Fengshen – Northwestern Pacific Ocean

Nov. 12, 2019 – NASA Finds Heavy Rain in Tropical Storm Fengshen

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite provided a look at the rainfall occurring within the newly developed Tropical Storm Fengshen.

GPM image of Fengshen
GPM passed over Tropical Storm Fengshen on Nov. 12 at 3:40 a.m. EDT (0840 UTC) and found heavy rainfall in several areas exceeding 1.6 inches (40 mm) per hour. Credit: NASA/NRL

Tropical Depression 26W formed in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on Nov. 11 and strengthened into a tropical storm. Once it strengthened it was renamed Fengshen.

GPM passed over Fengshen on Nov. 12 at 3:40 a.m. EDT (0840 UTC) and  found heavy rainfall in several areas exceeding 1.6 inches (40 mm) per hour around a consolidating low-level center.

At 10 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) on Nov. 12 (1 a.m. CHST, Nov. 13) the National Weather Service in Tiyan, Guam said the center of Tropical Storm Fengshen was located near latitude 16.3 degrees north and longitude 158.6 degrees east. Fengshen is moving west-northwest at 16 mph and is expected to maintain this general course and speed through Thursday, then turn slightly to the northwest on Friday the 15th  where it is forecast to pass just north of Agrihan. Maximum sustained winds have increased to 40 mph and Fengshen is forecast to gradually intensify through Friday. Tropical storm force winds extend outward from the center up to 15 miles.

Hurricanes and typhoons are the most powerful weather event on Earth. NASA’s expertise in space and scientific exploration contributes to essential services provided to the American people by other federal agencies, such as hurricane weather forecasting.

GPM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, JAXA.

For updated forecasts, visit: https://www.weather.gov/gum/Cyclones

By Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

Halong – Northwestern Pacific Ocean

Nov. 08, 2019 – NASA-NOAA Satellite Finds a Weaker, Transitioning Tropical Storm Halong

Halong continued to weaken and is transitioning into an extra-tropical cyclone. NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image of the less organized storm.

Suomi NPP image of Halong
On Nov. 8, 2019, the VIIRS instrument aboard NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP provided a visible image of Tropical Storm Halong in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean as it continued to weaken. Credit: NASA Worldview, Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) / NOAA

The Suomi NPP satellite passed over Halong in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on Nov. 8. The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard Suomi NPP provided a visible image of the storm that showed it appeared elongated and had a ragged low-level circulation center.

At 10 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) on Nov. 8, the center of Halong was located near latitude 30.0 degrees north and longitude 160.2 degrees east. Tropical storm Halong’s center was located approximately 419 nautical miles northeast of Minami Tori Shima. Halong’s maximum sustained winds had dropped to 60 knots (69 mph/111 kph). Halong was moving quickly to the east-northeast at 24 knots.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC said that Halong will continue to track northeastward and gradually turn east-northeastward later on Nov. 8. The JTWC noted, “The environment will become more unfavorable with increasing vertical wind shear and cooling sea surface temperatures, leading to rapid weakening. Extra-tropical transition will begin later on Nov. 8 as begins to interact with the baroclinic zone. A baroclinic zone is a region in which a temperature gradient exists on a constant pressure surface.

Suomi NPP captures all three storms
NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite provided a panoramic image of 3 tropical cyclones in the northern hemisphere. Cyclone Matmo (left) in the Bay of Bengal, Northern Indian Ocean, Typhoon Nakri (center) in the South China Sea, and Tropical Storm Halong (right) in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. Credit: NASA Worldview, Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS)

When a storm becomes extra-tropical it means that a tropical cyclone has lost its “tropical” characteristics. NOAA’s National Hurricane Center defines “extra-tropical” as a transition that implies both poleward displacement (meaning it moves toward the north or south pole) of the cyclone and the conversion of the cyclone’s primary energy source from the release of latent heat of condensation to baroclinic (the temperature contrast between warm and cold air masses) processes. It is important to note that cyclones can become extratropical and still retain winds of hurricane or tropical storm force.

Hurricanes and typhoons are the most powerful weather event on Earth. NASA’s expertise in space and scientific exploration contributes to essential services provided to the American people by other federal agencies, such as hurricane weather forecasting.

By Rob Gutro 
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

Nakri – Northwestern Pacific Ocean

Nov. 08, 2019 – NASA Sees Nakri Strengthen into a Typhoon

Former Tropical Storm Nakri strengthened into a Typhoon in the South China Sea on Nov. 8. NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite passed over the region and found Nakri appeared more circular and more organized.

Suomi NPP image of Nakri
NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite passed over Typhoon Nakri on Nov. 8 and captured a visible image of the storm in the South China Sea. Credit: NASA Worldview, Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS)

Visible imagery from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite on Nov. 8 showed Nakri appeared more circular indicating it had intensified. The imagery also showed a large band on thunderstorms west of the center and wrapping into the low-level center. The center of the storm was still west of the main Philippine Islands, and north of Palawan. However, Kalayaan was still feeling the effects of the storm.

Kalayaan is a municipality on Pagasa Island in the province of Palawan, Philippines. Kalayaan is part of the Spratly Group of Islands, west of the largest island of Palawan. Nakri is known in the Philippines as Quiel.

Suomi NPP captures all three storms
NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite provided a panoramic image of 3 tropical cyclones in the northern hemisphere. Cyclone Matmo (left) in the Bay of Bengal, Northern Indian Ocean, Typhoon Nakri (center) in the South China Sea, and Tropical Storm Halong (right) in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. Credit: NASA Worldview, Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS)

The satellite imagery showing better organization complemented the increase in Nakri’s maximum sustained winds. Sustained winds on Nov. 7 were near 60 knots (69 mph/111 kph). On Nov. 8 at 10 a.m. EST (1500 UTC), Nakri’s maximum sustained winds had increased to near 65 knots (75 mph/120 kph). The intensity is expected to remain relatively steady in the near-term. Nakri was located near latitude 12.7 degrees north and longitdue 116.1 degrees east, about 291 nautical miles west-southwest of Manila, Philippines. Nakri is moving slowly to the west.

Vietnam’s National Center for Hydro-Meteorological Forecasting issued a Typhoon Warning for the country as Nakri approaches.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects Nakri to slowly track westward and make landfall in Vietnam late on Nov. 10 or early Nov. 11, to the south of Danang.

Typhoons and hurricanes are the most powerful weather event on Earth. NASA’s expertise in space and scientific exploration contributes to essential services provided to the American people by other federal agencies, such as hurricane weather forecasting.

By Rob Gutro 
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

Matmo – Northern Indian Ocean (was South China Sea)

Nov. 08, 2019 – NASA Finds a Stronger Matmo Headed for Landfall

Matmo strengthened from a tropical storm to a storm with hurricane-force in the overnight hours of Nov. 7 into Nov. 8. NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Bay of Bengal, Northern Indian Ocean and found Matmo appeared more organized. Warnings are in effect in northeastern India and Bangladesh as Matmo approaches.

Suomi NPP image of Matmo
NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite passed over Cyclone Matmo on Nov. 8 and captured a visible image of the storm in the Bay of Bengal. Credit: NASA Worldview, Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS)

Visible imagery from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite on Nov. 8 showed Matmo appeared more circular indicating it may have intensified. The imagery also showed a large band on thunderstorms extending north from the center of circulation and over northeastern India and Bangladesh.

The satellite imagery showing better organization complemented the increase in Matmo’s maximum sustained winds. Sustained winds on Nov. 7 were near 55 knots (63 mph/102 kph). On Nov. 8 at 10 a.m. EST (1500 UTC), Matmo’s maximum sustained winds had increased to near 85 knots (98 mph/157 kph). Matmo was located near latitude 19.1 degrees north and longitude 88.1 degrees east, about 235 nautical miles south of Kolkata, India. Matmo is moving to the north.

Suomi NPP captures all three storms
NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite provided a panoramic image of 3 tropical cyclones in the northern hemisphere. Cyclone Matmo (left) in the Bay of Bengal, Northern Indian Ocean, Typhoon Nakri (center) in the South China Sea, and Tropical Storm Halong (right) in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. Credit: NASA Worldview, Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS)

The India Meteorological Service (IMS) has issued a cyclone watch for the Odisha-West Bengal coasts. Odisha is a state in India. Odisha has 301 miles (485 kilometers) of coastline along the Bay of Bengal from Balasore to Ganjam. West Bengal is on the eastern bottleneck of India. It extends from the Himalayas (in the north) to the Bay of Bengal in the south. IMS said, “Matmo is expected to cross the West Bengal – Bangladesh Coasts between Sagar Islands (West Bengal) and Khepupara (Bangladesh), across Sunderban delta by midnight of November 9 [local time].”

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects Matmo to make landfall near the border of India and Bangladesh on Saturday, Nov. 9 and continue moving inland.

Typhoons and hurricanes are the most powerful weather event on Earth. NASA’s expertise in space and scientific exploration contributes to essential services provided to the American people by other federal agencies, such as hurricane weather forecasting.

By Rob Gutro 
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

Halong – Northwestern Pacific Ocean

Nov. 07, 2019 – NASA Satellite Imagery Finds Typhoon Halong Resembles a Boxing Glove

Typhoon Halong has packed quite a punch and imagery from NASA’s Terra satellite found that the storm resembled a boxing glove.

Aqua image of Halong
On Nov. 7, the MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA’s Terra satellite took this image of Typhoon Halong and it resembled a boxing glove from space. Credit: NASA Worldview

On Nov. 7, NASA’s Terra satellite passed over the northwestern Pacific Ocean and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument that flies aboard captured a visible image of Halong. The MODIS image showed powerful thunderstorms circling the center of circulation and a band of thunderstorms northeast of center. Combined, the storm looked like a boxing glove from space with the “thumb” as the band of storms that curved to the east of the center. Satellite imagery using microwaves revealed that there is an eye under that large area of thunderstorms circling the center.

At 10 a.m. EST (1500 UTC) on Nov. 7, the center of Typhoon Halong was located near latitude 24.8 degrees north and longitude 152.2 degrees east. That puts the center about 110 nautical miles west of Minami Tori Shima, Japan. Maximum sustained winds were near 90 knots (104 mph/167 kph).

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC noted, “Halong will accelerate poleward [north] while gradually turning northeastward to east-northeastward. The environment will become more unfavorable with increasing vertical wind shear and cooling sea surface temperatures.” That means the storm will experience a weakening trend and after a day, the storm is expected to start transitioning into an extra-tropical storm.

Typhoons and hurricanes are the most powerful weather event on Earth. NASA’s expertise in space and scientific exploration contributes to essential services provided to the American people by other federal agencies, such as hurricane weather forecasting.

By Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

Matmo – Northern Indian Ocean (was South China Sea)

Nov. 07, 2019 – NASA Observes Tropical Storm Matmo in North Central Bay of Bengal

NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Bay of Bengal, Northern Indian Ocean and found that Tropical Storm Matmo was positioned in the center of that body of water.

Suomi NPP image of Matmo
NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Matmo on Nov. 7 and captured a visible image of the storm in the Bay of Bengal. Credit: NASA Worldview, Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS)

Visible imagery from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite on Nov. 7 showed Matmo appeared somewhat elongated from north to south, because of a large band on thunderstorms extending north from the center of circulation.

On Nov. 7 at 4 a.m. EST (0900 UTC), Matmo had maximum sustained winds near 55 knots (63 mph/102 kph). Matmo was located near latitude 15.0 degrees north and longitude 88.7 degrees east, about 353 nautical miles east-southeast of Visakhapatnam, India. Matmo is moving to the northwest.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects Matmo will move northwest, then later, north. The storm will strengthen to 85 knots, but will weaken rapidly to dissipate on approach to the north coast of the Bay of Bengal. Threatened landmasses include India and Bangladesh.

The India Meteorological Service has issued a cyclone watch for the Odisha-West Bengal coasts. Odisha is a state in India. Odisha has 301 miles (485 kilometers) of coastline along the Bay of Bengal from Balasore to Ganjam. West Bengal is on the eastern bottleneck of India. It extends from the Himalayas (in the north) to the Bay of Bengal in the south.

Matmo is forecast to make landfall just east of Kolkata on Nov. 9. Kolkata is the capital of the Indian state of West Bengal.

Typhoons and hurricanes are the most powerful weather event on Earth. NASA’s expertise in space and scientific exploration contributes to essential services provided to the American people by other federal agencies, such as hurricane weather forecasting.

By Rob Gutro 
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

Nakri – Northwestern Pacific Ocean

Nov. 07, 2019 – NASA-NOAA Satellite Finds Tropical Storm Nakri Affecting Kalayaan

NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Nakri and captured a visible image of the storm in the South China Sea. Although the bulk of the storm was not over any land areas, Nakri’s southwestern quadrant was over the island of Kalayaan, Palawan.

Suomi NPP image of Nakri
NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Nakri on Nov. 7 and captured a visible image of the storm in the South China Sea. Although the bulk of the storm was not over any land areas, the southwestern quadrant was over the island of Kalayaan, Palawan. Credit: NASA Worldview, Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS)

Kalayaan is a municipality on Pagasa Island in the province of Palawan, Philippines. Kalayaan is part of the Spratly Group of Islands, west of the largest island of Palawan. Nakri is known in the Philippines as Quiel.

Visible imagery from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite on Nov. 7 showed Nakri has maintained strength. Satellite imagery showed a central dense overcast covered its low-level center of circulation. A central dense overcast is the large central area of thunderstorms surrounding its circulation center, caused by the formation of its eyewall. It can be round, angular, oval, or irregular in shape.

On Nov. 7 at 10 a.m. EST (1500 UTC), Nakri had maximum sustained winds near 60 knots (69 mph/111 kph). Nakri is expected to peak at 70 knots (81 mph/130 kph) on Nov. 8 and 9 before weakening. Nakri was located near latitude 3.5 degrees north and longitude 117.2 degrees east, about 543 nautical miles east-southeast of Da Nang, Vietnam. Nakri is moving to the north and is then expected to curve toward the west. Nakri is forecast to cross the South China Sea, and head toward Vietnam.

Vietnam’s National Center for Hydro-Meteorological Forecasting issued Tropical Storm Warning number 6 for the country as Nakri approaches.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects Nakri to slowly track westward and make landfall in Vietnam in three days on Nov. 12, to the south of Danang.

Typhoons and hurricanes are the most powerful weather event on Earth. NASA’s expertise in space and scientific exploration contributes to essential services provided to the American people by other federal agencies, such as hurricane weather forecasting.

By Rob Gutro 
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

Halong – Northwestern Pacific Ocean

Nov. 06, 2019 – NASA-NOAA Satellite Finds Super Typhoon Halong Finally Weakening

Super Typhoon Halong has finally peaked in intensity and is now on a weakening trend. NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and provided a look at the storm.

Suomi NPP image of Halong
On Nov. 6, 2019, the VIIRS instrument aboard NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP provided a visible image of Super Typhoon Halong that showed the storm still maintained an eye and powerful bands of thunderstorms circling it, despite weakening slightly. Credit: NASA Worldview, Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) / NOAA

On Nov. 5, Halong was a powerful Category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. When the Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead on Nov. 6 the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard provided a visible image of the storm, after it had weakened slightly to a Category 4 storm. The VIIRS imagery showed bands of thunderstorms wrapping into the 10 nautical-mile wide eye.

At 10 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) on Nov. 6 (or 1 a.m. CHST on Nov. 7) the National Weather Service in Tiyan, Guam noted the eye of Super Typhoon Halong was located near latitude 22.0 degrees north and longitude 150.8 degrees rast. That puts the center of Halong about 255 miles southwest of Minamitorishima, 420 miles northeast of Pagan, 580 miles northeast of Saipan, and 710 miles northeast of Guam.

Halong was moving north-northeast at 6 mph. Halong is expected to maintain this north-northeast heading through Thursday, Nov. 7, with a gradual increase in forward speed. By Saturday, Nov. 9, Halong is forecast to move toward the east-northeast at a faster pace.

Maximum sustained winds have decreased to 155 mph. A Category 4 hurricane contains sustained winds between 130 and 156 mph (113 and 136 knots/209 and 251 kph). Typhoon force winds extend outward from the eye up to 35 miles and tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 145 miles southeast of the center and up to 105 miles elsewhere.

