Safety and Health Days: A Reinforcement of Kennedy’s Safety Culture

A participant crosses the finish line of Kennedy Space Center's annual Walk Run on March 26, 2019.
A participant crosses the finish line of Kennedy Space Center’s Walk Run on March 26, 2019. Part of Kennedy’s Safety and Health Days, the annual event takes place at the Florida spaceport’s Shuttle Landing Facility runway and offers employees and guests the chance to partake in a two-mile walk or run, a 5K or a 10K. Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky

Each year, NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Safety and Health Days demonstrates how this topic is not only a top priority both centerwide and agencywide, but that it’s ingrained in the spaceport’s DNA. This year’s Safety and Health Days took place March 25 – 29. Events and presentations held during the week emphasized the importance Kennedy places on the wellbeing of its employees, both at home and at work.

A few of the classes and presentations open to employees included: “Stop the Bleed,” a hands-on course that teaches basic life-saving interventions to equip individuals with the knowledge and power to act quickly and save lives; “Moments Matter,” where a flight crash survivor revealed how resiliency, leadership and managing your mind can help you overcome obstacles to grow and thrive; and a briefing on the “Space Launch System Low Oxygen Tank Mishap,” in which a team of investigators delved into the cause of the incident and discussed recommendations and corrective actions that have helped to prevent future incidents at Kennedy.

Also available for employees were presentations on how to determine if they are getting a good night’s sleep, the seriousness of skin cancer and what to look for, the Crimeline, safety awareness, crime prevention and education program, presented by Brevard County’s well-known Sheriff Wayne Ivey, and the importance of safe behaviors at home and at work. In addition to presentations, Kennedy and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station employees had the opportunity to attend the KSC Walk Run on Tuesday, March 26. Employees and up to four of their registered guests were able to participate in a two-mile walk or run, a 5K run, or a 10K run.

The Tour de KSC, a bike tour on Kennedy grounds open to employees and up to five guests per employee, is another event employees were encouraged to attend. Originating in 2009, the Tour de KSC is another way the spaceport promotes an active lifestyle and a healthy work-life balance. This year’s tour took place Saturday, March 30, with attendees riding alongside Center Director Bob Cabana, an avid bicyclist.

In addition to the presentations and events that took place during the week, Kennedy offers year-round fitness center and balance zone classes every week, giving employees the opportunity to improve and maintain their health throughout the year. The activities and information readily available to all employees reinforce the notion that health and safety continues to be a hallmark of Kennedy’s values — not only during this week, but throughout the entire year.

Earth Day Celebrations Take Flight at Kennedy

A butterfly sits in the palm of a visitor’s hand at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida.
A butterfly sits in the palm of a visitor’s hand at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. Kennedy kicked of its annual Earth Day celebrations with a sustainability expo at the visitor complex on April 11, 2019, where butterflies were released throughout the day. Approximately 40 exhibitors from across the nation assembled to provide information ranging from energy-saving solutions to wildlife and natural conservation. Photo credit: NASA/Isaac Watson

This year, Kennedy Space Center kicked off its annual Earth Day celebrations with a butterfly release and sustainability expo at the center’s visitor complex. On April 11, approximately 40 exhibitors from across the nation assembled to provide information ranging from energy-saving solutions to wildlife and natural conservation.

Also on display were electric cars for attendees to admire. Plant and wildlife specialists from organizations such as Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge and the University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS), among others, were there to provide expertise on safeguarding wildlife and preserving natural resources.

An image of the Butterfly Nebula captured by the Hubble Space Telescope in 2009.
Did you know:
That some of the bright clusters and nebulae of planet Earth’s night sky are often named for flowers or insects? This image of the Butterfly Nebula was captured by the Hubble Space Telescope in 2009. Image Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble, HLA; Reprocessing & Copyright: Robert Eder

Continuing the center’s Earth Day focus, Kennedy employees will have the opportunity to attend two lunch and learns, being held April 23 and 24, to further learn about ways in which we can protect our natural environment. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Investigator Steve Wayne and Officer Jeff Sidor will bring a special K9, Harry, for a demonstration. Dogs such as Harry are trained to locate protected species and detect non-native wildlife that can be harmful to native flora and fauna.

