Crew Explores How Space Impacts Nervous System and Exercise

A pair of docked Russian spaceships, (from left) the Soyuz MS-17 crew ship and the Progress 76 cargo craft, are pictured as the International Space Station orbited above the Atlantic Ocean during an orbital sunset.
A pair of docked Russian spaceships, (from left) the Soyuz MS-17 crew ship and the Progress 76 cargo craft, are pictured as the International Space Station orbited above the Atlantic Ocean during an orbital sunset.

Human research was the prime area of study today aboard the International Space Station. Results are helping NASA and its international partners keep astronauts safe and healthy on long term space missions.

Flight Engineers Michael Hopkins and Victor Glover took turns today exploring how weightlessness impacts their hand-eye coordination. The GRASP study, sponsored by the European Space Agency (ESA), explores how microgravity affects a crew member’s central nervous system. That experiment has been under way at the orbiting lab since 2016, providing researchers critical data and insights on how astronauts adapt to living and working in space.

Commander Sergey Ryzhikov and Flight Engineer Sergey Kud-Sverchkov, the two Expedition 64 cosmonauts, participated in a Russian exercise study today. The duo worked out on a treadmill in the Zvezda service module while attached to a variety of sensors. Observations could lead to improved crew training techniques and more effective workouts on the way to the Moon, Mars, and beyond.

NASA Flight Engineer Kate Rubins readied an external exposure experiment this morning that will be placed outside Japan’s Kibo laboratory module. Afterward, she resumed her work exploring the behavior of water droplets that may lead to more advanced fuel and life support systems.

Japanese astronaut Soichi Noguchi, on his third space mission, set up hardware for a fiber optics study then organized stowage space in the Kibo lab. Flight Engineer Shannon Walker of NASA spent most of Tuesday on maintenance servicing spacesuit batteries and working on stowage tasks in the Tranquility module.

7 thoughts on “Crew Explores How Space Impacts Nervous System and Exercise”

  1. Really wonderful work you all are doing together. Hope our astronauts in India currently under training too will join you in exploring new frontiers of knowlege and scientific experiments.

  2. As one of the millions who joyfully watch the ISS star in the skies I have a question: Who were the brilliant courageous workers who brought up part by part the station architecture and assembled the station in space? Has a book or article been written about that fete?

  3. Hi! You do a great job for the world. I was wondering if an EEG headset could help you in your space research?
    Many scientists use it for brain electromagnetic wave studies; closely related to the nervous system and the emotional phenomena. NeuroSky Inc. Produces many Brain-computer interface. I hope you will modernize this equipment as needed; maybe add a touch of real human emotion to the ISS live broadcast. We will be very curious to feel the space experience through astronauts. Their feelings inside the station (cold, dry, …) and their emotion as a person (happy, surprise, …). Good luck!

Leave a Reply to Mark Garcia Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *