The GOES-S Mission

The GOES-S mission logo.NOAA’s Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-S (GOES-S) is the second in the GOES-R Series of weather satellites that includes GOES-R (now named GOES-16), -S, -T and -U. The GOES-S satellite will be renamed GOES-17 when it reaches geostationary orbit. Once the satellite is declared operational, late this year, it will occupy NOAA’s GOES-West position and provide faster, more accurate data for tracking wildfires, tropical cyclones, fog and other storm systems and hazards that threaten the western United States, including Hawaii and Alaska, Mexico, Central America and the Pacific Ocean, all the way to New Zealand.

More information about NOAA’s GOES satellites is available at https://www.nasa.gov/content/goes.

Workhorse Rocket to Carry GOES-S to Orbit

The United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket carrying NOAA’s GOES-S satellite waits for liftoff from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.
The United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket carrying NOAA’s GOES-S satellite waits for liftoff from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Photo credit: United Launch Alliance

The rocket standing on the pad at Space Launch Complex 41 is an Atlas V 541 configuration, one of the most powerful rockets in the Atlas V fleet. The 541 designation means this rocket has a payload fairing, or nose cone, that is approximately five meters wide, four solid-rocket boosters fastened alongside the central common core booster, and a single engine on its Centaur upper stage. Booster propulsion is provided by the RD-180 engine system, a single engine with two thrust chambers. The RD-180 burns Rocket Propellant-1 (RP-1), a highly purified kerosene, along with liquid oxygen. Four solid rocket boosters generate the additional power required at liftoff, each providing 348,500 pounds of thrust.

The booster is controlled by the Centaur second stage avionics system, which provides guidance, flight control and vehicle sequencing functions during the booster and Centaur phases of flight. An Atlas V 541 rocket launched NASA’s Curiosity rover Nov. 26, 2011 on its 10-month, 354-million-mile journey to the surface of Mars. The single-engine Centaur upper stage is a cryogenic vehicle, fueled with liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen. The two-piece payload fairing that protects the GOES-S satellite tops the vehicle.

Atlas V Rocket Ready for Launch from Space Launch Complex 41

The United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket carrying NOAA’s GOES-S satellite waits for liftoff from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.
A colorful sunset Feb. 28 serves as the background for the United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket carrying NOAA’s GOES-S satellite as it waits for liftoff from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Photo credit: United Launch Alliance

The latest weather update from meteorologists with the U.S. Air Force 45th Space Wing is now at a 90 percent chance of favorable weather today for liftoff of the Atlas V rocket with NOAA’s GOES-S satellite. The rocket is slated to liftoff at 5:02 p.m. EST.

Atlas V Rolled to Pad 41 with NOAA’s GOES-S

The Atlas V rocket rolls to Pad 41 with NOAA's GOES-S. Launch is slated for March 1 at 5:02 p.m. EST.The United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket is rolled from the Vertical Integration Facility to the pad at Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The launch vehicle will send NOAA’s Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-S) into orbit. The GOES series is designed to significantly improve the detection and observation of environmental phenomena that directly affect public safety, protection of property and the nation’s economic health and prosperity. GOES-S is slated to lift off atop the Atlas V rocket March 1 at 5:02 p.m. EST.

Meteorologists with the U.S. Air Force 45th Space Wing are predicting an 80 percent chance of favorable weather for liftoff of the Atlas V rocket. On launch day, the primary weather concern is cumulus clouds and strengthening ground winds.

Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky

GOES-S NASA EDGE Rollout Webcast, NASA Social Briefing Today

Watch the live webcast with NASA Edge during the GOES-S launch vehicle rollout at SLC-41. The live show begins at 10 a.m. and can be viewed on NASA TV and social media at:
NASA TV: www.nasa.gov/live

NASA EDGE Facebook: www.facebook.com/nasaedgefan

NASA EDGE YouTube: www.youtube.com/user/NASAedge

NASA EDGE Ustream: www.ustream.tv/nasaedge

Guests on the show:
Sandra Smalley, director, Joint Agency Satellite Division, NASA Headquarters
Mike Stringer, GOES-R assistant system program director, NOAA
Ed Grigsby, GOES-R deputy system program director, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Pam Sullivan, GOES-R flight project manager, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Mic Woltman, chief, Fleet Systems Integration Branch, Launch Services Program, Kennedy Space Center

Watch the GOES-S NASA Social Briefing live on NASA TV at 11 a.m. at https://www.nasa.gov/nasalive.
Briefing Participants:
Tim Walsh, GOES-R System Program Director
Pam Sullivan, Flight Director, GOES-R
AJ Sandora, Lockheed Martin GOES-R Series Mechanical Operations ATLO Manager
Mic Woltman, Chief – Fleet Systems Integration Branch, Launch Services Program
Gabriel Rodriguez-Mena, Systems Test Engineer, United Launch Alliance
Joe Pica, Director, Office of Observations, NOAA’s National Weather Service

GOES-S Countdown to T-Zero, Episode 3: Rocket Science
The United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket reaches another major milestone on the road to T-Zero, as NOAA’s GOES-S spacecraft prepares for launch. Stacking the rocket begins with the booster – the largest component – and continues with the addition of four solid rocket motors and the Centaur upper stage. GOES-S, the next in a series of advanced weather satellites, is slated to launch aboard the Atlas V from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Visit https://youtu.be/gWC9WTQ2Blc

GOES-S Prelaunch Briefings Today

Artist image of the GOES-S satellite.With only two days remaining until the scheduled launch of NOAA’s GOES-S satellite, launch and mission managers are gathering at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center to provide briefings on launch status and the science aspects of the GOES-R series of advanced weather satellites. A prelaunch status briefing will be held at 1 p.m., followed by a science briefing at 2:30 p.m. Both briefings will be held at Kennedy’s Press Site TV Auditorium and air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Prelaunch news conference participants are:

  • Stephen Volz, director for satellite and information services, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
  • Tim Walsh, GOES-R system program director (acting), NOAA
  • Sandra Smalley, director, Joint Agency Satellite Division, NASA Headquarters
  • Tim Dunn, launch director, NASA, Kennedy Space Center
  • Scott Messer, program manager, NASA Programs, United Launch Alliance
  • Kathy Winters, launch weather officer, 45th Weather Squadron, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station

Science briefing participants are:

  • Dan Lindsey, GOES-R senior scientific advisor, NOAA
  • Louis Uccellini, director, National Weather Service, NOAA
  • George Morrow, deputy director, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
  • Jim Roberts, scientist, Earth System Research Laboratory, Office of Atmospheric Research, NOAA
  • Kristin Calhoun, research scientist, National Severe Storms Laboratory, NOAA

Meteorologists with the U.S. Air Force 45th Space Wing are predicting an 80 percent chance of favorable weather for liftoff of a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket carrying NOAA’s GOES-S satellite. Launch is scheduled for March 1 at 5:02 p.m. EST from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. On launch day, the primary weather concern is cumulus clouds.

Atlas V First Stage Lifted Vertical at Space Launch Complex 41 for GOES-S Mission

The Atlas V first stage is lifted into the Vertical Integration Facility at SLC-41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.
Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky

A United Launch Alliance Atlas V first stage was lifted by crane into the Vertical Integration Facility on Jan. 31, 2018, at Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The rocket will be positioned on its launcher to boost NOAA’s Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-S).

The satellite is the second in a series of four advanced geostationary weather satellites that will significantly improve the detection and observation of environmental phenomena that directly affect public safety. GOES-S is slated to launch March 1, 2018, aboard the Atlas V rocket.

NOAA’s GOES-S Spacecraft Prepares for Encapsulation

NOAA's GOES-S weather satellite is prepared for encapsulation in its payload fairing inside Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Florida.
NOAA’s GOES-S weather satellite is prepared for encapsulation in its payload fairing inside Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Florida. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

Technicians and engineers prepare NOAA’s Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-S, or GOES-S, for encapsulation in its payload fairing inside a clean room at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Florida. After encapsulation, the weather satellite will be moved to Space Launch Complex-41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. GOES-S is the second in a series of four advanced geostationary weather satellites. The GOES-R series – consisting of the GOES-R, GOES-S, GOES-T and GOES-U spacecraft – will significantly improve the detection and observation of environmental phenomena that directly affect public safety, protection of property and the nation’s economic health and prosperity. GOES-S is slated to launch March 1, 2018 aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket.