Space Station Receives Express Delivery in Six Hours

Progress Minutes Away from Docking
A high-definition camera on the International Space Station spots the Progress 61 resupply vehicle (upper left) just minutes before it docked to the Zvezda service module. Credit: NASA TV

Traveling about 252 miles over the North Atlantic, the unpiloted ISS Progress 61 Russian cargo spacecraft docked to the rear port of the Zvezda Service Module on the International Space Station at 6:52 p.m. EDT.

The spacecraft is delivering more than three tons of food, fuel and supplies, including 1,940 pounds of propellant, 110 pounds of oxygen, 926 pounds of water, and 3,397 pounds of spare parts and experiment hardware for the members of the Expedition 45 crew currently living and working in space.

The cargo includes a resupply of a Neurolab research kit necessary for the Russian Pilot-T investigation that tests performance during simulated manual space station docking. Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko and NASA astronaut Scott Kelly have previously participated in this experiment. It measures performance during a docking training test aboard the space station. This third generation device is used to measure skin conductance, finger temperature, and pulse wave transit time. These measurements will help researchers draw conclusions about changes in blood pressure and heart rate and other complex information related to the cardiovascular and nervous systems during mission-relevant operations. The investigation also assesses voice to help scientists better understand the stress ceilings of each test subject. Investigators plan to include EEG measurements in future iterations.

Researchers will also use biological sample kits delivered by the Progress spacecraft to obtain samples of blood, saliva or urine. The ongoing collection of biological samples from crew members help scientists determine if immune system impairment caused by spaceflight increases the possibility for infection or poses a significant health risk during life aboard the space station.

In addition to these studies, seven categories of human health research are ongoing during the One-Year Mission of Scott Kelly and Mikhail Kornienko. Researchers expect these investigations to yield beneficial knowledge on the medical, psychological and biomedical challenges faced by astronauts during long-duration spaceflight.

Read more about all of the One-Year Mission human health studies.

Progress 61 is scheduled to remain docked to ISS for the next two months. For more information about the current crew and the International Space Station, visit: https://www.nasa.gov/station.

Watch Cargo Craft Docking Live on NASA TV

Progress Spacecraft Docking
A Progress spacecraft is seen docking to the International Space Station in February 2014.

Beginning at 6:15 p.m. EDT today, NASA Television will provide live coverage of the docking of a Russian Progress spacecraft carrying more than three tons of food, fuel and supplies for the Expedition 45 crew aboard the International Space Station.

ISS Progress 61 is on track to complete a four-orbit rendezvous, and is scheduled to automatically link up to the rear port of the Zvezda service module at 6:54 p.m. The Expedition 45 crew will monitor key events during the spacecraft’s automated rendezvous and docking.

Watch the docking live on NASA TV or at https://www.nasa.gov/nasatv.

Launch of ISS Progress 61 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan occurred at 12:49 p.m. today (10:49 p.m. local time in Baikonur).

The spacecraft will remain docked to the station for two months.

Space Freighter on 6-Hour Delivery Trip After Flawless Launch

Progress 61 Launch
The Progress 61 rocket launches on time for a six-hour flight to the International Space Station. Credit: NASA TV

Carrying more than three tons of food, fuel, and supplies for the International Space Station crew, the unpiloted ISS Progress 61 cargo craft launched at 12:49 p.m. EDT (10:49 p.m. local time in Baikonur) from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

At the time of launch, the space station was flying above Southeast Kazakhstan.

Less than nine minutes after launch, the resupply ship reached preliminary orbit and deployed its solar arrays and navigational antennas as planned. The Russian cargo space craft will make four orbits of Earth before docking to the rear port of the Zvezda Service Module at 6:54 p.m.

Beginning at 6:15 p.m., NASA Television will air live coverage of Progress 61’s arrival to the space station.

Watch live on NASA TV and online at https://www.nasa.gov/nasatv.

Watch NASA TV for Live Coverage of Russian Cargo Craft Launch

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Progress 61 Rocket at Launch Pad
The ISS Progress 61 rocket is at the Baikonur Cosmodrome launch pad in Kazakhstan. Credit: RSC Energia

At 12:30 p.m. EDT, NASA Television will provide live coverage of the launch of a Russian Progress spacecraft carrying more than three tons of food, fuel and supplies for the Expedition 45 crew aboard the International Space Station.

Launch of ISS Progress 61 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan is scheduled for 12:49 p.m. (10:49 p.m. Baikonur time).

Watch the launch live on NASA TV or at https://www.nasa.gov/nasatv.

Following a fast-track, four-orbit journey, Progress 61 is scheduled to automatically link up to the rear port of the Zvezda Service Module at 6:54 p.m. It will remain docked to the station for about two months.

Expedition 45 crew members will monitor key events during Progress 61’s automated rendezvous and docking.