Three Crewmates Complete Short Station Trip in Soyuz Crew Ship

The Soyuz MS-17 crew ship, with three Expedition 64 crew members inside, is pictured after undocking from the Rassvet module beginning its short trip to the Poisk module. Credit: NASA TV
The Soyuz MS-17 crew ship, with three Expedition 64 crew members inside, is pictured after undocking from the Rassvet module beginning its short trip to the Poisk module. Credit: NASA TV

The Expedition 64 crew members who arrived to the International Space Station Oct. 14, 2020, have successfully relocated their Soyuz MS-17 spacecraft. Expedition 64 Flight Engineer Kate Rubins of NASA and Commander Sergey Ryzhikov and Sergey Kud-Sverchkov, both of the Russian Space Agency Roscosmos, undocked from the Earth-facing port of the station’s Rassvet module at 12:38 p.m. EDT, and Ryzhikov successfully piloted the spacecraft and docked again at the space-facing Poisk port at 1:12 p.m.

The relocation opens the Rassvet port for the arrival April 9 of another Soyuz, designated Soyuz MS-18, which will carry NASA’s Mark Vande Hei and Roscosmos’ Oleg Novitsky and Pyotr Dubrov to join the space station crew after launching from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

Rubins, Ryzhikov, and Kud-Sverchkov will conclude their six-month science mission aboard the station and return to Earth April 17 in the Soyuz MS-17.

This was the 19th overall Soyuz port relocation and the first since August 2019.

Learn more about station activities by following @space_station and @ISS_Research on Twitter as well as the ISS Facebook and ISS Instagram accounts.

3 thoughts on “Three Crewmates Complete Short Station Trip in Soyuz Crew Ship”

  1. Super cool…
    You just went over me house for nearly 8 minutes. Longest I’ve even seen
    I wave every time
    Thank you for all your hard work and sacrifice…in the name of science

    Stacey Metzler
    Upper Bucks County, PA USA

    1. I wave at the ISS every time I watch it pass over, too!
      Tonight I went out to look at the full moon rising and watched the ISS fly over. There appeared to be a satellite following the ISS, same path, maybe 10-15 seconds behind it. But I don’t see anything scheduled to dock soon.
      Thanks for all you do up there. I appreciate it!
      Ellen
      Neenah, WI USA

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