nasa.gov/zero-robotics.

For additional information about DARPA, visit
http://www.darpa.mil.

Please e-mail any questions about this opportunity to Jason Crusan at
Jason.Crusan@nasa.gov.

________________________________________________________________

Teaching From Space Office Seeks Educators to Experience Microgravity

Teaching From Space, a NASA Education office, in partnership with the Reduced Gravity Education Flight Program announces the opportunity for students and educators across the country to collaborate on an experiment to be tested aboard a microgravity aircraft. This incredible opportunity is open to any current K-12 classroom educator in the United States. Educators must also be U.S. citizens.

The Microgravity Experience begins with students and educators developing and proposing a reduced gravity experiment. Selected educator teams will then be engaged in a suite of activities that include online professional development on classroom resources for microgravity, collaboration with a NASA mentor and a reduced-gravity flight. With combined input from their students and mentor, educator teams will design and fabricate their experiments to be tested and evaluated aboard an aircraft that flies approximately 30 roller-coaster-like climbs and dips to produce periods of micro and hyper gravity, ranging from zero gravity to 2 g.

Seven teams of four to five educators will be selected from this application process to travel to NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. Educators will participate in Reduced Gravity Flight Week Feb. 6-11, 2012, and fly their own experiments aboard NASA’s Reduced Gravity Aircraft (Note: This opportunity is contingent upon the NASA Education budget).

Educator teams interested in participating in this unique Microgravity Experience need to submit a proposal no later than Sept. 21, 2011. For more information, check out http://microgravityuniversity.jsc.nasa.gov/tfs or send an e-mail to jsc-rgeducator@nasa.gov.

________________________________________________________________

Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — Aug. 18, 2011

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

NASA Explorer Schools Live Video Chat: How Clouds Affect Our Weather and Climate
Audience: 8-12 Educators and Students
Event Date: Aug. 24, 2011

Electromagnetic Spectrum: Remote Sensing Ices on Mars Webinar
Audience: 6-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Aug. 24, 2011

DEADLINE APPROACHING: 2011 SPHERES Zero Robotics Challenge
Audience: 9-12 Educators and Students
Registration Deadline: Sept. 5, 2011

2012 NASA’s Reduced Gravity Education Flight Program
Audience: Higher Education Students
Proposal Deadline: Oct. 26, 2011

New DIY Podcast Module: Rocket Science
Audience: 5-12 Educators and Students

New NASA eClips Videos Available
Audience: K-12 Educators

________________________________________________________________

NASA Explorer Schools Live Video Chat: How Clouds Affect Our Weather and Climate

NASA Explorer Schools, or NES, invites educators and students in grades 8-12 from across the U.S. and Departments of Defense and State schools to participate in a special live video webchat. This chat will feature Lin Chambers, a physical scientist with the Climate Science Branch at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va. Chambers will answer student questions about clouds, how they form, why they are important to our atmosphere and how they affect our weather and climate.

This one-hour video webchat starts at 2 p.m. EDT on Aug. 24, 2011.

You do not need to be a participant of the NASA Explorer Schools project to participate in the chat.

To learn more about NES, please visit the
explorerschools.nasa.gov website.

For more information about this NES live video chat, visit https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/nes2/home/Chambers-chat.html.

If you have any questions about the webcast, please contact John Entwistle at NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

________________________________________________________________

Electromagnetic Spectrum: Remote Sensing Ices on Mars Webinar

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute webinar on Aug. 24, 2011, at 6:30 p.m. EDT. Learn how to use authentic NASA mission data to investigate the composition and distribution of ices in the high latitude regions of Mars through analysis of visible light, infrared light and gamma rays. The seminar includes information about a unique student extension activity, where students access a free computer simulation illustrating how gamma rays are used to determine the chemical composition of Mars.

For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES2/webseminar1.aspx

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

E-mail any questions about this opportunity to John Entwistle at NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.

________________________________________________________________

DEADLINE APPROACHING: 2011 SPHERES Zero Robotics Challenge

NASA, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and MIT’s Space Systems Laboratory are offering high school students the opportunity to design experiments that will be tested in space.

The 2011 Zero Robotics challenge is a continuation and expansion of a science, technology, engineering and mathematics education program using bowling ball-sized spherical satellites aboard the International Space Station.

The Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES, are used inside the station to test maneuvers for spacecraft performing autonomous rendezvous and docking. The three satellites that make up SPHERES fly in formation inside the station’s cabin. Each is self-contained with power, propulsion, computing and navigation equipment. Test results support satellite servicing, vehicle assembly and spacecraft that fly in formation.

The SPHERES Zero Robotics Challenge requires high school student teams to write their own algorithm to fly the satellites in the station. Teams must register before Sept. 5, 2011, at
http://zerorobotics.mit.edu/.

Entries will be evaluated using simulations. Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass., will host a ground test 2D competition in October. Two elimination rounds in the 3D online simulation will be held in November. The top 27 teams will have their code sent to the station, where an astronaut will program the SPHERES satellites to run their tests.

The Zero Robotics challenge, facilitated by MIT, TopCoder and Aurora Flight Sciences, continues the STEM focus of the SPHERES program. The 2011 challenge expands on a pilot program performed in 2009 and 2010. By making the benefits and resources of the space program tangible to high school students, Zero Robotics is designed to inspire future scientists and engineers. Students will have the opportunity to push their limits and develop skills in STEM. This program builds critical engineering skills for students such as problem solving, design thought process, operations training, team work and presentation skills.

MIT’s Space Systems Laboratory developed SPHERES in 2006 to provide DARPA, NASA and other researchers with a long-term test bed for validating technologies critical to the operation of future satellites, docking missions and satellite autonomous maneuvers. The satellites provide opportunities to test a wide range of hardware and software at an affordable cost.

For additional information about NASA and MIT’s Zero Robotics program, visit
http://go.nasa.gov/zero-robotics.

For additional information about DARPA, visit
http://www.darpa.mil.

Please e-mail any questions about this opportunity to Jason Crusan at
Jason.Crusan@nasa.gov.

________________________________________________________________

2012 NASA’s Reduced Gravity Education Flight Program

NASA is offering undergraduate students an opportunity to test experiments in microgravity aboard NASA’s reduced gravity aircraft.

The opportunity is part of NASA’s Reduced Gravity Education Flight Program, which gives aspiring explorers a chance to propose, design and fabricate a reduced-gravity experiment. Selected teams will test and evaluate their experiment aboard NASA’s reduced-gravity airplane. The aircraft flies about 30 roller-coaster-like climbs and dips during experiment flights to produce periods of weightlessness and hypergravity ranging from 0 g to 2 g.

Proposals are due Oct. 26, 2011.

Interested students also should submit a letter of intent by Sept. 14, 2011. This step is optional but serves as an introductory notice that a team plans to submit a proposal for the upcoming competition.

NASA will announce selected teams Dec. 7, 2011. The teams will fly in the summer of 2012. Once selected, teams also may invite a full-time, accredited journalist to fly with them and document the team’s experiment and experiences. All applicants must be full-time undergraduate students, U.S. citizens and at least 18 years old.

To learn more about this opportunity, visit
http://microgravityuniversity.jsc.nasa.gov.

Questions about this opportunity should be e-mailed to
jsc-reducedgravity@nasa.gov.

________________________________________________________________

New DIY Podcast Module: Rocket Science

Launch into the new school year with a new Do-It-Yourself Podcast topic module: Rocket Science.

NASA Launch Vehicle Systems Analyst (rocket scientist) Tristan Curry provides expert sound bites for students to build podcast episodes about the laws of physics that govern building and launching rockets. Education specialist Fred Kepner explains the stability of a rocket and how to achieve it.

Whether you’re building a film canister rocket or a launch vehicle to travel beyond Earth, the science behind rockets is the same. The topic module includes 33 video clips with Curry, Kepner, historical footage of rockets and shuttle launches, and animations. Sixteen audio clips also are included in the module. Students may download these NASA multimedia materials and integrate them into their own recordings and narration to create a podcast.

Other DIY Podcast topic modules are:
— Fitness.
— Lab Safety.
— Newton’s Laws.
— Robots.
— Solar Arrays.
— Spacesuits.
— Sports Demo.

Students can build their own multimedia projects, while teachers meet national education standards.

A companion blog offers tips and suggestions for incorporating the DIY Podcast into the classroom.

To learn more and to start building podcasts, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/diypodcast/index.html.

________________________________________________________________

New NASA eClips Videos Available

Check out the new videos that NASA eClips™ has rolled out for August.

Our World: Moons In Our Solar System (Grades K-5) — Did you know astronomers have identified more than 300 moons in our solar system? How big is Ganymede? How small is Deimos? Which moons might have what it takes to support life? Follow the NASA missions to learn about these unique bodies in space.

Real World: Comets – It’s Done With Math (Grades 6-8) — NASA engineers are finding new uses for old spacecraft as a way to study comets. Find out how a repurposed spacecraft can return to a comet for a second visit to uncover secrets about the formation of the solar system. Use angular size to see just how big this comet really is!

Real World: Legacy of NASA’s Space Shuttle – Because It Flew (Grades 6-8) — Use a graph to learn more about the history of NASA’s Space Shuttle Program. Find out how mission complexity increased over time, leading to new careers and innovations that will launch us into the next stage of space exploration. See how important the shuttle was, just because it flew!

Launchpad: Curiosity Goes to Mars (Grades 9-12) — Find out why Curiosity is the best name for the largest rover ever sent to another planet. Learn about the challenges of landing on a planet with an atmosphere and the geology and chemistry questions scientists hope to answer with instruments on the Mars Science Laboratory.

To learn more about NASA eClips, visit
www.nasa.gov/nasaeclips.

Follow NASA eClips on
Facebook and Twitter!

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — Aug. 11, 2011

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Smart Skies Webinar
Audience: 5-9 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Aug. 16, 2011

NASA Earth Ambassador Training Program
Audience: Informal Educators
Application Deadline: Aug. 17, 2011

Center for Astronomy Education Teaching Excellence Workshops
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Event Dates: Multiple Dates October 2011 – January 2012

NASA Announces Next Opportunity for CubeSat Space Missions

Audience: Higher Education Educators & Students
Application Deadline: Nov. 14, 2011

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Smart Skies Webinar


As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, the NASA Explorer Schools project is hosting a 60-minute webinar on Aug. 16, 2011, at 4 p.m. EDT. Learn how to use an innovative air traffic control simulator to engage your students as they explore the mathematics involved in the role of an air traffic controller. In the three-plane problem featured in this lesson, the challenge is to change routes and speeds to line up the planes safely, with proper spacing, at a given route intersection.

For more information and to register online, visit https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-smart-skies/.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

E-mail any questions about this opportunity to John Entwistle at
John.D.Entwistle@nasa.gov.

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NASA Earth Ambassador Training Program

Informal educators are invited to apply to the Earth Ambassador Program, part of NASA Climate Days. The program will hold a two-day training workshop at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, in Greenbelt, Md., Oct. 13-14, 2011, with extended training on Oct. 15, for those not attending the ASTC (Association of Science – Technology Centers) Conference.

During the workshop, participants will interact with Earth scientists who are looking at the effect of climate change with respect to their research areas, learn effective ways of communicating global climate change with the public and become familiar with the online resources available to host their own events at their local institutions.

Transportation, lodging and meal per diem will be covered.

Applications are due Aug. 17, 2011.

For more information and to apply online, visit
http://mynasadata.larc.nasa.gov/NCD_Ambassador_Application.html.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please e-mail Heather Weir at
heather.weir@ssaihq.com.

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Center for Astronomy Education Teaching Excellence Workshops

The Center for Astronomy Education announces a series of educator workshops for astronomy educators. Advanced workshops are available for participants who have taken part in previous CAE workshops.

The overarching goal of these workshops is for participants to become familiar with research-validated active engagement teaching strategies and assessment materials, as well as how to implement them in their college courses, through role-playing, modeling, practice, and more! To accomplish this goal, participants will learn how to create productive learning environments beginning with a brief review of research on the nature of teaching and learning. Most workshop time will be spent with participants playing the roles of student, instructor, and critical friend to practice implementing active engagement strategies such as interactive lectures, Think-Pair-Share, interactive demonstrations and videos, collaborative groups, Lecture-Tutorials and Ranking Tasks.

