Live Coverage of Progress Docking on NASA TV

ISS Progress 60 Launch
The ISS Progress 60 cargo craft launches July 3 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Credit: RSC Energia

Beginning Sunday at 2:30 a.m. EDT, NASA Television will provide live coverage of the docking of a Russian Progress spacecraft carrying more than three tons of food, fuel and supplies for the Expedition 44 crew aboard the International Space Station.

The ISS Progress 60 is scheduled to arrive at the Pirs docking compartment of the space station at 3:13 a.m. on July 5. The Expedition 44 crew will monitor key events during Progress 60’s automated rendezvous and docking.

Watch the docking live on NASA TV or at https://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

The spacecraft will remain docked to the station for four months. Launch of ISS Progress 60 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan occurred at 12:55 a.m. Friday, July 3 (10:55 a.m. local time in Baikonur).

To join the online conversation about the International Space Station and Progress 60 on Twitter, follow @Space_Station and the hashtag #ISScargo. To learn more about all the ways to connect and collaborate with NASA, visit: https://www.nasa.gov/connect.

Progress Reaches Orbit for Two Day trip to Station

ISS Progress 60 launch
The ISS Progress 60 resupply ship launches on time from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Credit: NASA TV

Carrying more than 6,100 pounds of food, fuel, and supplies for the International Space Station crew, the unpiloted ISS Progress 60 cargo craft launched at 12:55 a.m. EDT (10:55 p.m. local time in Baikonur) from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

At the time of launch, the International Space Station was flying about 249 miles over northwestern Sudan, near the border with Egypt and Libya.

Less than 10 minutes after launch, the resupply ship reached preliminary orbit and deployed its solar arrays and navigational antennas as planned. The Russian cargo craft will make 34 orbits of Earth during the next two days before docking to the orbiting laboratory at 3:13 a.m. Sunday, July 5.

Beginning at 2:30 a.m. Sunday, July 5, NASA Television will provide live coverage of Progress 60’s arrival to the space station’s Pirs Docking Compartment. Watch live on NASA TV and online at https://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

To join the online conversation about the International Space Station and Progress 60 on Twitter, follow @Space_Station and the hashtag #ISScargo.

A camera from the Progress spacecraft shows the Earth below as it begins its two day trip to the space station. Credit: NASA TV
A camera from the Progress spacecraft shows the Earth below as it begins its two day trip to the space station. Credit: NASA TV

Watch NASA TV for Live Coverage of Progress Launch

Progress Roll Out
The rocket that will carry the ISS Progress 60 spacecraft into orbit is seen rolling out to its launch pad. Credit: RKK Energia

At 12:30 a.m. EDT, NASA Television will provide live coverage of the launch of a Russian Progress spacecraft carrying more than three tons of food, fuel, and supplies for the Expedition 44 crew aboard the International Space Station.

Launch of ISS Progress 60 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan is planned for 12:55 a.m. (10:55 a.m. local time in Baikonur).

Watch the launch live on NASA TV or at https://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

Following a 34-orbit, two-day trip, Progress 60 is scheduled to arrive at the Pirs Docking Compartment of the International Space Station at 3:13 a.m. on Sunday, July 5. It will remain docked to the station for about four months.

The Expedition 44 crew will monitor key events during Progress 60’s automated rendezvous and docking.

To join the online conversation about the International Space Station and Progress 60 on Twitter, follow @Space_Station and the hashtag #ISScargo. To learn more about all the ways to connect and collaborate with NASA, visit: https://www.nasa.gov/connect.

Cargo Mission Counting Down to Late Night Launch

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Over 3 tons of food, fuel, water, oxygen and supplies stands ready for a sky high delivery to the International Space Station late tonight. Meanwhile, the three-person Expedition 44 crew is at work on a variety of space science and orbital maintenance as they await the two-day space cargo mission.

Russia’s ISS Progress 60 spacecraft is poised atop its launch pad at the Baikonur Cosmodrome for a 12:55 a.m. EDT launch Friday from Kazakhstan. The resupply ship will arrive Sunday at 3:13 a.m. and dock automatically to the Pirs docking compartment. The space station is currently well-stocked through October and the crew is fine despite the loss of the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket Sunday morning.

Back on orbit, a pair of cosmonauts, Commander Gennady Padalka and One-Year crew member Mikhail Kornienko, worked on Russian science exploring cell cultivation in space and a crew member’s exposure to radiation.

NASA astronaut Scott Kelly participated in the maintenance of science hardware. Kelly disconnected cables from an experiment that observes Earth’s magnetic field, he gathered hardware for upcoming research in the Combustion Integrated Rack and restocked the Human Research Facility-2 with new supplies.

Astronaut Scott Kelly
Astronaut Scott Kelly talks live with NASA Commentator Dan Huot about the loss of the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and the upcoming launch of the ISS Progress 60 resupply ship.

Russian Resupply Ship Rolls Out, Crew Preps for Japanese Cargo Craft

The ISS Progress 60 cargo craft
The ISS Progress 60 cargo craft is at its launch pad at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Credit: RKK Energia

The next Russian resupply ship to launch to the International Space Station rolled out to its launch pad today. The crew is also preparing for Japan’s next cargo mission due in August.