Sally Scalera, urban horticulture agent and master gardener coordinator from the UF/IFAS Brevard Extension office, will lead the second lunch and learn, which will educate employees on ways to make their yards Florida-friendly. Topics will include using native plants to reduce water consumption, reducing turf area, watering efficiently and learning how to employ integrated pest management.

For more than five decades, NASA has used the vantage point of space to understand and explore our home planet, improve lives and safeguard our future. The activities held at Kennedy in celebration of Earth Day further promote awareness of our planet’s natural resources and strengthen the center’s emphasis on the importance of sustainability. They encourage employees and guests to engage in practices that benefit the environment, both at work and at home.

Crawler-Transporter 2 Gets Engine Maintenance in Preps for Exploration Mission-1

Pat Brown, left, and William Vardaman, mechanical technicians with the Jacobs contracting team, perform engine maintenance on NASA's crawler-transporter 2 on March 26, 2019.
Pat Brown, left, and William Vardaman, mechanical technicians with the Jacobs contracting team, perform engine maintenance on NASA’s crawler-transporter 2 on March 26, 2019.

Even the toughest vehicles need regular maintenance to function at their best. Recently, William Vardaman and Pat Brown, both working under the Jacobs contracting team, performed engine maintenance on NASA’s crawler-transporter 2 in the crawler yard located in the agency’s Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Complex 39 area in Florida.

Vardaman, a mechanical technician with the Jacobs contracting team, performs engine maintenance on NASA's crawler-transporter 2 on March 26, 2019.The massive, tracked vehicles are powered by large electrical power engines and two 16-cylinder American Locomotive Company (ALCO) engines. Vardaman and Brown, both mechanical technicians supporting the agency’s Test and Operations Support Contract, spent several days rebuilding the vehicle’s fuel pump assemblies on both ALCO engines. They also installed new oil pumps that will lubricate the ALCOs from the top down before they’re started, minimizing future wear.

This is one of two crawler-transporters that carried rockets and spacecraft, including the Apollo/Saturn V and space shuttle, from the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) to the launch pad. Now, they’re getting ready for NASA’s accelerated return to the Moon.

Crawler-transporter 2 has been modified and upgraded to carry the mobile launcher and NASA’s Space Launch System rocket, topped by the Orion spacecraft, for Exploration Mission-1, which will launch in 2020. The agency’s Exploration Ground Systems oversaw extensive upgrades to crawler-transporter 2, including new generators, gear assemblies, roller bearings and brakes, as well as the hydraulic jacking, equalization and leveling (JEL) cylinders that keep its carrying surface level.

Last fall, crawler-transporter 2 carried the newly completed mobile launcher from its construction site north of the VAB, out to Launch Pad 39B, then into the VAB, where the mobile launcher continues extensive testing. The crawler is gearing up for another move of the mobile launcher back to the pad later this spring for more testing.

Learn more about the crawlers at https://www.nasa.gov/content/the-crawlers

Photo credits: NASA/Kim Shiflett

Now Open: New Headquarters Building at Kennedy Space Center

The new, seven-story headquarters building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida
Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson

A brand-new headquarters building boasting several sustainable features has opened for use at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The newly constructed facility anchors the multi-user spaceport’s Central Campus.

The facility has earned the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold designation. It has LED lighting throughout, along with occupancy sensors to turn off unneeded lights; windows, screens and shades designed to maximize natural light; chilled beam HVAC technology reducing the need for ductwork; and more. Outside, the parking lot has dual electric vehicle charging stations and Florida native plants.

More than 500 civil service and contractor employees will be based in the 200,000-square-foot building, including shared services such as printing, reprographics and the center’s post office. Several center organizations have recently moved in, and more will follow during the coming months.

NASA on the Air

In a surprising and touching turnout, tens of thousands of people around the world turned on their ham (or amateur) radios to participate in several “NASA on the Air” events held over the past year. “This was a beautiful thing,” said Kevin Zari, head of the amateur radio club at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. Zari especially loved the event photos tweeted by people from different countries.

Radio clubs from 10 NASA centers and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, all supported the yearlong event. Ham radio operators tuned in from all 50 U.S. states and 56 countries across six continents to chat with NASA personnel. “There were times in our log where we had 20 contacts a minute – it was that quick. And there were other more relaxed times, where we were able to just sit and talk,” said Zari. “I don’t know how many times people said, ‘We thought NASA was gone. We thought NASA was dead.’ So we educated people around the world.”

