Columbia ‘Relaunch’ Aims to Inspire, Educate

Evelyn Husband Thompson, widow of STS-107 Commander Rick Husband, speaks to NASA civil service and contractor employees and guests in Kennedy Space Center’s Training Auditorium on April 12, 2019. Husband Thompson was one of the presenters for “Columbia: The Mission Continues,” an event organized by the Apollo Challenger Columbia Lessons Learned Program (ACCLLP).
Evelyn Husband Thompson, widow of STS-107 Commander Rick Husband, speaks to NASA civil service and contractor employees and guests in Kennedy Space Center’s Training Auditorium on April 12, 2019. Husband Thompson was one of the presenters for “Columbia: The Mission Continues,” an event organized by the Apollo Challenger Columbia Lessons Learned Program (ACCLLP). Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
Veteran space reporter John Zarrella, left, moderates a “Lessons of Columbia” discussion with former space shuttle launch directors Mike Leinbach, center, and Bob Sieck in Kennedy Space Center’s Training Auditorium on April 12, 2019. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

The space shuttle Columbia national tour launched at Kennedy Space Center on April 12, 2019, embarking on an educational journey that will take the program to all 10 NASA centers throughout the country.

Apollo Challenger Columbia Lessons Learned Program (ACCLLP) Manager Mike Ciannilli was the master of ceremonies for “Columbia: The Mission Continues,” an event that featured remarks from NASA senior managers and astronaut Shane Kimbrough, a “Lessons of Columbia” discussion with former space shuttle launch directors Bob Sieck and Mike Leinbach, multimedia presentations and a powerful speech by Evelyn Husband Thompson, widow of STS-107 Commander Rick Husband.

Kelvin Manning, Kennedy Space Center associate director, technical, delivers opening remarks for “Columbia: The Mission Continues." The event took place on the 38th anniversary of STS-1, the first orbital spaceflight of NASA’s Space Shuttle Program.
Kelvin Manning, Kennedy Space Center associate director, technical, delivers opening remarks for “Columbia: The Mission Continues.” The event took place on the 38th anniversary of STS-1, the first orbital spaceflight of NASA’s Space Shuttle Program. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

The event was held on the 38th anniversary of STS-1, April 12, 1981, the first orbital spaceflight of NASA’s Space Shuttle Program.

“We are returning Columbia back to flight on a new mission to inspire, educate and powerfully share the invaluable lessons learned from the past to help bring us successfully into the future,” said Kennedy Associate Director, Technical, Kelvin Manning, who delivered the opening remarks.

The tour includes an exhibit of nine Columbia artifacts, which are on display in the lobby of Kennedy’s old Headquarters building through April 23, and training from APPEL Knowledge Services. The exhibit, APPEL training and a centerwide event focusing on lessons learned all will be a part of the traveling program.

An edited version of the “Columbia: The Mission Continues” event will be released in the near future. To learn more about the space shuttle Columbia national tour, listen to Episode 7 of the podcast “Small Steps, Giant Leaps,” available on the following platforms:

Google Play: Small Steps, Giant Leaps on Google Play

NASA on the Air

In a surprising and touching turnout, tens of thousands of people around the world turned on their ham (or amateur) radios to participate in several “NASA on the Air” events held over the past year. “This was a beautiful thing,” said Kevin Zari, head of the amateur radio club at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. Zari especially loved the event photos tweeted by people from different countries.

Radio clubs from 10 NASA centers and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, all supported the yearlong event. Ham radio operators tuned in from all 50 U.S. states and 56 countries across six continents to chat with NASA personnel. “There were times in our log where we had 20 contacts a minute – it was that quick. And there were other more relaxed times, where we were able to just sit and talk,” said Zari. “I don’t know how many times people said, ‘We thought NASA was gone. We thought NASA was dead.’ So we educated people around the world.”

The NASA on the Air event wrapped up with three special opportunities for people to use their radios to download images from the International Space Station. This was done in coordination with Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS), an international consortium of amateur radio organizations and space agencies. ARISS encourages young people to explore science, technology, engineering and math through the use of ham radios, and their program works to connect students worldwide with astronauts onboard the space station.

For the final three events, cosmonauts on the station transmitted several NASA on the Air images from space. Participants could compete to collect images and upload them to a website for credit. Over 34,600 uploads were received from 18,619 participants.

The reaction to NASA on the Air was so positive, NASA Radio Clubs plans to activate NASA on the Air for special anniversaries in 2019 and beyond (e.g. 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11). Follow @NASARadioClubs on Twitter or join the NASA on the Air (NOTA) group on Facebook for notifications of future activities.