NASA “Science WOW!” Message – April 18, 2018

Check out the latest edition of NASA’s “Science WOW!” — your source for NASA science opportunities for educators and students.

The final edition of the NASA Science WOW! newsletter will be delivered on April 25, 2018. But there is good news! The NASA EXPRESS has recently been updated and revamped, so if you aren’t a subscriber already, please subscribe to the NASA EXPRESS newsletter at nasa.gov/education/express.


Science Always Starts With a Question …


This Week’s Question: What Is Earth?

Are your students curious about our home planet? Check out these “What Is Earth?” features written just for students.

K-4: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/k-4/stories/nasa-knows/what-is-earth-k4.html
5-8: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/5-8/features/nasa-knows/what-is-earth-58.html

For even more K-4 resources, visit the “More to Explore: Earth” page at https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/k-4/more_to_explore/Earth.html.

And for Earth facts for curious science fans of all ages, visit https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/earth/overview/.


Have You Seen This?


Earth Day is coming up on April 22! Decorate your space with downloadable Earth Day Posters from NASA.

https://science.nasa.gov/toolkits/earth-day-posters


Opportunities for Future Scientists of All Ages



Science Opportunities for Educators of Grades K-12



Science Opportunities for Higher Education and Informal Institutions


 


Opportunities for Future Scientists of All Ages


 Help NASA Predict Landslides — Citizen Science: Landslide Reporter
Audience: All Educators and Students

Landslides affect all countries, yet scientists don’t have a clear picture of where and when landslides occur globally. To predict landslides more accurately, NASA scientists are building the Cooperative Open Online Landslide Repository with data of past landslides — and you can help. Learn how to add to the COOLR catalog using the Landslide Reporter citizen science application.

To learn more, visit https://landslides.nasa.gov.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to landslide_support@nccs.nasa.gov.


Download the New ‘Spacecraft AR’ App
Audience: All Educators and Students

NASA spacecraft travel to far-off destinations in space, but a new mobile app from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory brings spacecraft to you! The new app, called Spacecraft AR, uses the latest augmented reality (AR) technology to put virtual 3-D models of NASA’s robotic space explorers into any environment with a flat surface.

Download the new app to explore and snap pictures with 3-D rovers, space probes and more! Learn more at https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=7082.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Holli.riebeek@nasa.gov.

 


Science Opportunities for Educators of Grades K-12


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Earth Right Now: STEM Activites for Relationships in Ecosystems
Audience:
K-5, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Event Date: April 18, 2018, at 5 p.m. EDT
Learn about the Elementary GLOBE “Earth System Module” containing storybooks and STEM activities. Activities help students learn what plants need from water, sunlight and soil; explain how Earth’s processes and components are interconnected; and demonstrate their knowledge of how water, air, soil and living things interact in the Earth system. Register online to participate. https://www.eiseverywhere.com/327332

Earth Right Now: Exploring Our Earth From Space
Audience:
5-9, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Event Date: April 19, 2018, at 6 p.m. EDT
Explore Earth from above with the help of astronauts and satellites. Learn how observations from space teach us about our planet and the processes that shape it. Using NASA missions, real data, online resources and classroom lessons, we’ll investigate Earth with eyes from above. Register online to participate. https://www.eiseverywhere.com/327116

**NEW** STEAM in Space
Audience:
5-12, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Event Date: April 25, 2018, at 6 p.m. EDT
Explore beyond the science, technology, engineering and mathematics of space. Integrate the “A” in STEAM in your classroom by learning the important role that language, art and music play in space exploration. Register online to participate. https://www.eiseverywhere.com/331841

**NEW** Earth Right Now: Hurricanes in the Classroom
Audience:
5-8, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Event Date: April 26, 2018, at 6 p.m. EDT
As we continue to recover from the 2017 hurricane season and prepare for the 2018 season, discover ways to explore hurricanes, tropical cyclones and other severe storms in the classroom. This webinar present strategies to integrate NASA hurricane missions and STEM classroom resources and lessons into your instruction. Register online to participate. https://www.eiseverywhere.com/316066

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


Free Webinar — Shake, Bake and Shout: Materials ISS Experiment-X (MISSE-X)
Audience: 5-12 Educators
Event Date: April 18, 2018, at 6 p.m. EDT

Join NASA’s Beginning Engineering, Science and Technology educators for a free 60-minute professional development webinar. Learn how NASA is using a series of experiments mounted externally on the space station to investigate the effects of long-term exposure to the harsh environment of space. Using NASA’s BEST engineering design process, participants will test a variety of materials to determine if they would be suitable for long-term use in space.

For more information and to register to participate, visit https://www.eiseverywhere.com/329527.

Please direct questions about this webinar to afrc-nasabestedu@mail.nasa.gov.


NASA Mars Science: MAVEN Outreach Webinar — Do Habitable Worlds Require Magnetic Fields?
Audience: Formal and Informal Educators, Parents and Teens
Event Date: April 18, 2018, 7 p.m. EDT

MAVEN Outreach Webinars are virtual gatherings of team members from the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution, or MAVEN, mission. The webinars offer professional development for formal and informal educators, troop leaders, museum docents, and others interested in MAVEN and Mars science.

Join the MAVEN team on April 18, 2018, at 7 p.m. EDT, for the “Do Habitable Worlds Require Magentic Fields?” webinar. What makes a planet hospitable for life? Join MAVEN Co-Investigator Dr. Dave Brain of the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) to learn about the role that a global magnetic field may play in the evolution of a planet’s atmosphere and in planetary habitability.

For more information, visit http://lasp.colorado.edu/home/maven/education-outreach/maven-outreach-webinars/.

Questions about this webinar should be directed to epomail@lasp.colorado.edu.


 2018 Texas Space Grant Consortium STEM Educator Scholarships
Audience: Educators Enrolled in Programs for a Master’s Degree in a STEM Field at Member Institutions of the Texas Space Grant Consortium
Application Deadline: April 27, 2018

The Texas Space Grant Consortium’s Educator STEM Scholarship Program provides $1,500 scholarships to eligible teachers enrolled in master’s programs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields. Applicants must be U.S. citizens who hold a bachelor’s degree and are enrolled in a master’s program at a Texas Space Grant Consortium institution. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/edu_stem/.

Please direct questions about this scholarship to scholarships@tsgc.utexas.edu.


2018 NASA SEES TEX2 Teacher Externship Program
Audience: Secondary Educators in Texas
Application Deadline: May 1, 2018

Join NASA, the Texas Space Grant Consortium and The University of Texas at Austin Center for Space Research for a weeklong “externship” this summer. Educators will collaborate with students selected from across the nation and NASA scientists. Participants will conduct research using Earth-observing satellite data and explore STEM careers. Housing, meals and a stipend will be provided.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/sees-externship/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to baguio@csr.utexas.edu.


**NEW** Online Training Session: Using NASA Earth Observing Data for Monitoring and Response to Vector-borne and Water-borne Diseases
Audience: All Educators
Event Date: May 8, 2018, 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. EDT

Vectors are living organisms that are able to transmit diseases between humans or from animals to humans. Vectors include mosquitoes, ticks, sandflies, fleas and other insects.

Join NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement mission for a beginner-level online training webinar to learn how NASA Earth-observing satellite data sets can be used to identify environmental conditions that may result in the onset of vector-borne diseases. Two sessions are being offered. To learn more and to register to attend, visit https://pmm.nasa.gov/disease-initiative.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to dorian.w.janney@nasa.gov.


**NEW** NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement Mission’s Vector-borne and Water-related Disease Initiative Workshop
Audience: All Educators
Event Date: May 17, 2018, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. EDT

Vector-borne diseases are responsible for over 17 percent of all the infectious diseases globally. Many of these diseases are preventable through protective measures.

Join NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement mission for a daylong workshop at the Wilson Center in Washington, D.C., to hear success stories that showcase how NASA data is being used to inform, predict and better understand water-related and vector-borne disease. Register online to attend the workshop in person or remotely.

For more information, visit https://pmm.nasa.gov/disease-initiative.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to dorian.w.janney@nasa.gov.

 


Opportunities for Higher Education and Informal Institutions


NASA Stennis Community College and Education Faculty Fellowship Program
Audience: Full-time Faculty at Accredited Higher Education Institutions in Mississippi and Louisiana
Application Deadline: April 27, 2018, at 5 p.m. CDT
Fellowship Dates: June 4 – Aug. 10, 2018

The NASA Stennis Community College and Education Faculty Fellowship Program provides opportunities for STEM faculty to do research for 10 weeks during the summer at NASA’s Stennis Space Center near the Mississippi Gulf Coast.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens working full time at a two-year or four-year accredited university or college in Mississippi or Louisiana. The program provides a weekly stipend. Qualified faculty from minority-serving institutions are particularly encouraged to apply.

Applications are due April 27, 2018, at 5 p.m. CDT. For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/2018_nasa_stennis_community_college_and_education_summer_faculty_fellowship_program_announcement.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to mitch.krell@nasa.gov.


Call for Papers: 2018 International Space Station Research and Development Conference
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Abstract Submission Deadline: April 27, 2018

The seventh annual International Space Station Research and Development Conference will be held July 23-26, 2018, in San Francisco, California

NASA, the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space, and the American Astronomical Society are seeking abstracts under the categories of Biology and Medicine; Human Health in Space; Commercial and Nongovernment Use; Physical Sciences and Materials Development; Plant Science; Earth Science and Remote Sensing; Innovative Solutions; Technology Development and Demonstration; Finances; and STEM Education (science, technology, engineering and mathematics). Topics should relate to science, exploration and technology activities (past, present, planned or under development) on the International Space Station.

Both the conference and abstract submittal are open to entrepreneurial, commercial, academic and government agency attendees, both from and outside the United States. Eligible attendees include professionals, young professionals, students and interested parties. The working language for the conference is English. The conference will include plenaries for topics of general interest and technical sessions for focused discussions.

Because of the large number of expected submissions, presenters are encouraged to submit abstracts early. The deadline is April 27, 2018.

For more information about the conference and how to submit an abstract for consideration, visit http://www.issconference.org/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to ISSTechChair@atdl-inc.com.


2018 Columbia Crew Memorial Undergraduate Scholarships
Audience: Undergraduate Students at Member Institutions of the Texas Space Grant Consortium
Application Deadline: April 27, 2018

The Texas Space Grant Consortium and the Aviation and Space Foundation of Texas, in partnership with NASA, are offering undergraduate scholarships of $1,500 in memory of the Space Shuttle Columbia astronauts. These scholarships recognize outstanding students and encourage graduate studies in STEM-related fields. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and registered for at least a half-time course load at a Texas Space Grant Consortium institution. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/grants/scholars_announcement.html.

Please direct questions about this scholarship to scholarships@tsgc.utexas.edu.


2018-2019 Texas Space Grant Consortium Graduate Fellowships
Audience: Graduate Students at Member Institutions of the Texas Space Grant Consortium
Application Deadline: April 27, 2018

Texas Space Grant Consortium Fellowships encourage graduate study in the fields of space science and engineering. Interdisciplinary and integrated work experience are emphasized. Each $5,000 award supplements half-time graduate support (or a fellowship) provided by a consortium institution. Applicants must be U.S. citizens registered for full-time study in a graduate program at one or more of the Texas Space Grant Consortium institutions. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

For more information, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/grants/fellows_announcement.html.

Please direct questions about this fellowship to fellowships@tsgc.utexas.edu.

 


Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities
.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educators and Students Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom.
NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Take Part in a Year of Education on Station
September 2017 – September 2018: Although on different crews, astronauts Joe Acaba and Ricky Arnold — both former teachers — will work aboard the International Space Station. Visit NASA’s A Year of Education on Station website for out-of-this-world resources and opportunities for K-16 students and educators.

Visit NASA Education on the web:
NASA Office of Education: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

Did you miss last week’s NASA Science WOW! newsletter?
Visit the Science WOW! blog for an archive of previous messages.
https://blogs.nasa.gov/educationsciencewow/

NASA “Science WOW!” Message — Dec. 13, 2017

Check out the latest edition of NASA’s “Science WOW!” — your source for NASA opportunities in science education delivered “Weekly On Wednesday.”






Science WOW! banner


Science Always Starts With a Question …


This Week’s Question: How Can I View Tonight’s Peak of the Geminid Meteor Shower?

This year’s Geminid meteor shower will be the best of 2017! The shower peaks tonight with rates around one meteor per minute under good conditions. So bundle up and head outside. But check out these resources before you go!

Heads Up, Earthlings! The Geminids Are Here
https://www.nasa.gov/centers/marshall/news/news/releases/2017/heads-up-earthlings-the-geminids-are-here.html

Video: What’s Up for December?
https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/video/details.php?id=1512


Have You Seen This?


Have you ever wondered what makes a meteor different from a meteorite? Or if asteroids and comets are made of the same stuff? Flip through the “What’s That Space Rock?” Slideshow to learn all about these and other bodies in our solar system.

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/learn/slideshow/whats-that-space-rock/


Opportunities for Future Scientists of All Ages



Science Opportunities for Educators of Grades K-12



Science Opportunities for Higher Education and Informal Institutions


 

 


Opportunities for Future Scientists of All Ages


Free Program — Cubes in Space™
Audience: Students Ages 11-18 and Educator Mentors
Registration Deadline: Feb. 2, 2018

NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility and Langley Research Center, along with the Colorado Space Grant Consortium and idoodledu, inc., are offering a free STEAM education program for students ages 11-18. Cubes in Space lets students design and compete to launch an experiment into space. Selected student-designed payload cubes will be launched via a sounding rocket from Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia, in late June 2018 or from a high-altitude scientific balloon from NASA’s Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility in New Mexico in late August 2018.

Registration closes on Feb. 2, 2018. For more information, visit http://www.cubesinspace.com/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to info@cubesinspace.com.


