NASA Invites Media to View Launch of ICESat-2 from West Coast

Artist's image of NASA's ICESat-2 spacecraft above Earth.
The ICESat-2 mission will measure the changing height of Earth’s glaciers, ice sheets and sea ice, one laser pulse at a time, 10,000 laster pulses per second. Image credit: NASA

Media accreditation is open for the launch of NASA’s Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2, or ICESat-2, scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 15, with a 40-minute window opening at 8:46 a.m. EDT (5:46 a.m. PDT). ICESat-2 will provide precise measurements of the changing height of Earth’s glaciers, ice sheets and sea ice.

The spacecraft will lift off from Space Launch Complex 2 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on the final launch of a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket.

Media interested in attending prelaunch and launch activities must submit an accreditation request online at https://media.ksc.nasa.gov/.

International media without U.S. citizenship must apply by 12 p.m. EDT Monday, Aug. 13. U.S. media must apply by 12 p.m. EDT Tuesday, Aug. 28. For questions about accreditation, please email ksc-media-accreditat@mail.nasa.gov.

For questions about the launch, contact the NASA Kennedy Space Center newsroom in Florida at 321-867-2468. Launch date schedule updates will be posted at https://www.nasa.gov/launchschedule/.

ICESat-2 will measure the height of our changing Earth, one laser pulse at a time, 10,000 laser pulses per second. The satellite will carry a single instrument, the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS), which measures the travel times of laser pulses to calculate the distance between the spacecraft and Earth’s surface. ICESat-2 will provide scientists with height measurements that create a global portrait of Earth’s third dimension, gathering data that can precisely track changes of terrain including glaciers, sea ice, forests and more.

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, manages development of the ICESat-2 mission, including mission systems engineering and mission operations on behalf of the agency’s Earth Science Division. Goddard also built and tested the ATLAS instrument. The ICESat-2 spacecraft was built and tested by Northrop Grumman in Gilbert, Arizona. United Launch Alliance of Centennial, Colorado, is providing the Delta II launch service. NASA’s Launch Services Program, based at Kennedy, is responsible for launch service acquisition, integration, analysis and launch management.

For more information about the ICESat-2 mission, visit https://www.nasa.gov/icesat-2.

Join the conversation on social media by following on Twitter at https://twitter.com/NASA_ICE.

Photo and video content for ICESat-2 is available at http://images.nasa.gov/.

https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/Gallery/icesat2.html

NASA’s ICESat-2 Spacecraft Arrives at Vandenberg Air Force Base

ICESat-2 arrives at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.
NASA’s Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) arrives in its shipping container aboard a heavy transport truck on June 12, 2018, at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. Photo credit: USAF 30th Space Wing/Mark Mackley

NASA’s Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2, or ICESat-2, arrived at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on Tuesday, June 12, from the Northrop Grumman facility in Gilbert, Arizona. The satellite will be offloaded in its shipping container from the heavy transport truck and moved into the Astrotech Space Operations facility where it will be processed and prepared for its mission.

ICESat-2 is scheduled to launch Sept. 12, 2018, on the final United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket, from Space Launch Complex-2 at Vandenberg.

Once in orbit, the satellite is designed to measure the height of a changing Earth, one laser pulse at a time, 10,000 laser pulses a second. ICESat-2 will help scientists investigate why, and how much, Earth’s frozen and icy areas, called the cryosphere, are changing.

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center manages development of the ICESat-2 mission, including mission systems engineering and mission operations on behalf of the agency’s Earth Science Division. The ICESat-2 spacecraft was built and tested by Northrop Grumman in Gilbert, Arizona. The satellite will carry a single instrument called the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System, or ATLAS, built and tested at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. United Launch Alliance of Centennial, Colorado, is providing the Delta II launch service. NASA’s Launch Services Program, based at Kennedy Space Center in Florida, is responsible for launch service acquisition, integration, analysis, and launch management.

For more information about ICESat-2, visit http://go.nasa.gov/2LL7VNU.

Read a feature story about ICESat-2 at http://go.nasa.gov/2t1z6fy.

Delta II Second Stage Arrives for NASA’s ICESat-2 Mission

The Delta II second stage arrived at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.The United Launch Alliance Delta II second stage arrived at NASA’s Building 1555 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. Technicians assist as a crane lifts the top of the shipping container up from the second stage so it can be offloaded and prepared for transport to the horizontal processing facility at Space Launch Complex-2. NASA’s Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) will launch later this year on the final Delta II rocket.

ICESat-2 will measure the height of a changing Earth, one laser pulse at a time, 10,000 laser pulses a second. The satellite will carry a single instrument, the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System. ICESat-2 will help scientists investigate why, and how much our planet’s frozen and icy areas, called the cryosphere, is changing in a warming climate.

Photo Credit: Randy Beaudoin

Delta II Payload Fairings for ICESat-2 Moved to ULA Facility

The payload fairings for the United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket arrive at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.Both halves of the United Launch Alliance (ULA) Delta II rocket payload fairing arrived at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California and were transported by convoy Feb. 23, 2018, to ULA’s Building B8337. The fairings were unpacked from their transportation carrier and secured on work stands. NASA’s Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) will launch later this year on the final Delta II rocket.

The payload fairings for the Delta II are inside ULA's Building B8337 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.
Both halves of the United Launch Alliance (ULA) Delta II rocket payload fairing were moved inside ULA’s Building B8337 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. Technicians begin the process to remove them from their transporters. Photo Credit: NASA/Randy Beaudoin

ICESat-2 will measure the height of a changing Earth, one laser pulse at a time, 10,000 laser pulses a second. The satellite will carry a single instrument, the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System. ICESat-2 will help scientists investigate why, and how much our planet’s frozen and icy areas, called the cryosphere, is changing in a warming climate.

Photo Credit: NASA/Randy Beaudoin