Successful Deployment of the Integrated Health Management Architecture in Firing Room 1

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Successful AGSM IHM Deployment

Engineers at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center were recognized recently for creating and deploying the IHM Architecture. The deployed IHM Architecture is one of the main elements in the Advanced Ground Systems Maintenance (AGSM) project, formulated to provide Health Management capabilities to Ground Systems to reduce O&M costs and increase systems’ availability.
Photo credit: NASA

Engineers at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center were recognized recently for creating and deploying the Integrated Health Management (IHM) Architecture — hardware, software and network components — that will be instrumental in accessing the health of ground support equipment, predicting breakdowns, isolating components that have failed, and recommending corrections if failures occur. The deployed IHM Architecture is one of the main elements in the Advanced Ground Systems Maintenance (AGSM) project, formulated to provide health management capabilities to ground systems to reduce operations and maintenance costs, and increase systems’ availability.

Operating in Firing Room 1 of the Launch Control Center, the IHM Architecture will oversee the hardware at the launch pad for NASA’s Space Launch System and Orion spacecraft. When specific ground systems are incorporated in the IHM Architecture, it will be capable of collecting the information from the Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) and advising launch controllers of its status.

Taken together, the system is meant to reduce the likelihood of surprises during the countdown and launch activities of the massive SLS vehicle and Orion spacecraft as they prepare to conduct missions beyond Earth orbit.

The work was led by Kennedy’s Engineering Directorate and has been turned over to the teams of NASA and contractor engineers that will use and maintain it during operations.

Orbital ATK CRS-7 Launch Postponed

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NASA, Orbital ATK and United Launch Alliance (ULA) have postponed Orbital ATK’s seventh commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station. ULA discovered a new booster hydraulic issue during prelaunch testing. The ULA team is developing a plan to resolve the issue and a new launch date will be determined.

Orbital ATK has contracted with ULA for its Atlas V rocket for the launch service, which will lift off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Orbital ATK’s Cygnus cargo spacecraft is packed with 7,600 pounds of supplies and research for crew aboard the orbiting laboratory. The Atlas V and Cygnus remain secure.

First Umbilical Installed on Mobile Launcher for NASA’s Space Launch System and Orion

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The OSMU is installed on the mobile launcher.The first launch umbilical for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) and Orion spacecraft was installed on the mobile launcher tower March 16 at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The Orion Service Module Umbilical, or OSMU, was installed high up on the tower at about the 260-foot level.

“Installation of the OSMU is a major milestone for the mobile launcher team,” said Sam Talluto, deputy project manager. “This is the first of multiple umbilicals and launch accessories that will be installed.”

The tower on the mobile launcher will be equipped with several connections, called launch umbilicals, which will connect to the SLS core stage and twin solid rocket boosters, the interim cryogenic propulsion stage and the Orion spacecraft. They will provide power, communications, coolant and fuel.

The OSMU will connect from the mobile launcher tower to the Orion service module. Prior to launch, the umbilical will transfer liquid coolant for the electronics and purge air/ GN2 for environmental control to the Orion service module that houses these critical systems to support the spacecraft. The umbilical also will provide purge air/GN2 for environmental control to the Launch Abort System. Before launch, the OSMU will tilt up and the umbilical lines will disconnect.

The first integrated launch of SLS and Orion, Exploration Mission 1, will send the spacecraft to a stable orbit beyond the moon. Orion will return to Earth and be recovered from the Pacific Ocean. The mission will demonstrate the integrated performance of the SLS rocket, Orion and ground support teams.

Photo credit: NASA/Leif Heimbold

Progress in Central Campus Construction Adding Modern Facilities

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Central Campus Construction progress at Kennedy Space Center.

Now that NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida is a premier, multi-user spaceport, ongoing construction is adding new, ultra-modern facilities. A key element of the Central Campus makeover is a new, seven-story, 200,000-square-foot headquarters building that has taken shape in the heart of the spaceport.

The project is taking place in several phases. Phase 1 includes construction and outfitting of a shared services and office building to function as the first half of the new headquarters.

The headquarters building’s glass facade, as seen from NASA Causeway, is complete. The exterior skin of the building also is nearly finished. The remainder of the glass components are being installed on each floor. Construction of interior walls and utilities on most floors is well underway.

The construction approach will provide a campus-like setting with several buildings surrounding a pedestrian-friendly outdoor courtyard. The concept, similar to what is used by many educational institutions, provides close proximity and access to several buildings. It also promotes the use of pedestrian walkways instead of vehicle traffic used today because of the distances between buildings.

Construction of the headquarters building is targeted for completion in November 2017 and employees are expected to be able to move in soon after.

Additionally, Central Campus phase 1 construction includes a separate facility to operate as a consolidated Kennedy Data Center which opened in October 2015. This 16,500-square-foot building operates year-round, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Kennedy’s current headquarters and the Central Instrumentation Facility are among the oldest at the spaceport, more than 50 years of service since they were built in the mid-1960s. The overarching central campus construction will consolidate several buildings and administrative spaces in what is known as the space center’s Industrial Area.

Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

Orbital ATK CRS-7 Launch Targets NET March 27

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NASA, Orbital ATK and United Launch Alliance, or ULA, now are targeting launch of Orbital ATK’s seventh commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station no earlier than Monday, March 27. The additional time allows the ULA team to troubleshoot a hydraulic issue discovered on ground support equipment needed for launch. Orbital ATK has contracted with ULA for its Atlas V rocket for the launch service, which will lift off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Orbital ATK’s Cygnus cargo spacecraft is packed with 7,600 pounds of supplies and research for crew aboard the orbiting laboratory. The Atlas V and Cygnus remain secure and continue to undergo processing for launch. The encapsulated Cygnus spacecraft has been mounted to the top of the Atlas V in preparation for launch.

OneWeb Breaks Ground on Satellite Factory at Kennedy

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One Web Satellites Ground Breaking

OneWebconceptbuildingOne Web Satellites Ground BreakingThe portfolio of NASA’s Kennedy Space Center will soon include large-scale satellite manufacturing following Thursday’s groundbreaking for a 150,000-square foot spacecraft factory in the center’s Exploration Park.

“This is all a part of our vision for a multi-user
spaceport,” said Kelvin Manning, associate director of Kennedy. “I think when people signed up to work at Kennedy Space Center, they wanted to come to the place where we launch rockets.”

OneWeb, in partnership with Airbus’ American branch, intends to build 2,000 satellites that will form a constellation capable of wirelessly connecting every portion of the world to the Internet. The satellites will launch from the Kennedy spaceport as well, some on New Glenn rockets that will be built in the Blue Origin factory across the street from the OneWeb facility. Virgin Orbit’s LauncherOne, an air-launched rocket flying from the Shuttle Landing Facility at Kennedy, also will send some of the OneWeb satellites into orbit.

Rick Scott, governor of Florida, hailed the company’s decision to open the factory at Kennedy, noting the company’s goals enhance the value of the commercial space environment as it develops.

“OneWeb’s building this factory and providing jobs and they’re going to provide affordable Internet access worldwide so everybody has a chance to experience the Internet and get the benefits of the Internet,” Scott said.

The development is part of renaissance at the space center built on a philosophy of opening the center’s extensive capabilities and work force to commercial enterprises as well as government operations. It also works close partnerships with organizations such as Space Florida which administers Exploration Park.

“This is another exciting addition to the Multiuser Spaceport at the Kennedy Space Center,” said Tom Engler, acting director of Kennedy’s Center Planning and Development. “Having the OneWeb factory adding to all of the great capability that is here at Kennedy is fantastic. Seeing how we continue to evolve is going to be very exciting.”

Photos by NASA/Kim Shiflett, concept art by OneWeb.

Orbital ATK CRS-7 Launch Targeted for March 24

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NASA, Orbital ATK and United Launch Alliance (ULA) now are targeting launch of Orbital ATK’s seventh commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station at 9 p.m. EDT Friday, March 24. An option exists to move the launch earlier to March 23, if the Eastern Range becomes available. The additional time allows the ULA team to replace and retest a first stage hydraulic component. Orbital ATK has contracted with ULA for its Atlas V rocket for the launch service, which will lift off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Orbital ATK’s Cygnus cargo spacecraft is packed with 7,600 pounds of supplies and research for crew aboard the orbiting laboratory.

Launch for Orbital ATK CRS-7 NET March 21

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NASA, Orbital ATK and United Launch Alliance (ULA) are now targeting launch of Orbital ATK’s seventh commercial resupply mission to the International Space Station no earlier than Tuesday, March 21. During prelaunch testing March 10, ULA discovered a booster hydraulic issue at the pad, and the additional time will allow their team to replace a component and continue with launch preparations. Orbital ATK has contracted with ULA for an Atlas V rocket for the mission, which will launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The Cygnus spacecraft is packed with 7,600 pounds of supplies and research for crew aboard the orbiting laboratory. Both the cargo spacecraft and Atlas V rocket remain secure in their processing facilities.

Environmental Points of Contact Awarded for Expertise

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From left are Christine Herndon, Herndon Solutions Group; Nick Aleman; and Michael McDonnell; John Shaffer; Lisa Ruffe; Nancy P. Bray, Director, Spaceport Integration and Services; Timothy Mrdjenovich; and Kristina Herpich. Aleman, McDonnell, Ruffe, Mrdjenovich and Herpich were recognized for their work as Environmental Points of Contact.

From left are Christine Herndon, Herndon Solutions Group; Nick Aleman; and Michael McDonnell; John Shaffer; Lisa Ruffe; Nancy P. Bray, Director, Spaceport Integration and Services; Timothy Mrdjenovich; and Kristina Herpich. Aleman, McDonnell, Ruffe, Mrdjenovich and Herpich were recognized for their work as Environmental Points of Contact. Photo credit: NASA

New construction and upgrades to existing infrastructure are crucial to Kennedy Space Center’s role as a premier, multi-user spaceport. Thanks to the expertise of Kennedy’s Environmental Points of Contact team, each of these critical projects is managed with environmental concerns and guidelines in mind.

The EPOC team, as it’s known at the spaceport, recently received a Space Flight Awareness Award honoring this group of specialists. NASA environmental biologist John Shaffer nominated the EPOCs for the team award, citing the commitment, expertise, program interaction and “out-of-the-box thinking” each team member utilizes as they guide construction teams through the lifecycle of a project.

Team members are tasked with monitoring and support of these projects — jobs such as installation of the new VAB platforms, upgrading the launch pads, and building the new Data Center and the headquarters building in the new Central Campus. The EPOC team works for the Kennedy Environmental and Medical Contract (KEMCON), the resident contractor for environmental efforts at Kennedy.

Environmental Points of Contact participate in every aspect of such projects, from conception and design, through construction, to completion. Their involvement ensures environmental regulations, permitting and sustainability requirements are incorporated and followed, and waste products are managed and recycled or disposed of properly. They’re also experts on LEED certification.

The four members of the EPOC team are Kristina Herpich, Lisa Ruffe, Nick Aleman and Tim Mrdjenovich. NASA also included Mike McDonnell in the Space Flight Awareness Award based on his years of service on the team prior to taking on new responsibilities with the KEMCON contract.

Orbital ATK Dedicates Cygnus Spacecraft to John Glenn

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A supply spacecraft set to carry thousands of pounds of experiments and equipment to the International Space Station will also carry the name John Glenn, Orbital ATK said Thursday during a ceremony dedicating the mission to the first American to orbit the Earth.

“John Glenn was probably responsible for more students studying math and science and being interested in space than anyone,” said former astronaut Brian Duffy, Orbital ATK’s vice president of Exploration Systems. “When he flew into space in 1962, there was not a child then who didn’t know his name. He’s the one that opened up space for all of us.”

Glenn, who passed away in December at age 95, was one of NASA’s original seven astronauts. After making his landmark orbital mission in February 1962, he served as a U.S. senator from Ohio. After retiring from politics, Glenn made his second spaceflight in 1998 as part of the STS-95 crew flying space shuttle Discovery.

The spacecraft will carry 7,600 pounds of cargo to the station and will be lifted into space atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket. Read the full story at http://go.nasa.gov/2moxJnq
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hoto credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

 

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