International Space Station Research Design Challenge: Capillary Effects on Liquids Exploratory Research Experiments
Audience: Students in Grades 8-12
Design Submission Deadlines: March 1, 2018

NASA and Portland State University in Oregon are challenging students in grades 8-12 to design microgravity experiments investigating capillary action, similar to those conducted on the space station. Teams or individuals create their own experiment using computer-aided design with a provided template and submit short proposals presenting the experiments. Selected experiments will be tested in the university’s 2.1-second drop tower, and video results will be available for analysis and reporting.

Design ideas are due March 1, 2018. For more information, visit http://spaceflightsystems.grc.nasa.gov/CELERE/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to celere@lists.nasa.gov.


Be a Citizen Scientist With the ‘Aurorasaurus’ Project
Audience: All Educators and Students
Project Timeframe: Ongoing

Aurorasaurus is the first and only citizen science project that tracks auroras around the world via online reports, mobile apps and social media.

Aurorasaurus is a citizen science project that gathers real-time data about aurora sightings and sends out notifications to users when the northern or southern lights are likely visible in their area. Registered users get location-based notifications and a real-time monitor of space weather activity. The project also allows users to help verify tweets and search for real sightings. Plus, the website features answers to science and aurora questions.

To learn more, visit http://www.aurorasaurus.org/.

Please direct questions about this project to aurorasaurus.info@gmail.com.

This project receives support from the National Science Foundation and NASA’s Science Mission Directorate.

 


Science Opportunities for Educators of Grades K-12


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Earth Sense — Remote Sensing at NASA: Mission Geography, 6-12
Audience:
6-12, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Event Date: Dec. 14, 2017, at 6 p.m. EST
Learn about NASA’s Mission Geography resources featuring Earth science lessons that integrate STEM, geography and the language arts with Earth observations, remote sensing and maps. Discover ways to use the unique perspective from space to investigate Earth and the processes that shape it, both natural and human influenced. Register online to participate. https://www.eiseverywhere.com/285833

**NEW** The Chemistry of Space Exploration
Audience:
7-12, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Event Date: Dec. 18, 2017, at 7 p.m. EST
Engineering is only one of many disciplines at play in designing a mission to space. See how chemistry is involved in mission planning. Using several demos and highlighting NASA educational material, participants will explore the important role chemistry plays in designing spacecraft and keeping astronauts safe in space. Register online to participate. https://www.eiseverywhere.com/298669

**NEW** NASA Satellite Observations in Science Education — Hunting Icebergs
Audience:
4-10, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Event Date: Dec. 19, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EST
Explore the NASA Wavelength lesson, “Hunting Icebergs.” The resource uses three modules that engage students with real NASA data: Identifying; Sizing Up; and Tracing Data. Register online to participate. https://www.eiseverywhere.com/293843

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


GLOBE Student Research Campaign — Water in Our Environment
Audience: K-12 Educators
Campaign Dates: Now Through June 30, 2018

Water continuously circulates through one of Earth’s most powerful systems: the water cycle. Join GLOBE for its latest campaign that uses a set of guiding investigative questions to enable students to meaningfully explore water in their local environment and collaborate to consider the influence of water on a global scale. The project is flexible, allowing teachers to choose between many options to involve their students.

Visit the site for details about the project and upcoming informational webinars.

https://www.globe.gov/web/el-nino/el-nino-campaign/water-in-our-environment-student-research-campaign

Please direct questions about this opportunity to http://www.globe.gov/support/contact.



Opportunities for Higher Education and Informal Institutions


2018 High-Altitude Student Platform Opportunity
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: Dec. 15, 2017

The Louisiana Space Consortium, or LaSPACE, is accepting applications from students at U.S. colleges and universities who want to send experiments to the edge of space. The annual project, supported by the NASA Balloon Program Office and LaSPACE, provides near-space access for 12 student experiments to be carried by a NASA high-altitude research balloon. The flights typically last 15 to 20 hours and reach an altitude of 23 miles. Experiments may include compact satellites or prototypes.

Applications are due Dec. 15, 2017. For more information, visit http://laspace.lsu.edu/hasp/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to guzik@phunds.phys.lsu.edu.


2018 Lunar and Planetary Institute’s Exploration Science Summer Intern Program
Audience: Graduate Students
Application Deadline: Jan. 19, 2018

Join the Lunar and Planetary Institute for a 10-week program for graduate students in geology, planetary science, planetary astronomy and related programs. Learn how to integrate scientific input with exploration activities in a way that mission architects and spacecraft engineers can use. Activities will support missions to the Moon that use the Orion crew vehicle, the Deep Space Gateway and robotic assets on the lunar surface.

Interns will receive stipends and travel expense reimbursement. Applications are due Jan. 19, 2018.

For more information, visit https://www.lpi.usra.edu/exploration_intern/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to explorationintern@lpi.usra.edu.


Free ‘NASA’s Journey to Mars’ Planetarium/Dome Show
Audience: Formal and Informal Educators

Are you looking for ways to prepare students for STEM-related career opportunities? Do you want to spark their interest in pushing the boundaries of technology and innovation? Right now, NASA’s fleet of Mars robotic explorers is paving the way for human exploration of the solar system in the coming decades. Have your students join NASA in preparing for a monumental journey of a lifetime — to Mars!

“NASA’s Journey to Mars” is a short planetarium presentation that can be used in the educational domes of your school district, as well as local planetariums, to inspire interest in STEM. To learn more, including how you can acquire the show for use in your area, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/journey-of-a-lifetime-mars-education-resources/.

Please direct questions about the “NASA’s Journey to Mars” planetarium/dome show to Elsie Weigel at elsie.weigel@nasa.gov.

 


Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities
.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educators and Students Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom.
NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Take Part in a Year of Education on Station
September 2017 – September 2018: Although on different crews, astronauts Joe Acaba and Ricky Arnold — both former teachers — will work aboard the International Space Station. Visit NASA’s A Year of Education on Station website for out-of-this-world resources and opportunities for K-16 students and educators.

Visit NASA Education on the web:
NASA Office of Education: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

Did you miss last week’s NASA Science WOW! newsletter?
Visit the Science WOW! blog for an archive of previous messages.
https://blogs.nasa.gov/educationsciencewow/

NASA “Science WOW!” Message — Nov. 29, 2017

Check out the latest edition of NASA’s “Science WOW!” — your source for NASA opportunities in science education delivered “Weekly On Wednesday.”






Science WOW! banner


Science Always Starts With a Question …


This Week’s Question: What Is a Supermoon and Just How Super Is It?

The full Moon on Dec. 3 will be the first and only supermoon of 2017. It will be followed by two more in January and February 2018. Learn about supermoons and find resources to get students excited about exploring Earth’s only natural satellite.

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/news/2017/11/15/whats-a-supermoon-and-just-how-super-is-it/

For more Moon lessons from JPL Education, visit https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/teach/tag/search/Earth%27s+Moon.

To learn more about the Moon, visit https://moon.nasa.gov/. Explore the lunar surface with Moon Trek. Check it out at https://moontrek.jpl.nasa.gov/.


Have You Seen This?


Are you interested in discovering new facts about our universe? Do you like looking at cool pictures of the cosmos? Check out the Astronomy Picture of the Day website! Each day, a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html


Opportunities for Future Scientists of All Ages



Science Opportunities for Educators of Grades K-12



Science Opportunities for Higher Education and Informal Institutions


 

 


Opportunities for Future Scientists of All Ages


Help Nickname New Horizons’ Next Flyby Target
Audience: All Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: 3 p.m. EST on Dec. 1, 2017

On New Year’s Day 2019, the New Horizons spacecraft will fly past a small, frozen world at the outer edge of our solar system. Officially, the small world is known as “(486958) 2014 MU69.” NASA and the New Horizons team are asking for help in giving “MU69” a nickname.

Visit the site to submit ideas and to vote on names currently under consideration. Submissions and voting closes at 3 p.m. EST/noon PST on Dec. 1, 2017. NASA and the New Horizons team will announce the winning nickname in January.

For more information, visit http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/News-Center/News-Article.php?page=20171106.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Laura Cantillo at laura.l.cantillo@nasa.gov.


Help NASA Find New Planetary Systems — Become a Disk Detective!
Audience: All Educators and Students
Project Timeframe: Now Through 2018

Help NASA find new disks, homes of extrasolar planets, by classifying images from NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer telescope and other observatories. In this citizen science project, you’ll view animated images of disk candidates and classify them, distinguishing good candidates from galaxies, asteroids and image artifacts. This project, suitable for elementary students through expert adults, will yield targets for the James Webb Space Telescope and publications in professional scientific literature.

This project is ongoing and expected to run through 2018. For more information and to start hunting for planets, visit http://www.diskdetective.org/.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Marc Kuchner at marc.j.kuchner@nasa.gov.

 


Science Opportunities for Educators of Grades K-12


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Earth Sense — Remote Sensing at NASA: GLOBE Atmosphere
Audience:
K-12, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Event Date: Nov. 29, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EST
Learn about clouds and contrails using the GLOBE program, an international science and education program that gives students and the public the opportunity to participate in data collection and the scientific process. They are able to contribute meaningfully to our understanding of the Earth system and global environment. Register online to participate. https://www.eiseverywhere.com/281778

Earth Sense — Remote Sensing at NASA: Mission Geography, K-5
Audience:
K-5, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Event Date: Nov. 30, 2017, at 6 p.m. EST
Learn about NASA’s Mission Geography resources featuring Earth science lessons that integrate STEM, geography and the language arts with Earth observations, remote sensing and maps. Discover ways to use the unique perspective from space to investigate Earth and the processes that shape it, both natural and human-influenced. Register online to participate. https://www.eiseverywhere.com/285829

**NEW** Earth Sense — Remote Sensing at NASA: Using Earth Observations to Talk About Snow and Ice
Audience:
5-9, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Event Date: Dec. 4, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EST
Explore the Earth Observatory and NASA Earth Observations websites and discuss resources related to the effects of changing snow and ice coverage on Earth. The activities in this webinar address the Next Generation Science Standards ESS2 and ESS3. Register online to participate. https://www.eiseverywhere.com/273251

**NEW** Earth Sense — Remote Sensing at NASA: GLOBE Hydrology
Audience:
K-12, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Event Date: Dec. 5, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EST
Learn about water and the hydrologic cycle using GLOBE, an international science and education program that gives students the opportunity to participate in data collection and the scientific process. Discover ways to contribute to our understanding of the Earth system and global environment. Register online to participate. https://www.eiseverywhere.com/281780

**NEW** Earth Sense — Remote Sensing at NASA: Water Filtration
Audience:
K-12, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Event Date: Dec. 6, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EST
Explore the space station’s Environmental Control and Life Support System that reclaims waste water from crew members’ urine, cabin condensation and waste. Learn about hands-on experiments and physical demonstrations that can be used in the classroom to create, build and test a water filtration device using common materials. Register online to participate. https://www.eiseverywhere.com/281782

**NEW** NASA Food for Thought
Audience:
6-12, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Event Date: Dec. 7, 2017, at 6 p.m. EST
Explore the NASA Food for Thought education guide that investigates space food and guides students to construct sample space food meals based on the nutritional needs of the astronauts on a journey to Mars. Explore a menu of inquiry activities and other resources to satisfy your STEM appetite. Register online to participate. https://www.eiseverywhere.com/283687

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


Mars Survival Kit: Lessons and Activities to Guide Your Exploration of Mars!
Audience: K-12 Educators

NASA is embarking on a journey to Mars! Are your students ready to join in the adventure? Spark excitement in your classroom with the Mars Survival Kit.

The Mars Survival Kit is a collection of educational activities for students in grades K-12. Each educational activity includes a brief description, as well as information about how the activities and lessons align to the Next Generation Science Standards.

Start your classroom’s journey to Mars at http://go.nasa.gov/1NnZ0Rg.

To learn more about NASA’s Journey to Mars, visit http://www.nasa.gov/topics/journeytomars/index.html.



Opportunities for Higher Education and Informal Institutions


2018 BIG Idea Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Students and Faculty
Entry Deadline: Nov. 30, 2017

NASA’s 2018 Breakthrough, Innovative and Game-changing (BIG) Idea Challenge is an engineering design contest open to full-time undergraduate and graduate students. This competition seeks innovations in the design, installation and sustainable operation of a large solar power system on Mars. Top teams present their concepts via a design review at either NASA’s Langley Research Center in Virginia or NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Ohio. The winning team will receive NASA internship offers.

Entries are due Nov. 30, 2017. For more information, visit http://BigIdea.nianet.org.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to BigIdea@nianet.org.


2018 High-Altitude Student Platform Opportunity
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: Dec. 15, 2017

The Louisiana Space Consortium, or LaSPACE, is accepting applications from students at U.S. colleges and universities who want to send experiments to the edge of space. The annual project, supported by the NASA Balloon Program Office and LaSPACE, provides near-space access for 12 student experiments to be carried by a NASA high-altitude research balloon. The flights typically last 15 to 20 hours and reach an altitude of 23 miles. Experiments may include compact satellites or prototypes.

Applications are due Dec. 15, 2017. For more information, visit http://laspace.lsu.edu/hasp/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to guzik@phunds.phys.lsu.edu.


**NEW** 2018 Lunar and Planetary Institute’s Exploration Science Summer Intern Program
Audience: Graduate Students
Application Deadline: Jan. 19, 2018

Join the Lunar and Planetary Institute for a 10-week program for graduate students in geology, planetary science, planetary astronomy and related programs. Learn how to integrate scientific input with exploration activities in a way that mission architects and spacecraft engineers can use. Activities will support missions to the Moon that use the Orion crew vehicle, the Deep Space Gateway and robotic assets on the lunar surface.

Interns will receive stipends and travel expense reimbursement. Applications are due Jan. 19, 2018.

For more information, visit https://www.lpi.usra.edu/exploration_intern/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to explorationintern@lpi.usra.edu.


**NEW** Project Mars: International Art and Film Contest
Audience: College Students and Early Career Professionals
Entry Deadline: Aug. 31, 2018

NASA is leading human space exploration in the vicinity of the Moon and on to Mars. Project Mars invites college students and recent graduates with fewer than 5 years of experience in the film or graphic arts industry to learn about NASA’s deep space endeavors and create a visualization of what this expedition may look like.