The ISS Progress 60 (60P) cargo craft is at the Baikonur Cosmodrome launch pad preparing for a 12:55 a.m. EDT launch Friday from Kazakhstan. The 60P is delivering more than 3 tons of food, fuel and supplies to the crew and will dock to the Pirs docking compartment.

NASA astronaut and One-Year crew member Scott Kelly worked Wednesday to also get the station ready for another cargo craft, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s Kounotori HTV-5, due for launch Aug. 16. It will lift off from the Tanegashima Space Center in Japan for a four day trip to the station where it will be grappled and berthed to the Earth-facing side of the Harmony node.

The two cosmonauts, Commander Gennady Padalka and One-Year crew member Mikhail Kornienko, were on the Russian side of the orbital lab conducting science and maintenance. The duo explored the dynamic forces the station experiences caused by mission events such as vehicle dockings and spacewalks including internal activities like physical exercise.

Cargo Mission Training and Science Work for Crew

Expedition 44
From left are NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly, left, and Russian Cosmonauts Gennady Padalka, center, and Mikhail Kornienko. Photo Credit: (NASA/Victor Zelentsov)

Commander Gennady Padalka and One-Year crew member Mikhail Kornienko are getting ready for the Sunday arrival of a resupply ship. NASA astronaut Scott Kelly worked throughout the day on a variety of advanced microgravity science.

Roscosmos, The Russian Federal Space Agency, is counting down to its launch of the ISS Progress 60 (60P) cargo craft at 12:55 a.m. EDT Friday. Padalka and Kornienko trained for the approach and docking of 60P scheduled for Sunday at 3:13 a.m. The ISS Progress 60 will deliver more than 3 tons of food, fuel and supplies to the crew.

Kelly started Tuesday on botany research exploring how plants sense gravity and how roots grow in space. The One-Year crew member also collected gear from the completed Rodent Research-2 experiment which may be used on future life science studies.

Crew Looks Ahead to Russian Resupply Mission

The ISS Progress 60 spacecraft
The ISS Progress 60 spacecraft is seen in its processing facility at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan being prepared for launch July 3. Credit: RSC-Energia

The Expedition 44 trio will not see the SpaceX Dragon cargo craft arrive Tuesday after the Falcon 9 rocket was lost about 139 seconds after launch Sunday morning. The crew now turns its attention to another resupply mission, ongoing science activities and routine orbital maintenance.

The International Space Station is well stocked with plenty of supplies and consumables through October. Meanwhile, a Russian resupply ship is getting ready for its launch Friday at 12:55 a.m. EDT. The ISS Progress 60 will deliver more than 3 tons of food, fuel and supplies to the crew and dock to the Pirs docking compartment after a two-day ride.

The three orbiting residents Commander Gennady Padalka and One-Year crew members Scott Kelly and Mikhail Kornienko are also getting ready for another set of crew members due to arrive at the end of July. On the ground, Soyuz Commander Oleg Kononenko and Flight Engineers Kjell Lindgren and Kimiya Yui are in Russia training ahead of their July 22 launch in a Soyuz TMA-17M spacecraft.

SpaceX CRS-7 Status

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SpaceX CRS-7 lifted off from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station at 10:21 a.m. EDT today, on the company’s seventh resupply mission to the International Space Station. At roughly 139 seconds after launch, the Falcon 9 rocket experienced an anomaly which resulted in the loss of the vehicle.

Prior to launch, the SpaceX team was not tracking any issues. SpaceX will lead the accident investigation with support from NASA and oversight from the Federal Aviation Administration which issued the launch license. SpaceX will return to launching cargo to the space station as soon as it is safely possible. Initial data points to a potential issue with the second stage of the Falcon 9 rocket.

The Expedition 44 crew aboard the station remain in good shape in terms of supplies with adequate levels until at least October even without the upcoming Progress launch. Significant vehicle and research hardware was lost, including the first of two International Docking Adapters, but NASA will work to replace these items on future cargo flights. There is no immediate impact to station operations.

The next cargo launch to the space station is scheduled to take place at 12:55 a.m. Friday, July 3, with the Russian Progress 60P vehicle planned to deliver several tons of food and supplies to the station crew. Today’s events are not expected to impact the launch of the next station crew on July 22.

For residents near the launch zone, if you spot debris in the water or see it washed up anywhere along the Eastern Florida shore report it to either NASA’s debris reporting hotline at 321-867-2121 or Patrick Air Force Base at 321-494-7001 or contact your nearest local law enforcement official.

Managers from SpaceX, NASA and the FAA discussed the SpaceX rocket anomaly Sunday afternoon.
Managers from SpaceX, NASA and the FAA discussed the SpaceX rocket anomaly Sunday afternoon. Clockwise from top left: Gwynne Shotwell, President and Chief Operating Operating Officer, SpaceX; Bill Gerstenmaier, Associate Administrator for Human Exploration and Operations for NASA; Mike Suffredini, International Space Station Program Manager for NASA; Pam Underwood, Deputy Division Manager, FAA Operations Integration Division.

Anomaly News Conference no Earlier than 1p.m. EDT

SpaceX DragonSpaceX CRS-7 lifted off from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station at 10:21 a.m. EDT. After liftoff, an anomaly occurred. SpaceX is evaluating the issue, and NASA Television will carry a news conference no earlier than 1 p.m.