Halong is forecast to weaken further today with a steady weakening trend expected to commence Friday, Nov. 8. On Nov. 8 upper-level winds are forecast to begin to affect the typhoon as Halong moves over cooler sea surface temperatures. Both of those factors are expected to help the storm transition into an extra-tropical cyclone.

Hurricanes are the most powerful weather event on Earth. NASA’s expertise in space and scientific exploration contributes to essential services provided to the American people by other federal agencies, such as hurricane weather forecasting.

For updated forecasts, Visit: https://www.weather.gov/gum/Cyclones

By Rob Gutro 
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

Nakri – Northwestern Pacific Ocean

Nov. 06, 2019 – Newly Formed Tropical Storm Nakri Seen by NASA-NOAA Satellite

NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite passed over the South China Sea and captured a visible image of newly formed Tropical Storm Nakri while it remained quasi-stationary and as it slowly organized.

Suomi NPP image of Nakri
On Nov. 6, 2019, the VIIRS instrument aboard NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP provided a visible image of Nakri that showed that it appeared more circular in shape than in the previous 24 hours, but the strongest convection was occurring west of the center. Credit: NASA Worldview, Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) / NOAA

Nakri, known in the Philippines as Quiel, formed west of the central Philippines in the South China Sea part of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. On Nov. 6, 2019, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard Suomi NPP provided a visible image of Nakri. The VIIRS image showed it had become better organized and more circular over the previous 24 hours, although infrared satellite imagery revealed the strongest thunderstorms appeared to be displaced west of the center. The data provided valuable information to forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center.

On Nov. 6 at 4 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC), Tropical Cyclone Nakri’s maximum sustained winds were near 35 knots (40 mph/65 kph). It was located near latitude 13.2 degrees north and longitude 116.4 degrees east, about 281 nautical miles west-southwest of Manila, Philippines. Nakri was quasi-stationary, moving very slowly to the east.

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect Nakri will move slowly east for the next day before turning west and heading toward Vietnam. The system is forecast to intensify to 50 knots (58 mph/93 kph) before making landfall in Vietnam on Nov. 10.

Hurricanes are the most powerful weather event on Earth. NASA’s expertise in space and scientific exploration contributes to essential services provided to the American people by other federal agencies, such as hurricane weather forecasting.

By Rob Gutro 
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

Maha – Northern Indian Ocean

Nov. 06, 2019 – NASA-NOAA Satellite Finds Tropical Cyclone Maha Weakening

NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Northern Indian Ocean and provided forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center with a view of Tropical Cyclone Maha’s eroding structure that helped confirm it is weakening.

Suomi NPP image of Maha
On Nov. 6, 2019, the VIIRS instrument aboard NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP provided a visible image of Maha that showed it was less circular in shape as it approached the coast of northwestern India. Credit: NASA/NOAA/NRL

On Nov. 6, 2019, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard Suomi NPP provided a visible image of Maha that showed it was less circular. Dry air was wrapping into the center of the storm inhibiting thunderstorm development. Maha appeared less circular in the imagery.

The shape of the storm is a clue to forecasters that a storm is either strengthening or weakening. If a storm takes on a more rounded shape it is getting more organized and strengthening. Conversely, if it becomes less rounded or elongated, it is a sign the storm is weakening as Maha is doing.

On Nov. 6 at 4 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC), Tropical Cyclone Maha’s maximum sustained winds were near 50 knots (58 mph/93 kph). It was located near latitude 19.8 degrees north and longitude 66.9 degrees east, about 300 nautical miles south of Karachi, Pakistan.

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect Maha to continue moving east and weakening. The system is expected to skirt the Saurashtra coast and dissipate before making landfall north of Mumbai in northwestern India.

Hurricanes are the most powerful weather event on Earth. NASA’s expertise in space and scientific exploration contributes to essential services provided to the American people by other federal agencies, such as hurricane weather forecasting.

For updated forecasts from the India Meteorological Department, Visit: http://www.rsmcnewdelhi.imd.gov.in/

By Rob Gutro 
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center