Key Launch Day Milestones for Today’s GOES-T Mission

GOES-T spacecraft atop a ULA rocket
The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-T (GOES-T) spacecraft separation is targeted to take place at approximately 8:32 p.m. today. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

Here is a look at some of the key milestones for today’s GOES-T launch:

Mission Timeline (all times approximate)
LAUNCH AND SPACECRAFT DEPLOYMENT
Time                                Events
4:38 p.m. EST               Launch target (two-hour window)
4:50:04 p.m.                 Main Engine Cutoff #1 (MECO1)
5:01:20 p.m.                  Centaur Main Engine Start #2 (MES2)
5:06:57 p.m.                  Centaur Main Engine Cutoff #2 (MECO2)
8:06:04 p.m.                 Centaur Main Engine Start #3 (MES3)
8:07:47 p.m.                  Centaur Main Engine Cutoff #3 (MECO3)
8:32:32 p.m.                  GOES-T Spacecraft Separation

GOES-T’s launch from Cape Canaveral’s Space Force Station in Florida is now less than an hour away. Coverage of launch day activities will continue here on the blog. Also, tune in to NASA TV, the NASA app, or the agency’s website, starting at 4 p.m. EST for a live broadcast. Liftoff, from Space Launch Complex 41, is targeted for 4:38 p.m. EST.

A Closer Look at the GOES-T Mission

GOES-T rollout to Space Launch Complex 41
NOAA’s GOES-T satellite will help meteorologists observe and predict local weather events, including thunderstorms, tornadoes, fog, hurricanes, flash floods, and other severe weather. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-T (GOES-T) satellite is the third satellite in the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) – R Series, the Western Hemisphere’s most sophisticated weather observing and environmental monitoring system.

A part of the GOES-R series, GOES-T will be renamed GOES-18 once it reaches geostationary orbit, replacing GOES-17 as GOES West. It will be positioned to watch over the western contiguous United States, Alaska, Hawaii, Mexico, Central America, and the Pacific Ocean. The satellite will be ideally located to monitor weather systems and hazards that most affect this region of the Western Hemisphere.

Mission objectives include:

  • Supporting the search-and-rescue satellite aided system (SARSAT)
  • Contributing to the development of worldwide environmental warning services and enhancements of basic environmental services
  • Improving the capability for forecasting and providing real-time warning of solar disturbances
  • Providing data that may be used to extend knowledge and understanding of the atmosphere and its processes

Coming up next on the blog is a list of milestones for today’s launch, targeted for 4:38 p.m. EST from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station’s Launch Complex 41.

Live Coverage Begins for NOAA’s GOES-T Launch

GOES-T and ULA rocket on the pad
The GOES-T spacecraft sits atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 541 rocket at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station’s Space Launch Complex 41 in Florida ahead of today’s planned 4:38 p.m. EST launch. Photo credit: NASA

Good afternoon, and welcome to live coverage of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-T (GOES-T) satellite mission from Florida’s Space Coast!

Standing tall atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 541 rocket, GOES-T – a joint effort between NASA and NOAA – is set to lift off from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station’s Launch Complex 41 in just about 90 minutes (4:38 p.m. EST). The Launch is managed by NASA’s Launch Services Program, based at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Stay right here for a live blog that will take you straight through the launch day events. Or, tune in to NASA TV, the NASA app, or the agency’s website, starting at 4 p.m. EST, for a live broadcast.

It has been all good news on the weather front thus far, but we will keep you posted on any updates from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station’s 45th Weather Squadron prior to launch of the GOES-T mission to help meteorologists observe and predict local weather events, including thunderstorms, tornadoes, fog, hurricanes, flash floods and other severe weather.

Weather 80% Favorable for Today’s GOES-T Launch

A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket, with the GOES-T satellite atop, stands ready for launch at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station.
A United Launch Alliance Atlas V 541 rocket carrying the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-T (GOES-T), arrives at Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida on Feb. 28, 2022. Liftoff is scheduled for Tuesday, March 1, at 4:38 p.m. EST. Photo credit: Kim Shiflett

Weather officials with Cape Canaveral Space Force Station’s 45th Weather Squadron predict an 80% chance of favorable weather conditions for this afternoon’s launch of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-T (GOES-T) satellite from Florida’s Space Coast, with the cumulus cloud rule and liftoff winds serving as the primary weather concerns.

A joint effort between NASA and NOAA, GOES-T is scheduled to launch aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 541 rocket from Canaveral Space Force Station’s Space Launch Complex 41 today at 4:38 p.m. EST. GOES-T will help meteorologists observe and predict local weather events, including thunderstorms, tornadoes, fog, hurricanes, flash floods and other severe weather.

The launch is managed by NASA’s Launch Services Program, based at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center.

Follow the launch day activities here on the blog or by tuning in to NASA TV starting today at 4 p.m. To learn more about the GOES Satellite Network or to meet members of the GOES-T team, click here.

NOAA’s GOES-T Rolls out to the Pad for Tuesday’s Launch

GOES-T rollout to pad
A United Launch Alliance Atlas V 541 rocket, carrying the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-T (GOES-T), rolls out from the Vertical Integration Facility to Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida on Feb. 28, 2022. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

By Jim Cawley
NASA’s Kennedy Space Center

The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-T (GOES-T) satellite, a joint effort between NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is out at the launch pad and ready for its ride into space.

On Monday, Feb. 28, 2022, GOES-T rolled out from United Launch Alliance’s (ULA) Vertical Integration Facility Cape Canaveral Space Force Station’s Space Launch Complex 41. Secured atop a ULA V 541 rocket, GOES-T is targeted to lift off Tuesday, March 1, at 4:38 p.m. EST. There is a two-hour launch window.

The GOES satellite network helps meteorologists observe and predict local weather events, including thunderstorms, tornadoes, fog, hurricanes, flash floods, and other severe weather. In addition, GOES observations have proven helpful in monitoring dust storms, volcanic eruptions, and forest fires.

The launch is being managed by NASA’s Launch Services Program, based at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center.

“For us, this is really the last big operation other than launch,” said GOES-T Mission Manager Rex Engelhardt. “The end of my job is the beginning of the on-orbit checkout and operations that will go on for years and years. Once we separate the spacecraft into its correct orbit, we’re done. And that’s a good feeling; there is accomplishment there.”

GOES-T is the third satellite in NOAA’s GOES-R series – the Western Hemisphere’s most sophisticated weather observing and environmental monitoring system. The GOES-R series will maintain the two-satellite system, extending the operational lifetime through December 2036.

Follow the launch day activities here on the blog or by tuning in to NASA TV, the NASA app, or the agency’s website, starting tomorrow at 4 p.m.

Weather 70% Favorable for Tuesday’s GOES-T Launch

NOAA's GOES-T satellite
A crane is attached to NOAA’s Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-T (GOES-T) satellite for its lift into the Vertical Integration Facility at Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

Weather officials with Cape Canaveral Space Force Station’s 45th Weather Squadron predict a 70% chance of favorable weather conditions for Tuesday afternoon’s launch of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-T (GOES-T) satellite from Florida’s Space Coast, with the cumulus cloud rule serving as the primary weather concern.

A joint effort between NASA and NOAA, GOES-T is scheduled to launch aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 541 rocket from Canaveral Space Force Station’s Space Launch Complex 41, at 4:38 p.m. EST tomorrow. GOES-T will help meteorologists observe and predict local weather events, including thunderstorms, tornadoes, fog, hurricanes, flash floods and other severe weather.

The launch is managed by NASA’s Launch Services Program, based at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center.

Tune in today at 10 a.m. to watch the NASA EDGE Rollout show. The show will air live on NASA TV and YouTube. Follow the GOES-T mission on Twitter @NASA@NASASocial@NASA_LSP@NASAKennedy; Facebook: NASANASA LSPNASA Kennedy; and Instagram: NASANASA Kennedy.

‘Go for Launch’: NOAA’s GOES-T Satellite Cleared for Tuesday Liftoff

GOES-T at the Vertical Integration Facility
A United Launch Alliance technician monitors the progress as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-T (GOES-T) is moved into United Launch Alliance’s Vertical Integration Facility at Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
ULA's Vertical Integration Facility with GOES-T
GOES-T Liftoff is targeted for Tuesday, March 1, at 4:38 p.m. EST. There is a two-hour window for the launch. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

Following a successful Launch Readiness Review at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-T (GOES-T) satellite is cleared to proceed with Tuesday’s launch from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station.

Liftoff is targeted for 4:38 p.m. EST on Tuesday, March 1, on a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 541 rocket, from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station’s Launch Complex 41. There is a two-hour window for the launch, which is being managed by NASA’s Launch Services Program, based at Kennedy.

The current favorable weather forecast for launch day is 60%. The primary concerns are cumulus cloud and surface electric fields.

