Crew Checks Science Hardware as Station Raises Orbit

Expedition 42 crew members
Expedition 42 crew members
Expedition 42 crew members pose for a final crew portrait before they split up March 11, 2015. Cosmonauts Alexander Samokutyaev and Elena Serova and NASA astronaut Barry Wilmore returned to Earth a few hours later in the Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft.

The Expedition 43 crew members worked on science hardware Wednesday. Back on Earth, Russian flight controllers are planning to fire the thrusters of a docked cargo craft to raise the International Space Station’s orbit.

Italian astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti completed the activation and testing of the new Muscle Atrophy Research and Exercise System (MARES). She also inspected cables and connectors on a science freezer for corrosion.

› Read more about the MARES
› Read more about the Minus Eighty-Degree Laboratory Freezer for ISS

Commander Terry Virts configured hardware and reviewed procedures for the Advanced Colloids Experiment Microscopy-3 (ACE M-3). Virts also conducted an annual certification review of the Microgravity Science Glovebox, inspecting and cleaning up around the rack.

› Read more about the ACE M-3 study
› Read more about the Microgravity Science Glovebox

6 thoughts on “Crew Checks Science Hardware as Station Raises Orbit”

  1. What is the nature of the orbital change? Is this routine maintenance of the orbit or a new elevation? >400 kilometers?

    1. Orbital reboosts are done regularly to put the space station in the correct position to receive new spacecraft when they approach and dock. Also, due to slight atmospheric drag the station loses altitude so reboosts keep the station at its average altitude of about 250 miles above the Earth.

  2. Hi, my name is Prerana Kalapatapu, and I am from Mockingbird elementary in Coppell Texas. I am doing a school project in which I need to decide my future career, and interview someone with that career. I want to be an Astronomer and heard that you are one. It would be helpful if you could answer a few questions to clear my doubts about being an Astronomer.

    Interview Questions :

    How, and when, did you know that you wanted to be an astronomer

    What aspects of this career especially appeal to you and why?

    What personal and professional qualifications did you need for this career? Explain them.

    What are your basic day-to-day duties in this career? Be sure to consider all aspects of the work. Explain them

    .

    What benefits or drawbacks are there to these conditions?

    What are two or three aspects of the career that challenged you the most? Explain

    How did you meet these challenges?

    What is the average salary of an astronomer?

    What other careers or occupations are you qualified for with your background and training?

    What are general conditions of your work environment? (Where do you work? With whom do you work with? What is your work schedule like ?) Explain.

    How did this career affect your personal life outside of work, especially regarding the time you have for family, social activities, recreation and other pursuits

    What prerequisites, prior knowledge or experience did you need in order to begin your education or training

    How long did it take you to complete your education or training? What type of certification or degree did you receive at the end of your education or training?

    Please describe your schedule.

    How many hours a week, do you work for?

    What is the most stressful thing about being an
    astronomer?

    What additional activities did you get involved in to better prepare you for your career?

    Can you please send the questions with the answers back to the same E mail address.

    Prerana Kalapatapu
    Fifth Grader from
    Mockingbird Elm.
    Texas

    Sent from my iPad

    1. Orbital reboosts are done regularly to put the space station in the correct position to receive new spacecraft when they approach and dock. Also, due to slight atmospheric drag the station loses altitude so reboosts keep the station at its average altitude of about 250 miles above the Earth.

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