Oct. 8, 2011 — Dearborn, Mich.
Great Lakes Regional Teaching Exchange

Oct. 22-23, 2011 — Mesa, Ariz.
Improving the College Introductory Courses Through Active Engagement: A Tier I (Introductory) Workshop

Jan. 7-8, 2012 — Austin, Texas
Improving the College Introductory Courses Through Active Engagement: A Tier I (Introductory) Workshop

Jan. 8, 2012 — Austin, Texas
NASA CAE Tier II (Advanced) Special Topics Workshop: Using Technology in the Classroom

Jan. 20, 2012 — Ann Arbor, Mich.
Special Topics Workshop on Implementing Lecture-Tutorials for Introductory Astronomy

For more information and to register for workshops online, visit
http://astronomy101.jpl.nasa.gov/workshops/index.cfm.

Inquiries about this series of workshops should be directed to Gina Brissenden at
gbrissenden@as.arizona.edu.

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NASA Announces Next Opportunity for CubeSat Space Missions


NASA is seeking proposals for small satellite payloads to fly on rockets planned to launch between 2012 and 2014. These miniature spacecraft, known as CubeSats, could be auxiliary payload on previously planned missions.

CubeSats are a class of research spacecraft called nanosatellites. The cube-shaped satellites are approximately four inches long, have a volume of about one quart and weigh less than three pounds.

Proposed CubeSat investigations must be consistent with NASA’s Strategic Plan and the Education Strategic Coordination Framework. The research should address aspects of science, exploration, technology development, education or operations.

Applicants must submit proposals electronically by 4:30 p.m. EST on Nov. 14, 2011. NASA will select the payloads by Jan. 30, 2012. Selection does not guarantee a launch opportunity. The selected spacecraft will be eligible for flight after final negotiations when a launch opportunity arises. NASA will not provide funding for the development of the small satellites.

NASA recently announced the results from the second round of the CubeSat Launch Initiative. From the first two launch initiatives, 32 payloads made the short-list for launch opportunities in 2011 and 2012. They are eligible for launch pending an appropriate opportunity and final negotiations. The satellites come from 18 states: Alabama, Alaska, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, Pennsylvania, Utah and Virginia.

For additional information about NASA’s CubeSat Launch Initiative program, visit
http://go.nasa.gov/puk9K2
http://go.nasa.gov/CubeSatOp

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Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express — Aug. 4, 2011

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

Engineering Design Challenge: Water Filtration Webinar
Audience: 9-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Aug. 11, 2011

Smart SkiesTM Webinar
Audience: 5-9 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Aug. 16, 2011

NASA Earth Ambassador Training Program
Audience: Informal Educators
Application Deadline: Aug. 17, 2011

Student Spaceflight Experiments Program
Audience: 5-Higher Education Educators and Students
Deadline for Letter of Commitment: Sept. 15, 2011

ARISSat-1 Satellite Launched
Audience: All Educators and Students

NASA Sponsors Odyssey of the Mind Long-Term Problem — Weird Science
Audience: All Educators and Students
Visit Website for Regional Competition Dates


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Engineering Design Challenge: Water Filtration Webinar


As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, the NASA Explorer Schools project is hosting a 60-minute webinar on Aug. 11, 2011, at 4 p.m. EDT. Learn how your students can work in teams to design, build, test and measure the performance of a water filtration device, analyze the data collected and use this information to improve their filtration designs. During the webinar, participants will receive an overview of the activity, explore the NASA connection, share tips and tricks for implementing this lesson in the classroom, watch videos of students engaged in the lesson and discuss possible modifications to the activity.

For more information and to register online, visit https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-water-filtration/.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

E-mail any questions about this opportunity to John Entwistle at
John.D.Entwistle@nasa.gov.

________________________________________________________________

Smart SkiesTM Webinar


As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, the NASA Explorer Schools project is hosting a 60-minute webinar on Aug. 16, 2011, at 4 p.m. EDT. Learn how to use an innovative air traffic control simulator to engage your students as they explore the mathematics involved in the role of an air traffic controller. In the three-plane problem featured in this lesson, the challenge is to change routes and speeds to line up the planes safely, with proper spacing, at a given route intersection.

For more information and to register online, visit https://digitalmedia.wufoo.com/forms/nes-webinar-registration-smart-skies/.

To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

E-mail any questions about this opportunity to John Entwistle at
John.D.Entwistle@nasa.gov.

________________________________________________________________

NASA Earth Ambassador Training Program

Informal educators are invited to apply to the Earth Ambassador Program, part of NASA Climate Days. The program will hold a two-day training workshop at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, in Greenbelt, Md., Oct. 13-14, 2011, with extended training on Oct. 15, for those not attending the ASTC (Association of Science – Technology Centers) Conference.

During the workshop, participants will interact with Earth scientists who are looking at the effect of climate change with respect to their research areas, learn effective ways of communicating global climate change with the public and become familiar with the online resources available to host their own events at their local institutions.

Transportation, lodging and meal per diem will be covered.

Applications are due Aug. 17, 2011.

For more information and to apply online, visit
http://mynasadata.larc.nasa.gov/NCD_Ambassador_Application.html.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please e-mail Heather Weir at
heather.weir@ssaihq.com.

________________________________________________________________

Student Spaceflight Experiments Program

The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education, in partnership with NanoRacks LLC, announces an immediate opportunity for communities across the U.S. to participate in the first Student Spaceflight Experiments Program, or SSEP, mission to America’s national laboratory in space — the International Space Station. The program is also open to space station partner nations.

Each participating community will be provided an experiment slot in a real microgravity research mini-laboratory scheduled to fly on the space station from March 30 to May 16, 2012. An experiment design competition in each community — engaging 300 to 1,000 students — allows student teams to design real experiments vying for their communities’ reserved experiment slot on the space station. Additional SSEP programming leverages the experiment design competition to engage the community, embracing a Learning Community Model for science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, education.

SSEP missions on STS-134 (Space Shuttle Endeavour) and STS-135 (Space Shuttle Atlantis) have recently been completed, with 1,027 student team proposals received, and 27 SSEP experiments selected and flown — representing the 27 communities that participated in SSEP on the space shuttle.

Letters of Commitment for this opportunity are due Sept. 15, 2011.

To learn more about this opportunity, visit the SSEP Mission 1 to ISS National Announcement of Opportunity at
http://ssep.ncesse.org/2011/07/immediate-historic-opportunity-for-schools-student-spaceflight-experiments-program-mission-1-to-the-international-space-station/.

The SSEP in-orbit research opportunity is enabled through NanoRacks LLC, which is working in partnership with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of using the International Space Station as a national laboratory.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please e-mail SSEP National Program Director Jeff Goldstein at
jeffgoldstein@ncesse.org.

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ARISSat-1 Satellite Launched

A satellite with amateur radio capabilities and a student-designed experiment was released into orbit around Earth on Aug. 3, 2011, during a spacewalk outside the International Space Station. The satellite is transmitting signals containing information that students around the world can access.

ARISSat-1, which stands for Amateur Radio on the International Space Station Satellite-1, contains a student-designed experiment and other equipment that students can use to learn more about space and space exploration. The rectangular spacecraft is covered by six solar panels that will charge the batteries in the satellite for about six months as it orbits Earth. Spoken telemetry values, with data such as temperature and battery life, are intended to promote science and mathematics education by encouraging school children to listen to the satellite, track its progress and plot the changes.

The project website provides free downloadable software that can be used to decode the data. In addition to data, the satellite will transmit 24 pre-recorded greetings in 15 different languages — French, Spanish, German, English and Chinese, to name a few.

Check out the ARISSat-1 website at
http://arissat1.org/ for information on data transmissions, contests and student activities.

Questions about ARISSat-1 should be directed to
teachers@arissat1.org.

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NASA Sponsors Odyssey of the Mind Long-Term Problem — Weird Science

NASA is sponsoring the Odyssey of the Mind Long-Term Problem — Weird Science.

Odyssey of the Mind is an international educational program that offers creative problem-solving opportunities for students from kindergarten through college. Participants apply their creativity to solve problems that range from building mechanical devices to presenting their own interpretation of literary classics. The teams then bring their solutions to competition on the local, state and international levels.

This year’s NASA-sponsored problem requires teams to create and present a performance about a team of scientists on an expedition to uncover the cause of mysterious events. The performance must include a technical representation of the mysterious events, a moving backdrop that helps portray traveling and a team-created device that the scientists use on the expedition.

For more information and to find dates for regional competitions, visit
http://www.odysseyofthemind.com/.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please e-mail
info@odysseyofthemind.com.

________________________________________________________________

Don’t miss out on education-related opportunities available from NASA. For a full list of Current Opportunities, visit https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html.

Visit NASA Education on the Web:
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub