Spacewalkers to Continue Outfitting European Robotic Arm Live on NASA TV

Spacewalkers Samantha Cristoforetti of ESA (European Space Agency) and Oleg Artemyev of Roscosmos work outside the Nauka multipurpose laboratory module on the International Space Station while wearing Russian Orlan spacesuits. The duo continued outfitting the European Robotic Arm attached to Nauka during a spacewalk that lasted seven hours and five minutes on July 21, 2022.
Spacewalkers Samantha Cristoforetti of ESA (European Space Agency) and Oleg Artemyev of Roscosmos work outside the Nauka multipurpose laboratory module on the International Space Station while wearing Russian Orlan spacesuits. The duo continued outfitting the European Robotic Arm attached to Nauka during a spacewalk that lasted seven hours and five minutes on July 21, 2022.

NASA Television coverage is underway of today’s spacewalk with Russian cosmonauts to continue outfitting the European robotic arm on the International Space Station’s Nauka laboratory. Coverage of the spacewalk is on NASA Television, the NASA app, and agency’s website.

Expedition 67 Commander Oleg Artemyev and Flight Engineer Denis Matveev, both of Roscosmos, will install cameras on the European robotic arm, relocate an external control panel for the arm from one operating area to another, remove launch restraints near the two end effectors or “hands” of the arm, and test a rigidizing mechanism on the arm that will be used to facilitate the grasping of payloads.

Artemyev and Matveev will exit out of the Poisk module about 9:20 a.m. EDT to begin the six-and-a-half-hour excursion. Artemyev will wear a Russian Orlan spacesuit with red stripes, while Matveev will wear a Russian Orlan suit with blue stripes. This will be the seventh spacewalk for Artemyev and the third for Matveev. It will be the seventh spacewalk at the station in 2022 and the 252nd spacewalk for space station assembly, maintenance, and upgrades.

The European robotic arm will be used to move payloads and equipment outside the Russian segment of the station, joining the Canadian-built Canadarm2 robotic arm and the Japanese arm already supporting station maintenance, operations, and research.


Learn more about station activities by following the space station blog, @space_station and @ISS_Research on Twitter, as well as the ISS Facebook and ISS Instagram accounts.

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