Tune in to NASA TV today, Feb. 26, at 1 p.m. for a live broadcast of the GOES-T Prelaunch News Conference. Participants include:

  • Steve Volz, acting assistant secretary of commerce for environmental observation and prediction and assistant administrator for satellite and information services, NOAA
  • Pam Sullivan, director, GOES-R Program, NOAA
  • John Gagosian, director, Joint Agency Satellite Division, Science Mission Directorate, NASA
  • Tim Dunn, launch director, NASA’s Launch Services Program, NASA Kennedy
  • Scott Messer, program manager, NASA Launch Services, United Launch Alliance
  • Jessica Williams, launch weather officer, 45th Weather Squadron, Space Launch Delta 45

At 10 a.m. on Monday, Feb. 28, NASA EDGE will host the GOES-T rollout show. The broadcast will air live on NASA TV and YouTube. Coverage of launch day events begins at 4 p.m. Tuesday, March 1. Follow along right here on the blog, or tune in to the live show on NASA TV, the NASA app, or the agency’s website.

GOES-T is the third satellite in the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) – R Series, the Western Hemisphere’s most sophisticated weather observing and environmental monitoring system. The GOES-R Series provides advanced imagery and atmospheric measurements, real-time mapping of lightning activity, and space weather monitoring.

After GOES-T launches, it will be renamed GOES-18 once it reaches geostationary orbit. Following a successful on-orbit checkout of its instruments and systems, NOAA plans to put GOES-T immediately into operational service, replacing GOES-17 as GOES West.

Stay connected with the mission on social media, and let people know you’re following it on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram using the hashtag #GOEST. Also follow online at:

Click here for more information about GOES-T and to meet members of the mission team.

ULA Atlas V Rocket Topped Off With NOAA’s GOES-T Satellite

GOES-T at the Vertical Integration Facility
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-T (GOES-T), enclosed in its payload fairing, is moved into the Vertical Integration Facility at Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida on Feb. 17, 2022. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-T (GOES-T) satellite now officially has its ride.

GOES-T was transported from Astrotech’s Space Operations facility in Titusville, Florida, to United Launch Alliance’s (ULA) nearby Vertical Integration Facility at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station’s Space Launch Complex 41. It was then mated to the top of the Atlas V 541 rocket, which will carry it into space. Liftoff is targeted for March 1, 2022, at 4:38 p.m.

The launch is managed by NASA’s Launch Services Program based at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center, America’s multi-user spaceport.

After securing GOES-T atop the Atlas V, technicians conducted final validation of the communication paths through the rocket. The spacecraft and launch vehicle were then tested by successfully powering up both into launch mode to ensure they are compatible as a system.

GOES-T had been located inside the Astrotech facility since its arrival to Florida on Nov. 10, 2021. Numerous activities were conducted there, including lifting and mating the spacecraft to the payload adapter, and encapsulation, where the two halves of the ULA payload fairings were brought together and installed around the satellite to protect it during launch. The fully assembled launch vehicle will roll to the launch pad on Feb. 28.

The third satellite in NOAA’s GOES-R series, GOES-T will be delivered into a geosynchronous transfer orbit, separated from the launch vehicle, and then moved up to a higher geostationary orbit and renamed GOES-18. After being checked out, calibrated, and deemed ready for operations, GOES-18 will replace GOES-17 in the GOES-West position, keeping an eye on the U.S. West Coast, Alaska, Hawaii and the Pacific Ocean.

The GOES satellite network helps meteorologists observe and predict local weather events that affect public safety, including thunderstorms, tornadoes, fog, hurricanes, flash floods, and other severe weather. Click here to follow the GOES-T blog. To learn more about the GOES Satellite Network or to meet members of the GOES-T team, click here.

NOAA’s GOES-T Satellite Gets Payload Protection

GOES-T satellite encapsulation
With the first half of the United Launch Alliance Atlas V payload fairing secured around NOAA’s Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-T (GOES-T), the second half is moved into position inside the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Florida, on Feb. 7, 2022. Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky

By Jim Cawley
NASA’s Kennedy Space Center

Now safely encapsulated, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-T (GOES-T) satellite has completed another key milestone in preparation for its March 1, 2022, launch from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida.

GOES-T encapsulation at Astrotech
A technician inspects the first half of the United Launch Alliance Atlas V payload fairing for GOES-T. The mission is scheduled to launch March 1, 2022, from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station. Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky

Inside the Astrotech Space Operations facility in nearby Titusville, the two halves of the United Launch Alliance Atlas V payload fairings were brought together and installed around GOES-T. The payload fairings will secure and protect the satellite during launch.

“Things are getting real now; GOES-T is fully assembled and ready for launch,” said GOES-T Mission Manager Rex Engelhardt. “Next week, we will be holding the final launch reviews and exercising the teams on their launch consoles in preparation for launch day.”

Last month, technicians began integrated operations, which included lifting and mating the spacecraft to the payload adapter – a piece of hardware that interfaces mechanically between the rocket and the spacecraft. On Feb. 17, GOES-T will be transported and mated to the launch vehicle. The fully assembled launch vehicle is targeted to roll to the launch pad on Feb. 28.

The third satellite in NOAA’s GOES-R series, GOES-T will lift off atop the Atlas V 541 rocket from Space Launch Complex 41. The launch is managed by NASA’s Launch Services Program based at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center, America’s multi-user spaceport.

The GOES satellite network helps meteorologists observe and predict local weather events that affect public safety, including thunderstorms, tornadoes, fog, hurricanes, flash floods, and other severe weather. GOES-T will provide critical data for the U.S. West Coast, Alaska, Hawaii, Mexico, Central America, and the Pacific Ocean.

Click here to follow the GOES-T blog. To learn more about the GOES Satellite Network or to meet members of the GOES-T team, click here.

NOAA’s GOES-T Arrives in Florida for Processing Ahead of Launch

Secured inside a shipping container, the GOES-T satellite is removed from the holding area of a United States Air Force C-5 cargo plane.
The shipping container holding the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite T (GOES-T) is unloaded from a United States Air Force C-5 cargo plane following its arrival at the Launch and Landing Facility runway at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Nov. 10, 2021. Photo credit: NASA/Gregory B Harland

The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite T (GOES-T) – the third satellite in NOAA’s GOES-R series – is now in Florida, undergoing final preparations ahead of its targeted launch on March 1, 2022. The satellite arrived at the Launch and Landing Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center on Nov. 10, 2021, in a United States Air Force C-5 cargo plane. Shortly after landing at the runway, teams transported it to an Astrotech Space Operations facility in nearby Titusville, where it will remain for processing and final checkouts prior to liftoff.

Upon its arrival at Astrotech, teams removed the spacecraft from its shipping container and attached it to the electrical ground support equipment that they will use to perform multiple tests over the next few weeks to ensure all satellite elements function properly.

A ULA transport boat carrying the first and second stages of the Atlas V rocket that will launch the GOES-T satellite arrives at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station.
A United Launch Alliance (ULA) transport boat carrying the first and second stages of the company’s Atlas V 541 rocket arrives at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station (CCSFS) in Florida on Nov. 15, 2021. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper

GOES-T will launch aboard a United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V 541 rocket from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station (CCSFS). After departing from ULA’s manufacturing plant in Decatur, Alabama, on Nov. 6, the rocket’s first and second stages arrived at CCSFS aboard a transport boat on Nov. 15. When spacecraft testing is complete and teams have conducted the Launch Vehicle Readiness Review, the satellite – once encapsulated in its protective payload fairing – will be placed atop the Atlas V rocket in preparation for liftoff from Space Launch Complex 41.

The GOES-R program is a collaboration between NASA and the NOAA. NASA manufactures and launches the satellites and NOAA funds and operates them and distributes their data to users worldwide. The GOES satellite network helps meteorologists observe and predict local weather events that affect public safety, including thunderstorms, tornadoes, fog, hurricanes, flash floods, and other severe weather. GOES-T will provide critical data for the U.S. West Coast, Alaska, Hawaii, Mexico, Central America, and the Pacific Ocean.

This launch is being managed by NASA’s Launch Services Program based at Kennedy in Florida, America’s multi-user spaceport. NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center oversees the acquisition of the GOES-R spacecraft and instruments. Lockheed Martin designs, creates, and tests the GOES-R Series satellites. L3Harris Technologies provides the main instrument payload, the Advanced Baseline Imager, along with the ground system, which includes the antenna system for data reception.

Looking forward, NOAA is working with NASA on the next-generation geostationary satellite mission called Geostationary Extended Observations (GeoXO), which will bring new capabilities in support of U.S. weather, ocean, and climate operations in the 2030s. NASA will manage the development of the GeoXO satellites and launch them for NOAA.