Entries can be short films (two to five minutes in length) or posters (standard-size sheets, 27 by 41 inches). Winners will receive cash prizes.

For more information, visit http://projectmarscompetition.com/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to info@sciartexchange.org.


Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities
.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educators and Students Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom.
NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Take Part in a Year of Education on Station
September 2017 – September 2018: Although on different crews, astronauts Joe Acaba and Ricky Arnold — both former teachers — will work aboard the International Space Station. Visit NASA’s A Year of Education on Station website for out-of-this-world resources and opportunities for K-16 students and educators.

Visit NASA Education on the web:
NASA Office of Education: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

Did you miss last week’s NASA Science WOW! newsletter?
Visit the Science WOW! blog for an archive of previous messages.
https://blogs.nasa.gov/educationsciencewow/

NASA Education “Science WOW!” Message — Oct. 11, 2017

Check out the latest edition of NASA Education’s “Science WOW!” — your source for NASA opportunities in science education delivered “Weekly On Wednesday.”






Check out the latest edition of NASA Education’s “Science WOW!” — your source for NASA opportunities in science education delivered “Weekly On Wednesday.”


Science Always Starts With a Question …


This Week’s Question: Why Are Planets Round?

The planets in our solar system are different in a lot of ways. But one thing they all have in common is shape! What makes planets shaped like a sphere, instead of cube, pyramid or disc? This story from NASA’s Space Place has the scoop!

https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/planets-round/en/


Have You Seen This?


Geodesy is the science of measuring Earth’s shape, gravity and rotation to provide accurate measurements. It’s how we know Earth is shaped like a sphere, though not a perfect one. Watch “Looking Down a Well: A Brief History of Geodesy” to learn more!

https://youtu.be/_Cj1vgmXr5M


Opportunities for Future Scientists of All Ages



Science Opportunities for Educators of Grades K-12



Science Opportunities for Higher Education and Informal Institutions


 


Opportunities for Future Scientists of All Ages


Earth Science Week 2017 Contests
Audience: All Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: Oct. 13, 2017

The American Geosciences Institute is sponsoring a series of contests to celebrate Earth Science Week 2017. This year’s celebration takes place Oct. 8-14, 2017.

Earth Science Week 2017 Photography Contest — Open to All Ages
http://www.earthsciweek.org/contests/photography/index.html
Humans interact with the planet’s natural systems in many ways. With a camera, capture evidence of some ways people affect, or are affected by, Earth systems around your home, neighborhood, school, workplace, or local public spaces. In a photo, show human interaction with natural systems where you are.

Earth Science Week 2017 Visual Arts Contest — Open to K-5 Students
http://www.earthsciweek.org/contests/visualarts/index.html
The natural world is part of many things that people do. Think of where our food, clothes and homes come from. Think of the forces that shape our weather, our travels, our habits and all the things we can (and cannot) do. Create a picture that shows how human activities shape, and are shaped by, Earth systems.

Earth Science Week 2017 Essay Contest — Open to Students in Grades 6-9
http://www.earthsciweek.org/contests/essay/index.html
Earth science expands our understanding of human interaction with the planet’s natural systems and processes. Geoscientists explore the relationship between human activity and Earth’s systems. The impact of their research can be seen in areas such as energy, technology, climate change, the environment, natural disasters, industry, agriculture and tourism. Focusing on one topic, explain how geoscience helps us make the most of opportunities and manage challenges.

Earth Science Week 2017 Video Contest — Open to All Ages
http://www.earthsciweek.org/earth-connections
Explore the relationship between human activity and Earth systems, including the geosphere (earth), hydrosphere (water), atmosphere (air) and biosphere (life). Submit a brief, 30-90 second original video that tells viewers about how people have an impact on Earth systems, or how Earth systems have an impact on people, in your part of the world.

The entry deadline for all four contests is Oct. 13, 2017. Visit the contest websites for full details.

If you have any questions about these contests, please email the Earth Science Week staff at info@earthsciweek.org.


**NEW** 2017 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education
Next Lecture Date: Oct. 19 and Oct. 20, 2017, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)

The Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, named after the founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and presented by JPL’s Office of Communication and Education, shares the excitement of the space program’s missions, instruments and other technologies.

Lectures take place twice per month, on consecutive Thursdays and Fridays. The Thursday lectures take place in JPL’s Theodore von Kármán Auditorium, and Friday lectures take place at Pasadena City College’s Vosloh Forum. Both start at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT). Admission and parking are free for all lectures. No reservations are required, but seating is limited. The Thursday evening lectures are streamed live for viewing online. Archives of past lectures are also available online.

Next Lecture in the Series:

Sink or Swim? Using Radar to Protect California’s Water Supply
Event Date:
Oct. 19 and Oct. 20, 2017, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2017&month=10
California has highly variable annual precipitation and a great disparity between where precipitation falls and where people live and grow crops. To deal with these issues, a vast array of infrastructure is in place. Monitoring and maintaining this infrastructure is critical. Join Dr. Cathleen E. Jones, a signals analysis engineer, for a discussion about how NASA is using high-resolution, airborne radar to make this monitoring more efficient.

For more information about the Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, including a complete list of upcoming lectures, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.php.

Questions about this series should be directed to http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php.


**NEW** Send Your Name to Mars on NASA’s Next Red Planet Mission!
Audience: All Educators and Students
Deadline: Nov. 1, 2017

NASA invites the public to send their names to the Red Planet aboard NASA’s InSight Mars lander! InSight will launch in May 2018 and land on Nov. 26, 2018. The mission will do an in-depth study of the interior of Mars to answer key questions about how the solar system’s rocky planets formed, including Earth. InSight will place the first seismometer directly on the surface of Mars and deploy a self-hammering heat probe that will burrow deeper into the ground than any device on the planet has ever done.

To get your boarding pass to fly your name on the next mission to Mars, visit https://mars.nasa.gov/syn/insight.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to http://mars.nasa.gov/feedback/.


**NEW** Citizen Science Project: Cosmoquest’s Image Detective
Audience: All Educators and Students

CosmoQuest’s Image Detective, a NASA-funded citizen science project, invites the public to identify Earth features in photographs taken by astronauts aboard the International Space Station. Citizen scientists are asked to help identify geographic features (natural or human-made) in astronaut photographs and then determine the location on Earth where the photo is centered.

Your efforts can enhance NASA’s database of images taken by astronauts from the space station. To learn more, visit http://cosmoquest.org/ImageDetective.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to info@cosmoquest.org.


Search for Gravitational Waves With ‘Gravity Spy’ Citizen Science Project
Audience: All Educators and Students
Project Timeframe: Ongoing

In 1916, Einstein predicted the existence of ripples in spacetime known as gravitational waves. A century later, on Sept. 14, 2015, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory, or LIGO, made the first direct detection of this elusive phenomenon. This discovery is the first of many that will give researchers a whole new way to explore the universe. However, LIGO needs your help!

Being the most sensitive and most complicated gravitational experiment ever created, LIGO is susceptible to many instrumental and environmental noise sources called “glitches.” These glitches are difficult to model using computers, can mimic true astrophysical signals, and generally make LIGO less sensitive to gravitational waves.

Classifying glitches using computers has proven to be an exceedingly difficult task. That’s where the Gravity Spy Zooniverse Citizen Science Project comes in! Human intuition has proven time and time again to be a useful tool in pattern recognition problems such as this. One of the innovations of this project is that citizen scientists and computer algorithms will work in a symbiotic relationship, helping one another to optimally classify and characterize glitches. By selecting the right classification for a given glitch, you will help computers learn to do this classification themselves on much larger datasets. That capability will help scientists determine and eliminate the sources of noise.

For more information and to learn how to participate, visit the “Gravity Spy” website at https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/zooniverse/gravity-spy.

To learn more about the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory and its mission to detect gravitational waves, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2016/nsf-s-ligo-has-detected-gravitational-waves.

Download the “Direct Observation of Gravitational Waves” Educator Guide for activities and background information designed for grades 5-12. https://dcc.ligo.org/LIGO-P1600015/public.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Tyson Littenberg at tyson.b.littenberg@nasa.gov.

“Gravity Spy” is a collaboration between the following entities:
–Northwestern University, led by Scott Coughlin and Michael Zevin with PI Vicky Kalogera and co-PI Aggelos Katsaggelos. Northwestern’s team is composed of a LIGO group in the CIERA astrophysics research center and a machine learning group in the Image and Video Processing Laboratory.
–The Adler Planetarium Zooniverse Team, led by co-PI Laura Trouille.
–Syracuse University, led by co-PI’s Kevin Crowston and Carsten Østerlund.
–California State University at Fullerton, led by co-PI Josh Smith.
–The LIGO Scientific Collaboration, of which NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center and Goddard Space Flight Center are member institutions.

The project is funded by the National Science Foundation.


Science Opportunities for Educators of Grades K-12


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Lessons From a Decade of Stratospheric Exploration: STEM in Action for Educators
Audience:
K-12, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Event Date: Oct. 11, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Learn about the Far Horizons project. Managed by the Adler Planetarium, Far Horizons has engaged students and volunteers as young as 10 years old in hands-on STEM experiences with high-altitude balloon missions. The program’s manager will discuss the amazing opportunities — and interesting challenges — high-altitude balloon missions can provide to students and educators. Register online to participate. https://www.eiseverywhere.com/282502

Testing Terror — Technology for Exploration: Rockets to Mars
Audience:
4-8, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Event Date: Oct. 12, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT
Blast off into learning by exploring the STEM of rockets to Mars with NASA missions and classroom resources. Launch your students’ interest in forces and motion with NASA rocket activities and design challenges that include designing, building and launching simple rockets while recording and analyzing data. Register online to participate. https://www.eiseverywhere.com/270987

**NEW** Dance of the Planets: Motion Laws and the Solar System
Audience:
Grades 4-6, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Event Date: Oct. 16, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Participants will get an overview of resources for relating motion equations from Isaac Newton and Johannes Kepler to the bodies of the solar system. The activities presented in this webinar address the Next Generation Science Standards ESS1, PS2 and PS3. Register online to participate. https://www.eiseverywhere.com/273223

**NEW** Testing Terror — Technology for Exploration: Engineering a Satellite
Audience:
Grades 4-10, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Event Date: Oct. 18, 2017, at 5 p.m. EDT
Materials going into space encounter extremely harsh conditions not normally encountered on Earth. Probes dropped into the atmosphere of a planet like Jupiter or Saturn’s moon, Titan, may encounter tremendous pressures, temperatures and corrosive gases. Learn how to bring these challenges into your classroom with two satellite engineering design challenges. Register online to participate. https://www.eiseverywhere.com/271398

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


**NEW** Updated ‘Teachable Moment’ Educational Resources Available From JPL Education — Nobel-Prize-Winning Research: Modeling Gravitational Waves
Audience: Educators of Grades 6-8

Are you looking for ways to bring the latest NASA science and mission news into your classroom? Education specialists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California have the resources to help you do just that! The “Teachable Moments” blog brings together news, activities and education tips on the latest happenings at NASA.

Check out the latest offering from JPL Education.

Teachable Moment —
Nobel-Prize-Winning Research: Modeling Gravitational Waves — Grades 6-8
Researchers Kip Thorne and Barry Barish of Caltech and Rainer Weiss of MIT have been awarded the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics for their “decisive contributions to the LIGO detector and the observation of gravitational waves.” To learn more about the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory and ways to bring its scientific breakthroughs into the classroom, visit https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/news/2016/3/23/modeling-gravitational-waves/.

Looking for more? Check out the “Teachable Moments” archives for more resources. http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/news/column/teachable-moments/


**NEW** Middle School Teacher Reviewers Needed — Online Astrobiology Game
Audience: Educators of Grades 7-8

The NASA Astrobiology Institute has funded the production of an exciting new online educational game for 7th- and 8th-grade classrooms called “Life Underground.” In the interactive experience, the student takes on the role of a young scientist who navigates and investigates a subsurface environment, searching for and characterizing microbial life.

The project’s development team at the University of Southern California’s School of Cinematic Arts is seeking teacher reviewers for the game. Reviewers are asked to spend an hour or so exploring the software and reviewing the accompanying supplemental materials.

To learn more, fill out the brief interest survey found at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/midschoolsoftware.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Daniella Scalice at daniella.m.scalice@nasa.gov.


**NEW** GLOBE Student Research Campaign — Water in Our Environment
Audience: K-12 Educators
Campaign Dates: Now Through June 30, 2018

Water continuously circulates through one of Earth’s most powerful systems: the water cycle. Join GLOBE for its latest campaign that uses a set of guiding investigative questions to enable students to meaningfully explore water in their local environment and collaborate to consider the influence of water on a global scale. The project is flexible, allowing teachers to choose between many options to involve their students.

Visit the site for details about the project and upcoming informational webinars.

https://www.globe.gov/web/el-nino/el-nino-campaign/water-in-our-environment-student-research-campaign

Please direct questions about this opportunity to http://www.globe.gov/support/contact.


Opportunities for Higher Education and Informal Institutions


2018 RASC-AL Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge Tech Demo and Engineering Design Competition
Audience: Higher Education Students and Faculty
Notice of Intent Deadline: Oct. 13, 2017
Project Plan Submission Deadline: Nov. 16, 2017

The 2018 RASC-AL Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge is an engineering design and technology demonstration contest open to full-time undergraduate and graduate students at accredited colleges and universities in the U.S. This challenge gives teams the opportunity to design and build hardware that can extract water from simulated Martian subsurface ice.

Up to 10 teams will be chosen to demonstrate their system’s water extraction capabilities in June 2018 at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia.

A notice of intent is requested by Oct. 13, 2017. Project plans are due Nov. 16, 2017.

For more information, visit http://specialedition.rascal.nianet.org.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to rascal@nianet.org.


