Crew Works Advanced Physics, Biology Ahead of Cargo Missions

An aurora dances in the horizon of Earth's atmosphere as city lights shine through clouds cast over Mongolia.
An aurora dances in the horizon of Earth’s atmosphere as city lights shine through clouds cast over Mongolia.

Ultra-cold space physics and immunity research were the top science objectives aboard the International Space Station on Monday. The seven-member Expedition 70 crew is also stepping up its cargo operations this week while continuing to maintain lab systems.

The coldest place in the universe may just be the orbital outpost’s Cold Atom Lab, a quantum research device that chills atoms to near absolute zero, lower than the average temperature of space. NASA Flight Engineer Jasmin Moghbeli configured components and installed hardware for a controller test of the facility that provides unique observations of atomic wave functions seen at extremely low temperatures not possible on Earth.

Moghbeli also assisted Commander Andreas Mogensen inside the Columbus laboratory module setting up the Kubik incubator first thing Monday morning. Next, Mogensen from ESA (European Space Agency) collected and processed his blood and saliva samples for the Immunity Assay biology study that is exploring cellular immunity in space. Afterward, he placed a set of samples inside a science freezer and placed another set inside Kubik for later analysis.

Astronauts Loral O’Hara and Satoshi Furukawa focused mainly on maintenance throughout Monday. O’Hara spent the afternoon inspecting the COLBERT treadmill in the Tranquility module. She photographed and cleaned components, checked pin alignment and treadmill slats, and greased axles. Furukawa from JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) worked in the Kibo laboratory module servicing gear that cools and rejects heat from equipment to ensure a safe operating environment aboard the space station.

Furukawa later partnered with Mogensen and Moghbeli loading cargo inside the SpaceX Dragon spacecraft docked to the Harmony module’s forward port. The Dragon cargo spacecraft arrived on Nov. 11 carrying about 6,500 pounds of gear including advanced science hardware to study laser communications and atmospheric gravity waves. Dragon is due to return to Earth in mid-December packed with hardware and completed science experiments for retrieval and analysis.

The Roscosmos Progress 84 resupply ship will end its mission when it departs on Wednesday after six months docked to the Poisk module. Flight Engineer Nikolai Chub packed trash and discarded gear inside the departing Progress that will reenter the atmosphere above the south Pacific Ocean for a fiery, but safe disposal. It will be replaced when the Progress 86, packed with nearly 5,600 pounds of cargo, launches at 4:25 a.m. EDT on Friday and automatically docks to Poisk at 6:14 a.m. on Sunday.

Veteran cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko started his day pointing a specialized camera toward Earth to gain atmospheric and climatic data. Next, he studied how fluid systems are affected by spaceflight conditions such as electrical and magnetic fields. First-time space flyer Konstantin Borisov began Monday servicing a variety of life support and communications gear. During the afternoon, he collected air samples throughout the station’s Roscosmos modules for chemical analysis.


Learn more about station activities by following the space station blog@space_station and @ISS_Research on X, as well as the ISS Facebook and ISS Instagram accounts.

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More Space Biology, Lab Upkeep Day Before Thanksgiving

Four Expedition 70 crewmates wish a Happy Thanksgiving from the International Space Station to the Earth below.
Four Expedition 70 crewmates wish a Happy Thanksgiving from the International Space Station to the Earth below. Watch the video on YouTube. Credit: NASA TV

All seven members of the Expedition 70 crew spent Wednesday continuing its space biology research and maintaining the upkeep of the International Space Station. The orbital septet will also observe the Thanksgiving holiday and share a traditional turkey meal aboard the space laboratory.

Astronauts Jasmin Moghbeli, Satoshi Furukawa, and Andreas Mogensen kicked off the day with a periodic health evaluation checking each other’s temperature, blood pressure, pulse, and respiratory rate. The trio also took turns using an otoscope examining their ear canals and eardrums. Doctors are constantly monitoring how living and working in microgravity affects an astronaut’s health.

Afterward, NASA’s Moghbeli processed liver stem samples inside the Life Science Glovebox for the Space AGE investigation exploring regenerative medicine technology. Furukawa from JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) worked in the Kibo laboratory module’s airlock removing lithium-ion batteries and installing research gear to be exposed to the space environment. Mogensen from ESA (European Space Agency) wore a specialized vest filled with sensors monitoring his heart and breathing for the Cardiobreath blood pressure study.

NASA astronaut Loral O’Hara performed orbital plumbing tasks in both the station’s Tranquility module and the SpaceX Dragon Endurance spacecraft. She then filmed a video for students on Earth demonstrating how to use a microscope in the microgravity environment of the space station.

In the orbiting lab’s Roscosmos segment, five-time station visitor and cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko swapped out life support and electronics gear. He also joined cosmonaut Nikolai Chub and tested communications with the Progress 84 cargo craft that is due to undock from the Poisk module and depart at the end of the month. Chub also partnered with Flight Engineer Konstantin Borisov for abdomen scans using an ultrasound device after breakfast to learn how microgravity affects the digestive system. Borisov later worked on ventilation systems in the Rassvet module.

On Thursday, the entire seven-member crew will take the day off, relax, and enjoy a hearty meal. The seven crewmates from four countries are due to enjoy a Thanksgiving feast with items such as turkey, duck, quail, seafood, and cranberry sauce. Treats awaiting the crew include chocolate, pumpkin spice cappuccino, rice cake, and mochi. Crew preference is also considered when planning festive meals in space.


Learn more about station activities by following the space station blog@space_station and @ISS_Research on X, as well as the ISS Facebook and ISS Instagram accounts.

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Space Biology, Manufacturing Research Helping Plan Future Long-Term Missions

Astronaut Andreas Mogensen operates a microscope to capture imagery of brain cell-like samples for the Cerebral Ageing space biology study.
Astronaut Andreas Mogensen operates a microscope to capture imagery of brain cell-like samples for the Cerebral Ageing space biology study.

Astronaut health, an aging study, and cargo operations kept the Expedition 70 crew busy on Tuesday. The International Space Station residents also explored space manufacturing and downloaded radiation data.

Scientists representing NASA and its international partners are collecting a multitude of physiological and psychological data from crew members living on the orbital outpost. The observations from the CIPHER suite of 14 human research experiments will help researchers and mission planners understand health issues astronauts may face on future missions. Insights from the space biology study will be especially useful when crews begin traveling longer and farther away from Earth toward the Moon, Mars, and beyond.

NASA astronaut Loral O’Hara spent most of Tuesday contributing to the CIPHER study processing blood and urine samples and participating in a cognition test. She processed the samples in a centrifuge and stowed them in a science freezer for later analysis. Results from the sample analyses and cognition tests will help doctors and astronauts prepare for long-term radiation exposure, isolation, extreme distances, and closed environments.

Aging is a key research topic aboard the space station as researchers study microgravity’s effect on brain cell-like samples. NASA Flight Engineer Jasmin Moghbeli was busy during the morning treating some of those samples inside the Kibo laboratory module’s Life Science Glovebox. The Cerebral Ageing study may provide insights unachievable on Earth into accelerated ageing symptoms, neurodegenerative diseases, and hypersensitivity to ultraviolet radiation on a molecular level. Results may promote advanced health treatments on Earth and in space.

Morale is also a very important characteristic to ensure mission success during long periods in deep space. Scientists are exploring the hypothesis that virtual reality experiences onboard a spacecraft may lead to less stress and greater mental relaxation. Commander Andreas Mogensen from ESA (European Space Agency) took part in that study today, VR Mental Care, wearing VR goggles and a controller, and watching a 360-degree movie to understand its stabilizing effect on the nervous system.

Astronaut Satoshi Furukawa from JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) worked inside the SpaceX Dragon Endurance crew spacecraft checking orbital plumbing gear with assistance from Mogensen. In the Harmony module’s port adjacent to Endurance, Moghbeli worked on cargo transfers inside the Dragon cargo spacecraft as O’Hara photographed some of the specially delivered gear.

3D printing in space is critical as crews traveling farther in space will be less dependent on cargo missions launched from Earth. Veteran cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko printed test samples in a 3D printer to learn how to manufacture tools and supplies on demand in microgravity. The five-time station resident also attached sensors to himself measuring his cardiac activity for a long-running Roscosmos experiment.

Roscosmos Flight Engineer Konstantin Borisov assisted Kononenko with the cardiac sensor attachments, checked camera hardware, then downloaded monthly radiation detection data. Flight Engineer Nikolai Chub explored how spaceflight conditions such as spacecraft vibrations, electric fields, and magnetic fields affect fluid systems.


Learn more about station activities by following the space station blog@space_station and @ISS_Research on X, as well as the ISS Facebook and ISS Instagram accounts.

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Crew Studies Biology and Works in Dragon as Station Turns 25

The space station is pictured from the SpaceX Crew Dragon Endeavour during its departure and flyaround on Nov. 8, 2021.
The space station is pictured from the SpaceX Crew Dragon Endeavour during its departure and flyaround on Nov. 8, 2021.

Space biology and Dragon work were the top duties at the beginning of the week for the Expedition 70 crew. The International Space Station also turned 25 years old today with its first module having orbited Earth since 1998.

Eye scans were on the biomedical research schedule for four astronauts on Monday afternoon. Commander Andreas Mogensen kicked off the exams activating the Ultrasound 2 device then setting up communications gear allowing doctors on the ground to remotely monitor the activities. Mogensen from ESA (European Space Agency) then took turns with flight engineers Loral O’Hara, Jasmin Moghbeli, and Satoshi Furukawa in the Columbus laboratory module participating in the regularly scheduled eye exams.

Mogensen partnered with Moghbeli from NASA at the end of the day and practiced SpaceX Dragon Endurance undocking and landing procedures on the crew spacecraft’s computers. Mogensen earlier unpacked medical supply kits from Endurance and stowed them inside the orbital outpost. O’Hara from NASA and Furukawa from JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) worked inside Endurance as well configuring orbital plumbing gear in the vehicle that has been docked to the station since Aug. 27.

O’Hara later worked on a space botany study to promote STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) education among tribal members. Five varieties of seeds provided by the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma are exposed to microgravity for several months then returned to Earth and planted next to the same seeds left on Earth for comparison. Furukawa turned off a microscope in the Kibo laboratory module and removed samples for a study that was observing how cells sense gravity or the lack gravity. He then stayed in Kibo setting up research hardware and connecting an incubator for an upcoming experiment to observe stem cell growth that may support regenerative medicine technology.

In the Roscosmos segment of the space station, veteran cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko spent the day inside the Nauka science module checking its airlock, ventilation, and docking systems. Flight Engineer Nikolai Chub attached sensors to himself monitoring his cardiac activity then cleaned air ducts inside the Nauka and Poisk modules. Flight Engineer Konstantin Borisov wore a sensor-packed cap that recorded his responses while practicing futuristic planetary and robotic piloting techniques on a computer.

On Nov. 20, the International Space Station passes 25 years since the first module launched into orbit. The Zarya module lifted off in November 1998 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan and would shortly be joined by the Unity module less than a month later. Through this global endeavor, 273 people from 21 countries now have visited the unique microgravity laboratory that has hosted more than 3,000 research and educational investigations from people in 108 countries and areas.


Learn more about station activities by following the space station blog@space_station and @ISS_Research on X, as well as the ISS Facebook and ISS Instagram accounts.

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Space Biology Research Wraps Up Crew’s Work Week

The sun's first rays begin illuminating Earth's atmosphere as the space station orbited 260 miles above the central United States.
The sun’s first rays begin illuminating Earth’s atmosphere as the space station orbited 260 miles above the central United States.

Bacteria, brain aging, and gravity-sensing cells were the main research subjects aboard the International Space Station on Friday. The seven Expedition 70 crew members also worked on computers, communications gear, and life support maintenance to wrap up the work week.

NASA Flight Engineer Loral O’Hara explored how microorganisms grow in microgravity, the potential damage they cause to spacecraft, and ways to disinfect the harmful bacteria. She inoculated microbe samples inside the Life Science Glovebox that will be compared to uninoculated samples. The NASA-sponsored Bacteria Adhesion and Corrosion study takes place in the Kibo laboratory module and aims to keep space crews and humans on Earth healthy.

Commander Andreas Mogensen from ESA (European Space Agency) viewed cell samples under a microscope for the Cerebral Ageing experiment. The study looks at brain cell-like samples to understand accelerated aging symptoms seen in patients on Earth and observed in astronauts on long-term space missions.

Astronaut Satoshi Furukawa from JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) prepared different cell samples for observation inside the Confocal Microscope then closed out the Cell Gravisensing biology Investigation. Earlier in the day, he swapped hard drives on a laptop computer then assisted O’Hara continuing to unpack the SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft.

NASA Flight Engineer Jasmin Moghbeli spent her day in the Harmony module configuring a variety of NASA and Roscosmos hardware. She first calibrated an ultrasonic inspection device that uses high-frequency sound waves to analyze materials, Afterward, Moghbeli checked space-to-ground, VHF, and inter-module communication systems.

Roscosmos cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko researched 3D printing techniques to learn how to manufacture tools and supplies in space and reduce dependence on cargo missions from Earth. Cosmonaut Nikolai Chub spent his day on life support and electronics maintenance. Cosmonaut Konstantin Borisov configured Soyuz crew ship and Progress resupply ship laptop computers then continued his photographic analysis of the station’s Roscosmos modules.


Learn more about station activities by following the space station blog@space_station and @ISS_Research on X, as well as the ISS Facebook and ISS Instagram accounts.

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Station Research Benefits Humans on Earth, Crews in Space

Astronaut Loral O'Hara uses a portable glovebag to replace components on a biological printer that tests the printing of organ-like tissues in microgravity.
Astronaut Loral O’Hara uses a portable glovebag to replace components on a biological printer that tests the printing of organ-like tissues in microgravity.

A variety of research taking place today on the International Space Station is helping NASA and its partners support crews living and working off the Earth. The ongoing Expedition 70 investigations are informing ways to improve human health and plan future missions to the Moon, Mars, and beyond.

Astronauts Loral O’Hara and Satoshi Furukawa joined each other in the Columbus laboratory module for vein scans using the Ultrasound 2 device. Doctors on the ground assisted the duo monitoring how weightlessness affects the neck, shoulder, and leg veins, and learning how to keep crews healthy.

O’Hara from NASA also teamed up with fellow NASA Flight Engineer Jasmin Moghbeli and worked in the Tranquility module throughout Thursday. Both astronauts were clearing hardware from the Bishop airlock to make space for the NanoRacks External Platform. Bishop will open its door to space and the platform will be retrieved by the Canadarm2 robotic arm for scientific operations outside of the orbital laboratory. The external research gear is designed to carry experiments for exposure to the vacuum of outer space.

Furukawa from JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) collected cell samples from an incubator and placed them inside the Confocal Microscope to observe how they sense microgravity. He also swapped a gas bottle inside the Electrostatic Levitation Furnace then assisted O’Hara and Moghbeli with the NanoRacks work.

Commander Andreas Mogensen from ESA (European Space Agency) began his day with a conference with ESA managers, charged portable electronics inside the SpaceX Dragon Endurance spacecraft, then set up Earth science hardware. The two-time station visitor then supported a student-designed space botany experiment, analyzed station water samples, and serviced spacesuit batteries.

Veteran Roscosmos cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko practiced futuristic piloting techniques that may be used to operate spacecraft and robots on potential planetary missions. Flight Engineer Nikolai Chub tested a 3D printer for its ability to manufacture tools and supplies without assistance from Earth. Flight Engineer Konstantin Borisov worked on orbital plumbing duties inside the Nauka science module then conducted a photographic analysis of the station’s Roscosmos modules.


Learn more about station activities by following the space station blog@space_station and @ISS_Research on X, as well as the ISS Facebook and ISS Instagram accounts.

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Dragon Kicks Off Robotics and Science Activities on Station

Thrusters on the SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft fire automatically adjusting the vehicle's approach for a docking to the station's forward port.
Thrusters on the SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft fire automatically adjusting the vehicle’s approach for a docking to the station’s forward port.

The Expedition 70 crew and robotics controllers on the ground were busy unloading a U.S. cargo craft today. The International Space Station residents are also activating new science experiments to reveal how microgravity affects humans.

The astronauts and teams on the ground are working together today unpacking some of the nearly 6,500 pounds of science, supplies, and hardware delivered inside the SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft on Saturday. Commander Andreas Mogensen worked inside the commercial resupply ship on Tuesday disassembling some of the loaded crew bags strapped inside Dragon. The ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut then moved the smaller cargo items through the hatch and into the station to replenish the crew. Mogensen also supported a pair of space botany experiments to help sustain crews traveling farther away from Earth.

Mission controllers from the U.S. and Japan coordinated their robotics activities to retrieve and install some of the heavier science hardware delivered inside Dragon’s unpressurized trunk. The U.S. engineers remotely controlled the Canadarm2 robotic arm to extract the new ILLUMA-T laser communications experiment stowed in Dragon. The JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) robotics controllers were standing by as the Canadarm2 handed off ILLUMA-T to the Japanese robotic arm for installation on the Kibo laboratory module.

NASA Flight Engineer Loral O’Hara worked throughout Tuesday on a new investigation for a deeper understanding of the aging process. She processed human cell samples for incubation and stowage in a science freezer. The cell samples are being cultured in space and compared to samples on Earth to observe cell stress, metabolism, and other characteristics that may contribute to accelerated aging processes in humans living on and off the Earth.

Astronauts Jasmin Moghbeli and Satoshi Furukawa partnered together treating cell samples inside the Kibo lab for the Cell Gravisensing-2 study. The duo retrieved samples from an incubator, observed them in a microscope, then inserted them into a science freezer for later analysis. Observations will help researchers learn how cells respond to the lack of gravity promoting space biology and improving treatments for ailments on Earth.

Moghbeli from NASA also installed computer gear inside the Combustion Integrated Rack that enables the safe research of fuels and flames in weightlessness. Furukawa from JAXA routed cables and set up a laptop computer that will support operations for the ILLUMA-T laser technology study.

The orbiting lab’s three cosmonauts spent Tuesday focusing on their array of research and maintenance tasks for Roscosmos. Cosmonaut and five-time station visitor Oleg Kononenko inspected the Zvezda service module with inputs from specialists on the ground. Flight Engineer Nikolai Chub photographed the internal condition of the station’s Roscosmos modules for analysis then strapped on a sensor-packed cap and practiced futuristic piloting techniques. Finally, Flight Engineer Konstantin worked on orbital plumbing tasks, updated computer tablet software, and photographed landmarks on Earth for study.


Learn more about station activities by following the space station blog@space_station and @ISS_Research on X, as well as the ISS Facebook and ISS Instagram accounts.

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Dragon Hatch Opened, Crew Unpacking Science and Supplies

The space station soars 260 miles above the southernmost point of Alaska into an orbital nighttime.
The space station soars 260 miles above the southernmost point of Alaska into an orbital nighttime.

The Expedition 70 crew is unpacking the SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft following its arrival early Saturday morning. Meanwhile, the orbital residents are also continuing their research and maintenance activities following the International Space Station’s debris avoidance maneuver last week.

The hatches are open between Dragon and the orbital outpost following its arrival on Saturday. NASA Flight Engineers Jasmin Moghbeli and Loral O’Hara monitored Dragon’s arrival and entered the cargo spacecraft less than two hours after its docking. The duo along with Commander Andreas Mogensen and Flight Engineer Satoshi Furukawa spent a busy weekend unloading time-sensitive experiments for installation and activation aboard the orbital outpost.

The foursome worked throughout Monday transferring science freezers stocked with research samples from Dragon into the station and kicking off some of the new investigations. Mogensen from ESA (European Space Agency) and Furukawa from JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) configured space biology hardware and began offloading some of the 6,500 pounds of new crew supplies and hardware.

O’Hara and Moghbeli assisted the two international astronauts with both the science freezer work and the cargo transfers during the morning. O’Hara then spent the afternoon servicing components on a biological printer, the BioFabrication Facility (BFF), that is testing the printing of organ-like tissues in microgravity. Moghbeli set up new life science hardware, helped with the BFF work, and maintained standard life support and electronics hardware.

At the end of the day, the four astronauts joined the space station’s three cosmonauts reviewing updated emergency procedures while the new Dragon cargo spacecraft is docked to the Harmony module’s forward. Dragon will stay attached to Harmony until early December when it will return to Earth filed with station hardware and completed research for retrieval and analysis.

Veteran cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko began his day inside the Poisk airlock checking pressurization gear, then inspected windows on the Zvezda service module, and finally jogged on Zvezda’s treadmill for a fitness evaluation. Flight Engineer Nikolai Chub spent much of his day testing a 3D printer to make tools and supplies without depending on cargo missions from Earth. Flight Engineer Konstantin Borisov deactivated a camera remotely controlled by students on Earth, inspected Roscosmos laptop computers, and cleaned ventilation systems.

On Nov. 10, the Roscosmos Progress 85 resupply ship’s engines were fired for five minutes and 16 seconds beginning at 10:07 a.m. to maneuver the complex away from the predicted track of an orbital debris fragment.  The maneuver had no effect on the rendezvous and docking of NASA’s SpaceX 29th commercial resupply mission, which docked to the space station at 5:07 a.m. Nov. 11 after launching two days prior.


Learn more about station activities by following the space station blog@space_station and @ISS_Research on X, as well as the ISS Facebook and ISS Instagram accounts.

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Dragon Docks to Station Carrying Science and Supplies

The station is viewed from the SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft. The SpaceX Dragon Endurance crew spacecraft is pictured at docked center top. Credit: NASA TV
The station is viewed from the approaching SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft. The SpaceX Dragon Endurance crew spacecraft is pictured docked at center top. Credit: NASA TV

While the International Space Station was traveling more than 262 miles over central Brazil, a SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft autonomously docked to station’s Harmony module at 5:07 a.m. EST, with NASA astronauts Jasmin Moghbeli and Loral O’Hara monitoring operations from the station.

The Dragon launched on SpaceX’s 29th contracted commercial resupply mission for NASA at 8:28 p.m. EST, Nov. 9, from Launch Complex 39A at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. After Dragon spends about one month attached to the space station, the spacecraft will return to Earth with cargo and research.

Among the science experiments Dragon is delivering to the space station are:

Laser Communication from Space

NASA’s ILLUMA-T investigation tests technology to provide enhanced data communication capabilities on the space station. A terminal mounted on the station’s exterior uses laser or optical communications to send high-resolution information to the agency’s Laser Communications Relay Demonstration (LCRD) system, which is in geosynchronous orbit around Earth. The system uses invisible infrared light and can send and receive information at higher data rates than traditional radio frequency systems. The ILLUMA-T demonstration also paves the way for placing laser communications terminals on spacecraft orbiting the Moon or Mars.

Watching Waves in the Atmosphere

NASA’s AWE (Atmospheric Wave Experiment) uses an infrared imaging instrument to measure the characteristics, distribution, and movement of atmospheric gravity waves. These waves roll through Earth’s atmosphere when air is disturbed much like waves created by dropping a stone into water. Researchers are looking at how AGWs contribute to space weather, which refers to the varying conditions within the Solar System, including solar wind. Space weather affects space- and ground-based communications, navigation, and tracking systems. The space station provides an ideal platform for the investigation given its altitude and geographic and time coverage.

 Respiratory Health Research

Gaucho Lung, sponsored by the International Space Station National Lab, studies how mucus lining the respiratory system affects delivery of drugs carried in a small amount of injected liquid, known as a liquid plug. Conducting this research in microgravity makes it possible to isolate the factors involved, including capillary or wicking forces, mucus characteristics, and gravity. Understanding the role of these factors could inform the development and optimization of targeted respiratory treatments.

Water Filtration Technology

Aquamembrane-3, an investigation from ESA (European Space Agency), continues evaluation of replacing the multi-filtration beds used for water recovery on the space station with a type of membrane known as an Aquaporin Inside Membrane (AIM). These membranes incorporate proteins found in biological cells, known as aquaporins, to filter water faster while using less energy. Results could advance development of a complete and full-scale membrane-based water recovery system, improving water reclamation and reducing the amount of material that needs to be launched to the space station. This water filtration technology also could have applications in extreme environments on Earth, such as emergency settings, and decentralized water systems in remote locations.

These are just a few of the hundreds of investigations currently being conducted aboard the orbiting laboratory in the areas of biology and biotechnology, physical sciences, and Earth and space science. Advances in these areas will help keep astronauts healthy during long-duration space travel and demonstrate technologies for future human and robotic exploration beyond low-Earth orbit to the Moon through NASA’s Artemis missions and eventually Mars.


Learn more about station activities by following the space station blog@space_station and @ISS_Research on X, as well as the ISS Facebook and ISS Instagram accounts.

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Cargo-Filled Dragon Approaching Station Live on NASA

The SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft is pictured approaching the space station above the Indian Ocean on March 16, 2023.
The SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft is pictured approaching the space station above the Indian Ocean on March 16, 2023.

A SpaceX Dragon is on track to arrive at the International Space Station today, Saturday, Nov. 11, with an expected docking of the cargo spacecraft about 5:10 a.m. EST. When it arrives at the space station, Dragon will dock to the station’s Harmony module.

Watch Dragon dock live on the NASA+ streaming service via the web or the NASA app. Docking coverage also will air live on NASA Television, YouTube, and on the agency’s website. Learn how to stream NASA TV through a variety of platforms including social media.

Dragon successfully launched on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket at 8:28 p.m. EST, Nov. 9, from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, carrying about 6,500 pounds of research, hardware, and supplies to the International Space Station.


Learn more about station activities by following the space station blog@space_station and @ISS_Research on X, as well as the ISS Facebook and ISS Instagram accounts.

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