The NASA on the Air event wrapped up with three special opportunities for people to use their radios to download images from the International Space Station. This was done in coordination with Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS), an international consortium of amateur radio organizations and space agencies. ARISS encourages young people to explore science, technology, engineering and math through the use of ham radios, and their program works to connect students worldwide with astronauts onboard the space station.

For the final three events, cosmonauts on the station transmitted several NASA on the Air images from space. Participants could compete to collect images and upload them to a website for credit. Over 34,600 uploads were received from 18,619 participants.

The reaction to NASA on the Air was so positive, NASA Radio Clubs plans to activate NASA on the Air for special anniversaries in 2019 and beyond (e.g. 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11). Follow @NASARadioClubs on Twitter or join the NASA on the Air (NOTA) group on Facebook for notifications of future activities.

Former Kennedy Space Center Director Richard G. Smith Passes Away

Official portrait of Kennedy Space Center Director Richard G. Smith. Photo credit: NASA

Richard G. Smith, a former director of NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, passed away March 14, 2019, in Decatur, Alabama. He was 89 years old.

Smith served as director of Kennedy from Sept. 26, 1979 to Aug. 2, 1986. During his years as director, the buildup of the space shuttle was completed, 25 space shuttle missions were launched and planning efforts began for the International Space Station.

At the beginning of his career, Smith became a member of the rocket research and development team at Redstone Arsenal in Alabama in 1951. He transferred to NASA in July 1960 when the Development Operations Division of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency became the nucleus for the establishment of the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville.

Smith served in various positions at Marshall, including in the former Guidance and Control Laboratory and in the Systems Engineering Office prior to being appointed deputy manager and later manager of the Saturn Program. In 1974, Smith was named deputy director of the Marshall Center.

In August 1978, Smith accepted a one-year assignment as deputy associate administrator for Space Transportation Systems at NASA Headquarters in Washington. He served as director of the Skylab Task Force, appointed by the NASA administrator to represent NASA preceding and following the re-entry of Skylab.

For his contributions to the Apollo Lunar Landing Program and the Skylab Program, Smith received the NASA Medal for Exceptional Service in 1969 and the NASA Medal for Distinguished Service in 1973. Smith was inducted into the Alabama Engineering Hall of Fame in 2011.

Smith was born in Durham, North Carolina, 1929. He attended Florence State College and Auburn University in Alabama, where he received a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering in 1951. In June 1981, he was awarded an honorary doctorate of science degree by Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne, Florida. He also was awarded an honorary doctorate of science degree by his Alma Mater, Auburn University, in December 1983.

He is survived by his wife of close to 66 years, Louise Self Smith, two daughters, two grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

Plant Experiment Veg-03 H Initiated on Space Station

Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques began growing two new crops aboard the International Space Station on Saturday, March 9, 2019.
Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques initiated plant experiment Veg-03 H aboard the International Space Station on Saturday, March 9, 2019. This required Saint-Jacques to add water to “plant pillows,” which are space pots for plants that contain pre-packed seeds, granular media for the roots to grow into, controlled-release fertilizer, and a way for the on-orbit gardeners to water their plants in microgravity. The experiment should take 30 days to complete and will provide data on food safety for the new crops to compare to ground studies in order to establish a baseline.

Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques began growing two new crops aboard the International Space Station on Saturday, March 9, 2019. The two crops, Wasabi Mustard Greens and Extra Dwarf Pak Choi, are part of experiment Veg-03 H. Saint-Jacques placed six “plant pillows” into the veggie growth chamber. This experiment is part of ongoing research on the space station and on Earth to identify fresh vegetables capable of providing astronauts food and nutrition during long-duration spaceflight, including future missions to the Moon or Mars.

Each pillow serves as a pot designed for space with pre-packed seeds, a substance for the roots to grow into, controlled-release fertilizer, and a way for the in-orbit gardeners to water their plants in microgravity.

High school and middle school students participating in the Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden’s Growing beyond Earth Challenge identified Extra Dwarf Pak Choi as a potential candidate crop for space through classroom science experiments, along with Dragoon Lettuce, which NASA astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor grew on the station last fall. Using science stations designed to mimic conditions on the space station gave students a chance to grow plants and record data that NASA was able to use. Those experiments culminated in the plant species which launched to the space station aboard the 15th SpaceX cargo resupply mission on June 29, 2018, along with three other plant species.

The experiment should take 30 days to complete and will provide data on food safety for the new crops to compare to ground studies in order to establish a baseline.

“I think the astronauts will be surprised to learn that the Extra Dwarf Pak Choi that they grow and eat has the same amount of Vitamin C by weight as does a fresh Florida orange,” said NASA scientist Matt Romeyn, “and the leaves don’t taste much different than other fresh leafy greens.”

Demo-1 Concludes With Crew Dragon Splashdown

The SpaceX Crew Dragon splashes down in the Atlantic Ocean about 200 miles off Florida’s east coast at 8:45 a.m. EST, Friday, March 8, 2019.
The SpaceX Crew Dragon splashes down in the Atlantic Ocean about 200 miles off Florida’s east coast at 8:45 a.m. EST, Friday, March 8, 2019. Image credit: NASA TV

The SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft splashed down at 8:45 a.m. EST about 200 miles off Florida’s east coast, returning from the uncrewed Demo-1 flight test to the International Space Station and the company’s inaugural flight with NASA’s Commercial Crew Program.

The mission, known as Demo-1, is a critical step for NASA and SpaceX to demonstrate the ability to safely fly missions with NASA astronauts to the orbital laboratory.

The Crew Dragon launched March 2 from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. It was the first commercially-built and operated American crew spacecraft and rocket to launch from American soil on a mission to the space station and autonomously dock to the station. To complete the docking, both the station and Crew Dragon’s adapters used the new international docking standard.

Crew Dragon is returning to Earth some critical research samples from science investigations conducted to enable human exploration farther into space and develop and demonstrate in the U.S. ISS National Laboratory new technologies, treatments, and products for improving life on Earth.

Also traveling aboard the spacecraft is an anthropomorphic test device named Ripley outfitted with sensors to provide data about potential effects on humans traveling in Crew Dragon.

SpaceX’s recovery ship, Go Searcher, is equipped with a crane to lift Crew Dragon out of the water and onto the main deck of the ship within an hour after splashdown.

NASA and SpaceX still have work to do to review the systems and flight data to validate the spacecraft’s performance and prepare it to fly astronauts. Already planned upgrades, additional qualification testing, and an in-flight abort test will occur before NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley will climb aboard for Demo-2, the crewed flight test to the International Space Station that is necessary to certify Crew Dragon for routine operational missions.

Demo-1 Mission Nearing Completion

Crew Dragon docked to the International Space Station on March 3, 2019
Crew Dragon docked to the International Space Station on March 3, 2019. Image credit: NASA

The SpaceX Crew Dragon continues to perform well as the Demo-1 flight test nears completion. The Crew Dragon hatch will be closed Thursday, March 7, at approximately 12:25 p.m. EST.

Crew Dragon will remain docked to the International Space Station until approximately 2:30 a.m. on Friday, March 8. The spacecraft is expected to return to Earth hours later, with a splashdown in the Atlantic Ocean at approximately 8:45 a.m.

More details about the mission and NASA’s commercial crew program can be found in the press kit online and by following @commercial_crew and commercial crew on Facebook.

Learn more about station activities by following @space_station and @ISS_Research on Twitter as well as the ISS Facebook and ISS Instagram accounts.

Demo-1 Underway: Crew Dragon Launches on Debut Flight

Image credit: NASA TV

The Demo-1 uncrewed flight test to the International Space Station, SpaceX’s inaugural flight with NASA’s Commercial Crew Program, is underway following the successful launch Saturday morning of the company’s Falcon 9 rocket and Crew Dragon spacecraft. The first-of-its-kind mission, planned to be a full demonstration of the spacecraft and its systems, launched on time at 2:49 a.m. EST from Launch Complex 39A at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in

In addition to 400 pounds of supplies and equipment, Crew Dragon is carrying Ripley, an anthropomorphic test device outfitted with sensors to gather important data about what an astronaut flying aboard the spacecraft would experience throughout the mission.

Crew Dragon will carry out a series of phasing maneuvers as it pursues the space station during approach. The spacecraft is scheduled to autonomously dock with the orbiting laboratory tomorrow morning, March 3, at about 6 a.m. EST, and remain docked until approximately 2:30 a.m. on Friday, March 8. Crew Dragon is expected to return to Earth with a splashdown in the Atlantic Ocean at approximately 8:45 a.m., a little more than six hours after departing the space station.