NASA Accepting Applications for NASA Spring Internships
Audience: High School, Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Application Deadline: Oct. 17, 2017

Now is your chance to apply for exciting hands-on spring internship opportunities available at all NASA centers. High school, undergraduate and graduate students are needed to help NASA scientists and engineers with ongoing scientific and engineering research, technology development and spaceflight operations activities. Internship opportunities also exist in nontechnical areas such as communications, budget, procurement, education and human resources. NASA internships are stipend-paid and offer students mentor-directed, degree-related, NASA-relevant tasks. If you think you have what it takes to be a NASA intern, please visit https://intern.nasa.gov today to apply or to learn more about the numerous opportunities available.

The deadline for spring applications is Oct. 17, 2017!

Please submit inquiries about the NASA Internships, Fellowships, and Scholarships One Stop Shopping Initiative, or NIFS OSSI, via https://intern.nasa.gov/oic/.


Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities
.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educators and Students Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom.
NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Visit NASA Education on the web:
NASA Office of Education: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

Did you miss last week’s NASA Education Science WOW! newsletter?
Visit the Science WOW! blog for an archive of previous messages.
https://blogs.nasa.gov/educationsciencewow/

NASA Education “Science WOW!” Message — Oct. 4, 2017

Check out the latest edition of NASA Education’s “Science WOW!” — your source for NASA opportunities in science education delivered “Weekly On Wednesday.”






Check out the latest edition of NASA Education’s “Science WOW!” — your source for NASA opportunities in science education delivered “Weekly On Wednesday.”


Science Always Starts With a Question …


This Week’s Question: What Is the Parker Solar Probe?

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe will be the first spacecraft to “touch the sun.” Find out more about this daredevil mission and how it will help us to better understand our star.

https://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/parker-solar-probe-humanity-s-first-visit-to-a-star


Have You Seen This?


Play the “Helios” game from NASA’s Space Place! Learn how the sun creates energy by combining protons and neutrons in just the right way to make helium and release energy.

Check it out at https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/helios-game/en/.


Opportunities for Future Scientists of All Ages



Science Opportunities for Educators of Grades K-12



Science Opportunities for Higher Education and Informal Institutions


 


Opportunities for Future Scientists of All Ages


Earth Science Week 2017 Contests
Audience: All Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: Oct. 13, 2017

The American Geosciences Institute is sponsoring a series of contests to celebrate Earth Science Week 2017. This year’s celebration takes place Oct. 8-14, 2017.

Earth Science Week 2017 Photography Contest — Open to All Ages
http://www.earthsciweek.org/contests/photography/index.html
Humans interact with the planet’s natural systems in many ways. With a camera, capture evidence of some ways people affect, or are affected by, Earth systems around your home, neighborhood, school, workplace, or local public spaces. In a photo, show human interaction with natural systems where you are.

Earth Science Week 2017 Visual Arts Contest — Open to K-5 Students
http://www.earthsciweek.org/contests/visualarts/index.html
The natural world is part of many things that people do. Think of where our food, clothes and homes come from. Think of the forces that shape our weather, our travels, our habits and all the things we can (and cannot) do. Create a picture that shows how human activities shape, and are shaped by, Earth systems.

Earth Science Week 2017 Essay Contest — Open to Students in Grades 6-9
http://www.earthsciweek.org/contests/essay/index.html
Earth science expands our understanding of human interaction with the planet’s natural systems and processes. Geoscientists explore the relationship between human activity and Earth’s systems. The impact of their research can be seen in areas such as energy, technology, climate change, the environment, natural disasters, industry, agriculture and tourism. Focusing on one topic, explain how geoscience helps us make the most of opportunities and manage challenges.

Earth Science Week 2017 Video Contest — Open to All Ages
http://www.earthsciweek.org/earth-connections
Explore the relationship between human activity and Earth systems, including the geosphere (earth), hydrosphere (water), atmosphere (air) and biosphere (life). Submit a brief, 30-90 second original video that tells viewers about how people have an impact on Earth systems, or how Earth systems have an impact on people, in your part of the world.

The entry deadline for all four contests is Oct. 13, 2017. Visit the contest websites for full details.

If you have any questions about these contests, please email the Earth Science Week staff at info@earthsciweek.org.


**NEW** Participate in International Observe the Moon Night
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Oct. 28, 2017

On Oct. 28, 2017, the whole world has the chance to admire and celebrate our moon on International Observe the Moon Night. And you can join in the fun! Visit the website to find a map of registered events and make plans to attend. If you don’t see an event near you, sign up to host your own! The website has step-by-step plans for hosting an event of any size. Ideas for hands-on activities are available to make your event a success.

To learn more, visit http://observethemoonnight.org/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/contact-us.


Fly Your Exoplanet on the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite
Audience: All Educators and Students
Submission Deadline: Nov. 20, 2017

Set to launch in June 2018, the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite is an explorer-class planet finder. In the first-ever spaceborne all-sky transit survey, TESS will identify planets ranging from Earth-sized to gas giants and will orbit a wide range of stellar types and orbital distances. As the TESS team prepares for launch, it invites the public to ponder what exoplanets might look like and share their ideas in the form of sketches and graphics.

This opportunity is open to all ages and skill levels. Submissions will be collected via email. To download the template for submitting your artwork, visit https://tess.gsfc.nasa.gov/fly_your_exoplanet.html.

The deadline for submissions is Nov. 20, 2017, or when capacity of the drive carrying the submissions to space is reached, whichever occurs first.

To learn more about the TESS mission, visit https://tess.gsfc.nasa.gov/.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to GSFC-TESS@mail.nasa.gov.


Science Opportunities for Educators of Grades K-12


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Testing Terror — Technology for Exploration: Microgravity
Audience:
6-12, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Event Date: Oct. 5, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT
Join the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. Microgravity is the condition in which people or objects appear to be weightless. Explore how microgravity is created and used for learning in space and how it also can be created and used for learning here on Earth, even in your classroom. Register online to participate. https://www.eiseverywhere.com/270982

**NEW** Testing Terror — Technology for Exploration: The Curiosity Rover
Audience:
K-12, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Event Date: Oct. 10, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT
Explore how the Curiosity rover was built to traverse the hard terrain and survive the harsh climate of Mars, as well as how we continue to keep the rover safe on Mars. This webinar will tie into several engineering design lessons aligned to Next Generation Science Standards. Register online to participate. https://www.eiseverywhere.com/279385

**NEW** Lessons From a Decade of Stratospheric Exploration: STEM in Action for Educators
Audience:
K-12, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Event Date: Oct. 11, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Learn about the Far Horizons project. Managed by the Adler Planetarium, Far Horizons has engaged students and volunteers as young as 10 years old in hands-on STEM experiences with high-altitude balloon missions. The program’s manager will discuss the amazing opportunities — and interesting challenges — high-altitude balloon missions can provide to students and educators. Register online to participate. https://www.eiseverywhere.com/282502

**NEW** Testing Terror — Technology for Exploration: Rockets to Mars
Audience:
4-8, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Event Date: Oct. 12, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT
Blast off into learning by exploring the STEM of rockets to Mars with NASA missions and classroom resources. Launch your students’ interest in forces and motion with NASA rocket activities and design challenges that include designing, building and launching simple rockets while recording and analyzing data. Register online to participate. https://www.eiseverywhere.com/270987

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


**NEW** Celebrate Earth Science Week With Resources From GLOBE
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Earth Science Week Dates: Oct. 8-14, 2017

What determines the color of your sky? Use the Elementary GLOBE Aerosol book and a suggested phenomenon-based learning progression to teach your students about aerosols, clouds and sky color. Collect and submit your observations during Earth Science Week using the GLOBE Observer app, and NASA will send you observations from Earth-observing satellites. Educators may sign up for this opportunity and receive a free classroom set of the Elementary GLOBE book titled “What’s Up in the Atmosphere? Exploring Colors in the Sky.”

To learn more, visit https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSflUo52KHfe-PLTEUli-FDRIDG7FtZ51sbtMMpLUxzqL-qdGQ/viewform.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Marilé Colón Robles at Marile.ColonRobles@nasa.gov.


Opportunities for Higher Education and Informal Institutions


2018 RASC-AL Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge Tech Demo and Engineering Design Competition
Audience: Higher Education Students and Faculty
Notice of Intent Deadline: Oct. 13, 2017
Project Plan Submission Deadline: Nov. 16, 2017

The 2018 RASC-AL Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge is an engineering design and technology demonstration contest open to full-time undergraduate and graduate students at accredited colleges and universities in the U.S. This challenge gives teams the opportunity to design and build hardware that can extract water from simulated Martian subsurface ice.

Up to 10 teams will be chosen to demonstrate their system’s water extraction capabilities in June 2018 at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia.

A notice of intent is requested by Oct. 13, 2017. Project plans are due Nov. 16, 2017.

For more information, visit http://specialedition.rascal.nianet.org.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to rascal@nianet.org.


NASA Accepting Applications for NASA Spring Internships
Audience: High School, Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Application Deadline: Oct. 17, 2017

Now is your chance to apply for exciting hands-on spring internship opportunities available at all NASA centers. High school, undergraduate and graduate students are needed to help NASA scientists and engineers with ongoing scientific and engineering research, technology development and spaceflight operations activities. Internship opportunities also exist in nontechnical areas such as communications, budget, procurement, education and human resources. NASA internships are stipend-paid and offer students mentor-directed, degree-related, NASA-relevant tasks. If you think you have what it takes to be a NASA intern, please visit https://intern.nasa.gov today to apply or to learn more about the numerous opportunities available.

The deadline for spring applications is Oct. 17, 2017!

Please submit inquiries about the NASA Internships, Fellowships, and Scholarships One Stop Shopping Initiative, or NIFS OSSI, via https://intern.nasa.gov/oic/.


Apply to Receive Free ‘Explore Science: Earth & Space 2018’ Toolkits
Audience: Children’s Museums, Science Centers, Science Museums, NASA Visitor Centers, Public Planetariums and Observatories Located in the U.S.
Application Deadline: Nov. 1, 2017

The National Informal STEM Education Network, or NISE Network, is pleased to offer free “Explore Science: Earth & Space 2018” toolkits to new and existing eligible partners in the United States. In collaboration with NASA, the NISE Network has assembled a new set of engaging, hands-on Earth and space science experiences with connections to science, technology and society. In addition to the physical toolkits, all digital materials will be available online as a free download in February 2018.

A total of 250 toolkits will be awarded to eligible organizations through a competitive application process. Eligible organizations include children’s museums, science centers, science museums, public planetariums and observatories, and NASA visitor centers located in the U.S.

Applications are due Nov. 1, 2017. To learn more, visit http://www.nisenet.org/blog/post/applications-free-physical-2018-explore-science-earth-space-toolkits-hands-activities-due.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Catherine McCarthy at cmccarthy@smm.org.


Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities
.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educators and Students Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom.
NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Visit NASA Education on the web:
NASA Office of Education: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

Did you miss last week’s NASA Education Science WOW! newsletter?
Visit the Science WOW! blog for an archive of previous messages.
https://blogs.nasa.gov/educationsciencewow/

NASA Education “Science WOW!” Message — Sept. 27, 2017

Check out the latest edition of NASA Education’s “Science WOW!” — your source for NASA opportunities in science education delivered “Weekly On Wednesday.”






Check out the latest edition of NASA Education’s “Science WOW!” — your source for NASA opportunities in science education delivered “Weekly On Wednesday.”


Science Always Starts With a Question …


This Week’s Question: Why Did the OSIRIS-REx Spacecraft Fly by Earth Last Week?

The OSIRIS-REx spacecraft is on a mission to visit the asteroid Bennu and return a piece of it to Earth. The spacecraft is set to rendezvous with Bennu in August 2018, so why did it fly by Earth on Sept. 22?

To find out, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2017/osiris-rex-spacecraft-slingshots-past-earth.


Have You Seen This?


Want to learn more about OSIRIS-REx and Asteroid Bennu? Check out the 321Science! Video Series to learn about asteroid science and details about the mission.

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL-sncRQpy4-sN0ROwD3a1oR4VivhBBm_X


Opportunities for Future Scientists of All Ages


 


Science Opportunities for Educators of Grades K-12


 


Science Opportunities for Higher Education and Informal Institutions


 


Opportunities for Future Scientists of All Ages


**NEW** Earth Science Week 2017 Contests
Audience: All Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: Oct. 13, 2017

The American Geosciences Institute is sponsoring a series of contests to celebrate Earth Science Week 2017. This year’s celebration takes place Oct. 8-14, 2017.

Earth Science Week 2017 Photography Contest — Open to All Ages
http://www.earthsciweek.org/contests/photography/index.html
Humans interact with the planet’s natural systems in many ways. With a camera, capture evidence of some ways people affect, or are affected by, Earth systems around your home, neighborhood, school, workplace, or local public spaces. In a photo, show human interaction with natural systems where you are.

Earth Science Week 2017 Visual Arts Contest — Open to K-5 Students
http://www.earthsciweek.org/contests/visualarts/index.html
The natural world is part of many things that people do. Think of where our food, clothes and homes come from. Think of the forces that shape our weather, our travels, our habits and all the things we can (and cannot) do. Create a picture that shows how human activities shape, and are shaped by, Earth systems.

Earth Science Week 2017 Essay Contest — Open to Students in Grades 6-9
http://www.earthsciweek.org/contests/essay/index.html
Earth science expands our understanding of human interaction with the planet’s natural systems and processes. Geoscientists explore the relationship between human activity and Earth’s systems. The impact of their research can be seen in areas such as energy, technology, climate change, the environment, natural disasters, industry, agriculture and tourism. Focusing on one topic, explain how geoscience helps us make the most of opportunities and manage challenges.

Earth Science Week 2017 Video Contest — Open to All Ages
http://www.earthsciweek.org/earth-connections
Explore the relationship between human activity and Earth systems, including the geosphere (earth), hydrosphere (water), atmosphere (air) and biosphere (life). Submit a brief, 30-90 second original video that tells viewers about how people have an impact on Earth systems, or how Earth systems have an impact on people, in your part of the world.

The entry deadline for all four contests is Oct. 13, 2017. Visit the contest websites for full details.

If you have any questions about these contests, please email the Earth Science Week staff at info@earthsciweek.org.


Be a Mosquito Habitat Mapper With ‘GLOBE Observer’ App
Audience: All Educators and Students
Project Dates: Now Through Nov. 10, 2017

Mosquitos are more than just a summertime nuisance — they spread diseases. Now citizen scientists can use the “GLOBE Observer” app, available for Apple and Android phones, to help those who are working to understand and reduce mosquito-borne diseases. The Mosquito Habitat Mapper helps users identify and eliminate mosquito breeding sites. This local, ground-based information will help NASA by supporting satellite-based research of environmental conditions that indicate possible outbreaks of mosquitoes.

To learn more, visit https://www.globe.gov/news-events/globe-news/newsdetail/globe/nasa-citizen-science-app-tackles-mosquito-borne-disease.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Holli Riebeek at Holli.riebeek@nasa.gov.


Science Opportunities for Educators of Grades K-12


NASA Mars Science: MAVEN Outreach Webinar — Deep Dips: Designing a Mission Orbiter
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Sept. 27, 2017, 7 p.m. EDT

Join the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution, or MAVEN, mission team for a professional development webinar for formal and informal educators, troop leaders, museum docents, and others interested in MAVEN and Mars science.

The MAVEN spacecraft has been orbiting Mars since 2014, making periodic “deep dips” to sample Mars’ upper atmosphere. Guy Beutelschies from Lockheed Martin will discuss the challenges engineers face in designing missions like MAVEN for success.

For more information, visit http://lasp.colorado.edu/home/maven/education-outreach/maven-outreach-webinars/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to epomail@lasp.colorado.edu.


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

**NEW** There’s Space in Your Classroom for Cross-Curricular: The Math of Climate Science
Audience:
5-12, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Event Date: Sept. 28, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT
Explore several activities on how climate change can be measured using simple math. NASA makes climate data available to students, meaning your classroom can download and manipulate real data to construct arguments about our global impact. Register online to participate. https://www.eiseverywhere.com/279384

**NEW** Testing Terror — Technology for Exploration: BEST GPIM
Audience:
K-12, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Event Date: Oct. 3, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Join the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar to learn about how technology drives exploration. Using the NASA Beginning Engineering Science and Technology (BEST) curriculum, participants will learn how to use the engineering design process to build a satellite and test green propellant. Participants also will learn about current research at NASA, specifically the Green Propellant Infusion Mission. Register online to participate. https://www.eiseverywhere.com/281494

**NEW** Testing Terror — Technology for Exploration: Microgravity
Audience:
6-12, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Event Date: Oct. 5, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT
Join the NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University for a free 60-minute webinar. Microgravity is the condition in which people or objects appear to be weightless. Explore how microgravity is created and used for learning in space and how it also can be created and used for learning here on Earth, even in your classroom. Register online to participate. https://www.eiseverywhere.com/270982

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


Become a Member of the Infiniscope Education Advisory Board
Audience: Formal and Informal Educators of Grades 5-12
Application Deadline: Sept. 29, 2017

The Arizona State University Infiniscope Project (under cooperative agreement with NASA’s Science Mission Directorate) aims to recruit individuals with enthusiasm and ambition for a renewable, one-year term from 2017-2018 on its advisory board. Board members will review Infiniscope-developed educational products and receive a stipend, training, collaborative space, and recognition on the Infiniscope website. Board members also will have opportunities to earn badges and attend group meet-ups at national conventions.

For more information, visit https://infiniscope.org/announcements/educator-advisory-board-application/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Jessica Swann at jlswann@asu.edu.


Solar System Ambassadors Program Accepting Applications
Audience: All Educators
Application Period: Sept. 1-30, 2017

The Solar System Ambassadors Program, a nationwide network of space enthusiast volunteers, is seeking highly motivated individuals to represent NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory as volunteer Solar System Ambassadors to the public. Enthusiasts nationwide are eligible — and those in Arkansas, Delaware, Idaho, Iowa, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont, West Virginia, Wyoming, the District of Columbia and U.S. territories are especially encouraged to apply.

Applications will be accepted Sept. 1-30, 2017. For more information, visit https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/ssa/home.cfm.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to ambassad@jpl.nasa.gov.

 


Opportunities for Higher Education and Informal Institutions


NASA Internships, Fellowships, and Scholarships Virtual Career Summit
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Event Date: Sept. 27, 2017, 1-2:30 p.m. EDT

Join the NASA Internships, Fellowships, and Scholarships recruiting team for this event showcasing the NIFS programs as well as highlighting the different types of available opportunities. Participants will learn about NASA opportunities, eligibility requirements and tips for the application process. Previous and current interns will share their experiences. The session will allow students to ask questions and have them answered live by NASA professionals.

For more information and to register to attend, visit http://bit.ly/2x9oZJp.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to https://intern.nasa.gov/oic/.


2018 BIG Idea Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Students and Faculty
Notice of Intent Deadline: Oct. 1, 2017
Entry Deadline: Nov. 30, 2017

NASA’s 2018 Breakthrough, Innovative and Game-changing (BIG) Idea Challenge is an engineering design contest open to full-time undergraduate and graduate students. This competition seeks innovations in the design, installation and sustainable operation of a large solar power system on Mars. Top teams present their concepts via a design review at either NASA’s Langley Research Center in Virginia or NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Ohio. The winning team will receive NASA internship offers.

A notice of intent is requested by Oct. 1, 2017. Entries are due Nov. 30, 2017.

For more information, visit http://BigIdea.nianet.org.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to BigIdea@nianet.org.


NASA Accepting Applications for NASA Spring Internships
Audience: High School, Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Application Deadline: Oct. 17, 2017

Now is your chance to apply for exciting hands-on spring internship opportunities available at all NASA centers. High school, undergraduate and graduate students are needed to help NASA scientists and engineers with ongoing scientific and engineering research, technology development and spaceflight operations activities. Internship opportunities also exist in nontechnical areas such as communications, budget, procurement, education and human resources. NASA internships are stipend-paid and offer students mentor-directed, degree-related, NASA-relevant tasks. If you think you have what it takes to be a NASA intern, please visit https://intern.nasa.gov today to apply or to learn more about the numerous opportunities available.

The deadline for spring applications is Oct. 17, 2017!

Please submit inquiries about the NASA Internships, Fellowships, and Scholarships One Stop Shopping Initiative, or NIFS OSSI, via https://intern.nasa.gov/oic/.


Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities
.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educators and Students Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom.
NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Visit NASA Education on the web:
NASA Office of Education: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

Did you miss last week’s NASA Education Science WOW! newsletter?
Visit the Science WOW! blog for an archive of previous messages.
https://blogs.nasa.gov/educationsciencewow/

NASA Education “Science WOW!” Message — Aug. 9, 2017

Check out the latest edition of NASA Education’s “Science WOW!” — your source for NASA opportunities in science education delivered “Weekly On Wednesday.”






Check out the latest edition of NASA Education’s “Science WOW!” — your source for NASA opportunities in science education delivered “Weekly On Wednesday.”


Science Always Starts With a Question …


This Week’s Question: What Will This Year’s Perseid Meteor Shower Be Like?

August 2017 is a big month for astronomy! In addition to the solar eclipse on Aug. 21, the Perseid meteor shower is set to peak on Aug. 11-13, 2017. Find out what to expect from this year’s event in this blog post from NASA meteor expert Bill Cooke.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/Watch_the_Skies/2017/08/03/the-greatest-meteor-show-of-all-time/

And to learn more about the Perseid meteor shower and the solar eclipse, check out the newest episode of ScienceCast at https://science.nasa.gov/science-news/sciencecasts/big-month-for-astronomy.


Have You Seen This?


NASA is on the hunt for a new Planetary Protection Officer, and space fans of all ages are excited about the position. Nine-year-old Jack Davis “applied” for the job, and NASA’s science team was quick to respond.

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/planetary-protection-excites-space-fans-of-all-ages


Solar Eclipse Countdown!


Less Than TWO WEEKS Until the Total Solar Eclipse!

Diagram of a total solar eclipseAs excitement for the total solar eclipse builds, be sure you know what to expect on the big day! Get the “Who? What? Where? When? and How?” before the eclipse on Aug. 21!

https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/eclipse-who-what-where-when-and-how


Science WOW! Thanks Subscribers on First Anniversary


On Aug. 10, 2016, the first Science WOW! message was sent to 953 subscribers.

Since that date, NASA’s science experts found distant worlds, shared views from space probes that zoomed near Saturn and Jupiter, and launched satellites that help us better understand our home planet. And the number of Science WOW! subscribers multiplied to near 7,000!

NASA’s STEM Science Activation team wants to thank YOU for being a part of our first year of Science WOW! We hope you have enjoyed learning answers to the “Question of the Week” and exploring the “Have You Seen” items featured each week. And we can’t wait to share more science and learning opportunities with you in the many years to follow.

How can we improve sharing the science? Please send your feedback to https://science.nasa.gov/about-us/contact-us.


Opportunities for Future Scientists of All Ages



Science Opportunities for Educators of Grades K-12



Science Opportunities for Higher Education and Informal Institutions


 


Opportunities for Future Scientists of All Ages


ESTEEM Virtual “Ask US” Event: Exploring the Eclipse Through a Native American Perspective
Audience: Members of Tribal and Indigenous Communities
Event Date: Aug. 10, 2017, 4 – 5:15 p.m. EDT

On Aug. 21, 2017, North America will be treated to a solar eclipse. Native Americans have been observing natural events such as eclipses for thousands of years.

Join the ESTEEM team on Aug. 10, 2017, at 4 p.m. EDT, as we preview materials, answer science questions, and allow for dialogue related to Native American knowledge about the eclipse. What is actually happening to the sun during an eclipse? What Tribal traditions take place in our region? Discover how to bring the eclipse to life through the lens of a Native American perspective.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln/live.

Please direct questions about this event to Bonnie Murray at bonnie.murray@nasa.gov.


**NEW** Safety First! Solar Eclipse Safety Tips From NASA
Audience: All Educators and Students
Eclipse Date: Monday, Aug. 21, 2017

Potentially, more than 300 million people in the United States could directly view the Aug. 21 total solar eclipse, and NASA wants everyone who witnesses the eclipse to do so safely. Looking at the sun with the naked eye is unsafe, but with special solar filters, such as eclipse glasses or a handheld solar viewer, you can safely look directly at the sun. Learn how to check the safety authenticity of viewing glasses or find out how to observe the eclipse with alternate methods.

For tips to safely view the solar eclipse, visit https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/safety.

Please send questions about the solar eclipse to https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/contact-us.


**NEW** NASA’s Digital Learning Network Live Event — E-Day 2017: Total Solar Eclipse Webcast
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Aug. 21, 2017, 1:15 – 3:15 p.m. EDT

Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network for a two-hour solar eclipse extravaganza! Tune in to see the eclipse live from within the path of totality and learn about the science of the sun-Earth-moon system. Watch CricketCam and make predictions. Find out how to get involved in NASA opportunities.

Ask NASA experts your questions via Twitter @NASADLN using #askDLN or by email at DLiNfochannel@gmail.com.

For more information about this event, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln/live.

Please direct questions about this event to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com.


**NEW** Be a Citizen Scientist During the Solar Eclipse With ‘GLOBE Observer’ App
Audience: All Educators and Students
Eclipse Date: Aug. 21, 2017

Earth is solar-powered. So what happens when the sun’s light is blocked, even temporarily? If you measure air temperature and cloud changes, how cool is the eclipse?

Download the “GLOBE Observer” app, available for Apple and Android phones, and contribute to a citizen science database used by scientists and students to study the effects of eclipses on the atmosphere. Observations are welcome from across North America, even if you are not in the path of totality.

To learn more, visit https://observer.globe.gov/eclipse2017.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Holli Riebeek at Holli.riebeek@nasa.gov.


**NEW** Space Racers Solar Eclipse Content for Young Children
Audience: Pre-K and Kindergarten Educators and Students
Eclipse Date: Aug. 21, 2017

Find everything you need to know about viewing the upcoming solar eclipse with pre-K and Kindergarten students. Watch a short video that explains the science behind solar eclipses in language and graphics designed specifically for young learners. Young explorers can view a U.S. map that illustrates the path of totality, and do a hands-on eclipse activity.

To learn more, visit https://augusteclipse.com/.

All materials were developed in conjunction with The U.S. Space & Rocket Center and the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry. Please direct questions about these materials to info@spaceracers.org.


**NEW** Be a Mosquito Habitat Mapper With ‘GLOBE Observer’ App
Audience: All Educators and Students
Project Dates: Now Through Nov. 10, 2017

Mosquitos are more than just a summertime nuisance — they spread diseases. Now citizen scientists can use the “GLOBE Observer” app, available for Apple and Android phones, to help those who are working to understand and reduce mosquito-borne diseases. The Mosquito Habitat Mapper helps users identify and eliminate mosquito breeding sites. This local, ground-based information will help NASA by supporting satellite-based research of environmental conditions that indicate possible outbreaks of mosquitoes.

To learn more, visit https://www.globe.gov/news-events/globe-news/newsdetail/globe/nasa-citizen-science-app-tackles-mosquito-borne-disease.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Holli Riebeek at Holli.riebeek@nasa.gov.


Science Opportunities for Educators of Grades K-12


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

**NEW** Exploring Beyond the Planets: Searching for Habitable Worlds With Kepler
Audience: 4-10, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Event Date: Aug. 9, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Explore planet Kepler-452b, the first near-Earth-size world to be found in the habitable zone of a star that is similar to our sun. While this location doesn’t mean that the planet is inhabited, it does mean that it has many of the same characteristics as our own Earth-sun system, and the odds of it hosting life are worth further exploration. Register online to participate. https://www.eiseverywhere.com/254531

**NEW** Exploring Beyond the Planets: Our Eyes on the Universe
Audience:
5-12, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Event Date: Aug. 10, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT
Learn how space telescopes are our “eyes on the universe” that expand our view and understanding of the solar system and beyond. The Hubble Space Telescope, the James Webb Space Telescope and the electromagnetic spectrum will be explored. NASA STEM lessons, online resources and teaching strategies will be integrated. Register online to participate. https://www.eiseverywhere.com/265075

**NEW** Exploring Beyond the Planets: Water Worlds
Audience:
K-12, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Event Date: Aug. 15, 2017, at 8 p.m. EDT
Explore a number of activities related to the water worlds Enceladus and Europa. These moons, consisting of huge liquid-water oceans, represent an exciting opportunity to contextualize science, mathematics and art standards in the classroom. Register online to participate https://www.eiseverywhere.com/269397

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


Get Ready for the 2017 Solar Eclipse With NASA Resources
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Date: Aug. 21, 2017

On Aug. 21, 2017, the United States will experience a solar eclipse! This celestial event will provide a golden opportunity to engage and educate diverse audiences, and NASA has the resources to help.

Along a path 60 to 70 miles wide stretching from Oregon to South Carolina, observers will be able to see a total solar eclipse. Others across North America will see a partial eclipse. The event will happen around lunch time across the country. For an interactive map with timing information along the path of the eclipse, visit http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEgoogle/SEgoogle2001/SE2017Aug21Tgoogle.html.

Visit the following websites to find additional information and resources, including:
— Tips for safely viewing the solar eclipse.
— Recorded interviews with NASA scientists, mission specialists and eclipse path communities.
— Topical online eclipse videos, featuring a variety of STEM and cultural topics.
— Social media community development and networking.
— Mobile educational eclipse applications.
— Public challenges and engagement activities.
— 2-D and 3-D printing exercises for K-16 students.
— Citizen science campaigns in partnership with NASA mission observations.
— Adjunct activities and educational resources.
— Live streaming of observations and programming.

Total Eclipse 2017 — Through the Eyes of NASA
http://eclipse2017.nasa.gov

Eclipses and Transits
http://www.nasa.gov/eclipse


Free Eclipse Digital Experience Available from NASA and Infiniscope
Audience: Grades 5-12 and Informal Educators
Eclipse Date: Aug. 21, 2017

Introduce your students and informal audiences to an entirely new type of learning experience with “Eclipse 2017” from NASA and Infiniscope. Aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards, the experience presents NASA’s “Eyes on the Solar System” visualization embedded within the immersive digital learning environment of Infiniscope. Learners will explore the Earth-moon-sun system; learn about shadows at the astronomical level; and predict the eclipse’s path of totality.

For more information, visit https://infiniscope.education/lesson/eclipse-2017/.

Please direct questions about this resource to Jessica Swann at jlswann@asu.edu.


Opportunities for Higher Education and Informal Institutions


**NEW** Register to Host: NASA’s Digital Learning Network Live Event — E-Day 2017: Total Solar Eclipse Webcast
Audience: Museums and Educational Institutions
Registration Deadline: Aug. 10, 2017
Event Date: Aug. 21, 2017, 1:15 – 3:15 p.m. EDT

NASA’s Digital Learning Network is looking for museums and other educational institutions to host a live virtual event in conjunction with the total solar eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017. Host venues will connect with NASA for a two-hour solar eclipse extravaganza. A limited number of sites will be selected to participate in the LIVE event, and participants will ask questions of our experts directly. All sites must register and complete a technical test no later than Aug. 10, 2017.

For more information, visit http://bit.ly/DLN_E-Day. Please direct questions about this opportunity to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com.


New 2017 Solar Eclipse Resources Available for Public Libraries
Audience: Librarians and Informal Educators

The total solar eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017, is quickly approaching! To help you prepare for the big event, STAR_Net has developed educational resources to assist libraries in creating promotional and program materials for events surrounding the eclipse.

Funded by the NASA@ My Library program, these materials include images, videos, posters, activities, webinars and more! Here are just a few highlights of what is available:

2017 Solar Eclipse Guide: This eclipse information booklet may be downloaded free by anyone at http://www.starnetlibraries.org/EclipseGuide/. The 24-page booklet includes background information on eclipses, times when the eclipse is visible over different parts of the country, safe viewing techniques, suggestions for good outreach partners for libraries, and more.

Online Course About the Sun and the 2017 Solar Eclipse: This course is perfect for librarians who want more extensive background information on how and why astronomers study the sun. It is a five-meeting course, and the last “class” is all about eclipse day. Check it out at http://www.starnetlibraries.org/2017eclipse/eclipse-resource-center/educational-resources/online-course/.

Eclipse-related STEM Clearinghouse Activities: Find fun, hands-on activities to bring the science behind the eclipse to life! Activities are available for a wide range of ages and interest areas. Learn more at http://clearinghouse.starnetlibraries.org/index.php?id_category=124&controller=category.

Eclipse Resources Forum:
Share ideas and brainstorm with other librarians about eclipse programming and events. Join the discussion at http://www.starnetlibraries.org/forums/forum/eclipse-resources-forum/.

Please direct questions about these resources to Anne Holland at aholland@spacescience.com.

For more information about STAR_Net, visit http://www.starnetlibraries.org/.

Looking for more information about the 2017 solar eclipse? Visit NASA’s eclipse website at https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/.


NASA Accepting Applications for NASA Spring Internships
Audience: High School, Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Application Deadline: Oct. 17, 2017

Now is your chance to apply for exciting hands-on spring internship opportunities available at all NASA centers. High school, undergraduate and graduate students are needed to help NASA scientists and engineers with ongoing scientific and engineering research, technology development and spaceflight operations activities. Internship opportunities also exist in nontechnical areas such as communications, budget, procurement, education and human resources. NASA internships are stipend-paid and offer students mentor-directed, degree-related, NASA-relevant tasks. If you think you have what it takes to be a NASA intern, please visit https://intern.nasa.gov today to apply or to learn more about the numerous opportunities available.

The deadline for spring applications is Oct. 17, 2017!

Please submit inquiries about the NASA Internships, Fellowships, and Scholarships One Stop Shopping Initiative, or NIFS OSSI, via https://intern.nasa.gov/oic/.


Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities
.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educators and Students Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom.
NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Visit NASA Education on the web:
NASA Office of Education: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

Did you miss last week’s NASA Education Science WOW! newsletter?
Visit the Science WOW! blog for an archive of previous messages.
https://blogs.nasa.gov/educationsciencewow/

NASA Education “Science WOW!” Message — July 12, 2017

Check out the latest edition of NASA Education’s “Science WOW!” — your source for NASA opportunities in science education delivered “Weekly On Wednesday.”






Check out the latest edition of NASA Education’s “Science WOW!” — your source for NASA opportunities in science education delivered “Weekly On Wednesday.”


Science Always Starts With a Question …


This Week’s Question: Where Is Juno?

Earlier this week, the Juno spacecraft flew directly over Jupiter’s Great Red Spot, the gas giant’s iconic 10,000-mile-wide (16,000-kilometer-wide) storm. Visit the link below to see Juno’s current position!

https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/juno/where


Have You Seen This?


Learn more about the Juno mission to Jupiter and what scientists hope to learn as the spacecraft gets closer to Jupiter than any mission ever before! Bill Nye explains what makes Jupiter a treacherous and curious place in the “Why With Nye — Mission to Jupiter” video series.

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/learn/video/why-with-nye-mission-to-jupiter/


Solar Eclipse Countdown!


Two mobile devices displaying the Total Solar Eclipse 2017 AppLess Than Six Weeks Until the Total Solar Eclipse!

Download the Total Solar Eclipse 2017 App for access to live video streams of the total solar eclipse!

To learn more, visit https://www.exploratorium.edu/explore/apps/total-solar-eclipse-app.

 

 


Opportunities for Future Scientists of All Ages



Science Opportunities for Educators of Grades K-12



Science Opportunities for Higher Education and Informal Institutions


 


Opportunities for Future Scientists of All Ages


2017 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education
Next Lecture Date: July 13 and July 14, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)

The Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, named after the founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and presented by JPL’s Office of Communication and Education, shares the excitement of the space program’s missions, instruments and other technologies.

Lectures take place twice per month, on consecutive Thursdays and Fridays. The Thursday lectures take place in JPL’s Theodore von Kármán Auditorium, and Friday lectures take place at Pasadena City College’s Vosloh Forum. Both start at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT). Admission and parking are free for all lectures. No reservations are required, but seating is limited. The Thursday evening lectures are streamed live for viewing online. Archives of past lectures are also available online.

Next Lecture in the Series:

Five Years of Exploring Gale Crater With the Curiosity Mars Rover
Event Date:
July 13 and July 14, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2017&month=7
Nearly five years after its celebrated arrival at Mars, the Curiosity rover continues to reveal Mars as a once-habitable planet. Early in the planet’s history, generations of streams and lakes created the landforms that Curiosity explores today. Join James Erickson and Dr. Ashwin Vasavada, mission team members from the Mars Science Laboratory, for a discussion about the latest findings from the mission, the challenges of exploration with an aging robot, and what lies ahead.

For more information about the Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, including a complete list of upcoming lectures, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.php.

Questions about this series should be directed to http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php.


NASA Seeks Creative Arts Inspired by Cassini’s Mission to Saturn
Audience: All Educators and Students Ages 13 and Older

During nearly two decades in space, Cassini has inspired people on Earth. Cassini has sent home thousands of images of icy moons and resplendent rings. It helped discover erupting water geysers on Enceladus and seas of methane on Titan. It showed us a view of Earth as a blue dot.

Now the mission is moving toward its “Grand Finale,” and in September 2017 it will finally draw to a dramatic end. NASA’s Cassini team would like to know this: How has Cassini inspired you?

Visit the Cassini Inspires website to explore images and more from the mission. Then use inspiration to get creative. Write a poem. Paint a picture. Choreograph a dance. Tell a story. The possibilities are endless!

Share your creation with the NASA Cassini team on the social media platform of your choice, such as Instagram, YouTube, Facebook, Twitter or others. Tag it #CassiniInspires. Or send it directly to cassinimission@jpl.nasa.gov.

To learn more, visit https://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/cassiniinspires/.


Science Opportunities for Educators of Grades K-12


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

**NEW** Lava Layering: Making and Mapping a Volcano
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-8
Event Date: July 13, 2017, at 8 p.m. EDT
Participants will be introduced to an activity that focuses on interpreting geologic history through volcano formation and excavation. Baking soda, vinegar and play dough are used to model fluid lava flows. Various colors of play dough identify different eruption events. The activity challenges students to do the following:

  1. Construct a model of a volcano.
    2. Produce lava flows.
    3. Observe, draw, record, and interpret the history and stratigraphy of a volcano produced by other students.
    4. Make the connection between the life cycle of a volcano and see these features on Earth and Mars.

Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/261971

**NEW** Solar Eclipse: Edible Experiments/The Great American Eclipse/Eclipse Book Reviews
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: July 17, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Explore resources for making edible models to teach about lunar and solar eclipses. Browse websites with hands-on activities on subjects such as protection from UV rays. Learn about a collection of children’s literature to use for studying the eclipse. These activities will be great for summer camps and back-to-school events before the solar eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017. Register online to participate. https://www.eiseverywhere.com/263976

**NEW** Solar Eclipse: Guest Scientist — High-Altitude Ballooning
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: July 18, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Get an overview of high-altitude ballooning during eclipses with Bernhard Beck-Winchatz from the STEM Studies Department at DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois. Beck-Winchatz has worked on several NASA projects using weather balloon flights that provide affordable access to a spacelike environment for student research. Register online to participate. https://www.eiseverywhere.com/263980

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


NASA Education Workshop at Glenn Research Center — Modeling the Solar Eclipse
Audience: K-12 Educators
Workshop Date: July 25, 2017, 8:30 a.m. EDT

On Aug. 21, 2017, the United States will experience a solar eclipse. This event will provide an excellent opportunity to engage and educate diverse audiences, and NASA has the resources to help.

Join the Office of Education at NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, for a STEM educator workshop on July 25, 2017. Participants will be introduced to problem-based-inquiry learning activities related to the solar eclipse. Learn how to bring STEM challenges and the adventure of space exploration to students in the classroom.

For full event details and registration information, visit https://www.eiseverywhere.com/ehome/index.php?eventid=237940&.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Stephanie Brown-Houston at sdbrown-houston@nasa.gov.


Get Ready for the 2017 Solar Eclipse With NASA Resources
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Date: Aug. 21, 2017

On Aug. 21, 2017, the United States will experience a solar eclipse! This celestial event will provide a golden opportunity to engage and educate diverse audiences, and NASA has the resources to help.

Along a path 60 to 70 miles wide stretching from Oregon to South Carolina, observers will be able to see a total solar eclipse. Others across North America will see a partial eclipse. The event will happen around lunch time across the country. For an interactive map with timing information along the path of the eclipse, visit http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEgoogle/SEgoogle2001/SE2017Aug21Tgoogle.html.

Visit the following websites to find additional information and resources, including:
— Tips for safely viewing the solar eclipse.
— Recorded interviews with NASA scientists, mission specialists and eclipse path communities.
— Topical online eclipse videos, featuring a variety of STEM and cultural topics.
— Social media community development and networking.
— Mobile educational eclipse applications.
— Public challenges and engagement activities.
— 2-D and 3-D printing exercises for K-16 students.
— Citizen science campaigns in partnership with NASA mission observations.
— Adjunct activities and educational resources.
— Live streaming of observations and programming.

Total Eclipse 2017 — Through the Eyes of NASA
http://eclipse2017.nasa.gov

Eclipses and Transits
http://www.nasa.gov/eclipse

 


Opportunities for Higher Education and Informal Institutions


**NEW** Now Accepting Applications for NASA Spring Internships
Audience: High School, Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Application Deadline: Oct. 17, 2017

Now is your chance to apply for exciting hands-on spring internship opportunities available at all NASA centers. High school, undergraduate and graduate students are needed to help NASA scientists and engineers with ongoing scientific and engineering research, technology development and spaceflight operations activities. Internship opportunities also exist in nontechnical areas such as communications, budget, procurement, education and human resources. NASA internships are stipend-paid and offer students mentor-directed, degree-related, NASA-relevant tasks. If you think you have what it takes to be a NASA intern, please visit https://intern.nasa.gov today to apply or to learn more about the numerous opportunities available.

The deadline for spring applications is Oct. 17, 2017!

Please submit inquiries about the NASA Internships, Fellowships, and Scholarships One Stop Shopping Initiative, or NIFS OSSI, via https://intern.nasa.gov/oic/.


Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities
.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educators and Students Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom.
NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Visit NASA Education on the web:
NASA Office of Education: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

Did you miss last week’s NASA Education Science WOW! newsletter?
Visit the Science WOW! blog for an archive of previous messages.
https://blogs.nasa.gov/educationsciencewow/

NASA Education “Science WOW!” Message — May 10, 2017

Check out the latest edition of NASA Education’s “Science WOW!” — your source for NASA opportunities in science education delivered “Weekly On Wednesday.”






Check out the latest edition of NASA Education’s “Science WOW!” — your source for NASA opportunities in science education delivered “Weekly On Wednesday.”


Science Always Starts With a Question …


This Week’s Question: How Long Is a Day on Mars?

Is a day on the Red Planet longer or shorter than a day on Earth? Find this answer and other Mars facts at https://mars.nasa.gov/allaboutmars/facts/.


Have You Seen This?


NASA is embarking on a journey to Mars! Are your students ready to join in the adventure? Spark excitement in your classroom with the Mars Survival Kit, a collection of educational activities for students in grades K-12.

Start your classroom’s journey to Mars at http://go.nasa.gov/1NnZ0Rg.

 


Opportunities for Future Scientists of All Ages



Science Opportunities for Educators of Grades K-12



Science Opportunities for Higher Education and Informal Institutions


 


Opportunities for Future Scientists of All Ages


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Special Event With Beth Nielsen Chapman and Rocky Alvey
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-12
Event Date: May 18, 2017, at 11 a.m. EDT

Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network on May 18, 2017, at 11 a.m. EDT for a special live event to celebrate the 100th anniversary of NASA’s Langley Research Center. The event will feature Grammy-nominated songwriter Beth Nielsen Chapman and fellow songwriter Rocky Alvey.

Beth Nielsen Chapman has released nine solo albums and written seven #1 hits. Her songs have been recorded by many artists including Bonnie Raitt, Willie Nelson, Bette Midler, Elton John, Keb Mo’, Indigo Girls and Faith Hill. In 2012, Chapman released “The Mighty Sky,” a Grammy-nominated astronomy CD for kids of all ages. This work was featured during NASA’s 2012 Summer of Innovation program to inspire students to learn about the universe and their place in it and to pursue STEM studies.

Rocky Alvey is director of the Vanderbilt Dyer Observatory and is also a songwriter. His collaborations with Nielsen on “The Mighty Sky” album include writing lyrics and developing lesson plans based on the songs and their content.

Those tuning in to the webcast may ask questions via email at dlinfochannel@gmail.com and via social media using #askDLN.

To learn more about this event, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln/live.

For information about other DLN events, visit http://www.nasa.gov/dln.

Please send any questions about this opportunity to dlinfochannel@gmail.com.


Student Spaceflight Experiments Program — Mission 12 to the International Space Station
Audience: School Districts Serving Grades 5-12, Informal Education Institutions, Colleges and Universities
Inquiry Deadline: May 31, 2017
Start Date: September 5, 2017

The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education and the Arthur C. Clarke Institute for Space Education announce a science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, opportunity for school districts across the U.S. and space station partner nations. The newest flight opportunity, Mission 12 to the International Space Station, gives students across a community the ability to design and propose real experiments to fly in low Earth orbit on the space station. This opportunity is part of the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program, or SSEP.

Each participating community will receive a microgravity research mini-laboratory capable of supporting a single microgravity experiment and all launch services to fly the minilab to the space station in spring/summer 2018 and return it to Earth. An experiment design competition in each community — engaging typically 300+ students — allows student teams to design and propose real experiments vying for their community′s reserved mini-lab.

Content resources for teachers and students support foundational instruction on science in microgravity and experimental design. Additional SSEP programming uses the experiment design competition to engage the community in embracing a learning-community model for STEM education.

This competition is open to students in grades 5-12 and college. Informal education groups and organizations also are encouraged to participate. Interested communities must inquire about the program no later than May 31, 2017. The National Center for Earth and Space Science Education is available to help interested communities in the U.S. secure the needed funding.

To learn more about this opportunity, visit the “SSEP Mission 12 to International Space Station” National Announcement of Opportunity at http://ssep.ncesse.org/2017/03/new-flight-opportunity-for-school-districts-announcing-student-spaceflight-experiments-program-ssep-mission-12-to-the-international-space-station-starting-september-2017/.

SSEP is enabled through a strategic partnership with DreamUp PBC and NanoRacks LLC working with NASA under a Space Act Agreement as part of the use of the International Space Station as a national laboratory. The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (http://www.iss-casis.org/) is a national partner of SSEP. To view a list of all SSEP national partners, visit http://ssep.ncesse.org/national-partners/.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please email SSEP National Program Director Jeff Goldstein at jeffgoldstein@ncesse.org.


NASA Seeks Creative Arts Inspired by Cassini’s Mission to Saturn
Audience: All Educators and Students Ages 13 and Older

During nearly two decades in space, Cassini has inspired people on Earth. Cassini has sent home thousands of images of icy moons and resplendent rings. It helped discover erupting water geysers on Enceladus and seas of methane on Titan. It showed us a view of Earth as a blue dot.

Now the mission is moving toward its “Grand Finale,” and in September 2017 it will finally draw to a dramatic end. NASA’s Cassini team would like to know this: How has Cassini inspired you?

Visit the Cassini Inspires website to explore images and more from the mission. Then use inspiration to get creative. Write a poem. Paint a picture. Choreograph a dance. Tell a story. The possibilities are endless!

Share your creation with the NASA Cassini team on the social media platform of your choice, such as Instagram, YouTube, Facebook, Twitter or others. Tag it #CassiniInspires. Or send it directly to cassinimission@jpl.nasa.gov.

To learn more, visit https://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/cassiniinspires/.

 


Science Opportunities for Educators of Grades K-12


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Picking Up STEAM: Using Models to Understand the Solar Eclipse
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: May 10, 2017, at 5 p.m. EDT
Participants will be introduced to problem-based inquiry learning activities related to the solar eclipse. Learn how to bring STEM challenges and the adventure of space exploration to students in the classroom. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/237938

**NEW** International Space Station — Off the Earth, For the Earth: Exploring the Extreme
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-8
Event Date: May 11, 2017, at 6 p.m. EDT
Explore the over-50-year history of spacewalking. Investigate the critical role of spacewalks in human space exploration, the harsh space environment endured during spacewalks, and how spacesuits are designed to protect astronauts from the space environment. NASA STEM classroom lessons, online resources and teaching strategies will be integrated into this “walking with the stars” webinar. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/235769

**NEW** International Space Station — Off the Earth, For the Earth: One-Year Crew
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: May 16, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Educators will explore the STEM on Station website and celebrate the “One-Year Crew” and their yearlong mission on board the International Space Station. Participants will receive NASA “STEM on Station” resources, lesson plans, videos and education news to help bring space into the classroom. Learn about astronaut Scott Kelly’s Year in Space mission, including the 10,944 sunrises and sunsets that transpired during his mission, his need for more than 700 hours of exercise to keep strong, and his drinking 730 liters of recycled urine and sweat. Educators will be presented with hands-on, standard-aligned activities that they can take back to the classroom to inspire their students. The activities will involve radiation, sleep restraints, solar energy and space food. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/244258

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


Take Your Students on a Series of Virtual Field Trips!
Audience: Grades 6-12 — Students and Educators, Formal and Informal
Next Event Date: May 18, 2017, 2 p.m. CDT

Bring your students along on a series of virtual field trips to NASA centers where students will go behind-the-scenes to see cool NASA places and visit with NASA professionals. Each session is 15-30 minutes long and includes an interactive question-and-answer session. Pre-registration is not required.

Upcoming virtual field trips include:

Adventures in Aeronautics — May 18, 2017, 9 a.m. CDT
Learn about high-flying careers with NASA Aircraft Operations. Join Mallory Yates, aerospace engineer, and Angela Bauer, deputy engineering branch chief of the Aircraft Operations Division, for a behind-the-scenes look at aviation at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas.

Fun With Technology — May 22, 2017, 10 a.m. CDT
Take a virtual field trip to NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. Go behind-the-scenes with NASA intern Kaitlin Lostroscio to learn about NASA robotics.

These virtual field trips are a series of events offered to students and teachers as a component of “The Search for STEMnauts” — a virtual scavenger hunt where student teams in grades 6-12 solve puzzles, unravel riddles, break codes and make weekly virtual field trips to exclusive NASA locations. Student teams can even check out where they stand among the competition by following real-time updates on “The Search for STEMnauts” website!

This interactive, technical twist on a traditional scavenger hunt is offered through a partnership between NASA’s STEM on Station and Texas Instruments to provide students with a fun way to learn important STEM skills including coding and problem solving.

All students and educators (grades 6-12) are invited to participate in any virtual field trip offered. Participation in “The Search for STEMnauts” competition is not required. To learn more about these virtual field trips, including links to join in, go to https://education.ti.com/NASAliveevents.

For more information about “The Search for STEMnauts,” including how to register, visit www.STEMnauts.com.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Kelly McCormick at Kelly.mccormick-1@nasa.gov.


NASA Mars Science: MAVEN Outreach Webinar — Mars and Venus: Terrestrial Analogues for Exoplanets
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Event Date: May 24, 2017, 7 p.m. EDT

MAVEN Outreach Webinars are virtual gatherings of team members from the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution, or MAVEN, mission to offer professional development for formal and informal educators, troop leaders, museum docents, and others interested in MAVEN and Mars science.

Join the MAVEN team on May 24, 2017, at 7 p.m. EDT, for the Mars and Venus: Terrestrial Analogues for Exoplanets webinar. Learn about ways the MAVEN mission may help scientists understand how the atmospheres of other rocky worlds are also being eroded. Dr. Shannon Curry from the University of California Berkeley will discuss how planetary bodies such as Mars and Venus can be used to provide insight into how atmospheres evolve, as scientists model (and begin to observe directly) the atmospheres of exoplanets.

For more information, visit http://lasp.colorado.edu/home/maven/education-outreach/maven-outreach-webinars/.

Questions about this webinar should be directed to epomail@lasp.colorado.edu.

 


Opportunities for Higher Education and Informal Institutions


NASA Fundamental Physics Workshop 2017
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Deadline: May 17, 2017
Workshop Dates: May 31-June 2, 2017

The NASA Fundamental Physics Workshop 2017 will be held May 31-June 2, 2017, in Santa Barbara, California.

The workshop will provide a forum for NASA fundamental physics investigators to present results and discuss research ideas for future space experimentation with interested international and U.S. colleagues. Topic areas include atomic and molecular physics; fundamental forces and symmetries; dusty plasma physics; and condensed matter physics.

All interested scientists and researchers are invited to participate. The participation of the current NASA-funded investigators is strongly encouraged and kindly requested.

The deadline to register to attend the workshop is May 17, 2017. For more information and to register to attend, visit http://icpi.nasaprs.com/fpw2017.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Renee Atkins at ratkins@nasaprs.com.


2017 Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Abstract Submission Deadline: May 19, 2017
Workshop Dates: Aug. 21-25, 2017

The annual Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop will be held Aug. 21-25, 2017, at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

The Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop encourages knowledge sharing, professional development, and networking throughout the thermal and fluids engineering community within NASA, academia and the aerospace community at large. STEM faculty and university students are encouraged to attend, submit a poster or paper on their thermal/fluids work, take free training, or do a combination thereof.

Registration to attend the workshop is free. Participants interested in presenting at the conference, via manuscript or technical poster, must submit an abstract by May 19, 2017.

For more information about the workshop and how to submit an abstract for consideration, visit https://tfaws.nasa.gov/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Ramona Cummings at ramona.o.cummings@nasa.gov.


**NEW** Lloyd V. Berkner Space Policy Internships
Audience: Undergraduate and Graduate Students at U.S. Universities and Colleges
Application Deadline: June 2, 2017

The Space Studies Board is seeking applicants for the Lloyd V. Berkner Space Policy Internships for autumn 2017. The goal of the program is to provide promising undergraduate and graduate students with the opportunity to work in the area of civil space research policy in the nation’s capital.

Established in 1958, the Space Studies Board is the principal advisory group providing independent scientific and programmatic advice to NASA and other government agencies on all aspects of civil space research and associated ground-based activities. Interns typically undertake one or more short-term research projects designed to assist with or to enhance ongoing study projects.

Applicants must be registered students (undergraduate or graduate) at a U.S. university or college who have completed their junior year. Applicants should have long-term career goals in space science research, applications or policy.

For more information and a full list of eligibility requirements, visit http://sites.nationalacademies.org/SSB/SSB_052239.

Please direct questions about this internship to Dr. David H. Smith at dhsmith@nas.edu.


Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities
.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educators and Students Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom.
NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Visit NASA Education on the web:
NASA Office of Education: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

Did you miss last week’s NASA Education Science WOW! newsletter?
Visit the Science WOW! blog for an archive of previous messages.
https://blogs.nasa.gov/educationsciencewow/

NASA Education “Science WOW!” Message — Feb. 1, 2017

Check out the latest edition of NASA Education’s “Science WOW!” — your source for NASA opportunities in science education delivered “Weekly On Wednesday.”






Check out the latest edition of NASA Education’s “Science WOW!” — your source for NASA opportunities in science education delivered “Weekly On Wednesday.”


Science Always Starts With a Question …


This Week’s Question: What Is Mars Like?

Mars is Earth’s neighbor in the solar system. But what is the Red Planet like? Visit http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/all-about-mars/en/ to find out!


Have You Seen This?


Bring a Mars-themed snack to your Super Bowl party! Check out this Martian North Polar Layered Bean Dip recipe that models the layers of the Martian arctic terrain.

http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/docs/Cooking%20Up%20a%20Cap.pdf

 


Opportunities for Future Scientists of All Ages



Science Opportunities for Educators of Grades K-12



Science Opportunities for Higher Education and Informal Institutions


 


Opportunities for Future Scientists of All Ages


2016-2017 Cassini Scientist for a Day Essay Contest
Audience: 5-12 Students
Entry Deadline: Feb. 24, 2017

The Cassini Scientist for a Day contest challenges students to become NASA scientists studying Saturn. Participants examine three of the best scientific targets imaged by the Cassini spacecraft in its 12 years at Saturn. After researching the topics, students are to choose the one they think yielded the best scientific results. This year’s targets are Enceladus’ plumes, Titan’s lakes and Saturn’s hexagon. After researching the three options, students write an essay of fewer than 500 words explaining their choice.

The contest is open to all students in the United States in grades 5-12. The essays will be divided into three groups for scoring: grades 5-6, 7-8 and 9-12. All submissions must be students’ original work. Participants may enter as individuals or as part of a team of up to four students.

The deadline for entries is Feb. 24, 2017.

For more information, visit http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/scientist-for-a-day.

If you have questions about this contest, please email scientistforaday@jpl.nasa.gov.


Fly Your Exoplanet on the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite
Audience: All Educators and Students
Submission Deadline: March 1, 2017

Set to launch in June 2018, the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite is an explorer-class planet finder. In the first-ever spaceborne all-sky transit survey, TESS will identify planets ranging from Earth-sized to gas giants and will orbit a wide range of stellar types and orbital distances. As the TESS team prepares for launch, it invites the public to ponder what exoplanets might look like and share their ideas in the form of sketches and graphics.

This opportunity is open to all ages and skill levels. Submissions will be collected via email. To download the template for submitting your artwork, visit https://tess.gsfc.nasa.gov/fly_your_exoplanet.html.

The deadline for submissions is March 1, 2017, or when capacity of the drive carrying the submissions to space is reached, whichever occurs first.

To learn more about the TESS mission, visit https://tess.gsfc.nasa.gov/.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to GSFC-TESS@mail.nasa.gov.

 


Science Opportunities for Educators of Grades K-12


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Technology Enables Exploration: Detecting Exoplanets
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 9-12
Event Date: Feb. 1, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EST
Participants will get an overview of methods used by NASA to detect planets outside of the solar system. Learn about NASA education resources related to these methods and discuss possible modifications to adapt to your classroom. This webinar addresses the Next Generation Science Standards PS2, PS4 and ESS1. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/223283

Technology Enables Exploration: Strange New Planet
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-12
Event Date: Feb 2, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EST
Participants will get an overview of the “Strange New Planet” activity from the Mercury Messenger Mission education module, “Mission Possible.” Discussion will include modifications of activities and accommodations. This webinar addresses the Next Generation Science Standards PS4 and ETS1. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/223286

**NEW** From Hidden to Modern Figures: Bringing Katherine Johnson’s Story Into Your Classroom
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School, and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: Feb. 6, 2017, at 4 p.m. EST
The film “Hidden Figures,” based on the book by Margot Lee Shetterly, focuses on the stories of Katherine Johnson, Mary Jackson and Dorothy Vaughan — African-American women who were essential to the success of early human spaceflight. This session will focus on K-12 classroom activities, related to current NASA projects, that are perfect for English, social studies and history, science, math, and engineering. Additional resources and adaptation recommendations will be included for activities that tie directly to the work portrayed in the movie. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/224199

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


**NEW** Teacher Advisors Needed: NASA / WGBH’s ‘Bringing the Universe to America’s Classrooms’ Initiative
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: Feb. 8, 2017

Public Broadcasting Station WGBH/Boston, supported by a NASA cooperative agreement, is developing new instructional models and digital media tools for STEM classrooms. WGBH is looking for 50 K-12 educators to act as advisors in the development of the new resources.

Teacher Advisors will work with media producers and education researchers to design new ways to engage students around topics in Earth science. The main activity will center on the evaluation and testing of instructional modules that incorporate cutting-edge, scientific-data digital media tools (e.g., data visualizations, interactives, virtual field trips, etc.) and address educational standards.

Applicants must be full-time K-12 educators (U.S. or U.S. territories) who will be teaching Earth science topics in fall 2017. Eligible candidates must have a passion for using digital technology and media and a desire to gain instructional design experience.

Applications are due Feb. 8, 2017.

For more information and to access the online application, visit http://www.wgbhteacheradvisors.org/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to carolyn_jacobs@wgbh.org.


2017 Space Exploration Educators Conference
Audience: K-12 Educators
Event Date: Feb. 9-11, 2017

Make plans to attend the 23rd Annual Space Exploration Educators Conference to be held Feb. 9-11, 2017, at Space Center Houston. This conference is for all K-12 educators. Activities presented use space-related themes to teach across the curricula. The activities may be used for science, language arts, mathematics, history and more.

Attend sessions hosted by scientists and engineers working on exciting projects like the International Space Station and the exploration of Mars and other parts of our solar system. Hear from astronauts who will be “leading the charge” in exploration. Attend sessions presented by educators and receive ready-to-implement classroom ideas. Attendees can earn up to 24 hours of continuing professional education credit.

For more information, visit http://spacecenter.org/teacher-programs/teachers-seec/.

Please email any questions about the conference to seec@spacecenter.org.


**NEW** NASA Solar Eclipse Workshops at Marshall Space Flight Center
Audience: K-12 Educators
Next Workshop Date: April 4, 2017, 4-6 p.m. CDT

On Aug. 21, 2017, the United States will experience a solar eclipse. This celestial event will provide a golden opportunity to engage and educate diverse audiences, and NASA has the resources to help. Join the Educator Resource Center at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, for a series of grade-level specific educator workshops to learn about safety tips, hands-on activities, resources and more!

April 4, 2017, 4-6 p.m. CDT: Educators of Grades K-2
April 13, 2017, 4-6 p.m. CDT: Educators of Grades 3-5
April 18, 2017, 4-6 p.m. CDT: Educators of Grades 6-8
May 6, 2017, 9-11 a.m. CDT: Educators of Grades K-12
June 1, 2017, 9-11 a.m. CDT: Educators of Grades K-12

For full event details and registration information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/solar_eclipse_workshop2017.pdf.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Maria Chambers at maria.a.chambers@nasa.gov.

 


Opportunities for Higher Education and Informal Institutions


2017 Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program
Audience: Undergraduate Students Majoring in Geology or a Related Science
Application Deadline: Feb. 10, 2017

The Planetary Geology and Geophysics Undergraduate Research Program, or PGGURP, pairs qualified undergraduate students with NASA-funded investigators at research locations across the U.S. for eight weeks during the summer. Students spend the summer at the NASA scientists’ home institutions. Selected students receive a cost-of-living stipend and compensation for housing and travel.

Undergraduate students majoring in geology or related sciences are eligible to apply. Students graduating in 2017 who have not started graduate school yet are also eligible. Preference is given to U.S. citizens and permanent residents.

Applications are due Feb. 10, 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/~tgregg/pggurp_homepage.html.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please email Robyn Wagner, PGGURP administrator, at pggurp@buffalo.edu.


NASA’s Ames Research Center Summer Internships — NASA Astrobiology Institute
Audience: Undergraduate Students Who Have Completed Their Sophomore Year or More
Application Deadline: Feb. 15, 2017

The NASA Astrobiology Institute at NASA’s Ames Research Center in California is looking for internship candidates for summer 2017 sessions. Internship opportunities are available within three modules of NAI research.

Laboratory Studies of Chemical Processing in Astrophysical Ices
The intern will work in the Astrochemistry and Astrophysics Laboratory to help carry out experiments designed to study the photochemistry and catalytic chemistry that occurs in astrophysical ice analogs of cometary, planetary and interstellar ices. Emphasis will be placed on how these processes produce organic compounds, particularly compounds of astrobiological interest.

Computer Modeling of Protoplanetary Disks
The intern will work on astronomical modeling of planet-forming disks using existing computational models. The main task will be to apply these models to one or two objects and infer the physical and chemical conditions in planet-forming regions of the disk. The intern will learn to compute disk models, analyze results, and compare observable signatures with available astronomical data from disks.

Computational Quantum Chemistry Studies of Astrophysical Ices and Gases
Computational quantum chemistry is an important tool to elucidate the detailed mechanisms of quantum chemical reactions in both the gas and condensed phases. The intern will study important reactions that lead to the gas and solid-state formation of biogenic molecules using computer programs. Work will include exploring molecular structures, reaction rates, spectroscopic constants and reaction pathways of important biomolecules and their precursors.

Students selected for all three 10-week internships will do real, ongoing NASA research. It is anticipated that these efforts may lead to one or more reports or peer-reviewed scientific publications on which the student would be coauthor. 

These opportunities are open to underrepresented students who are currently enrolled in a college or university and who have successfully completed their sophomore, junior or senior years with a GPA of 3.0 or higher (based on a 4.0 scale). Applicants must be U.S. citizens and at least 18 years of age. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

Application materials are due Feb. 15, 2017.

For more information and complete application process details, visit https://amesteam.arc.nasa.gov/TeamMemberDirectory/intern_opportunities2017.html.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Scott Sandford at scott.a.sandford@nasa.gov.


Call for Abstracts: 68th International Astronautical Congress
Audience: Full-time U.S. Graduate Students Attending U.S. Universities
Submission Deadline: Feb. 27, 2017

NASA announces its intent to participate in the 68th International Astronautical Congress, or IAC, and requests that full-time U.S. graduate students attending U.S. universities respond to this “Call for Abstracts.”

The IAC — which is organized by the International Astronautical Federation, or IAF; the International Academy of Astronautics, or IAA; and the International Institute of Space Law, or IISL — is the largest space-related conference worldwide and selects an average of 1,000 scientific papers every year. The upcoming IAC will be held Sept. 25-29, 2017, in Adelaide, Australia. NASA’s participation in this event is part of an ongoing effort to connect NASA with the astronautical and space international community.

This “Call for Abstracts” is a precursor to a subsequent submission of a final paper, which may be presented at the 68th IAC. Student authors are invited to submit an abstract regarding an original, unpublished paper that has not been submitted in any other forum. A NASA technical review panel will select abstracts from those that have been accepted by the International Astronautical Federation. This opportunity is for graduate students majoring in fields related to the IAF research topics. Students may submit technical (oral) presentations and/or posters. Students may submit abstracts that are co-authored with their Principal Investigators. However, the student must be the “lead author,” and only the student will present at the IAC. Students must be available to travel to the conference to represent NASA and their universities. Students must be U.S. citizens, attending a U.S. university, who plan to enter a career in space science or aeronautics. Pending the availability of funding, graduate students selected by NASA to participate in the IAC will be considered for subsidy funding from NASA.

Many students and professors currently are involved in NASA-related research that could be considered for this submission. Students submitting abstracts are strongly encouraged to seek advice from professors who are conducting NASA research and/or from NASA scientists and engineers. Abstracts must be related to NASA’s ongoing vision for space exploration and fit into one of the following IAC categories:

— Science and Exploration — Systems sustaining missions, including life, microgravity, space exploration, space debris and Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence, or SETI
— Applications and Operations — Ongoing and future operational applications, including earth observation, communication, navigation, human space endeavors and small satellites
— Technology — Common technologies to space systems including astrodynamics, structures, power and propulsion
— Infrastructure — Systems sustaining space missions including space system transportation, future systems and safety
— Space and Society — Interaction of space with society including education, policy and economics, history, and law

The criteria for the selection will be defined according to the following specifications:
— Abstracts should specify purpose, methodology, results, conclusions and areas for discussion.
— Abstracts should indicate that substantive technical and/or programmatic content is included.
— Abstracts should clearly indicate that the material is new and original; they should explain why and how.
— Prospective author(s) should certify that the paper was not presented at a previous meeting.

Abstracts must be written in English, and the length should not exceed 400 words. Tables or drawings are not allowed in the abstract.

NOTE: If you plan to seek assistance from NASA, you must submit to the International Astronautical Federation and to NASA.
— Submit your abstract to the IAF at their website
www.iafastro.org by Feb. 28, 2017 (11:59:00 CET).
— Submit your abstract to NASA at
https://iac.nasaprs.com no later than 11:59 p.m. EST on Monday, Feb. 27, 2017.

IAC Paper Selection
Submitted abstracts will be evaluated by the Session Chairs on the basis of technical quality and relevance to the session topics. Selected abstracts may be chosen for eventual oral or poster presentation. Any such choice is not an indication of quality of the submitted abstract. Their evaluation will be submitted to the Symposium Coordinators. They will make acceptance recommendations to the International Programme Committee, which will make the final decision. Please note that any relevance to the Congress main theme will be considered as an advantage.

The following information must be included in the submission: paper title, name of contact author, name of co-author(s), organization(s), full postal address, phone, email of the author and co-author(s). The abstract should specify purpose, methodology, results and conclusions. The abstract should indicate that substantive technical and/or programmatic content is included, as well as clearly indicate that the material is new and original and explain why and how.

Please check the IAF website (www.iafastro.org) regularly to get the latest updates on the Technical Programme.


Check out the ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities
.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educators and Students Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at https://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom.
NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Visit NASA Education on the web:
NASA Office of Education: https://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

Did you miss last week’s NASA Education Science WOW! newsletter?
Visit the Science WOW! blog for an archive of previous messages.
https://blogs.nasa.gov/educationsciencewow/